Arkansas Confederate Regimental Histories: Infantry

Source: Reprinted Jul 2015 from Web.Archive.org


1st Arkansas Infantry Battalion

Initially organized with eight companies (lettered from "L" to "P" and "R" to "T" as an extra force attached to the 2nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment at some time between May and August, 1861. Assigned to the Upper District of Arkansas from August until September of 1861, then sent to the Indian Territory (eastern Oklahoma) in September and October of that year. Returned to Pocahontas, AR in October, 1861, where it was assigned to Hindman's Brigade of Hardee's Division in the Army of Central Kentucky from October to December, 1861. Engaged in battle at Rowlett's Station, KY on December 17, 1861. Two additional unlettered companies were attached to this battalion in December, 1861, and it was then reorganized and renamed as the 18th (Marmaduke's) Arkansas Infantry in December, 1861. On January 31, 1862, the 18th Arkansas converted from state troops to a Confederate regular army unit, and was renamed the 3rd Confederate Infantry Regiment, under which designation it fought in all the battles of the Confederate Army of Tennessee through the end of the War.

Officers: LTC John Sappington.Marmaduke

1st Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 1st Arkansas Infantry Regiment, (Confederate) was organized at Little Rock, Arkansas, in May, 1861 following the seizure of the Little Rock Arsenal by the state militia. Before the creation of the Arkansas Military Board, Thompson B. Flournoy had been authorized by President Jefferson Davis to organize an Arkansas regiment for the Confederate service. The first companies which arrived in Little Rock sought admission into this regiment, and were recognized by Col. Flournoy, a patriotic planter of Laconia, on the Mississippi River, and strong supporter of the Douglas/Johnson presidential ticket in the 1860 election. Flournoy had other politically-appointed officers associated with him in the commissioning of the regiment, and when it came time for the regiment to elect officers, both Flournoy and his associates were soundly defeated - the regiment electing Cpt. James F. Fagan of Saline County as colonel and regimental commander, Cpt. James C. Monroe of Clark County as Lt. Col., and John Baker Thompson as major. Professor Frank Bronaugh of the military department of St John's College, Little Rock, was chosen as adjutant. Col. Flournoy and his partners eventually acquiesced, and were assigned to other duties in other commands. Company organization: Co. A, the "El Dorado Sentinels" from Union county, Cpt. Asa Morgan; Co. B, the "Clark County Volunteers" from Clark county, Cpt. Charles Stark of Arkadelphia; Co. C, the "Camden Knights" from Ouachita county, Cpt. Crenshaw, of Camden; Co. D, "Clan McGregor" from Jefferson county, Cpt. Donelson McGregor, of Pine Bluff; Co. E, from Saline county, Cpt. William A. Crawford, of Benton; Co. F, the "Ettoman Guards" from Pulaski county, Cpt William F. Martin,of Little Rock; Co. G., the "Jackson Guards" from Jackson county, Cpt. A.C. Pickett, of Augusta; Co. H, the "Crockett Guards" from Arkansas county, Cpt. Robert H. Crockett of DeWitt; Co. I, the "Monticello Guards" from Drew county, Cpt. James Jackson of Monticello; Co. K, the "DeWitt Guards" from Arkansas county, Cpt. Quartermous, of DeWitt.

The regiment was immediately ordered to Richmond, Virginia, and attracted much attention while on the road, being known to have among its captains a grandson of the immortal Davy Crockett and Cpt. Donelson McGregor, who was raised near the Hermitage and was a grand-nephew of the beloved wife of "Old Hickory." The regiment was stationed first at Aquia Creek, near Fredericksburg, in the brigade of Gen. Theophilus H. Holmes, and was led by him into battle of 1st Manassas, in which it participated late in the day supporting Cpt. Lindsey Walker's battery of artillery. The 1st Arkansas was then stationed at Evansport, where the men of the regiment, under Cpt. Will H. Martin, made a daring but unsuccessful attempt to capture the federal gunboat Pocahontas on the Potomac. The "Fagan Rifles" were assigned as an unlettered company on October 12, 1861; this company was later transferred to become C Company, 2nd Arkansas Infantry Battalion. Served in Walker's Brigade, Dept. of Fredericksburg, from July 1861 until January 1862. Returned to Western Theater, Confederate Army of Mississippi in February, 1862 to reinforce the Confederate forces gathering at Corinth, MS, and assigned to Gibson's Brigade, Ruggles' Division, 2nd Corps, where it participated in the Battles of Shiloh on Apr 6-7, 1862, and Perryville, KY on October 8, 1862. In December, 1862, reassigned to Polk's Brigade, Cleburne's Division where it fought in the battles of Murfreesboro (Dec. 31, 1862-Jan 3, 1863), Tullahoma Campaign in June, 1863; Chickamauga (Sep 19-20, 1863); Siege of Chattanooga (Sep.-Nov. 1863); Battle of Chattanooga, the Atlanta Campaign, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta, and the siege of Atlanta. Consolidated with the 15th Arkansas Infantry in the spring of 1864. Regiment and colors were captured at Jonesboro, Georgia on Sept. 1, 1864, and exchanged approximately 1 month later. Rejoined Cleburne's Division for Hood's Tennessee Campaign where it fought at Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville. Engaged in the Carolinas Campaign in early 1865, and at the last battle of the Army of Tennessee at Bentonville on March 19-21, 1865. Survivors were consolidated along with those of the 2nd, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 13th, 19th (Dawson's) and 24th Arkansas Infantry and the 3rd Confederate Regiment (formerly Marmaduke's 18th Arkansas Infantry) to form the 1st Infantry Regiment (Consolidated) at Smithfield, NC on April 9th, 1865. Surrendered two weeks later with LTG Joe Johnston's Army of Tennessee near Durham, North Carolina.

Officers: COL James F. Fagan. Field Officers: Maj. (later Col.) John W. Colquitt; Lt. Col. William A. Crawford; Maj. Atkinson Little; Maj. (later Lt. Col.) William H. Martin; Lt. Col. Donaldson McGregor; Lt. Col. James C. Monroe; Maj. (later Lt. Col.) John B. Thompson.

References: W.E. Bevans, Reminiscences of a Private, Company G, First Arkansas Regiment, Infantry. John C. Hammock, With Honor Untarnished, the Story of the First Arkansas Infantry Regiment, Confederate States Army.


1st Arkansas Infantry Regiment (State Troops)

Organized at Camp Rector on May 14, 1861. Moved to Pocahontas, Ark. where it was mustered into Confederate service on July 23, 1861. Trained at Pittman's Ferry; served in the Upper District of Arkansas and in the Army of Central Kentucky as part of Hardee's Division from September to December, 1861. Renamed as the 15th Arkansas Infantry Regiment by the Confederate War Department on December 31, 1861. (see 15th Arkansas Infantry below for further service.)

Officers: Col Patrick R. Cleburne. Field Officers: Lt. Col. Archibald E. Patton; Maj. John E. Glenn; Maj. James T. Harris.

Also Known As: Arkansas 1st (Cleburne's) Infantry Regiment; 15th Arkansas Infantry Regiment.

References: Craig L. Symonds, Stonewall of the West: Pat Cleburne and the Civil War.


1st Arkansas Infantry Regiment Volunteers (State Militia)

Organized by companies for Confederate service for 30 days between November and December, 1861. Mustered out on December 19, 1861.

Officers: James H. McCaleb, Field Officers: Major John Black, Lt. Col. Liggin

 

2nd Arkansas Infantry Battalion

Mustered as three independent companies between Sept. 29 and Oct. 11, 1861; organized by Special Order #194 on Oct. 29, 1861 in Aquia District, Virginia. The battalion was formed from independent Arkansas infantry companies which were at that time attached to the 1st Arkansas Infantry regiment. Company A was commended by Captain Gregory. Company B, known as "Fagan's Guard", was recruited from southern Saline and western Jefferson county, and was commanded by Captain Henry H. Beavers. Company C was commanded by Captain Lacy. Total battalion strength on organization was 147 men, 76 of these in Company B. The 2nd Battalion was assigned initially to French's Brigade, transferred to Pettigrew's Brigade in March, 1862. Maryland Zouaves were attached to the battalion from February to June, 1862. Served in combat at the Siege of Yorktown (April-May, 1862); Seven Pines (May 31-June 1, 1862), and the Seven Days' Battles (June 25-July 1, 1862). Major Bronaugh and the Battalion was commended in Brigadier General Dorsey Pender's report of the battle of Mechanicsville (Beaver Dam Creek) during the Seven Days, where Major Bronaugh was killed. 7 other members of the battalion were killed inthis battle, and 33 seriously wounded. The battalion had managed to cross Beaver Dam Creek, but then were pinned down and unable to advance further, with the enemy guns only 20 yards away and 10 feet over their heads. Bronaugh's death effectively ended the battalion as a separate unit. The survivors were then merged with the 3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment, Walker's Brigade, on July 25, 1862.

Officers: Maj. William N. Bronaugh

References: Calvin L. Collier, They'll Do to Tie To!


2nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Raised at Helena, Arkansas in the spring of 1861 at the expense and under the command of Col. Thomas C. Hindman, former Arkansas congressional representative from Helena. Hindman resigned his Congressional seat upon Arkansas's secession from the Union, and returned home to recruit volunteers for the Confederate army, soon forming a full regiment of which he was elected Colonel. J.W. Bocage was elected as Lt. Col.; J.W. Scaife as major. Charles E. Patterson was appointed adjutant; Dr. Ralph Horner as surgeon; and Rev. Samuel Cowley as chaplain. Company commanders were: Co. A, Cpt. C.A. Bridewell; Co. B, Cpt. Thomas Quinlan; Co. C, Cpt. E. Warfield; Co. D, Cpt. E.G. Brashear; Co. E, Cpt. Anderson; Co. F, Cpt. (later Colonel and Brigadier General) Daniel C. Govan; Co. G, Cpt. B.B. Taliaferro, Co. H, Cpt. R.F. Harvey, and Co. I, Cpt. C.D. Ross.

Hindman was disappointed in being unable to acquire arms for his regiment at first, and asked for orders to march. These were not issued as promptly as he desired. He believed that through political influences in Richmond he was being slighted. He adopted heroic (and draconian) measures -- he seized steamers laden with heavy cargoes of sugar going up the river to Cincinnati and Pittsburgh, and confiscating their freight, purchased such arms as he could and embarked his command for Memphis. While thus delayed, other organizations joined him - Lt. Col. John S. Marmaduke's battalion of eight companies, which he later renamed the 3rd Confederate Infantry; three companies of cavalry under Major C.W. Phifer, and Captain Swett's Mississippi battery of four guns. This combined force, known temporarily as "Hindman's Legion", was ultimately ordered to assemble with the other Arkansas troops assembling at Pocahontas, where they were mustered into Confederate service by companies between May 26 and June 26, 1861 and assigned to Hardee's Division. Moved through Pittman's Ferry to Kentucky where Hardee's Division became the Army of Central Kentucky, and Col. Hindman was reassigned to brigade command. Engaged at Rowlett's Station, KY on 12/17/1861. Assigned to Hindman's (later Liddell's) brigade, Army of Mississippi in March, 1862 where it participated in the Battle of Shiloh on Apr. 6-7 and in the Corinth Campaign from April through June of that year. The units of the 11th Arkansas Infantry who were not captured at Island No. 10 served with the 2nd as an extra Company "E" from May until September, 1862. Participated in battles of Richmond and Perryville, KY in August and October of 1862, respectively. In December, 1862, reassigned to Cleburne's Division where it fought in the battles of Stones River (Dec. 31, 1862-Jan 3, 1863), Tullahoma Campaign in June, 1863; Liberty Gap (June 24-26, 1863), Chickamauga (Sep 19-20, 1863); Siege of Chattanooga (Sep.-Nov. 1863); Battle of Chattanooga, Ringgold Gap, Dalton, Resaca, the Atlanta Campaign, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta, and the siege of Atlanta. Consolidated with the 15th Arkansas Infantry in the spring of 1864. Regiment and colors were captured at Jonesboro, Georgia on Sept. 1, 1864, and exchanged approximately 1 month later. Rejoined Cleburne's Division for Hood's Tennessee Campaign where it fought at Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville. Engaged in the Carolinas Campaign in early 1865, and at the last battle of the Army of Tennessee at Bentonville on March 19-21, 1865. Survivors were consolidated along with those of the 1st, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 13th, 15th, 19th (Dawson's) and 24th Arkansas Infantry and the 3rd Confederate Regiment (formerly Marmaduke's 18th Arkansas Infantry) to form the 1st Infantry Regiment (Consolidated) at Smithfield, NC on April 9th, 1865. Surrendered two weeks later with LTG Joe Johnston's Army of Tennessee near Durham, North Carolina.

Officers: Col Thomas C. Hindman. Field Officers: LTC Joseph W. Bocage, Maj. (later Lt. Col.) Eldrige G. Brasher, Lt. Col. (later Col. and BG) Daniel C. Govan, Maj. Reuben F. Harvey, Maj. A.T. Meek, Maj. later Lt. Col and Col.) James W. Scaife, and Maj. (later Lt. Col. and Col.) Elisha Warfield

 

3rd Arkansas Infantry Battalion

Organized with seven companies on July 15, 1861. Served with BG Benjamin McColloch's brigade in northwest Arkansas and along the border with the Indian Territory from August to December of 1861. Fought with McColluch's Brigade at Wilson's Creek on August 10, 1861. Augmented with additional companies to fill out as a regiment, and reorganized as the 21st (McRae's) Infantry Regiment on December 3, 1861.

Officers: Lt. Col. Dandridge McRae; Maj. Thomas H. McRae.

Also Known As: 21st Arkansas Infantry Regiment

 

3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment was organized by companies in Lynchburg, VA on July 5, 1861 and mustered into Confederate service for the duration of the War. When Dr. W.H. Tebbs and Van H. Manning, a lawyer at Hamburg, Ashley county, organized two companies in early 1861 and marched them to Vicksburg, where they offered them to the Confederate States at Montgomery, Alabama, the Confederate secretary of war refused to accept them. The two officers then went to Montgomery, and by persistent entreaty, succeeded at length in securing their admission to the Confederate Army "for the war". Manning knew Congressman Albert Rust, then the Congressional representative for his district in southern Arkansas, obtained the assistance of his influence, and when Rust decided to enter the military service of the Confederacy, persuaded him to return to his home at Champagnolle, raise eight more companies, and follow on to some rendezvous where together they could organize a regiment for the service "during the war." Rust did so, and joined Manning at Lynchburg, where the regiment was organized , really the "first" regiment from Arkansas, as regular troops of the Confederacy, enlisted for the duration of the war. The officers of the regiment on organization were: Col. Albert Rust; Lt. Col. Seth M. Barton; Maj. Van H. Manning; Adjutant Henry A. Butler; and Surgeon Joseph Brown of Union county. Co. A, Cpt. W.H. Tebbs of Ashley county; Co. B, Cpt. Capers of Ashley county; Co. C, Cpt. T.M. Whittington of Drew County; Co. D, Cpt. Douglas of Desha county; Co. E, Cpt. R.S. Taylor of Desha county; Co. F, the "Hot Springs Hornets", Cpt. Thrasher of Hot Springs county; Co. G, Cpt Reedy of Union county; Co. H, Cpt. Reed of Desha county; Co. I, the "Tulip Rifles", Cpt. J.H. Alexander of Dallas county; and Co. K, the "Arkansas Travelers", Cpt. Wilson Wilkins, of Ashley county. Company L, commanded by Cpt. J. D. Christian of Ashley County, was not present at the muster in Lynchburg, but joined the regiment three weeks later. Colonels Rust and Barton being later promoted to brigadier generals, Major Manning became colonel of the regiment, Cpt. R.S. Taylor became lieutenant colonel, and Cpt W. Wilkins major, subsequently succeeded by Major Smith.

The regiment was ordered to the mountains of West Virginia, where it performed arduous and discouraging service in the campaign on the Gauley and Cheat rivers. This was followed by hard marching under Stonewall Jackson (whom Col Rust later described as "an impracticable old schoolmaster who said grace before he ate and prayed before going to bed") in the Valley Campaign. The regiment was engaged in the battles of Greenbrier and Allegheny. Under General Jackson at Winchester, in January, 1862, the 3rd Arkansas marched to Bath and Romney, returned to Winchester, and was ordered thence to Fredericksburg and assigned to the brigade of Gen. Theophilus H. Holmes. Colonel Rust was promoted to brigadier general about this time, and was transferred to a command in the western armies. Van Manning was promoted to the colonel of the regiment succeeding Col. Rust.

The 3rd Arkansas was engaged in the battles of White Oak Swamp, June 3, 1862, in J.G. Walker's brigade, on July 1, 1862 participated in the battle of Malvern Hill, and was at Sharpsburg on September 17, 1862 where Col. Manning was seriously wounded. At Fredericksburg again in December, 1862, the 3rd Arkansas was assigned to Hood's Texas Brigade, with which it remained until the end of the war. Here the regiment was additionally augmented by the incorporation of Bronaugh's 2nd Arkansas Infantry Battalion of five Arkansas companies.

The regiment was not engaged at Chancellorsville, being engaged instead with Longstreet's Corpa at Suffolk. The 3rd Arkansas participated in the battle of Gettysburg with Longstreet's Corps, fighting in and in the vicinity of the "Devil's Den", and went with that corps to Tennessee in September, 1863 where it fought at Chickamauga (where the gallant Major Reedy was mortally wounded), Chattanooga, Wauhatchie, and in the siege of Knoxville, TN. Returning to the Army of Northern Virginia in the spring of 1864, the regiment fought with the Texas Brigade at the battle of the Wilderness, May 6, 1864, marching at the double-quick several miles that morning to save the Confederate line and subsequently throw Grant's forces back. Here Col. Manning was shot through the thigh and captured, being detained a prisoner of war until July, 1865. The regiment moved on to continue the fight at Spotsylvania, and on to Cold Harbor. The regiment was at Deep Run on August 6, 1864; at Petersburg during the siege by Grant, at High Bridge and Farmville in 1865, and surrendered at Appomattox Court House with General Lee on April 9, 1865. At Appomattox, only 144 men remained to stack their arms instead of the nearly 1,500 mustered throughout the war.

Officers: Col Albert Rust. Field Officers: Lt. Col. Seth M. Barton, Maj. J. Hickson Capers, Maj (later Lt. Col.) Vannoy Manning, Maj. John W. Reedy, Maj. Samuel W. Smith, Maj. (later Lt. Col.) Robert S. Taylor, Lt. Col. William H. Tebbs, Maj. William K. Wilkins.

References: Calvin L. Collier, They'll Do to Tie To! - The Story of the Third Regiment, Arkansas Infantry, C.S.A. (Complete regimental history and muster rolls); Douglas C. Jones, The Barefoot Brigade (fiction); Mauriel Joslyn, "For Ninety Nine Years or the War" Gettysburg Magazine issue 14, published by Morningside Books in Dayton, Ohio (an article on the 3rd Arkansas at Gettysburg); Col. Harold B. Simpson, Hood's Texas Brigade: A Compendium (has some statistics, numbers etc. as well as a complete roster of the 3rd Arkansas with more detail than Collier's roster. This is out of print, but worth it if you can find it.)

 

3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment (State Troops)

Organized at Arkadelphia in June, 1861. Assigned to the Arkansas State Troops Brigade gathering in northwest Arkansas under the direction of BG Nathan Pearce, joined McCulloch's Brigade along the border of the Indian Territory and in the southwestern Missouri campaign culminating in the Battle of Wilson's Creek on August 19, 1861. Regimental strength at Wilson's Creek: 500 men. Returned to Fort Smith and mustered out in September, 1861.

Officers: Col. Jonathan R. Gratiot; Lt. Col David Provence; Maj. H. Ward

Also Known As: Gratiot's 3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment; Gratiot's Infantry Regiment

 

4th Arkansas Infantry Battalion

Organized with five companies at Little Rock on November 10, 1861 and assigned to the defenses of Columbus, KY and subsequently to Island No. 10 near New Madrid, Missouri. Company D was detached at Island No. 10, given charge of a battery of heavy guns and reorganized as Company H, 1st Tennessee Heavy Artillery. Company D was captured at the fall of Island No. 10 on Apr. 6-7, 1862, and exchanged later that summer, where they manned the water batteries at Vicksburg with the rest of the 10th Tennessee Artillery, and were surrendered again with the Vicksburg garrison after the siege of that place. The remainder of the battalion was stationed at Tiptonville at the time and managed to escape by wading through the river's overflow to the transport Jeff Davis, on which they floated in the dark down to Fort Pillow, TN. At Corinth, the battalion was reorganized under Maj. T.F. Murff, and participated in the Corinth Campaign from April through June of that year. Participated in battles of Richmond, KY in August 1862. In December, 1862, reassigned to McNair's Brigade, McCown's Division where it fought in the battles of Stones River (Dec. 31, 1862-Jan 3, 1863), the siege of Jackson MS in July, 1863; Chickamauga (Sep 19-20, 1863); Siege of Chattanooga (Sep.-Nov. 1863); the Atlanta Campaign, Dug Gap, Resaca, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, Ezra Church, the siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, and Lovejoy's Station. Consolidated with the 4th and 34th Arkansas Infantry in the summer of 1863. Reassigned to D.H. Hill's Brigade for Hood's Tennessee Campaign where it fought at Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville. Engaged in the Carolinas Campaign in early 1865, and at the last battle of the Army of Tennessee at Bentonville on March 19-21, 1865. Survivors were apparently consolidated along with those of the 4th, 9th, and 25th Arkansas Infantry and the 1st and 2nd Arkansas Mounted Rifles regiments and renamed as the 1st Mounted Rifles Consolidated Regiment at Smithfield, NC on April 9th, 1865. Surrendered two weeks later with LTG Joe Johnston's Army of Tennessee near Durham, North Carolina.

Officers: Lt. Col. Francis A. Terry; Maj. John McKay; Maj. Jesse A. Ross

 

4th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized and mustered into Confederate service under the command of Colonel Evander McNair at Miller's Springs, Lawrence County, MO on August 17, 1861; an 11th, unlettered company was mustered in on November 11, 1861 and which was later detached to become Company H of the 16th Arkansas Infantry on December 4, 1861. Co. A was the "Calhoun Escopets"; Co. B the "Hempstead Hornets"; Co. C the "Caddo Rifles"; Co. D was the "Bright Star Rifles"; Co. E the "Confederate Guards"; Co. F the "Montgomery Hunters"; Co. G the "Pike County Blues"; Co. H, the "Polk County Invincibles".

the 4th Arkansas was assigned to McCulloch's Brigade in northwest Arkansas in late August, 1861. Served in the Indian Territory, September-October 1861. Reassigned to McIntosh's Brigade, McCulloch's Division of Van Dorn's Army of the West in February, 1862. Fought at Leetown battlefield at Pea Ridge on March 7-8, 1862. Reconsolidated at Van Buren, Arkansas, then marched overland to Des Arc where the regiment was transported by steamboat to Memphis in an attempt to unite the Army of the West with the Confederate Army of Mississippi to attack Grant at Pittsburgh Landing TN, but arrived too late for the Battle of Shiloh. Reorganized at Corinth, MS on May 8, 1862. Served in Price's Division, Army of the West in the Corinth Campaign in May-June, 1862, then participated in battles of Richmond, and Perryville KY in August and October of 1862, respectively. In December, 1862, reassigned to McNair's Brigade, McCown's Division where it fought in the battles of Stones River (Dec. 31, 1862-Jan 3, 1863), the siege of Jackson MS in July, 1863; Chickamauga (Sep 19-20, 1863); Siege of Chattanooga (Sep.-Nov. 1863); the Atlanta Campaign, Dug Gap, Resaca, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, Atlanta, Ezra Church, the siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, and Lovejoy's Station. Consolidated with the 4th and 34th Arkansas Infantry in the summer of 1863. Reassigned to D.H. Hill's Brigade for Hood's Tennessee Campaign where it fought at Spring Hill, Franklin, Nashville, and Sugar Creek. Engaged in the Carolinas Campaign in early 1865, and at the last battles of the Army of Tennessee at Avarasboro and Bentonville on March 19-21, 1865. Survivors were apparently consolidated along with those of the 4th Infantry Battalion, 9th, and 25th Arkansas Infantry regiments and the 1st and 2nd Arkansas Mounted Rifles regiments and renamed as the 1st Mounted Rifles Consolidated Regiment at Smithfield, NC on April 9th, 1865. Surrendered two weeks later with LTG Joe Johnston's Army of Tennessee near Durham, North Carolina.

Officers: Col. Evander McNair. Field Officers: Lt. Col. (later Col.) Henry G. Bunn, Maj. (later Lt. Col) James H. May, Maj. Joseph B. McCulloch, Lt. Col. Samuel Ogden

References: Washington L. Gammage, The Camp, the Bivouac, and the Battlefield, Being a History of the Fourth Arkansas Regiment, from its First Organization Down to the Present Date; John W. Lavender, They Never Came Back: the Story of Company "F", Fourth Arkansas Infantry

 

4th Arkansas Infantry Regiment (State Troops)

Organized in June, 1861. Assigned to the Arkansas State Troops Brigade gathering in northwest Arkansas under the direction of BG Nathan Pearce, joined McCulloch's Brigade along the border of the Indian Territory and in the southwestern Missouri campaign culminating in the Battle of Wilson's Creek on August 10, 1861. Regimental strength at Wilson's Creek: 550 men. Returned to Fort Smith and mustered out in September, 1861.

Officers: Col. James D. Walker

 

5th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized for one year's state service at Gainesville on June 28, 1861, and transferred to Confederate service on July 17, 1861 at Pocahontas, assigned to Hardee's Division. Moved through Pittman's Ferry to Kentucky where Hardee's Division became the Army of Central Kentucky. Assigned to Hindman's (later Liddell's) brigade, Army of Mississippi in March, 1862 where it performed rear area security duties near Corinth during the Battle of Shiloh on Apr. 6-7 and in the defensive works surrounding Corinth and the campaign in that vicinity from April through June of that year. Participated in battles of Perryville, KY in October of 1862. In December, 1862, reassigned to Cleburne's Division where it fought in the battles of Stones River (Dec. 31, 1862-Jan 3, 1863), Tullahoma Campaign in June, 1863; Liberty Gap (June 24-26, 1863), Chickamauga (Sep 19-20, 1863); Siege of Chattanooga (Sep.-Nov. 1863); Battle of Chattanooga, Ringgold Gap, Dalton, Resaca, the Atlanta Campaign, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta, and the siege of Atlanta. Consolidated with the 15th Arkansas Infantry in the spring of 1864. Regiment and colors were captured at Jonesboro, Georgia on Sept. 1, 1864, and exchanged approximately 1 month later. Rejoined Cleburne's Division for Hood's Tennessee Campaign where it fought at Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville. Engaged in the Carolinas Campaign in early 1865, and at the last battle of the Army of Tennessee at Bentonville on March 19-21, 1865. Survivors were consolidated along with those of the 1st, 2nd, 6th, 7th, 8th, 13th, 15th, 19th (Dawson's) and 24th Arkansas Infantry and the 3rd Confederate Regiment (formerly Marmaduke's 18th Arkansas Infantry) to form the 1st Infantry Regiment (Consolidated) at Smithfield, NC on April 9th, 1865. Surrendered two weeks later with LTG Joe Johnston's Army of Tennessee near Durham, North Carolina.

Officers: Col. David C. Cross Field Officers: Maj. T.W. Ellsberry, Col. Lucious Featherton, Maj (later Lt.Col. and Col.) Peter V. Green, Lt. Col. E.A. Howell, Lt. Col. (later Col.) John E. Murray, Maj. Riddick Pope, Lt. Col. Benjamin F. Sweeney

References: Floyd R. Barnhill, Sr.; The Fighting Fifth. Pat Cleburne's Cutting Edge: the Fifth Arkansas Infantry Regiment, C.S.A (privately published) (1990)

 

5th Arkansas Infantry Regiment (State Troops)

 

Organized with five companies in June, 1861 under the command of Colonel Thomas P. Dockery of Lamartine in Magnolia County. Lt. Col. Joseph Neal was deputy regimental commander. Company commanders were Co. A, Cpt. Whallings; Co. B, Cpt. Dismukes; Co. C, Cpt. Lawrence; Co. D, Cpt. Dowd, and Co. E, Cpt. Titsworth. Assigned to the Arkansas State Troops Brigade gathering in northwest Arkansas under the direction of BG Nathan Pearce, joined McCulloch's Brigade along the border of the Indian Territory and in the southwestern Missouri campaign culminating in the Battle of Wilson's Creek on August 19, 1861. Regimental strength at Wilson's Creek: 650 men. Returned to Fort Smith and mustered out in September, 1861. Most former members of the 5th State Troops subsequently re-enlisted in Dawson's Infantry regiment.

 

6th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 6th Arkansas Infantry Regiment was organized at Little Rock on June 10, 1861 with the election of Col. Richard Lyon as Colonel, A.T. Hawthorn as Lt. Col., and D.L. Kilgore as Major. C.A. Bridewell was appointed adjutant and John F. Ritchie as adjutant. Company commanders were Co.A, the "Capital Guards" of Little Rock, Cpt. Gordon N. Peay; Co. B, the "Dallas Volunteer Rifles" of Calhoun county, Cpt. P.H. Echols; Co. C, the "Dallas Rifles", Cpt. F.J. Cameron; Co. D, the "Ouachita Voyageurs" of Ouachita county, Cpt. J.W. Kingswell; Co. E, the "Dixie Grays" of Arkansas county, Cpt. Sam G. Smith; Co. F, the "Lafayette Guards"of Lafayette county, Cpt. Sam H. Dill; Co. G, the "Columbia Guards" of Magnolia county, Cpt. J.W. Austin; Co. H, the "City Guards"of Camden, Cpt. S.H. Southerland; Co. I, the "Lisbon Invincibles" of Union county, Cpt. Sam Turner; and Co. K, the "Ouachita Grays" of Ouachita county, Cpt. Hope T. Hodnett.

After the organization, the regiment marched on June 19th overland to Pocahontas. Measles broke out in camp, and a great many died here. In September, 1861, the regiment was transferred to Confederate service in the brigade (consisting of the 2nd, 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th Arkansas Infantry regiments) commanded by Brig. Gen. William J. Hardee. Company B, as well as a number of individual soldiers from the other companies, declined to enlist for Confederate service here, and were released. After a raid into Missouri, the 6th Arkansas returned to camp at Pittman’s Ferry, on Current River. The latter part of September, 1861, the brigade was moved to southeast Missouri, and thence by boat to Columbus, KY, arriving on October 3. From there, it was sent to Cave City, Barren county, KY, where it spent the winter of 1861. While camped at Cave City, the 6th Arkansas smelled its first powder, and a deep companionship with Terry’s Texas Rangers and Swett’s Mississippi Battery was formed in a skirmish with a Union patrol. Colonel Lyon was killed in an accident on October 10, 1861, while supervising the crossing of the regiment over the Tennessee River, when his horse fell over a precipice with him. Lt. Col. Alexander T. Hawthorn succeeded to Colonel in his place. On December 17th, the 6th Arkansas supported the 8th Texas Cavalry (Terry’s Texas Rangers) and Swett’s Mississippi Battery in a skirmish at Woodsonville, KY, when Colonel Terry was killed. The regiment occupied this advanced position until the fall of Fort Donelson, when it moved with the remainder of the army to Corinth, Mississippi under General Albert Sydney Johnston. BG Hardee having been promoted to Major General, Col. T.C. Hindman of the 2nd Arkansas was promoted to brigadier general and the brigade command until he was promoted to major general, and Col. R.G. Shaver was appointed as his successor. Col. Shaver commanded the brigade gallantly at the vicious battle of Shiloh, General Hindman commanding the division. When Corinth was evacuated, the brigade retreated to Tupelo, MS where it remained until July, 1862. Then the 6th Arkansas was sent to Chattanooga, TN, with General Bragg, and from there on to the Kentucky campaign. It was present when 4,500 Federals surrendered at Munfordville, KY, and was in the line at Perryville, when Adjutant Sampson Harris, of Company A, was mortally wounded. Sergeant W.W. Carter of Company A was promoted to lieutenant and succeeded Harris as adjutant. Before the regiment had left Corinth, approximately 200 men of the 12th Arkansas which had escaped from Island No. 10 were organized into two companies and attached to the 6th Arkansas. In December, at Shelbyville, TN, these two companies were returned to their own regiment as the 12th Arkansas had been exchanged by that time. Casualties at the battle of Perryville had already weakened the regiment, as well as decimating the 7th Arkansas, so the 6th and 7th Arkansas regiments were consolidated into one unit on December 15, 1862. The regiment was heavily engaged at the battle of Murfreesboro, TN (Stones River) on December 31, 1862, through January 2, 1863; and in the spring advanced to Bellbuckle, where it remained until June 24, 1863, when it was hastily ordered to the front to Liberty Gap, where it found and reinforced the 5th Arkansas in dealing with a large Union force. It retreated from middle Tennessee to south of the Tennessee River, and went into camp at Chickamauga Station, a few miles south of Chattanooga, and remained there until about the 1st of September, when Bragg began maneuvering for the battle of Chickamauga. The regiment was engaged, actually, or in line of battle, all through the Georgia campaign , at Tunnel Hill, the Atlanta Campaign and the defenses of Atlanta where they, along with the rest of Govan's Brigade, were captured en masse near Jonesboro, GA. They were exchanged three weeks later, and rejoined the Army of Tennessee at Palmetto, GA. and were at the battles of Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville, TN. The survivors were consolidated into a single regiment, the 3rd Confederate Infantry Regiment, Consolidated, containing the survivors of the 1st, 2nd, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 13th, 15th, Dawson's 19th, and 24th Arkansas and the 3rd Confederate Infantry at the last reorganization of the Army of Tennessee at Smithfield, NC on April 9, 1865, only to be surrendered with General Johnston's army near Greensboro, NC on April 26, 1865. Of the nearly 1000 men mustered with the regiment, only about 150 remained with the colors at the surrender.

Officers: Col Richard Lyon. Field Officers: Lt.Col (later Col.) Alexander T. Hawthorn, Maj. F. J. Cameron, Maj. William F. Douglas, Maj. J.B. Gordon, Maj. Dawson L. Kilgore, Lt. Col. Gordon N. Peay, Maj. (later Lt. Col. and Col.) Samuel G. Smith.

References: Calvin L. Collier, First In - Last Out: The Capitol Guards, Arkansas Brigade (Unit history and muster rolls for Company A.)

 

7th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized on June 16, 1861 at Smithfield, Lawrence County, and mustered into Confederate service on July 26, 1861 at Camp Shaver, near Pocahontas with an initial strength of over 1200 troops. Gen. W. J. Hardee made the 7th the nucleus of his brigade consisting of the 3rd Confederate (formerly Marmaduke's 18th Arkansas), and the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th Arkansas infantry regiments, McCarver's regiment, and McCann's battery of artillery The regimental staff and company commanders of the 7th Arkansas were: Col. Robert G. Shaver; Lt. Col. William R. Cain, Maj. James T. Martin. John M. Dean was appointed Adjutant, H.C. Tunsell quartermaster, Commissary John S. Shaver, Br. Bohannon, surgeon, Dr. Hoadley, assistant surgeon. The company officers at the time of organization were: Co. A, Cpt. John C. McCauley , of White county; Co. B, Cpt. George B. Orme, of Jackson county; Co. C, Cpt. James T. Martin, of Randolph county who was elected major of the regiment and was replaced as captain by his brother, J.H. Martin); Co. D, Cpt. Deason, of Izard county; Co. E, Cpt. M. Van Shaver, of Fulton county; Co. F, Cpt. (Rev.) John H. Dye, of White county; Co. G, Cpt. C.C. Straughan of Lawrence county; Co. H, Cpt. James F. Archer of Marion county; Co. I, Cpt Mellon, of Randolph county; Co. K, the "Arkansas Guards", Cpt Brightwell, of Independence county. Lt. Col. Cain resigned at Camp Shaver because of failing health, and was replaced by John M. Dean as lieutenant colonel and Jack Horne as adjutant. Commissary Shaver resigned at about the same time, and John D. Sprigg replaced him.

The regiment remained in State service about six weeks, when General Hardee was ordered to make transfer of the State regiments into Confederate service. In making these transfers, nearly all the regiments lost the equivalent of a company in those men who declined to re-enlist for confederate service and were subsequently discharged. The 7th Arkansas transferred with the loss of only 17 men who refused to re-enlist as "Confederate troops". Cpts. C.C. Straughan of Co. G, and Cpt. James F. Archer of Co. H retired, and were replaced by Cpt. Warner and Cpt. Blackburn, respectively. The 7th Arkansas was ordered to Pittman's Ferry, where it was drilled and disciplined by General Hardee in person until the last of August, when Hardee's brigade marched by land to Point Pleasant, MO on the Missouri River, and then traveled by steamboat to the Confederate stronghold at Columbus, KY. From Columbus the brigade moved to Bowling Green, KY, in October, where it was assigned to the division commanded by General Simon B. Buckner. Here, Col. Shaver was appointed to command a newly-formed brigade made up of the 7th and 8th Arkansas regiments, the 19th Tennessee, and a battalion of the 9th Arkansas. Shaver's Brigade remained at Bowling Green until February, 1862, when that place was evacuated. Shaver's brigade guarded the Confederate rear during this retreat, being shelled by the artillery of Buell's advance while the last trains of stores were being loaded. On leaving, Col. Shaver, by order of Gen. Hardee, burned the depot and took down the telegraph wires. It was during the worst month in that climate, with rain and snow and the thermometer at night below zero, when this retreat was made. The 7th was caused to stand at arms all night by a report that a large force of Buell's army was coming on its heels, which turned out to be Helm's Kentucky cavalry coming in his rear by an unexpected order of march. General A.S. Johnston, at Nashville, sent a message to Colonel Shaver that the enemy's cavalry was advancing on his rear. This was made known to General Wood, of Alabama, who had taken command of the brigade during the retreat. General Wood refused to wait for the rear guard, and for this reason Colonel Shaver applied for and secured a transfer of the 7th to Hindman's brigade.

The regiment reached Nashville ten days after the fall of Fort Donelson, and went there to Murfreesboro, where the remnants of Zollicoffer's command had gone into camp after the battle of Fishing Creek. From Murfreesboro the 7th went to Decatur and thence to Courtland, Alabama, and went into camp at Corinth, Mississippi to await the concentration of the Confederate armies to meet the federal advance through Tennessee. Then followed the battle of Shiloh, where Shaver commanded the brigade under General Hindman. The 7th Arkansas acquitted itself valiantly at Shiloh, suffering high casualties and being dubbed "the Bloody 7th" by General Hardee. The regiment returned to Corinth after the Confederate repulse at Shiloh, where it rested and refitted and participated in the defense of that railroad junction from April to June, 1862. Upon Bragg's assumption of command of the Army of Mississippi, the army moved out again in a campaign intended to regain lost ground in Kentucky. The 7th fought there at Perryville on October 8, 1862, but suffered such high casualties in the attack there that it was subsequently consolidated with the 6th Arkansas Infantry, with whom it continued to serve with the Army of Tennessee for the remainder of the war.

Officers: Col. Robert G. Shaver. Field Officers: Lt.Col. William R. Cain; Maj. (later Lt. Col.) John M. Dean; Col. D.A. Gillespie; Maj. J.A. Hill; Maj. James T. Martin; Maj. J.C. Macauley; Lt. Col. J. Rutherford; Lt. Col. (later Col.) Peter Snyder

 

8th Arkansas Infantry Battalion

Organized with seven companies early in 1862 and assigned to Van Dorn's Army of the West in April, 1862. Moved with the Army of the West from Van Buren to Corinth, MS. Reassigned to Cabell's Brigade in Price's Corps in October, 1862 where it fought throughout the Corinth Campaign and in the Battle of Corinth on October 3-4, 1862. Served in Bowen's Division, in Price's Army of North Mississippi from October to the end of December, 1862, opposing Grant's overland campaign against Vicksburg. Assigned to Beall's Brigade in the Dept. of Mississippi and East Louisiana in January, 1863, where they defended Port Hudson during the May-July 1863 siege, Surrendered at Port Hudson, LA on July 8, 1863. The survivors of the battalion were paroled at Port Hudson later that month; but the battalion was never reformed, its men returning home or joining other units.

Officers: Lt. Col. Bart Jones Field Officers: Maj. John Miller; Maj. M.R. Wilson

Also Known As: Jones' 1st Arkansas Infantry Battalion

 

8th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 8th Arkansas Volunteer Infantry Regiment was organized under state service at Camp Price, near Jacksonport (just south of present-day Newport, AR) on July 13, 1861. Companies of the 8th Ark. mustered in at Camp Price, Oil Trough, West Point, and Pocahontas. The 8th Arkansas was mustered into Confederate service for a period of 12 months (later extended "for the war") on September 10, 1861.

The Regiment's first commander was Colonel William K. Patterson. Field Officers were Major (later Lt. Col. and Col.) George F. Baucum, Lt. Col. H.M. Couch, Col. John H. Kelly, Major John A. Price, Major (later Lt. Col.) Anderson Watkins, Lt. Col James H. Wilson, and Major W.P. Witt.

Following organization, the 8th Arkansas marched to Pocahontas where it was sworn into Confederate service under the command of General Hardee. In October, 1861 Hardee took his division, including the 8th Ark., across the Mississippi River into Kentucky, where they served on occupation duty until the Confederates were forced to evacuate that state after the fall of Forts Henry and Donelson in February, 1862. Hardee moved to Nashville, then retreated south to Corinth, Mississippi later in March.

The 8th Arkansas's first taste of battle was a big bite, when they were thrown into the Battle of Shiloh on April 6-7 as part of Wood's Brigade in Hardee's Corps, as part of the Confederate right wing in that battle, entering the early part of the battle at Fraley's Field, then the desperate fight to reduce the "hornet's nest", and finally rolling up against Grant's Last Line just before dark. The 8th suffered heavily at Shiloh, losing more than half its strength.

Following the repulse at Shiloh, the 8th served in the early part of the Corinth campaign, then went with Bragg as a part of Liddell's Brigade (what would soon be come as the Army of Tennessee's "Arkansas Brigade" of Pat Cleburne's Division to invade Kentucky once again, fighting and losing heavily again at Perryville and at Stone's River. After Stone's River, the 8th Ark. was so reduced in manpower that it was combined with the 19th Arkansas in order to maintain some semblance of combat power. They were engaged in the Tullahoma (TN) campaign, and fought at Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Ringgold Gap, the Atlanta Campaign, Dalton, GA; Resaca, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, the Atlanta campaign and siege thereof, were captured at Jonesboro, and paroled just in time for the disastrous campaign at Franklin and Nashville, TN. They returned to the Carolinas under Gen'l Joe Johnston where they attempted to fight off Sherman's advance on Richmond from the rear, and in the final battle of the western Confederate army at Bentonville. Less than a hundred survivors were still with the colors when they surrendered with the Army of Tennessee on April 26, 1865 near Durham, North Carolina.

 

9th Arkansas Infantry Battalion

Organized in January, 1862 by grouping four companies from McCarver's 14th Arkansas Infantry in January, 1862. Assigned with Wood's Brigade, Hardee's Division in Kentucky from January to March, 1862. Fought at Shiloh with Wood's Brigade on Apr 6-7, 1862. Casualties at Shiloh caused the battalion to be consolidated into two companies on May 6, 1862, whereupon it was further consolidated to become the new Company F and G of the 8th Arkansas Infantry Regiment.

Officers: Maj. John H. Kelly

 

9th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 9th Regiment, Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, was organized at Pine Bluff on July 20, 1861, and taken into state service at Pine Bluff on July 27. They marched to Pocahontas, Arkansas, later that month where they were mustered into Confederate service and assigned initially to Pillow's Division. Like all the other Arkansas regiments raised in the first wave of recruiting in 1861, they were taken into Confederate armies east of the Mississippi River, and only the few survivors made it back home after the war.

The 9th Arkansas was known as the "Parson's Regiment" because they included 42 ministers of the Gospel of all Protestant denominations among their ranks. The regimental commander was a preacher, as was the major and many of the company officers. Notwithstanding that it contained so many men of the cloth, it was a hard-fighting regiment and many of its officers, notably its last lieutenant colonel (Dunlop), were as intrepid and gallant as any knight of chivalry. Field officers were Colonel John M. Bradley, Major John C. Bratton, Lt. Col (later Col.) Isaac L. Dunlop, Lt. Cols. W.Y. McCammon, Reuben W. Millsaps, and Jefferson W. Rogers, and Majors R.M. Wallace and W.J. Wallace. The company commanders were: Co. A, the "Bradley Guards", of Jefferson county, Cpt. John M. Bradley; Co. B, the "Cut-Off Guards, of Drew county, Cpt. W.H. Isom.; Co. C, "Henry's Hornets", of Jefferson county, Cpt. Phillip G. Henry; Co. D, of Bradley county, Cpt. W.Y. McCammon; Co. E, of Bradley county, Cpt. John W. Blankenship; Co. F, the "Dixie Guards", of Drew county, Cpt. W.G. Haislip, Co. G, the "Arkansaw Travelers" of Union county, Cpt. Robert M. Wallace; Co. H, the "Hardee Guards" of Jefferson county, Cpt. James T. Anderson, Co I, "McCulloch's Guards" of Jefferson county, Cpt. George F. Bayne; Co. K, of Ashley county; Cpt. John F. Carr.

The regiment saw its first combat at the battle of Belmont, MO, and was subsequently retained at Bowling Green, KY for the defense of that post during the winter of 1861-1862. The regiment served in Shaver's Brigade, covering the retreat out of Kentucky to Corinth. It fought gallantly at Shiloh, charging repeatedly upon the "Hornet's Nest" where it lost Lt. Col. Dunlop. It was through this regiment that General A. Sidney Johnston rode from the rear to the front, with a tin cup he had appropriated earlier that morning, saying "Men of Arkansas, the enemy is stubborn. I want you to show General Beauregard and General Bragg what you can do with your bayonets and toothpicks!" The regiment went forward with a cheer and passed him at a run; in five minutes 130 men of their ranks were killed or wounded, but they did not falter. Lt. Duckworth was killed at the head of his company, and Cpt. Wallace was wounded. It closed up and disappeared into the thicket in front, followed by the whole Confederate line, and the enemy was silenced in twenty minutes. General Johnston, however, received a mortal wound while leading this charge, and shortly thereafter bled to death.

Following the Confederates' repulse at Shiloh, the 9th Arkansas returned to Corinth and participated in the Corinth Campaign, in the battles of Corinth, and Iuka, MS. They served at Coffeeville, and in the Vicksburg Campaign in the spring and summer of 1863, where they served briefly in the garrisons of Port Hudson, Louisiana, and Jackson, Mississippi, then fought in the battle of Champion Hill on May 15, 1863. The 9th served in Loring's Division at Champion Hill, and following that battle, Loring retreated north to join Joes Johnston's army near Jackson rather than being trapped with the rest of Pemberton's army in the Vicksburg defenses.

The 9th Arkansas served with Johnson's attempt to relieve Vicksburg, in the second battle of Jackson, in the Meridian (MS) campaign in Feb. to March, 1864; and the Atlanta Campaign at Resaca, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Dug Gap, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta, Ezra Church, and the final siege of Atlanta, as well as follow-on action at Lovejoy's Station and Jonesboro, Georgia. Following the fall of Atlanta, the regiment participated in the Tennessee campaign that resulted in the battles of Franklin, and Nashville, TN.

They continued service with the Army of Tennessee to the close of the war, fighting at Sugar Creek on December 26, 1864, and in the Carolinas campaign in February to April, 1865, including the last big stand-up fight of the Tennessee Army at Bentonville on March 19-21, 1865.

The few remaining survivors of the 9th Arkansas were consolidated with the survivors of the 1st and 2nd Arkansas Mounted Rifles, the 4th and 25th Arkansas, and others as the "1st Mounted Rifles Regiment" (Dismounted, since they didn't have many horses left, either) in the last reorganization of the Army at Smithfield, North Carolina on April 9, 1865. Two weeks later, they were surrendered with the rest of the Army of Tennessee near Raleigh, North Carolina.

Also Known As: "The Parson's Regiment"... This regiment numbered 42 ministers of the Gospel among its members.

References: James Willis, Arkansas Confederates in the Western Theater (Regimental and Brigade history and complete, annotated muster rolls for the regiment.)

 

10th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The Tenth Arkansas Infantry Regiment was organized at Springfield in Conway County in July 1861. This is where many volunteers from Van Buren County (southern Van Buren County later became Cleburne) were mustered into the Confederate Army. Company "A," known as the "Quitman Rifles," was headed by Captain A. R. Witt. Other officers were First Lt. W. W. Martin, Second Lt. C. M. Cargile, Third Lt. Israel Davis, and First Sergeant W. R. Corbin. The company had eight non-commissioned officers and 94 men in all.

Company "G" was called the "Red River Riflemen." Officers were Captain John B. Miller, First Lt. James E. Lockard, Second Lt. Henry J. Gatton, Third Lt. Edwin Ellis, and First Sergeant Daniel Johnson. This company with ten non-commissioned officers had 91 men.

Other companies in the regiment were the "Ready Rifles" of Company B; the "Choctaw Riflemen" of Company C from Conway County, the "Conway Invincibles of Company E; "Pemberton's Company," "Muddy Bayou Heroes" of Company F; the "Perry County Mountaineers" of Company H; the "Conway Tigers" of Company I; and "Springfield Sharpshooters" of Company K. Field and staff officers for the Tenth were Colonel Thomas D. Merrick, Lt. Col. S. S. Ford, Major Obed Patty, and Adjutant Robert C. Bertrand.

The Tenth Arkansas Regiment was assigned to General Bowen's Brigade, consisting of the Ninth and Tenth Arkansas, Fifth Missouri and Tenth Mississippi regiments before they were moved to Kentucky. They remained at Bowling Green until the evacuation of that place when they were placed to guard the rear on the retreat. They were then placed in Hardee's Corps and marched to Corinth. Here the Ninth Arkansas was put in Breckenridge's Reserve Corps and marched to Shiloh. The 10th Arkansas fought on the Confederate right flank at Shiloh on April 6, 1862, participating in the many vicious attacks against the "Hornet's Nest" which ultimately led to the surrender of Prentiss's division. The 10th's attack petered out around dark when they ran up against Grant's Last Line. At this same time, Confederate attacks were called off until the next day. In this battle they lost about 160 men.

After the Battle of Shiloh the regiment went back to Corinth, where they reorganized. Formal charges related to the disorganized condition of his regiment were brought against Col. Merrick. He resigned and on May 27, 1862 Captain A. R. Witt of Company "A," "The Quitman Rifles," was promoted to colonel and became commander of the regiment. Here their brigade was broken up and the regiments assigned to other brigades..

They were moved first back of Vicksburg, where they stayed some time on the Yazoo River, at Camp Price. Then they were moved to Vicksburg, where they stayed a short while. They were then with the Ninth Arkansas, placed in a brigade commanded by General Jeff Thompson and moved to Louisiana, 30 or 40 miles above New Orleans, where they spent the winter of 1862-63 guarding the New Orleans, Jackson and Great Northern Railway.

By the early spring of 1863 the Tenth Arkansas was first sent again to Baton Rouge where they were to prepare defenses against the approaching General Nathaniel Banks. This they did by felling large numbers of trees to block the roadways leading to Baton Rouge, digging trenches and mounting siege guns around the city.

By the first of March, 1863, the Tenth Arkansas Infantry was at Port Hudson, Louisiana above New Orleans and during March 7-27 they were in operations against Federal forces at Port Hudson. After a series of engagements and a siege lasting into July, 1863, the Tenth Arkansas Infantry surrendered to General Banks, a surrender that was apparently helped along by internal dissension within the regiment. Certain officers of the Tenth Arkansas seemingly were able to influence some enlisted men to desert and refuse to alternate duties with their fellow companies. By July 7, just two days before the regiment capitulated, there was practically open mutiny.

On July 9, 1863 the entire regiment surrendered and became prisoners of war. The men were paroled until exchanged, with the officers imprisoned at Johnson's Island, Ohio, in Lake Erie. The unit was eventually exchanged and returned to Arkansas. Col. A. R. Witt reorganized the unit, including some newly recruited members to form Witt's Cavalry.

John F. Walter in his Capsule History of Arkansas Military Units gives additional information on the Tenth Arkansas Infantry and Witt's Arkansas Cavalry.

The regiment participated in the following engagements during its career: Battle, Pittsburg Landing, Shiloh, Tenn. - April 6-7, 1862; Engagement, Baton Rouge, La. - Aug. 5, 1862; •Operations against expedition from Pass Manchac and Ponchatuoula, La. - Sept. 13-15, 1862; Skirmish, Bayou Bonfonca, La. - Nov. 21, 1862; Operations against Port Hudson, La. - Mar. 7-27, 1863; Action, Plain's Store, La. May 21, 1863; Siege, Port Hudson, La. May 24-July 9, 1863; Assault, Port Hudson, La. - May 27, 1863; Assault, Port Hudson, La. - June 14, 1863; Surrender, Port Hudson, La. - July 9, 1863

At its organization the Tenth Arkansas Infantry numbered 1000 men; yet at the close of the war there were fewer than 200 men surviving.

 

11th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 11th Arkansas Infantry was organized with eight companies (approximately 700 men) at Benton, in Saline County, Arkansas in July, 1861. Jabez M. Smith, of Benton, was elected Colonel, Mark Miller, Lt. Col., James T. Poe, major, Moses Waters, adjutant, and W.A. Moss, sergeant major. Company commanders were Co. A, the "Saline Tornadoes" of Saline County, Cpt. M. Vance; Co. B, the "Rough and Ready Riflemen" of Saline County, Cpt. J. Douglas; Co. C, from Saline and Hot Spring counties, Cpt. J. Sanders; Co. D, the "Fairplay Riflemen" of Saline county, Cpt. Z. Philips; Co. E, the "Falcon Guards" of Columbia and Hempstead counties, Cpt J. Moss; Co. F, the "Saline Avengers" of Saline county, Cpt. L. Mauney; Co. G, the "Camden Knights" of Ouachita county, Cpt. J. Logan; and Co. H, from Columbia County, Cpt. J. Matthews. Company I, from Saline, Hot Spring, and Pulaski counties under Cpt. Anderson Cunningham and Co. K, from Saline county under Cpt. J.G. Johnson, joined the regiment at Memphis, TN, and Island No. 10, respectively.

The regiment was ordered to Fort Pillow, TN, in November, 1861, was brigaded with the 12th Arkansas, commanded by Col. E.W. Gantt; and was stationed at Island No. 10 near Tiptonville, TN on the Mississippi River. The regiment was transferred back and forth from Island No. 10 to New Madrid, MO at the whim of General Gideon Pillow. Island No. 10 was surrendered on April 15, 1862 after a terrific bombardment by Union mortar boats and gunboats, aided by a rise of the river's water level which nearly submerged the island. The Confederate defenses at Island No. 10 consisted of dissolving earthworks and twenty cannon. Maj. W.J. Hoadley, of Little Rock, having served his guns with great bravery, spiked them and escaped with one section of the regiment. The others were included in the surrender, and were transported to prison camps at Camp Butler (near Springfield, IL) and then to Camp Chase (Chicago), the officers were sent to Johnson's Island near Lake Erie. Lieutenant Gibson, of Co. H, was shot dead at Johnson's Island by a federal sentry because he crossed the camp's "dead line". The 11th and 12th Arkansas were exchanged at Vicksburg, Mississippi on September 16, 1862, and were subsequently reorganized at Jackson, MS in October of that year. Their year's enlistment expiring at this time, the regiment re-enlisted and reorganized, electing Col. John L. Logan; Lt. Col. M.D, Vance, Maj. James T. Poe, Adjutant Edward A. Warren, Quartermaster E. Whitfield, Commissary Clark, Surgeon James Whitfield. Co. A, Cpt. Jasper Shepherd, Co. B Cpt. Claiborne Watkins; Co. C, Cpt. James D. Burke; Co. D, Cpt. A.A. Crawford; Co. E, Cpt. W.R. Selfridge; Co. F, Cpt L.H. Kemp; Co. G, Cpt. Frank Scott; Co. H, Cpt. Matthews, Co. I, Cpt. W.F. Morton; Co. K, Cpt. Anderson Cunningham. Col. Jabez Smith was as brave and pure as General Lee, but declined re-election. He returned to the Trans-Mississippi district for new duties.

The regiment was ordered to the lower Mississippi, where it was consolidated with the 17th Arkansas Infantry under Col. John Griffith and reorganized as a mounted rifle regiment. Griffith's "11th/17th Arkansas" was then dispatched to Clinton, Mississippi to head off the cavalry raid of Union General Benjamin Grierson, but failed to catch him before Grierson rejoined the Union lines near Baton Rouge. Then, still under the command of Col Griffith, they operated outside of the fortifications of Port Hudson, LA during the siege of that place in March, 1863. This detachment operated against the army of General Banks in Louisiana, and took a number of prisoners, among them General Neil Dow. Colonel Logan, of the 11th, was second in command of the detachment which captured General Dow.

After the fall of Port Hudson in July, 1863, the greater part of the regiment remained in Mississippi, where they fought in several small engagements against the Federals. A squad of the 17th, under Maj. B.B. Chisom captured a Federal gunboat on the Yazoo River. They had a sanguinary encounter with Federal cavalry at Keller's Lane, June 23, 1863 in which Lieutenant DeVaughn was wounded and maimed for life. Their services were of inestimable value in protecting citizens from the devastation wrought wherever the Yankees were left undisturbed to roam over the country between the fortified posts.

References: Anthony C. Rushing, Ranks of Honor: A Regimental History of the Eleventh Arkansas Infantry Regiment and Poe's Cavalry Battalion, C.S.A., 1861-1865. (Complete unit history and muster rolls)

 

11th and 17th Arkansas Mounted Infantry Regiment (Consolidated)

Organized in January, 1863 by consolidating the survivors of the 11th Arkansas and Rector's-Griffith's 17th Arkansas Infantry under the command of Colonel John Logan. After Logan was promoted to brigade command, Colonel John Griffith assumed command. The 11th/17th was then assigned to Logan's Cavalry Brigade in the Department of Mississippi and East Louisiana. Reorganized as a mounted rifles unit in May, 1863. Mounted detachment was assigned to pursue Union General Ben Grierson's cavalry raid through Mississippi in April and May of 1863; a dismounted detachment of the soldiers whose mounts had died or been otherwise lost joined the garrison of Port Hudson, LA until they could obtain remounts. The dismounted detachment was subsequently besieged there, surrendering with the Port Hudson garrison on July 9, 1863, and paroled later that month. Furloughed in September, 1863. Assigned to Adams' Cavalry Brigade from Novenber, 1863 to August, 1864. Participated in minor battles near Natchez, in the Meridian (MS) campaign, and at Concord Church, MS. Elements of the 11th/17th served as cavalry with Churchill's Division in Arkansas in August and September 1864, and with Wharton's 1st Texas Cavalry Division from September 1864 through the end of the war. Surrendered with General Kirby Smith in the Trans-Mississippi on May 26, 1865.

 

12th Arkansas Infantry Battalion, Sharpshooters

Organized at Corinth, Mississippi in June, 1862, with four companies - each one composed of men handpicked for their marksmanship abilities from the 18th, Dockery's 19th, 20th, and Craven's 21st Arkansas Infantry regiments. Commanded by Major William F. Rapley, the battalion served with distinction in Hebert's Brigade at the battle of Corinth on October 3-4, 1862, and at Hatchie Bridge during the retreat from Corinth, and subsequently throughout the Vicksburg campaign in the fall of 1862 through the summer of 1863. The battalion was employed to oppose the federal Steele's Bayou Expedition on March 14-27, 1863 and at Rolling Fork on March 20; and subsequently fought at Grand Gulf (April 29), Port Gibson (May 1), Champion Hill (May 16), Big Black River (May 17), and was besieged with the Vicksburg garrison during the 45-day siege of that strongpoint from May 20 until July 4, 1863. Surrendered with the Vicksburg garrison on July 4, 1863 and was paroled at that place later that month. Survivors of the battalion returned home to Arkansas, where many of them reformed their old unit under Brig. Gen. James F. Fagan's Cavalry Division , fighting in the Camden Expedition and at the battle of Marks' Mill. There is little or no record of the unit's activity after this point.

 

12th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 12th Arkansas Infantry Regiment was raised and organized at Arkadelphia, in Clark county, under a commission granted to Edward W. Gantt, the recently-resigned U.S. Representative for the 2nd District of Arkansas. The regiment was deployed east of the Mississippi River and saw its first service in the garrison of Fort Donelson, TN, on the Cumberland River. The regiment was engaged in the battle of Fort Donelson on February 16-18, 1862, and was surrendered with the garrison of that post. While Col. Gantt was confined as a prisoner at Fort Warren, the 12th Arkansas was exchanged and reorganized at Jackson, MS. Col. T.J. Reid, Lt. Col. Ed C. Jordan, Maj John S. Walker, Adjutant W.L. Hemingway, and Quartermaster C.H. Jonas were elected as the regimental officers in this second reorganization. There were too few men to bring the regiment up to effective strength, so the officers were granted leave to return to Arkansas to recruit replacements, while the enlisted men were temporarily attached to the 11th Arkansas under Col. Logan. When the officers returned to the regiment, the added recruits brought the regiment's strength up to approximately 500 men in the ranks. The company officers in this new organization were: Co. A, Cpt. N.W. Stewart; Co.B, Cpt. W.P. Donnell; Co. C, Cpt. H.L.W. Johnson; Co. D, Cpt. W.P. Linzee; Co. E, Cpt. W.F. Glasgow, Co. F, Cpt. J.C. Bowen; Co. G, Cpt. A.E. Doggett; Co. H, Cpt. J.E. Inge; Co. I, Cpt. J. Archer; Co. K, Cpt. J.B. Davis.

Colonel Gantt, upon his exchange, was placed in command of an Arkansas brigade consisting of his old regiment, the 12th Arkansas, and assigned to the garrison of Island No. 10 near New Madrid, MO. On the fall of that strongpoint on April 9, 1862, many of the regiment found themselves again prisoners of war. Two companies managed to escape through the overflowed river to the Tennessee shore, and were attached to the 6th Arkansas Infantry until the 12th was once again exchanged and reorganized. Though the surrender of Island No. 10 was inevitable, there was severe criticism of Colonel Gantt's performance, and he was not offered another command. He felt that his promotion to brigadier general was being held up, and so aggrieved, he left the Confederate army, went North, and made speeches in favor of the Union.

The 12th Arkansas held fast to the Southern cause, even though it still contained many friends and relatives of its old commander. Exchanged and reorganized again at Jackson, MS on October 2, 1862, the regiment was assigned to Beall's Brigade in the District of Mississippi and East Louisiana, where they served in the garrison and defense of Port Hudson, LA, enduring the siege and ultimate surrender of that place in July, 1863. Lt. Col. Jordan was killed by a shell on the ramparts of Port Hudson during this 49-day siege. Adjutant Hemingway, Cpt. H.L.W. Johnson, and many others were killed at Port Hudson as well. Following the surrender of Port Hudson, the noncommissioned officers and the enlisted men were again paroled, but the regiment's officers were sent to prison camp at Johnson's Island. The 12th Arkansas was never reformed after Port Hudson, its soldiers drifting home to re-enlist or be conscripted into other units, its officers in a POW camp.

 

13th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Enlisted at Harrisburg, and organized for one year's state service at Gainesville on June 29, 1861 under the command of Colonel (later Brigadier General) James F. Tappan., and transferred to Confederate service on July 17, 1861 at Pocahontas. Field Officers were Lt. Col. A.R. Brown and Major Robert A. Duncan. Moved through Pittman's Ferry to Kentucky where Hardee's Division became the Army of Central Kentucky. Assigned to Travis' Brigade, Pillow's Division, where it fought it the battle of Belmont, MO on November 7, 1861. Col Tappan was promoted to the brigade command in March, 1862, and led it in the Battle of Shiloh on Apr. 6-7 and in the Corinth Campaign from April through June of that year. Company K of the 7th Kentucky Infantry was assigned to the regiment as a second "Company E" on April 13, 1862. The regiment re-enlisted and reorganized for a period of two years or the duration of the War on April 29, 1862. Following the evacuation of Corinth, moved to Tupelo, MS, and thence to Chattanooga, TN under General Bragg for his 1862 Kentucky campaign. Participated in battles of Richmond (August 29-30) and Perryville, KY on October 8, 1862. In December, 1862, reassigned to Cleburne's Brigade (later Liddell's Arkansas Brigade of Cleburne's Division) where it fought in the battles of Stones River (Dec. 31, 1862-Jan 3, 1863), Tullahoma Campaign in June, 1863; Liberty Gap (June 24-26, 1863), Chickamauga (Sep 19-20, 1863); Siege of Chattanooga (Sep.-Nov. 1863); Battle of Chattanooga, Ringgold Gap, Dalton, Resaca, the Atlanta Campaign, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta, and the siege of Atlanta. Consolidated with the 15th Arkansas Infantry early in 1863, and additionally with the 5th Arkansas Infantry in August, 1863. Regiment and colors were captured at Jonesboro, Georgia on Sept. 1, 1864, and exchanged approximately 1 month later. Rejoined Cleburne's Division for Hood's Tennessee Campaign where it fought at Spring Hill, Franklin, and Nashville. Engaged in the Carolinas Campaign in early 1865, and at the last battle of the Army of Tennessee at Bentonville on March 19-21, 1865. Survivors were consolidated along with those of the 1st, 2nd, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 15th, 19th (Dawson's) and 24th Arkansas Infantry and the 3rd Confederate Regiment (formerly Marmaduke's 18th Arkansas Infantry) to form the 1st Infantry Regiment (Consolidated) at Smithfield, NC on April 9th, 1865. Surrendered two weeks later with LTG Joe Johnston's Army of Tennessee near Durham, North Carolina.

Officers: Colonel (later Brigadier General) James C. Tappan. Field Officers: Lt. Col. A.R. Brown, Maj. (later Lt. Col.) Robert A. Duncan, Lt. Col. A.D. Grayson, Maj. E.A. Howell, Maj. George B. Hunt, Maj. (later Lt. Col.) James A. McNeely, and Lt. Col. James A. Pollard.

 

14th (McCarver's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized and mustered into Confederate service for 12 months at Pocahontas on September 23, 1861 under the command of Col. John S. McCarver, Lt. Col. Samuel J. Mason, and Major John H. Kelly. Companies A, B, E, and H were detached from the regiment under Major Kelly's command and designated as the 9th Arkansas Infantry Battalion in January, 1862. The remainder of the regiment was then often referred to as the 18th Arkansas Infantry Battalion. Assigned to Rust's Brigade, Jone's Division, in Earl Van Dorn's Army of the West, where it served in the Corinth Campaign from April to June, 1862. The remaining six companies were consolidated into four on May 14, 1862, and were subsequently consolidated with the 17th (Lemoyne's) Arkansas Infantry on May 14, 1862, and the new organization renamed as the 21st Arkansas Infantry Regiment.

Also Known As: 9th (McCarver's) Arkansas Infantry; 18th Arkansas Infantry Battalion (after January, 1862).

 

14th (Mitchell's-Powers') Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized and mustered into Confederate service in August, 1861; Assigned to Hebert's Brigade in McCulloch's Division in northwest Arkansas that October . Fought at Leetown battlefield at Pea Ridge on March 7-8, 1862. Reconsolidated at Van Buren, Arkansas, then marched overland to Des Arc where the regiment was transported by steamboat to Memphis in an attempt to unite the Army of the West with the Confederate Army of Mississippi to attack Grant at Pittsburgh Landing TN, but arrived too late for the Battle of Shiloh. Reorganized at Corinth, MS on May 8, 1862. Served in the Corinth Campaign in May-June, 1862. fighting valiantly at the Battle of Iuka, MS on September 19, and at Corinth on October 3-4, 1862. Consolidated with the 18th and 23rd Arkansas Infantry in February, 1863. Reassigned to Beale's Brigade, Dept. of Mississippi and East Louisiana in January, 1863. Served in the garrison of Port Hudson, LA and was besieged in that strongpoint for 49 days in May to July, 1863. Surrendered with the Port Hudson garrison on July 9, 1863, and was paroled later that month. The regiment dissolved, and was never reformed after this time. Some survivors re-enlisted in the 15th (Northwest), 16th, and 21st Arkansas early in 1864.

Officers: Colonel William C. Mitchell. Field Officers: Lt.Col. (later Col.) Eli Dodson, Major John Allin, Lt. Col (later Col. ) Pleasant Fowler, Maj. H.E. Messick, Maj. J.H. Messick, Col. Frank P. Powers.

 

15th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 15th Arkansas was initially organized as the 1st Arkansas Infantry Regiment (State Troops) at Camp Rector near Mound City, Arkansas (about 6 miles north of what is now West Memphis) on July 23, 1861 under the command of Colonel Patrick Ronayne Cleburne. Company A was the "Harris Guards"; Company B the "Jefferson Guards"; Company C the "Yell Rifles" of Helena; Company D the "Tyronza Rebels"; Company F the "Monroe Blues"; Company G, the "Hindman Guards" of Phillips county; Company H the "Rector Guards".

The regiment moved via steamboat from Camp Rector down the Mississippi and back up the White River to Pocahontas, Arkansas where they were sworn into Confederate service as the 1st Arkansas Infantry Regiment. They conducted their initial training here, and were part of Hardee's Division. They made a short excursion into southeast Missouri in September, and in October, moved with the rest of Hardee's command across the river into KY, becoming Hardee's Division, Army of Central Kentucky. Col Cleburne was promoted to command the brigade, and was succeeded in command by LTC Archibald K. Patton. Other field officers were LTC Samuel S. Black, MAJ Charles H. Carlton, James T. Harris, MAJ John E. Josey, and Col Lucious E. Polk. After the regiment's paperwork was forwarded to Richmond, the Confederate Army headquarters realized that it had mustered in two 1st Arkansas regiments, and so changed the numbering of Cleburne's old regiment to the 15th Arkansas Volunteer Infantry effective December 31, 1861.

The 15th Arkansas saw its first combat at the Battle of Shiloh on April 6-7, 1862, where it suffered heavy casualties in driving back Sherman's division of Union troops. After regrouping at Corinth, the regiment participated with Cleburne's Brigade in the Confederate Army of Tennessee at the battle of Richmond and Perryville, KY in October 1862, at Stones River (Dec. 31, 1862-Jan. 3, 1863). Heavy casualties in this campaign caused the regiment's consolidation with the 13th Arkansas early in 1863, and shortly afterwards wit the 2nd Arkansas as well. Participated in the Tullahoma Campaign in June, 1863 and at Liberty Gap on June 24. Fought with Cleburne's Division at Chickamauga (Sept 19-20, 1863); the siege of Chattanooga (Sept- Nov 1863); and at Tunnel Hill in the Missionary Ridge battle on November 23-25, 1863. Served with Cleburne in the Atlanta Campaign at Ringgold, Dalton, Resaca, New Hope Church, and Kennesaw Mountain and Atlanta, and during the siege of Atlanta. Regiment and colors were captured at Jonesboro, GA on Sept. 1, 1864, and paroled approximately a month later. Participated as a part of Cleburne's Division at Spring Hill, TN, Franklin, and Nashville. Survivors were consolidated along with those of the 2nd, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 13th, 19th (Dawson's) and 24th Arkansas Infantry and the 3rd Confederate Regiment (formerly Marmaduke's 18th Arkansas Infantry) to form the 1st Infantry Regiment (Consolidated) at Smithfield, NC on April 9th, 1865. Surrendered two weeks later with LTG Joe Johnston's Army of Tennessee near Durham, North Carolina.

 

15th (Gee's-Johnson's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized at Camden, AR on January 2, 1862 with the following officers: Colonel James M. Gee, Lt. Col. John C. Wright, Major P. Lynch Lee, Adjutant Benjamin W. Johnson; Co. A, Cpt. Proctor; Co. B, Cpt. H. Purefoy; Co. C, Cpt. L.W. Matthews; Co. D, Cpt. Frank Jordan; Co. E, Cpt. Ferguson; Co. F, Cpt Alexander Byrne; Four of the companies were taken from the early regiment commanded by Col. Marsh Walker when he was promoted brigadier general. Before its completion as a regiment, six companies were sent to the defense of Fort Henry on the Tennessee River where they were part of the garrison when a fleet of gunboats and Grant's federal Army of the Tennessee attacked. Fort Henry being nearly flooded, the infantry regiments in the garrison (including the 15th Arkansas) were sent overland to reinforce neighboring Fort Donelson on the Cumberland River while the heavy artillery batteries fought it out with the gunboats to cover their movement. At the following assault by Grant and the gunboats on Fort Donelson, the 15th Arkansas was distinguished for their valor. They manned the heavy guns until these were burst or dismounted, and then led in a sortie in the snow and sleet against the Federal trenches which were in the course of construction in their front.They took the first line of works, suffering great loss - at least one fourth of the regiment. Cpt. Frank Jordan was among the slain, and Adjutant Ben W. Johnson among the wounded. The remaining men and officers were made prisoners in the "unconditional surrender". The enlisted men were sent to POW camps at Camp Butler; the officers to Fort Warren. Lt. Col. John C. Wright escaped, and returning to Arkansas, was appointed as a colonel of cavalry under General Hindman and later commanded a brigade in the Camden Expedition. The other officers were exchanged in the fall of 1862, and the regiment was reorganized at Jackson, MS on October 16, 1862 under Colonel Ben W. Johnson, Lt. Col. P.L. Lee, Maj. W.E. Steward, and Adjutant J.E. Baker. The captains on reorganization were Co. A, Cpt. John Stevenson; Co. B, Cpt. Joseph Daniels; Co. C, Cpt. James Franklin; Co. D, Cpt. John Hubbard; Co. E, Cpt. Ed Wilson; Co.F, Cpt. William Walker; Co. G, Cpt. Albert Reed; Co. H, Cpt. Wilkerson; Co. I, Cpt. L.W. Matthews; and Co. K, Cpt. McClung.

The regiment after reorganization was sent south to Louisiana to resist federal General Nathaniel Banks' operations, and fought in many minor engagements - Cross Landing, Greenfield, Plum's Store, and with the 1st Alabama and 13th Mississippi, engaged at Keller's Lane a largely superior force of Federals, whom they routed, taking many prisoners and valuable stores. The regiment was called into the fortifications of Port Hudson when this strongpoint was attacked by Banks and elements of the U.S. Navy. Captain Reed, of Co. G, was killed on May 29, 1863; Captain Hubbard, of Company D, was killed the same day. Within a day or two, Captain Stevenson died of wounds received. Captain E. Wilson died from concussion of the brain, caused by his being struck by a shell. The regiment, though not serving in the wider filed of conflict, contained some of the finest fighting material, proved its patience, and suffered and was exposed as much as any in the Confederate service. The 15th Arkansas went into the works at Port Hudson with 484 men; it emerged on the surrender of that place with only 92 survivors. Exchanged in the fall of 1863, the few survivors were consolidated with the 19th Arkansas Infantry in November 1863, and were further consolidated with the remnants of the 20th and Dawson's - Hardy's Consolidated Infantry Regiment late in September, 1864 to form the 3rd Consolidated Infantry Regiment, Trans-Mississippi Dept.

  

15th (Northwest) Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized in central Mississippi by renaming McRae's 21st Arkansas Infantry Regiment in February, 1863. Assigned to Green's Brigade, of Bowen's Division, where it fought in the battles of the Vicksburg campaign that spring and summer. The regiment was engaged at the battle s of Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, Champion Hill, and the Big Black River. Besieged with the garrison of Vicksburg from May 21 to July 4, 1863, and surrendered with that strongpoint on July 4, 1863. Paroled at Vicksburg late in July, 1863, and the unit disbanded with many of its survivors being incorporated along with those of the 14th, 16th, and 21st Arkansas into the 1st Infantry Regiment, Consolidated, in January, 1864.

Officers: Colonel James F. Hobbs. Field Officers: Lt. Col. (later Col.) Squire Boone, Major David A. Stuart, Lt. Col. (later Col.) William W. Reynolds.

  

16th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 16th Arkansas Infantry Regiment was organized at Rogers, Benton County, Arkansas on December 4, 1861. The companies (listed below) were mustered into Confederate service in October and November 1861. On 2 December 1861, the Regiment was encamped at Callahan's Store, Arkansas, and moved to Elm Springs, 8 December 1861. Before the Battle of Pea Ridge, the regiments' sick were sent off to Van Buren, Arkansas. During the maneuvering prior to Pea Ridge, 1 member of the 16th Arkansas was wounded. At Pea Ridge, the regiment lost 6 killed and mortally wounded, 5 wounded and 12 missing or captured. BG McCulloch was killed on the Leetown battlefield at Pea Ridge on March 7 while advancing with the 16th Arkansas. The regiment was reorganized at Corinth, Mississippi on 8 May 1862, with election of new field and line officers taking place in late June near Tupelo, Mississippi. The unit underwent field consolidation with the 14th, 17th, 18th and 23rd Arkansas Infantry Regiments and the 8th Arkansas Infantry Battalion in the winter of 1862-3. Field consolidation with the 15th (Gee's/Johnson's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment and the 8th Arkansas Infantry Battalion from 2 January 1863 until 2 May 1863. The regiment was surrendered by Major General Franklin Gardner at Port Hudson, Louisiana on 9 July 1863, and the men were paroled there later in the month, while the officers were conducted to New Orleans and Johnson's Island for imprisonment. A portion of the regiment were regrouped and consolidated into two companies prior to 30 September 1863. The two companies were consolidated with the 14th, 15th Northwest and the 21st Arkansas Infantry Regiments and designated as the 1st Arkansas Infantry Regiment Consolidated, Trans-Mississippi Department, in January 1864.

Many other survivors of the 16th Arkansas served in other regiments after their parole from Port Hudson, most notably in the 7th and 10th Arkansas Cavalry Regiments and the 27th, 35th and 36th Arkansas Infantry Regiments.

Company A: Captain: Lorenzo N. C. Swagerty. Men from Johnson County.
Company B: Captains: George Turner, J. W. Utley. Men from Johnson County.
Company C: Captains: John F. Hill, James W. Clark, John G. Connelly. Men from Johnson County. Armed with "miniť rifles."
Company D: Captains: John H. Williams, E.G. Mitchell. Men from Carroll County
Company E: Captain: William S. Poyner. Men from Carroll County. Armed with Hall's Breech-loading rifles.
Company F: Captains: David Goodnight, William C. Stephens. Men from Stone County.
Company G: Captain: J. P. Carnahan. Men from Washington County.
Company H: Captains: William J. Kelley, John B. Cloud, Grandison Preston. Men from Pike County. (This company was initially part of the 4th Arkansas Infantry Regiment.)
Company I: Captain: Daniel Boone. Men from Madison County.
Company K: Captain: John W. Lawrence, Jasper Woodruff. Men from Searcy County.

FIELD OFFICERS AND STAFF

John F. Hill Colonel
David Provence Colonel
William T. Neal Lieutenant Colonel
Benjamin T. Pixlee Lieutenant Colonel
Samuel Farmer Major
James M. Pittman Major
Lorenzo N. Swagerty: Major

Augustus M. Ward QM Captain
Francis Miller QM Captain
John S. Tutt Adjutant
John P. Mitchell Surgeon
Orlando Hobson Assistant Surgeon
S. N. Denham Assistant Surgeon

BATTLES, ENGAGEMENTS & CAMPAIGNS:

Pea Ridge, 7-8 Mar 1862, Corinth Campaign (Apr-Jun 1862); Farmington, 26 May 1862; Iuka 19 Sep 1862; Corinth, 3-4 October 1862; Port Hudson Siege (May-Jul 1863); 1st Port Hudson Assault, 27 May 1863; 2nd Port Hudson Assault, 14 Jun 1863;

UNIT NOTES

:- On 22 March 1862, the regiment was brigaded with 4 Missouri units.
:- The regiment drew new uniforms on 22 July 1862.
:- On 31 July 1862, the regiment arrived at a new camp at Saltillo, Mississippi
:- From 6-10 September, 1862, the regiment camped at 20 Mile Creek, Mississippi.
:- The 16th Arkansas arrived at Iuka, Mississippi on 14 September 1862.
:- Regiment at Waterfront, Mississippi on 22 October 1862. Another source lists the unit in camp at Lawrence Mills, Mississippi from 13-26 October 1862.
:- Regiment at Camp Priceville, Tupelo, Mississippi in the autumn of 1862.

:- In the Corinth Campaign, from 6-25 May 1862, the regiment suffered 3 wounded and 3 missing or captured.
:- At the battle of Farmington, 26 May, 1862, the 16th Arkansas lost 6 killed and mortally wounded, 4 wounded and 3 missing or captured.
:- 2 men of the 16th Arkansas were wounded and 1 captured at Iuka, 19 September 1862.
:- Regimental casualties at the battle of Corinth, 3-4 October 1862, were 13 killed and mortally wounded, 31 wounded, and 12 missing or captured.
:- In the 27 May 1863 Port Hudson assault, the 16th Arkansas suffered 1 killed and 5 wounded.

Casualty returns for Port Hudson are incomplete after 1 June 1863. The known battle losses of the regiment prior to that date are incorporated below.

Combat losses:
6 officers and 23 men killed and mortally wounded; 6 officers and 41 men wounded; 5 officers and 39 men missing or captured, prior to Port Hudson. 32 officers and 215 surrendered at Port Hudson for a total of 247 survivors.

Non-Combat deaths

2 officers and 59 enlisted men died of disease.
1 officer and 5 enlisted men died as prisoners-of-war

Total unit mortality

9 officers and 87 enlisted men: 96

PARTIAL FIELD RETURNS
4 December 1861: 42 officers and 661 enlisted men mustered into service.
Enlisted between December 1861 and May 1863: 8 officers and 137 enlisted men
Discharged during service: 16 officers and 120 enlisted men.
Resigned during service: 12 officers
Deserted during service: 1 officer and 61 enlisted men.
Present at Pea Ridge: 46 officers and 618 enlisted men.
Crossed Mississippi with regiment, April 1862: 44 officers and 527 enlisted men.
Present at Farmington: 40 officers and 479 enlisted men.
Present at Corinth: 47 officers and 400 enlisted men.
On 3 May 1863, the 16th Arkansas fielded 235 officers and men.
Captured at Port Hudson, 9 July 1863: 32 officers and 215 enlisted men.

 

17th (Lemoyne's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 17th Arkansas Infantry was organized with 9 companies on August 1, 1861 in Fairfield, Yell County, Arkansas under orders of the Arkansas Military Board. The field and staff officers were Col. George W. Lemoyne, Lt. Col. S.W. Williams, and Major Lawrence of Danville, and adjutant William A. Dowdle of Conway County. The company commanders were: Co. A, Cpt. J.M. Dowdle, Conway county; Co. B, Cpt Bryan A. King, Conway county; Co. C, Cpt. Harsell, Pope county; Co. D, Cpt. John Mills, Yell county, Co. E, Cpt. John Perry, Johnson county; Co. F, Cpt. Bone, Yell county; Co. G, Cpt. Bull, Prairie county; Co. H, Cpt. J. Homer Scott, Pope county; and Co. I, Cpt William Herrod, Yell County. Maj. Lawrence was accidentally killed near Pocahontas on the march into Missouri, and Cpt. J.M. Dowdle was promoted to major in his place, Jordan E. Cravens then being elected from the ranks to replace Cpt. Dowdle as A Co. commander. After serving a short time in the garrison of Fort Pillow, TN, the regiment was held to duty in the vicinity of Memphis and in the early summer of 1862 was assigned to Rust's Brigade, Jones' Division in the Army of the West where it participated with distinction in the Corinth campaign and the battle of Corinth.

Maj Robert H. Crockett became Colonel of the regiment by promotion, and Cpt. W.N. Parrish was promoted to Lt. Col. "for gallant conduct on the field." After the Battle of Corinth on October 3-4, 1862, the 17th and 21st (McCarver's) Arkansas were consolidated into a single unit. Cpt. Jordan Cravens of Co. A was elected colonel of the consolidated regiment, which was thereafter known as the 21st Arkansas, and assigned to duties in the Army of Mississippi, defending Vicksburg, MS. The 17th/21st Arkansas participated in the battle of the Big Black River on May 17, 1863, and thence served in the garrison of Vicksburg during the 47-day siege of that place. The regiment was surrendered with the Vicksburg garrison on July 4, 1863. Col. Cravens was captured at the Big Black River and, with the other officers, was sent as a prisoner to Johnson's Island for the duration of the war.

  

17th (Rector's-Griffith's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment

This regiment was raised at Fort Smith, Arkansas on November 17, 1861 under the command of Col. Frank Rector and Lt. Col. John Griffith, and saw its first combat action in the Battle of Pea Ridge on March 7-8, 1862 as part of Hebert's Brigade, McCulloch's Division on the Leetown side of that battlefield. After Pea Ridge, the regiment was transferred to Little's Brigade, Price's Division, and moved with that division to Corinth, Mississippi in April, 1862. Companies A, B, C, and G were left west of the Mississippi River during this move, and were incorporated into the 35th Arkansas Infantry in July, 1862. The regiment was reorganized at Tupelo, MS with the election of Col. John Griffith as regimental commander, and Lt. Col. Dodson and Maj. B.F. Jett. The latter brought to the regiment a company from Hempstead County, in southwestern Arkansas. The company commanders were: Co. A, Cpt. Cliff Thompson; Co. B, Cpt. Van Hoose; Co. C, Cpt E.D. Jett; Co. D, Cpt David Arbuckle; Co. E, Cpt. Ed Adams. The regiment participated in the Corinth campaign in April through June of 1862, and fought in the battles of Iuka (Sept. 19, 1862) and Corinth (Oct. 3-4, 1862). Following the Confederate defeat at Corinth, the regiment was consolidated into a brigade with the 14th, 16th, 18th, and 23rd Arkansas under General Craven; with the survivors of the 17th and 11th Arkansas regiments being consolidated into a single regiment in January, 1863, under the command of Col. Griffith. The regiment was then assigned to the defenses of Port Hudson, Louisiana, where it endured the 48-day-long siege of that position and was surrendered with the rest of the Port Hudson garrison on July 9, 1863. After the surrender, the surviving enlisted men were paroled while the officers were sent north to prison camps at Johnson's Island, thence on to Fort Delaware and Point Lookout, Maryland, where they were imprisoned until the summer of 1865.

  

18th (Carroll's-Daly's-Crockett's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 18th Arkansas Infantry was organized at DeValls Bluff, AR on the White River, by the election of Colonel D.W. Carroll, of Pine Bluff, Lt. Col. John L. Daly, of Camden, and Major Robert H. Crockett of DeWitt. The company commanders were Co.A, Cpt. Thompson; Co. B, Cpt. (Rev.) R.B. Thrasher; Co. C, Cpt. James Peel; Co. D, Cpt. Robertson; Co. E, Cpt. Barnett; Co. G, Cpt. Charles Lynch; Co. H, Cpt. W.N. Parrish; Co. I, Cpt. Samuel Southerland; Co. K, Cpt. D.W. Carroll, succeeded by Cpt. W.F. Owen upon the former's election to regimental command. The regiment numbered 1,000 men when it was mustered and ordered to Fort Pillow, TN, but was decimated at that station by disease. On the evacuation of Fort Pillow, the regiment was ordered to Corinth, MS, where it continued to suffer from sickness, as did the entire army, due to the frequent rain and unwholesome water from pits dug about the camp. Colonel Carroll was compelled to relinquish his position because of ill health, whereupon Lt.Col. J.L. Daly succeeded to command of the regiment. The regiment took part in the battles of Iuka, MS (Sept 19, 1862) and Corinth (Oct. 3-4, 1862), suffering heavy losses. Its colonel was killed at Corinth, and many men and most of the officers were killed or wounded. After Colonel Daly received his death wound, Captain Parrish of Company H led the regiment through the rest of the battle with such courage and ability that he was promoted lieutenant Colonel of the regiment "for gallantry on the field of battle." Major R.H. Crockett became colonel of the regiment by order of seniority, and thenceforth led the regiment. The 18th Arkansas was ordered to Port Hudson, Louisiana in December, 1862, and served in the garrison and defense of that place through the 48-day siege, surrendering with the post on July 9, 1863. The officers were imprisoned on Johnson's Island for the duration of the war, while the enlisted men were paroled as prisoners of war until exchanged later that month. As the officer prisoners were being transported up the Mississippi River, Lieutenants James Hellums and Dink Atkins of Company K leaped from the steamer into the Mississippi between Napoleon and Helena, and made their escape by swimming ashore. The enlisted men were reorganized back in Arkansas in the spring of 1864 as mounted rifle troops, and participated in the Confederate operations by General Price's division against Steele's Camden expedition, and in the battle of Marks' Mill in April, 1864. The regiment surrendered in the Trans-Mississippi Department with General Kirby Smith on May 26, 1865.

  

18th (Marmaduke's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized in December, 1861 by adding two companies to the 1st Arkansas Infantry Battalion, bringing it to regimental strength. Assigned to Hindman's Brigade, Hardee's Division in the Army of Central Kentucky from December 1861 through January 1862; renamed as the 3rd Confederate Infantry Regiment on January 31, 1862.

Officers: Col John Sappington Marmaduke; Field Officer: Lt. Col. James B. Johnson

Also Known As: 3rd Confederate Infantry Regiment

  

19th (Dawson's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment

A second 19th Arkansas Infantry Regiment was organized for one year's service at Nashville, Arkansas in August, 1861. electing as its officers Colonel Charles L. Dawson, Lt. Col. P.R. Smith, and Major Joseph Anderson. The company commanders were: Co. A, Cpt. Castleman; Co. B, Cpt,. Gabe Stewart; Co. C, Cpt. Spars; Co. D, Cpt. J.H. Carter; Co.E, Cpt. Nathan Eldridge; Co. F, Cpt. D.H. Hamiter; Co. G, Cpt. D.C. Cowling; Co. H, Cpt. Featherston, Co, I, Cpt. B.H. Kinsworthy; and Co. K, Cpt. Herndon. In company with the 20th Arkansas, the 19th reported to General Ben McCulloch's division at Strickler's Station, AR in the first week of March, 1862 -- immediately before the Army of the West marched to attack the federal forces gathered around Elkhorn Tavern and Pea Ridge. Not having been issued weapons yet, the two regiments were left in the rear of the army and served mainly at Pea Ridge in guarding the army's trains. After the Confederate defeat at Pea Ridge, the 19th Arkansas served along the Arkansas border with the Indian Territory from April to August 12, 1862, when it re-enlisted and reorganized and was subsequently assigned to join Dunnigton's Brigade in General Tom Churchill's command at Arkansas Post. Arkansas Post was attacked by an overwhelming federal force on January 4-11, 1863. More than half of the regiment was captured with the surrender of the garrision of Fort Hindman at Arkansas Post, several companies managed to escape and evade surrender. The uncaptured companies were consolidated with Crawford's Infantry Battalion and the 24th Arkansas Infantry, and the consolidated unit renamed as "Dawson's-Hardy's Infantry Regiment (Consolidated) in the spring of 1863.

The captured companies of the regiment was exchanged at City Point, Virginia in May 1863, and were assigned to the Confederate Army of Tennessee where they were consolidated with the remnants of the 8th Arkansas Infantry in Liddell's Brigade, Cleburne's Division. Because of misconceptions about the surrender of Arkansas Post, few of the Confederate division commanders would accept the soldiers of the 19th; however Pat Cleburne welcomed them warmly and gave them ample opportunity to prove their worth at Chickamauga. After Chickamauga, the 8-19th Arkansas participated in all the remaining battles of Cleburne's Division and the Army of Tennesee: the siege of Chattanooga, Ringgold Gap, Dalton, Resaca, New Hope Church, Pickett's Mill, Kennesaw Mountain; Peachtree Creek; Atlanta and its ensuing siege, Jonesboro, Spring Hill (TN), Franklin, Nashville, the Carolinas Campaign, and the Army's last effort at Bentonville, North Carolina in March, 1865. The survivors were consolidated with those of the 1st, 2nd, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 13th, 15th, and 24th Arkansas regiments and the 3rd Confederate Regiment at the last reorganization of the Army of Tennessee at Smithfield, NC on April 9, 1865, and redesignated as the 1st Arkansas Infantry Regiment, Consolidated. Surrendered two weeks later, on April 26, 1865, with General Joe Johnston's Army of Tennessee at Greensboro, North Carolina.

  

19th (Smead's-Dockery's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 19th Arkansas Infantry was organized at DeVall's Bluff, Arkansas, on April 3, 1861 with the following officers: Colonel H.P. Smead of Columbia county; Lt. Col. Ben Hale, of Hot Springs; Maj. D.L. Kilgore of Magnolia; Quartermaster Thomas P. Dockery; Commissary H. Bussy. The captains were: Co. A, J.G. Johnson of Lewisville; Co. B, H.G.P. Williams of Hillsboro; Co. C, B.R. Mathews of El Dorado; Co. D. John Cook of Falcon; Co. E, P. Dismukes of Columbia county; Co. F, J.I. Kendrick of Columbia county; Co. G, William C. Langford of El Dorado; Co. H, James Henry of Hot Springs county. Under an act of Congress, the regiment was reorganized by electing Tom Dockery as Colonel, W.H. Dismukes as Lt. Col., and H.G.P. Williams as major. From Memphis, TN the regiment was ordered to Fort Pillow. On April 12, 1862, the Federal fleet which had caused the evacuation of Island No. 10 proceeded 80 miles downriver to Fort Pillow and began a vigorous bombardment of that strongpoint and of Randolph, about 12 miles below on the Tennessee bluffs. Both places were rendered untenable, and the Confederates there were withdrawn and sent to Corinth, Mississippi. They took part in the battles of Iuka and Corinth as a part of Cabell's Brigade, under General Sterling Prices's Corps, where the 19th Arkansas bore themselves with greatest gallantry. The 19th earned for its colonel, Tom Dockery of Lamartine, promotion to brigadier general and a brigade command. Colonel Dockery seemed designed for a soldier. Nothng excited him. His apparent indifferences to danger was such in fact that at times it rendered him negligent of necessary precautions. It was this defect, really, that prevented his further promotion.

Upon the promotion of Colonel Dockery, Lieutenat Colonel Dismukes became colonel of the regiment. The 19th Arkansas was assigned to Green's Brigade in January, 1863, with which it particpated in the defenses of Vicksburg, MS. The regiment fought hard throughout the battles of the Vicksburg campaign in the summer of 1863, engaged at Port Gibson, Champion Hill, the Big Black River bridge, and was besieged with the remainder of Pemberton's Army in Vicksburg ... finally surrendering with the garrision of that strongpoint on July 4, 1863.

The soldiers of the regiment were paroled at Vicksburg later that month, and many of the survivors made their way back to Arkansas, where they re-formed the regiment as a mounted rifles unit under their old commander BG Dockery's new brigade in Fagan's Cavalry Division. Here, they participated in the Confederate counterattacks against the federal Camden Expedition in March though May of 1864, and served ably at the battle of Marks' Mill on April 25, 1864. No records for the regiment exist after the summer of 1864, but it is believed the survivors were consolidated into the 3rd Infantry Regiment, Consolidated, of the Trans-Mississippi Dept. that summer, eventually surrendering with General Kirby Smith on May 26, 1865.

  

20th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 20th Arkansas was initially organized as the 22nd Arkansas Infantry in February, 1862 under the command of Colonel Henry P. Johnson. The regiment was recruited from the following counties: Co. A, Old Washington; Co. B, Old Washington, Co. C, Hempstead county; Co. D, Little Rock; Co. E, Lafayette county; Co. F, Little Rock and Perryville; Co. G, Little Rock and Perryville; Co. H, Little Rock and DeValls Bluff; Co. I, Little Rock; and Co. K, Lafayette county.

As the 22nd, the regiment participated in the battles of Pea Ridge, Fort Pillow (April, 1862) and in the Corinth campaign in northern Mississippi. (April-June 1862). They were renamed as the 20th Arkansas on May 13, 1862 at Corinth.

The 20th fought at Corinth (Oct 3-4, 1862), and in the battles of the Vicksburg campaign in the spring and early summer of 1863 (Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, Champion Hill, the Big Black River, and finally in the siege of Vicksburg, where they were surrendered on July 4, 1863. The survivors of Vicksburg returned home to Arkansas after being paroled and exchanged late in 1863, and were converted to mounted troops around April, 1864. . They fought in the Camden campaign and at Mark's Mill in the spring of 1864, were consolidated with the 15th and Dawson's-Hardy's Consolidated Infantry Regiments on November 29, 1864, and renamed as the 3rd Infantry Regiment, Consolidated, Trans-Mississippi Department. The regiment ended out the war in southwestern Arkansas, surrendering with Gen. Kirby Smith on May 26, 1865.

Officers: Col. Henry P. Johnson; Field Officers: Lt. Col. (later Col.) James H. Fletcher; Maj. William S. Haven; Maj (later Col.) Daniel W. Jones; Lt. Col. W.R. Kelley; Maj. J.W. Long; Lt. Col. H.G. Robertson

  

21st Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 21st Arkansas Infantry Regiment was organized at Corinth, Mississippi on May 14, 1862 by consolidating the remnants of McCarver's 14th Arkansas Infantry and Lemoyne's 17th Arkansas, and giving the consolidated regiment a new number. Field officers were Colonel Jordan E. Cravens, Lt. Col. William G. Matheny, and Majors William M. Dowdle and Harrison Moore. Their initial assignment was to BG Albert Rust's Brigade in Van Dorn's Army of the West, where they participated in the initial defenses of Corinth and were assigned to Cabell's Brigade for the remanider of the Corinth campaign in the spring and summer of 1862 and in the Battle of Corinth on October 3-4, 1862. After Corinth, the regiment served briefly in Craven's Brigade in eastern Louisiana near Port Hudson. Assigned to Green's Brigade in January 1863, the 21st Arkansas joined the defenses of the approaches to Vicksburg, and joined the garrison fortifying Grand Gulf on the Mississippi River below Vicksburg. On April 29, 1863, Admiral David Porter's fleet of gunboats bombarded Grand Gulf in an attempt to clear the position in preparation for Grant's amphibious crossing of the Mississippi. Repulsed by the strong position and batteries at Grand Gulf, Grant moved further downstream to cross at Bruinsburg, flanking the Grand Gulf garrison out of their position. Marching to block the Union advance, Green's Brigade and the 21st Arkansas joined Confederate forces at the battles of Port Gibson on May 1, at Champion Hill and the Big Black River bridge on May 16 and 17, respectively, and was besieged at Vicksburg from May 19 until July 4, 1863. Surrendered with the Vicksburg garrison, the survivors of the regiment were paroled there later that month. The 21st Arkansas was not reformed after the Vicksburg surrender, however many of its survivors made their way back to Arkansas where they were formed, with survivors of Mitchell's-Power's 14th Arkansas, the 15th Northwest, and the 16th Arkansas to form the 1st Trans-Mississippi Infantry Regiment (Consolidated) in January, 1864.

  

21st (McRae's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized initially in July, 1861 with eight companies as the 3rd Arkansas Infantry Battalion and increasing this unit to regimental strength on December 3, 1861. Commanded by Colonel Dandridge McRae of Searcy; field officers were Lt. Col. Squire Boone, Lt. Col. (later Colonel) James H. Hobbs, and Major William Thompson. Company commanders were Co. A, Cpt. Morris Hobbs, Co. B, Cpt. J.B. Cooper of of Benton County; Co. C, Cpt. S.B. Buchanan of Washington County; Co. D, Cpt. Caleb Davis of Pope County; Co. E, Cpt. Hallowell of Yell County; Co. F, Cpt. Knott of Franklin County; Co. G, Cpt Douglas of Benton County. The regiment was initially assigned to Gen. Ben McCulloch's division near Fayetteville in December 1861, and subsequently to Hebert's Brigade, where it fought at Wilson's Creek and in the battle of Pea Ridge on March 7-8, 1862. Moved with the Army of the West to Corinth, Mississippi in April, 1862, participating in the Corinth campaign in April through June of that year, and fought at Farmington, Iuka, and Corinth. Reorganized on May 8, 1862. Reorganized and renamed as the 15th Northwest Arkansas Regiment (Hobb's-Boone's) in February, 1863

Assigned to Green's Brigade, of Bowen's Division, where it fought in the battles of the Vicksburg campaign that spring and summer. The regiment was engaged at the battle's of Grand Gulf, Port Gibson, Champion Hill, and the Big Black River. Besieged with the garrison of Vicksburg from May 21 to July 4, 1863, and surrendered with that strongpoint on July 4, 1863. Paroled at Vicksburg late in July, 1863, and the unit disbanded with many of its survivors being incorporated along with those of the 14th, 16th, and 21st Arkansas into the 1st Infantry Regiment, Consolidated, in January, 1864. The new regiment was placed into a new brigade under Colonel (now Brigadier General ) McRae, where it served throughout the Red River Campaign.

Also Known As: 15th (Northwest) Arkansas Infantry; Hobb's-Boone's Infantry Regiment

  

22nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized in February, 1862 under the command of Colonel George W. King and field officers Lt. Col. Alf Carrigan and Major James H. Fletcher. Served in an unattached status with Van Dorn's Army of the West at the battle of Pea Ridge on March 7-8, 1862. Subsequently assigned to the garrison of Fort Pillow, TN from April through June, 1862. Moved to Corinth, Mississippi and assigned to Rust's Brigade in the Army of the West in April, serving in the Corinth campaign. Renamed as the 20th Arkansas Infantry on May 13, 1862.

  

23rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized near Corinth, Mississippi on April 25, 1862 by the consolidation of Adams' and Hughes' Infantry Battalions and Adair's Infantry Company. The individual companies and battalions were reorganized on May 27, 1862, but the regiment itself was not organized until September 10, 1862. Field officers were Colonel Charles W. Adams of Helena, Lt. Col. Simon P. Hughes of Clarendon, and Major J.S. Robinson of Chicot county. Company commanders were Co. A, Cpt. A.A. Adair of Craighead county; Co. B, Cpt. E. McAllister of Crittenden county; Co. C, Cpt. Henry Hillis of Craighead county; Co. D, Cpt. John Clendenin of Phillips county; Co. E, Cpt. W.W. Smith of Monroe county; Co. G, Cpt. Thomas Westmoreland of Poinsett county; Co. H, Cpt. J.H. Robinson of Chicot county; Co. I, Cpt. Seward of St. Francis county, and Co. K, Cpt. Brown Dolson, of Cross county. The regiment was reorganized after the batle of Shiloh, and the following field officers elected: Colonel Oliver P. Lyles of Crittenden county, Lt. Col. A.A. Pennington of Clark county, Major Erastus L. Black of Monroe county, Adjutant C.W. Lewis of Crittenden, Quartermaster McMurray, of Chicot, Commissary Norton, of Phillips county.

The 23rd Arkansas was heavily engaged in the battles of Iuka and Corinth. It was then united in a brigade withthe 15th, 16th, and 18th Arkansas and Colonel Batt. Jones' battalion and was sent to the defense of Port Hudson, LA under Colonel Lyles, going through the long siege of that strongpoint. The regiment was surrendered with the garrison of Port Hudson on July 9, 1863, and was paroled later that month and eventually exchanged. After exchange, the survivors returned to Arkansas where they were reorganized as mounted troops in Fagan's Cavalry Division in August, 1864. The regiment participated in Price's Missouri Raid in September and October of 1864, then served in northeast Arkansas for the remainder of the war. The regiment surrendered at Jacksonport, Arkanas with Brigadier General M. Jeff Thompson's troops on May 11, 1865.

  

24th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized on June 6, 1862 under the command of Colonel Edward E. Portlock, Jr., and field officers Lt. Col. Thomas M. Whittington and Majors William R. Hardy and Francis H. Wood. The regiment was recruited from the following counties: Co. A, Sevier county; Co. B, Camden and Palestine; Co. C, Halcon; Co. D, Warren; Co. E, Monticello and Drew county; Co. F, Washington; Co. G, Calhoun and Ouachita counties; Co. H, Dallas county; Co. I, Clark and Yell counties, and Co. K, Pike and Polk counties.

Assigned to the garrison of Arkansas Post in early December 1862. Most of the regiment was captured when that post was attacked by Union forces under Generals Sherman and McClernand on January 11, 1863. The elements not captured at Arkansas Post were subsequently consolidated with Crawford's Infantry Battalion and the 19th (Dawson's) Infantry Regiment and the combined unit redesignated as "Dawson's-Hardy's Infantry Regiment (Consolidated) in early 1863.

The remainder of the regiment was paroled and declared exchanged at City Point, Virginia on May 12, 1863 and were assigned to the Confederate Army of Tennessee where they were consolidated with the remnants of the 2nd Arkansas Infantry in Liddell's Brigade, Cleburne's Division. Because of misconceptions about the surrender of Arkansas Post, few of the Confederate division commanders would accept the soldiers of the 24th; however Pat Cleburne welcomed them warmly and gave them ample opportunity to prove their worth at Chickamauga. After Chickamauga, the 2-24th Arkansas participated in all the remaining battles of Cleburne's Division and the Army of Tennesee: the siege of Chattanooga, Ringgold Gap, Dalton, Resaca, New Hope Church, Pickett's Mill, Kennesaw Mountain; Peachtree Creek; Atlanta and its ensuing siege, Jonesboro, Spring Hill (TN), Franklin, Nashville, the Carolinas Campaign, and the Army's last effort at Bentonville, North Carolina in March, 1865. The survivors were consolidated with those of the 1st, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 13th, and 15th Arkansas regiments and the 3rd Confederate Regiment at the last reorganization of the Army of Tennessee at Smithfield, NC on April 9, 1865, and redesignated as the 1st Arkansas Infantry Regiment, Consolidated. Surrendered two weeks later, on April 26, 1865, with General Joe Johnston's Army of Tennessee at Greensboro, North Carolina.

  

25th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 25th Arkansas Infantry was organized in August, 1861 as the 30th Arkansas by the election of Colonel Charles J. Turnbull, of Little Rock, Lt. Col. Henry Remington (who resigned and was replaced by Lt. Col. Eli Hufstedler), and Major James J. Franklin. The company commanders were Co. A, of Pocahontas, Cpt Eli Hufstedler; Co. B, of Saline County, Cpt. James W. Adams; Co. C, of Jacksonport and Hickory Plain, Cpt. John Thomas; Co. D, of Pocahontas, Cpt S.T.Black, killed at Murfreesboro; Co. F, of Little Rock, Cpt. J.J. Franklin, elected major at the regimental organization and subsequently lieutenant colonel, succeeded by Cpt. L.L. Noles, promoted major, 1LT John O'Brien then becoming captain; Co. G, of Pocahontas, Cpt. Stephen Smith; Co. H, Cpt. W.A. Cotter; Co. I, of Jacksonport, Cpt J.G. Adams; Co. K, of St. Charles, Cpt. John A. Wakefield. Major Franklin was wounded at Murfreesboro, and Captain Noles, of Company E became major. He was killed at Kennesaw Mountain, and was succeeded by Captain Cotter, of Company H. Captain S.T. Black, of Company D, was killed at Murfreesboro. After the battle of Murfreesboro, the regiment was renamed as the 25th Arkansas Infantry.

Initially assigned to Van Dorn's Army of the West camped around Van Buren, the 30th/25th Arkansas moved to Corinth, MS with that army in April and May of 1862. At that point it was reassigned to McNair's Brigade, McCown's Division, serving in the battles of Richmond, KY, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Jackson, MS, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Dug Gap, Resaca, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Moore's Hill, Peachtree Creek, Atlanta and the siege thereof, Jonesboro, Lovejoy's Station, Moon's Station, Spring Hill, Franklin, Nashville, Sugar Creek, the Carolinas campaign, Avarasboro, and Bentonville, NC.

Also Known As: 30th (Turnbull's) Arkansas Infantry Regiment (until January, 1863)

  

26th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized at Camp White Sulphur Springs near Pine Bluff from nine companies of "Morgan’s Battalion" between April and July of 1862 as the "3rd Trans-Mississippi Infantry Regiment", a tenth company was added to fill out to regimental strength and the unit renamed as the 26th Arkansas Infantry Regiment on its transfer to Confederate service on July 23, 1862 under the command of Colonel Asa S. Morgan.

Colonel Morgan was a veteran officer who had raised and commanded Company A of Fagan's 1st Arkansas Infantry Regiment in 1861, and when the 1st Arkansas was reorganized and consolidated with the 15th Arkansas after the battle of Shiloh, Morgan returned to Arkansas to raise another company of infantry at El Dorado, and Morgan was appointed by Maj. Gen. T.C. Hindman to command the new battalion and ultimately the regiment to which his company was assigned at Camp White Sulphur Springs.

In addition to Colonel Morgan, the original Field Officers were Lt. Col. Fountain P. Yell and Major A.S. Greenwood. Company commanders were: Co. A, from Monticello and Drew county; Cpt. Iverson L. Brooks; Co. B, from Monticello, Capt. Samuel Gibson; Co. C, from Pine Bluff, Cpt. W.S. Otey; Co. D, from Bradley, Jefferson, and Pulaski counties, Cpt. A.H. Halliday; Co. E, from Selma in Drew county, Cpt J.R. Stanley; Co. F, from Tulip in Dallas county, Cpt Jesse Bland; Co. G, from Lewisville and Little Rock Cpt. J.S. Brooks; Co. H, from Brownsville, Cpt. J.W. May; Co. I, from DeWitt and Dardanelle; Cpt. J.R. Maxwell; and Co. K, from Pine Bluff, Cpt. W.A. Bull.

The regiment trained for a time at Camp Pike (near present-day Camp Robinson, near North Little Rock) and spent some time at Fort Hindman, the artillery position built at Arkansas Post to protect the south end of the Arkansas River. They then marched north to Van Buren, where they were assigned (along with the 28th, 30th, and 32nd Arkansas) to form a brigade under Colonel Dandridge McRae in Shoup's Division in MG Thomas Hindman's 1st Corps of the Army of the Trans-Mississippi. McRae’s Brigade fought in the battle of Prairie Grove on December 7-8, 1862. Regimental strength of the 26th Arkansas at Prairie Grove was 412 rifles.

Following the Battle of Prairie Grove, the 26th Arkansas was assigned to garrison Fort Smith along with a company from Monroe's 1st Arkansas Cavalry and Lane's company of Texas partisan rangers. In addition to garrisoning this frontier post, their responsibilities including providing security and support for the post hospital, containing approximately 1,500 wounded and sick from the Prairie Grove campaign, who were described as being in "wretched condition". During this time the regiment was allowed to hold re-election of officers under the Confederate Conscription Act of 1862, and Colonel Morgan withdrew his name from consideration for reelection. Lt. Col. Fountain Pitts Yell was then elected as colonel, with Iverson L. Brooks as the lieutenant colonel and Captain Sam Gibson as major. (Colonel Morgan requested and was reassigned to the Department staff as inspector of field transportation, in which post he served until the end of the war.) The 26th remained at Fort Smith through about September, 1863, when the Confederate forces under General Cabell were forced to evacuate the area following their defeat at Devil's Backbone.

Following the evacuation of Fort Smith, the 26th was reassigned to its old brigade, now under the command of Lucian Gause and composed of the 26th, 32nd, and 36th Arkansas regiments. Gause's Brigade spent the winter of 1863 camped southwest of Little Rock. Morale was sinking, not only because of the loss of Little Rock, but because many of the 26th’s soldiers’ families were destitute and starving. Many soldiers were granted furlough, or simply took "French leave" to go the short distance home to provide for their families that summer and fall, subject to recall for the upcoming campaign. Upon the launch of the Federal’s campaign up the Red River, seizing Alexandria, Louisiana and moving on Natchitoches and Shreveport, General Churchill's Arkansas Infantry Division and Gause’s Brigade was sent south to Shreveport, Louisiana in early March, 1864 to assist General Kirby Smith's army in countering Union General Nathaniel Banks' advance along the Red River. En route to Louisiana, the regiment was engaged in skirmishes with Union Colonel Powell Clayton’s cavalry at Mount Elba and Longview, Arkansas, on March 30 where Clayton managed to route the Confederate brigade under General Tom Dockery, and capture his trains at Longview. Churchill’s brigade reached Keatchie, Louisiana in time to support Richard Taylor’s main force who routed Banks’ army in the battle of Mansfield (Sabine Crossroads) on April 8, 1864. The next day, the Confederate forces united to attack the Union rear guard at Pleasant Hill on the afternoon of April 9. The Confederates had endured a long forced march from south central Arkansas to Mansfield, and another of ten hours to Pleasant Hill that day with only two hours’ rest. The Union troops held a formidable position, and although the Arkansans and Missourians fought valiantly, they were repulsed and retreated six miles to the nearest water. Lt. Col. Yell was killed in the 26th’s charge on the Union works at Pleasant Hill, and Lt. Col. Brooks succeeded to command of the regiment. After the battle of Pleasant Hill, Churchill's Division slung their knapsacks for a hasty return with General Kirby Smith back to Arkansas to assist General Price in dealing with the other half of the Red River campaign, Union General Frederick Steele's Camden Expedition moving southwest from Little Rock. The Division and Gause’s Brigade arrived just in time to join the pursuit of Steele's army as it retreated from Camden, and join in the attack on Steele as he tried to cross the Saline River at Jenkins' Ferry on April 30, 1864. After an all-night march through a rainstorm and ankle-deep mud, Gause’s Brigade fell upon the federal rear guard and drove them for more than a mile, until the brigade on their flank began to give way. Reinforced by Tappan’s Brigade, and personally led by General Churchill, the Confederate line rallied and drove the federals from the field.

Gause's Brigade and the 26th Arkansas returned to the vicinity of Camden following Jenkins' Ferry, and saw no substantial combat for the remainder of the war. Transferred to BG J. S. Roane's Brigade, Churchill's Arkansas Division, in September, 1864. The regiment ultimately surrendered with Kirby Smith's army on May 26, 1865.

Officers: Col. Asa S. Morgan. Field Officers: Lt. Col. (later Col.) Iverson Lea Brooks; Major Samuel Gibson; Maj. (later Lt. Col.) James P. Stanley; Lt. Col. John C. Wright; Maj. (later Lt. Col. and Col.) Fountain P. Yell; Maj. A.S. Greenwood

Also Known As: Arkansas 3rd Trans-Mississippi Infantry Regiment; Morgan's Arkansas Infantry Battalion; Morgan's Arkansas Infantry Regiment.

  

27th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 27th Arkansas Infantry was organized in July, 1862 under the command of Colonel James R. Shaler, with field officers Lt. Col. Arthur J. Magenis, Lt. Col. James M. Riggs, and Major (later Colonel) Beal Gaither, and sworn into Confederate service for the duration of the war. The regiment was recruited from the following counties: Co. A, Yellville and Izard county; Co. B, Carroll county; Co. C; Bellefonte and Searcy county; Co. D, Richland; Co. E, Marion county; Co. F, Locust Grove and Jasper; Co. G, Mount Olive; Co. H, Izard county; Co. I, Independence county; and Co. K,, from Yellville.

They were initially assigned to Shaver's Brigade of Hindman's Division in northwest Arkansas in January and February of 1863, then to Tappan's Brigade, in Gen'l Sterling Price's Division, from April to November of 1863. They remained with Tappan's Brigade through the remainder of the war.

In the first weeks of September, 1863, the 27th served in the Little Rock defenses at present-day North Little Rock. After General Price abandoned Little Rock, the 27th retreated down the Southwest Trail to Benton and on to the vicinity of Arkadelphia, while they spent the winter of 1863.

General Kirby Smith ordered Churchill's Arkansas Division which had most of his infantry (including Tappan's and Gause's brigades) to Shreveport, Louisiana in late March, 1864 to counter the advance of Union General Nathaniel Banks up the Red River.

The 27th served through most of the Red River Campaign during March-May 1864, including the final battle in the southern phase of this campaign at Pleasant Hill. They then slung their knapsacks and went back north into Arkansas in time to fight at Jenkins' Ferry on April 30, 1864. The regiment saw little additional combat during the rest of the war, and eventually surrendered with General Kirby Smith on May 26, 1865.

 

30th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized on June 18, 1862, Assigned to McRae's Brigade, Hindman's Division, January through February of 1863. Reassigned to Tappan's Brigade under MG Sterling Price in April, 1863 where the regiment fought in the Battle of Helena and in the defense of Little Rock on September 10, 1863. Retreated with Price into southwestern Arkansas, where the regiment was consolidated with the 32nd Arkansas Infantry in December, 1863. Fought throughout the Camden Campaign and at Jenkins' Ferry on April 30, 1864. Consolidated again with Dawson's Infantry Regiment in April, 1864. Remained in service in southwestern Arkansas until surrendered with MG Kirby Smith's army on May 26, 1865.

Officers: Col. Archibald J. McNeill. Field Officers: Lt. Col. Casten W. Baldwin; Maj. (later Lt. Col.) Paul M. Cobbs; Maj. Martin Dawson; Lt. Col (later Col.) Robert A. Hart; Maj. Joseph C. Martin; Maj. (later Lt. Col and Col.) James W. Rogan.

Also Known As: 39th Arkansas Infantry Regiment, 5th Trans-Mississippi Infantry Regiment

  

31st Arkansas Infantry Regiment

The 31st Arkansas Infantry was organized near Corinth, Mississippi on May 27, 1862 by consolidating Company G of Williamson's Infantry battalion to the nine companies of McCray's Infantry Battalion and renaming the consolidated unit as the 31st Arkansas. Commanded by Colonel Thomas H. McCray, the field officers included Lt. Cols. Jesse L. Hays, John A. Jacoway, and James F. Johnson, and Majors J.W. Clark, Davis G. Daugherty, and James M. Morgan.

Initially assigned to NcNair's Brigade, McCown's Division in the Army of Kentucky, the regiment served with Edmund Kirby Smith's corps during Bragg's 1862 Kentucky campaign in August through November 1862, then joined what became Bragg's Army of Tennessee and fought in the battle of Murfreesboro on December 31, 1862 -January 2, 1863. Heavy casualties suffered at Murfreesboro caused the regiment to be temporarily consolidated with the 25th Arkansas Infantry in March, 1863. Following this, McNair's Brigade was reassigned to Walker's (later French's) Division where it served under Joe Johnston defending Jackson, MS from Grant and Shermans' approaches during the Vicksburg Campaign. The Brigade rejoined the Army of Tennessee near Tullahoma, TN in September, 1863, where it fought at the battle of Chickamauga on September 19-20, 1863, and in the siege of Chattanooga in October and November, 1863. Heavy casualties again led to the regiment being consolidated with the 4th Arkansas Infantry and the 4th Arkanas Infantry Battalion after Chickamauga. The regiment was again consolidated with the 25th Arkansas during the retreat from Chattanooga into northern Georgia in January, 1864, and the 31st Arkansas disappeared from the records after January 20, 1864.

 

32nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized on August 6, 1862 by augmenting LTC Charles Matlock's Cavalry Battalion to form a full-sized regiment, enlisted for three years or the duration of the war. Assigned to Col. Dandridge McRae's brigade in January, 1863. Participated in the Battle of Helena on July 4, 1863, and in the defense of Little Rock in September, 1863. Consolidated with the 30th (McNeill's) Arkansas Infantry from December, 1863 until summer of 1864. Reassigned to Tappan's Brigade, Arkansas Division, where the regiment fought through the Red River Campaign of March and April, 1864, and at the Battle of Jenkins' Ferry on April 30, 1864. Continued service in southwestern Arkansas for the remainder of the war, until surrendered with MG Kirby Smith's army on May 26, 1865.

Officers: Col. Charles H. Matlock Field Officers: Maj (later Col.) Lucian C. Gause, Lt. Col. William Hicks, Maj. Arthur F. Stephenson, Maj. (later Lt. Col.) Charles L. Young.

Also Known As: 4th Trans-Mississippi Infantry Regiment

  

33rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized on July 11, 1862, Assigned to Shaver's Brigade, Hindman's Division, January through February of 1863. Reassigned to Tappan's Brigade, in Gen'l Sterling Price's Division, from April to November of 1863. They remained with Tappan's Brigade through the remainder of the war.

In the first weeks of September, 1863, the 33rd served in the Little Rock defenses at present-day North Little Rock. After General Price abandoned Little Rock, the 33rd joined the retreat down the Southwest Trail to Benton and on to the vicinity of Arkadelphia, while they spent the winter of 1863.

General Kirby Smith ordered Churchill's Arkansas Division which had most of his infantry (including Tappan's and Gause's brigades) to Shreveport, Louisiana in late March, 1864 to counter the advance of Union General Nathaniel Banks up the Red River.

The 33rd Arkansas served through most of the Red River Campaign during March-May 1864, including the final battle in the southern phase of this campaign at Pleasant Hill. They then slung their knapsacks and went back north into Arkansas in time to fight at Jenkins' Ferry on April 30, 1864. Colonel Grinstead was killed at Jenkins' Ferry leading the regiment's charge, and Lt. Col Thomson succeeded to command. The 33rd suffered a total of 21 killed and 71 wounded in this battle. The regiment saw little additional combat during the rest of the war, and remained in service in southwestern Arkansas until surrendered with MG Kirby Smith's army on May 26, 1865.

Officers: Col. H.L. Grinstead. Field Officers: Maj. W.L. Crenshaw, Lt. Col. H.W. McMillan, Maj. William T. Steele, Lt. Col. Thomas D. Thomson.
  

34th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized in September, 1862 at Prairie Grove Washington county, Arkansas under the command of Colonel William H. Brooks. Field officers were Lt. Col. Thomas M. Gunter, Major Fountaine R. Earle, Adjutant M.C. Duke, Quartermaster James Trott, surgeon, Dr. W.B. Welch, assistant surgeon. Company commanders were Co. A, Cpt. T.M. Gunter (succeeded by Cpt. J.W. Walker); Co. B, Cpt. Fountaine R. Earle (succeeded by Cpt. James Mitchell); Co. C, Cpt Samuel A. Smithson; Co. D, Cpt. William Owsley; Co. E, Cpt. James M. Wright; Co. F, Cpt. C.L. Pickens; Co. G, Cpt. James Owsley; Co. H, Cpt. Wallace; Co. I, Cpt. A.V. Edmondson; Co K, Cpt. J.R. Pettigrew; (succeeded by Cpt. A. Wilson). Companies A, B, C, H, and K recruited most of the able-bodied men from Washington County; Companies D, E, G, and K contained many from Franklin and Crawford counties. Company F was from Newton County.

After organization and muster, the regiment went into camp at Mount Comfort for drill and training, then at Elm Springs, then to Elkhorn Tavern, then to Camp Reagan, and then to Spadra, on the Arkansas River where the regiment was armed with M1853 Enfield rifles. From Spadra, the regiment marched to Mazzard Prairie, near Fort Smith, where they were assigned to Fagan's Brigade. From there, the brigade crossed the Arkansas River, leaving Van Buren on December 3, halting at Lee's Creek for a formal, mass presentation of battle flags to each regiment. The march was resumed, and on December 7, 1862, the brigade reached Prairie Grove, AR, where it met its first combat action. Fagan's Brigade held off the attack of Herron's division, taking substantial losses, but still held their ground at nightfall when the battle faded to a close. Despite their tactical victory, lack of supplies and reinforcements caused Hindman to retreat, and the army returned to the vicinity of Van Buren.

The regiment and Fagan's Brigade served after this at the battle of Helena on July 4, 1863, and in the defenses of Little Rock on September 10-11. General A.T. Hawthorn took command of the brigade in the fall of 1863, where it in turn was assigned to Churchill's Arkansas Division during the Red River Campaign. The Division fought against the advance of Union General Nathaniel Bank's army in north-central Louisiana in March and early April of 1864, defeating and repelling him in a series of battles at Mansfield (or Sabine Crossroads), Pleasant Grove, and Pleasant Hill, LA between March 30 and April 10, 1864. On April 22, Churchill's Division then slung their knapsacks for the long march north back into Arkansas to deal with the other part of the Federal advance, General Frederick Steele's advance simultaneous advance from Little Rock toward Camden. The divison arrived after a long forced march at Woodlawn, AR on April 26, where they rested overnight, then joined the pursuit of Steele's retreating army, catching it trying to cross the Saline River near Jenkins' Ferry. At Jenkins' Ferry, the 34th Arkansas probably suffered more losses than during the rest of the war, with its colonel falling wounded, and many of the officers as well.

Following Jenkins' Ferry, the 34th Arkansas returned to camp near Camden, and reorganized to account for its casualties. Companies C, H, and A were consolidated into Company A, Company G was merged into Company D, and Company I merged with Company K. The regiment saw no further combat action during the war, and laid down its arms on April 23, 1865, at Sulphur, Bowie County, Texas.

Officers: Col William H. Brooks. Field Officers: Major Fountaine R. Earle; Lt. Col. Thomas M. Gunter; Maj (later Lt. Col.) James R. Pettigrew.

Also Known As: Brook's 2nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment

References: Washington County Historical Society, The Battle of Prairie Grove

 

35th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized by individual companies throughout June of 1862, and organized as the 35th Arkansas Infantry Regiment on July 11, 1862 under the command of Colonel Frank A. Rector. Field Officers were Lt. Col. (later Colonel) Harry J. McCord, Major John J. Dillard, and later Colonel James P. King, Lt. Col. John W. Wallace, and Major Mark T. Tatum. Initially assigned (along with the 34th, 37th, and 39th Arkansas) to Fagan's Brigade in Shoup's Division in MG Thomas Hindman's 1st Corps of the Army of the Trans-Mississippi, where it fought in the battle of Prairie Grove on December 7-8, 1862. After the retreat from Prairie Grove to Van Buren, Fagan's Brigade was ultimately reassigned to General Sterling Price's division. On July 4, 1863, the brigade and the 35th Arkansas served in the attack on the federal post at Helena, Arkansas, and subsequently in the defense of Little Rock in September, 1863. The brigade, now under the command of Brig. Gen. A.T. Hawthorn and composed of the 29th, 34th, and 35th Arkansas regiments, spent the winter of 1863 in the vicinity of Arkadelphia, and then was sent south with Churchill's Arkansas Infantry Division to Shreveport, Louisiana in the early spring of 1864 to assist General Kirby Smith's army in countering Union General Nathaniel Banks' advance along the Red River. After fighting in the battle of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, Churchill's Division and Kirby Smith then marched back to Arkansas to assist General Price in dealing with the other half of the Red River campaign, Union Gen'l Frederick Steele's Camden Expedition moving southwest from Little Rock. The Division and Hawthorn's Brigade arrived in time to join the pursuit of Steele's army as it retreated from Camden, and join in the attack on Steele as he tried to cross the Saline River at Jenkins' Ferry on April 30, 1864. Hawthorn's regiment returned to the vicinity of Camden following Jenkins' Ferry, and saw no substantial combat for the remainder of the war. The regiment ultimately surrendered with Kirby Smith's army on May 26, 1865.

Also Known As: 22nd Arkansas (Rector's-King's-McCord's) Infantry Regiment

 

36th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized by individual companies throughout June of 1862, and organized originally as the 28th Arkansas Infantry Regiment on July 11, 1862 under the command of Colonel Danridge McRae. Field Officers were Lt. Col. Walter C. Robinson and Major John E. Glenn. Initially assigned (along with the 26th, 30th, and 32nd Arkansas) to form a brigade in Shoup's Division in MG Thomas Hindman's 1st Corps of the Army of the Trans-Mississippi.. Colonel McRae was given command of the brigade, and Major Glenn was elected colonel in his stead. The brigade fought in the battle of Prairie Grove on December 7-8, 1862. After the retreat from Prairie Grove to Van Buren, McRae's Brigade was ultimately reassigned to General Sterling Price's division, and command passed to Brig. Gen. T.J. Churchill. During this time, the regiment was reorganized and renamed as the 36th Arkansas Infantry. On July 4, 1863, the brigade and the 36th Arkansas served in the attack on the federal post at Helena, Arkansas, and subsequently in the defense of Little Rock in September, 1863. On September 30, the 36th Arkansas was consolidated into five companies. The brigade, now under the command of Lucian Gause and composed of the 26th, 32nd, and 36th Arkansas regiments, spent the winter of 1863 southwest of Little Rock, and then was sent south with General Churchill's Arkansas Infantry Division to Shreveport, Louisiana in the early spring of 1864 to assist General Kirby Smith's army in countering Union General Nathaniel Banks' advance along the Red River. After fighting in the battle of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, Churchill's Division and Kirby Smith then marched back to Arkansas to assist General Price in dealing with the other half of the Red River campaign, Union Gen'l Frederick Steele's Camden Expedition moving southwest from Little Rock. The Division and Hawthorn's Brigade arrived in time to join the pursuit of Steele's army as it retreated from Camden, and join in the attack on Steele as he tried to cross the Saline River at Jenkins' Ferry on April 30, 1864. Gause's Brigade returned to the vicinity of Camden following Jenkins' Ferry, and saw no substantial combat for the remainder of the war. In September, 1864, the 36th was reassigned to General Roane's 1st Arkansas Brigade. The regiment ultimately surrendered with Kirby Smith's army on May 26, 1865
 

 

37th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized in Pope County by individual companies throughout March through June of 1862 as the 1st Trans-Mississippi Infantry; and organized as the 29th Arkansas Infantry Regiment upon its acceptance into Confederate service on June 6, 1862 under the command of Colonel Joseph C. Pleasants. Field Officers were Lt. Col. Jeptha C. Johnson and Major John A. Geoghegan. Renamed as the 37th Arkansas Infantry regiment in the summer of 1862. Initially assigned (along with the 34th, 35th, and 39th Arkansas and Chew's Arkansas Sharpshooter Battalion) to form BG James F. Fagan's brigade in Shoup's Division in MG Thomas Hindman's 1st Corps of the Army of the Trans-Mississippi.. The brigade fought in the battle of Prairie Grove on December 7-8, 1862. After the retreat from Prairie Grove to Van Buren, On July 4, 1863, the brigade and the 37th Arkansas served in the attack on the federal post at Helena, Arkansas, and subsequently in the defense of Little Rock in September, 1863. The brigade, now under the command of BG A.T. Hawthorn, and composed of the 37th, 34th, and 35th Arkansas regiments, spent the winter of 1863 southwest of Little Rock, and then was sent south with General Churchill's Arkansas Infantry Division to Shreveport, Louisiana in the early spring of 1864 to assist General Kirby Smith's army in countering Union General Nathaniel Banks' advance along the Red River. After fighting in the battle of Pleasant Hill, Louisiana, Churchill's Division and Kirby Smith then marched back to Arkansas to assist General Price in dealing with the other half of the Red River campaign, Union Gen'l Frederick Steele's Camden Expedition moving southwest from Little Rock. The Division and Hawthorn's Brigade arrived in time to join the pursuit of Steele's army as it retreated from Camden, and join in the attack on Steele as he tried to cross the Saline River at Jenkins' Ferry on April 30, 1864. Gause's Brigade returned to the vicinity of Camden following Jenkins' Ferry, and saw no substantial combat for the remainder of the war. The regiment ultimately surrendered with Kirby Smith's army on May 26, 1865.

Also Known As: 29th Arkansas Infantry Regiment; 1st Trans-Mississippi Infantry Regiment.
 

 

38th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized by companies in July and August, 1862, combined to organize as the 38th Arkansas Infantry Regiment on September 21, 1862. Assigned to Shaver's Brigade, Hindman's Division, January through February of 1863. Reassigned to Tappan's Brigade under MG Sterling Price in April, 1863 where the regiment fought in the defense of Little Rock on September 10, 1863. Retreated with Price into southwestern Arkansas, where the regiment fought throughout the Camden Campaign and at Jenkins' Ferry on April 30, 1864. Remained in service in southwestern Arkansas until surrendered with MG Kirby Smith's army on May 26, 1865.

Officers: Col. Robert G. Shaver. Field Officers: Lt. Col. William C. Adams; Maj. (later Lt. Col.) Milton D. Baber; Maj. R.R. Henry.
 

 

39th Arkansas Infantry Regiment

See entry for Johnson's-Hawthorn's-Cocke's Arkansas Infantry below.

Also Known As: 6th Trans-Mississippi Infantry Regiment, 30th Arkansas Infantry Regiment; Johnson's/Hawthorn's/Cocke's Infantry Regiment
 

 

45th Arkansas Infantry Regiment (Mounted)

Organized as a mounted rifles unit in the late summer of 1864 under the command of Colonel Milton D. Baber and Lt. Col. J.W. Clark. Assigned to McCray's Brigade, Fagan's Arkansas Cavalry Division, where they participated in Price's Missouri Raid in September and October of 1864, and at the battle of Mine Creek on October 25, 1864. Returned to service in northeastern Arkansas after the Raid. Surrendered with BG M. Jeff Thompson near Chalk Bluff on May 11, 1865.
 

 

46th Arkansas Infantry Regiment (Mounted)

Organized as a mounted rifles unit in the late summer of 1864 from some of the men who had returned to Arkansas after surrendering at Vicksburg and Port Hudson, under the command of Colonel W.O. Coleman. Durring the summer of 1864, the 46th served in eastern Arkansas with Colonel Archibald Dobbins, and participated in the attack on Lamb's Plantation near Helena in August. Susequenly served in an unattached status with Shelby's Cavalry Division, where they participated in Price's Missouri Raid in September and October of 1864, and at the battle of Mine Creek on October 25, 1864. Returned to service in northeastern Arkansas after the Raid, where they remained until the end of the war, raiding Federal supply lines and operating as guerillas. Surrendered with BG M. Jeff Thompson near Chalk Bluff on May 11, 1865.

 

47th Arkansas Infantry Regiment (Mounted)

Organized as a mounted rifles unit in the late summer of 1864 under the command of Colonel Lee Crandall. Assigned to McCray's Brigade, Fagan's Arkansas Cavalry Division, where they participated in Price's Missouri Raid in September and October of 1864, and at the battle of Mine Creek on October 25, 1864. Returned to service in northeastern Arkansas after the Raid. Surrendered with BG M. Jeff Thompson near Chalk Bluff on May 11, 1865.
 

 

Dawson's - Hardy's Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Organized around February of 1863 by consolidating the portions of the 19th (Dawson's) and 24th Infantry Regiments and Crawford's Infantry Battalion that were not captured at the battle of Arkansas Post on January 11th, 1863. The regimental commander was Colonel Charles L. Dawson, assisted by Lt. Col. William R. Hardy and Major Francis H. Wood. Initially assigned in an unattached status to Frost's Division in southeastern Arkansas in May and June of 1863, they were reassigned to Drayton's Brigade of Price's Division, which in turn became Tappan's Brigade upon that officer's reassignment to the Trans-Mississippi in January, 1864. Field consolidated with the 30th Arkansas in March, 1864. Then under the command of Lt. Col. Hardy, the regiment participated in the Red River Campaign withTappan's Brigade in northwestern Louisiana in March and early April of 1864, and was engaged at the battle of Pleasant Hill. They then slung their knapsacks and went back north into Arkansas in time to fight at Jenkins' Ferry on April 30, 1864. The 33rd suffered a total of 8 killed and 18 wounded in this battle. Consolidated again with the 15th and 20th Arkansas Infantry on November 29, 1864, and the consolidated unit renamed as the 3rd Infantry Regiment, Consolidated. The regiment saw little additional combat during the rest of the war, and remained in service in southwestern Arkansas until surrendered with MG Kirby Smith's army on May 26, 1865.
 

 

Johnson's-Hawthorn's-Cocke's Arkansas Infantry Regiment

Mustered as individual companies in June and July of 1862. Regiment organized under the command of Colonel Alfred W. Johnson in August, 1862. Engaged at Cane Hill on November 28, 1862, and at the battle of Prairie Grove on December 7-8, 1862. Retreated to Van Buren, Ark. following Prairie Grove. Reorganized again on December 16, 1862 by consolidating some of the original companies and with the addition of three more companies of Gipson's Mounted Rifles Battalion. Initially assigned to Fagan's Arkansas Brigade, Hindman's Division, Army of the Trans-Mississippi in January 1863. Participated in the attack on Helena on July 4, 1863, and in the Little Rock Campaign from August 1 to September 14, 1863. Engaged at the battle of Reed's Bridge (Bayou Meto) on August 27, and at Bayou Fourche just outside Little Rock on September 11, 1863. Reteated with Price's army into southwest Arkansas following the fall of Little Rock. Col. Hawthorn assumed command of the brigade in early 1864, and the regiment participated in the Red River Campaign during March and April of 1864, fighting at Jenkins' Ferry on April 30, 1864. Remained on duty in southwest Arkansas until the end of the War in May, 1865

Commanders: Colonel Alfred W. Johnson; Colonel Alexander T. Hawthorn, Colonel John B. Cocke. Field Officers: Lt. Col. Cadwallader Polk; Lt. Col. D.W. Ringo.

Also Known as: 6th Trans-Mississippi Infantry Regiment; 39th Arkansas Infantry Regiment