St.Francis County
Arkansas

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1890 Goodspeed Biographies
Eastern Arkansas

Name:Last/First/Middle/Title/Military Unit (If any)/Biography-Obituary (If any)
ABLES JOHN J. ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.B-Fifth Arkansas Regiment-Govan's Brigade-Civil War.
John J. Ables, proprietor of one of the leading groceries of Colt, is a native of this county, and when a boy worked on his father's farm, attending school at intervals; although not regular in attendance, he being a bright scholar and willing to learn, received a fair common-school education. In May, 1861, at the age of seventeen, he entered the Confederate service, enlisting in Company B, Fifth Arkansas Regiment, Govan's brigade, Pat Claburne's division, Hardee's and Cheatham's corps of the Army of the Tennessee, commanded by Beauregard, Albert Sidney Johnston, Braxton Bragg, Joseph E. Johnston and J. B. Hood, of Texas. Mr. Able's career as a soldier led him through many different battles-Chickamauga, Murfreesboro, Franklin, from Bowling Green, Ky., to Bentonville, N. C., via Nashville, Chattanooga and Dalton down the railroad and State line to Atlanta, thence to Jonesboro via Augusta, Ga., back to Bentonville. He fought the last battle under Johnston at that place, that famous general then falling back to Greensboro, N. C., where he surrendered. Mr. Ables took his chances for his home in Arkansas, and was in all the engagements of that march, soldiering through East Tennessee, around Knoxville, on Clinch River, at Clinton, with Bragg through Cumberland Gap to Kentucky. He was wounded in the right hand, losing his little finger, which, though a small and seemingly unimportant member, necessitated his absence from active duty for three months. He served throughout the war, and took an active part in every battle of his division in the Mississippi Valley, with the exception of those during the three months of his disability. Returning home in May, 1865, Mr. Ables was married the following August to Miss Mary A. Stutts. They are the parents of eight children, all of whom are living: Cora Belle, John W., Willis R., Anna C., Micager C., Samuel, James D. and Emma Lou. Following his matrimonial venture Mr. Ables engaged in farming, and now has a nicely improved farm of 160 acres. He was born in 1844, being the son of M. C. and Jane C. (Moore) Ables, natives of Tennessee and Alabama, respectively. M. C. Ables came to Arkansas in 1828, and settled in this county at a time when there were but few families in the locality. Here he bought a farm of 320 acres, on which he lived until the time of his death, with the exception of a year or two during his residence in Wittsburg, and also while in the Mexican War.In 1887 our subject sold out his farming interests and came to Colt Station, embarking in the grocery business, in which he is still engaged. In this he has been very successful. He held the office of constable of his township before moving to Colt, and was also justice of the peace for ten years, and has now a commission as notary public. Mr. Ables is a stanch Democrat and a member of the I. O. O. F. and Knights of Honor. . Enl 12Jun1861 at Wittsburg, AR. Reenl 17 Feb 1864. Received clothing 17 Sep 1864. Signed by X. Was in the disabled camp at Lauderdale Springs, MS 14 Mar 1865 and granted a 60 day furlough due to a shell wound. COLT TIMES-Mr.J.J.Ables has moved to Little Rock, and his son, Mr.J.B.Ables has taken charge of his drug store at this place. - Date:+3-6-1903
ADAMS P. H. LEE CO.-page 572
P. H. Adams, a farmer and stock-dealer, was born in Lee County, Ark., in 1844, being the son of Henry and Nancy (Rolledge) Adams. Henry Adams was a native of Kentucky, but of English descent, and to his marriage fifteen children were born, only three of them now living: P. H., Thomas J. and Nancy (the wife of Thomas Kemp, a prosperous farmer of this county). Mr. Adams died in St. Francis County, in 1862, where he had resided for many years. His wife received her final summons some years previous. P. H. Adams was married to Miss Mary Upton, of Lee County, in 1866, and by her became the father of two children (both deceased). Mrs. Adams having died, for his second and present wife Mr. Adams chose Mrs. Mary J. Golightley, who bore him flve children: Martha C. (the wife of J. Bowman of this county), Allie S., Mary C., Belle E. and Francis R. Mr. Adams owns 240 acres of land, with 100 improved, giving evidence of a careful and thorough cultivation. He is a Mason, and belongs to Baxton Lodge, No. 242. In his religious faith he clings to the Baptist doctrine, being a member of that denomination. Mrs. Adams is a member of the Methodist Church, South. She is a native of Illinois, and was born in 1844, the daughter of Ames and Martha A. Smith. Her parents died in 1886 and 1887, respectively
ADARE J.L. ST.FRANCIS
J. L. Adare, a native of Northern Alabama, is a son of Samuel W. and Mary J. (Freeze) Adare, who also came originally from that State, the father being of French descent, and the mother of Irish ancestry. J. L. Adare assisted his father on the farm until twenty years of age, when he was engaged in clerking for about four years. In 1879 he came to Arkansas and located in St. Francis County, gave his attention to farming the first year, and the following year entered the employ of Mr. Vital Lesca, as clerk, and is now at the head of the business. Mr. Adare was born in Madison County, Ala., on December 27, 1850, and was married on September 8, 1889, to Mrs. Delia Lesca, widow of his former employer, and a daughter of Stephen Snowden, a native of Tennessee. Mr. Adare is a member of the K. of H., and is a well known citizen and highly respected. LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY
ALLEN WILLIAM D.-DR CROSS CO.
Dr. William D. Allen, of Wynne, Ark., has been a successful practitioner of Cross County, Ark., for forty years, and is ever to be found at the bedside of the sick and aflicted. His birth occurred in Baton Rouge, La., in 1823, and he was the fifth of a family of ten children, the result of the union of William and Clementine J. (Quillin) Allen, natives of Tennessee. Both Mr. and Mrs. Allen removed with their parents to Louisiana when children, and there attained their growth. William Allen was a farmer by occupation, also carried on stock raising, and remained in Louisiana until 1836, when in ihe spring of that year he came to Arkansas. He settled about six miles southeast of the present village of Wynne, in what was then Phillips County, Ark., and when there were about forty families living along Crowley's Ridge, a distance of about sixty miles. Here Mr. Allen, Sr., bought about 4,000 acres of land, on which he at once began making improvements, clearing land, erecting buildings, etc., and he brought with him a largenumber of negroes, who, with his family, numbered fifty-six souls. He chartered a small steamboat to transport his family and slaves to Arkansas, and landed at a point called Andrew's Landing. This boat was the second one up the St. Francis River. He then went to work and cleared about 400 acres, and resided on the same until his death, which occurred in 1846. The mother lived until 1880, and died at the age of seventy-eight years. Dr. William D. Allen was twelve years of age at the time his father moved to Arkansas, and prior to that time had attended school in his native State. After moving to Arkansas his father engaged a private teacher for his family and other children in the vicinity, and the Doctor received instruction in this manner for three years; then as new settlers came in they had permanently established subscription schools. At the age of twenty-one years Dr. Allen went to Lexington, Ky., and entered the Transylvania University, where he took a literary course of three years. There were attending, at that time, Gen. Morgan, William Walker, Gen. Buckner, Col. Pickett, and a number of others, who have since become known in history. From there Dr. Allen went to Louisville, where he took a year's course in medicine, and then went to the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated after a strict examination, in May, 1849. He then returned to Arkansas, and at once began the practice of his profession in the country surrounding his father's homestead. The Doctor has been in the constant practice of his profession since that time, and in the immediate vicinity of the place. In 1852, Dr. Allen was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Oliver, a granddaughter of John Johnson, who came to Arkansas in 1812, settling in Phillips, now St. Francis County,where he cleared a large tract of land, and there died about 1830. Many of his descendants are still living in this section, prosperous and well-to.do. After marriage Dr. Allen continued his practice, and in connection speculated considerably in land, making large sums on some of their sales, and on some tracts making extensive improvements. In 1884 he came to Wynne, a station on the military road, , that had just been named, and at that time there was but one shanty in the place. His office was a small log-cabin. In 1886 he erected an office which was destroyed in the fire that year. The Doctor is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Forrest City Lodge No. 34, and he and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. To his marriage were born four children: Willie, John, Walter and Emmett. The firstthree are living in St. Francis County, where they own fine farms, and the last is attending medical lectures in New Orleans. S. L. Austell, farmer, Wittsburg, Ark. This successful agriculturist owes his nativity to Cross County, Ark., where his birth occurred in 1848, and is the son of Samuel and Mabel Caroline (Wof- ford) Austell, natives of South Carolina, but who came to Arkansas at an early date. The Woffords were early pioneers, and Grandfather Isaac Wofford built the first housein Wittsburg. He opened a large farm, and there passed his last days, his death occurring in 1849. Samuel L. Austell at first settled on Crowley's Ridge, near the present city of Wynne, but removed to the bottoms, about one mile from Wittsburg, where he cleared about 100 Acres. Mr. Audell was for many years one of the leading spirits of that section. He took a prominent part in politics, and was elected the first county judge of Cross County. He was also quite prominently spoken of as Governor of Arkansas. He died in 1866, and the mother in 1870. At one time he owned nearly all the land around Wynne, and speculated largely in real estate.
ALLEN WILLIAM E. ST.FRANCIS
William E. Allen, active in the agricultural affairs of this county, was born in St. Francis County, Ark., being the son of William and Eliza L. (Oliver) Allen, natives of Louisiana, and Arkansas, respectively. The former began life for himself at the age of twenty-one years, and now owns 261 acres of valuable land, with 100 acres carefully improved and cultivated. Aside from his many farming interests, he is engaged in stock raising, making a success of that branch as with everything else. In 1877 Mr. Allen was married to Miss Florine L. Beazley, who died in 1884, leaving one child, Mary A. In 1888 Miss Ella E. Gray, a daughter of William F. and Sarah E. Gray, became his present wife. To their union one child has been born, Willie L. Mr. and Mrs. Allen are members in high standing of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the former is a Democrat in his political views. He contributes liberally to all public enterprises, and is held in high esteem by the entire community. CITY CEMETERY
ALLEY W.H. -DR ST.FRANCIS
W.H. Alley, M.D., in his connection with the professional affairs of this communtiy has attained a well-deserved prominence. Born in Mississippi in 1861, he passed his boyhood days in the common schools of that state, obtaining a practical education, and manifesting at an early age an unusally bright mind. At the age of fourteen he was head of classes in which majority were many years his senior. When seventeen years old he commenced the study of medicine under a tutor, and in 1879, entering the Vanderbilt University, was graduated from the Medical Dept. of that institution in March, 1881. He first located in his home in Mississippi, where he practiced with success for two years, but later became located at Lewsiburg, Miss., for one year, and then Bellevue, Miss., where he remained until 1888. Dr.Alley then came to Arkansas and settled in Forrest City, and though only a few years have elapsed since his entrance, he has built up a practice of which others of more advanced years and experience might feel proud. Dr.Alley's wife, the former Miss Emma L. Cobbs, daughter of Paul M. Cobbs, State and Land Commissioner of Arkansas. To their union one interesting little daughter has been born, Mary. The doctor owns an attractive home, which is furnished in excellent taste, and three valuable farms. He is a Democrat in his political views, a member of the Knights of Pythias and prominently identified with the County Medical Society. J.H. and Ophelia (McCombs) Alley, his parents were natives of Tennesseee. The father followed merchandising at Byahlia, Miss., nearly all of his life, but in 1884 came to Arkansas and is now engaged in operating a large plantation. Mrs.Alley is still living, and is of Scotch and Irish descent. The paternal grandfather was born in Virginia and the maternal grandfather. N.H.McCombs, came originally from North Carolina, spending the greatest portion of his life in Mississippi, where he died at the age of seventy-three years. The maternal grandmother's name was Reid; she was directly descended from the Scotch and Irish. BIO:Physicians-The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 39:Eight:Dr.J.O.Rush/Dr.L.H.Merritt/Dr.W.H.Alley/Dr.D.O.Bridgeforth/Dr.J.H.StoneDr.T.C.Strong/Dr.F.C.Smith/Dr.J.T.Longest-Born Mississippi, husband of Emma L. Cobbs b.abt 1864 in Arkansas, child Mary Alley b.abt.1888 Arkansas, source:http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=arleneisgr8&id=I4806 CITY CEMETERY
ANDERSON DEWITT CSA-CO.K-FOURTH TENNESSEE CAVALRY-1ST LT-CIVIL WAR LEE CO.-page 573
DeWitt Anderson has been prominently identified with the farming interests of Lee County, Ark., since 1881, and is now the owner of a fine farm comprising 400 acres. He was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1848, and is a son of Gen. Paulding Anderson and Martha T. (Horde) Anderson, the former of Tennessee and the latter of Virginia. She was a relative of the Morehead family, of North Carolina, and came with her parents to Tennessee when a small girl. She was a member of the Baptist Church, and at the time of her death, in 1861, was fifty-six years old. Her brother, Jesse Horde, was a leading minister of the Methodist Church, in Texas. Frank Anderson, the paternal grandfather, was a Virginian, and his father and mother were from Scotland, and settled in this country at a very early day. Paulding Anderson, the father of our subject, was one of a large family, and was reared in Tennessee, where he became well-known and arose to prominence in political matters. He held the various offices of his county, with the exception of county clerk, and was a member of both houses of the legislature several terms. He served in the Confederate army, and, after the Federals took possession of the State, he went to the South with Gov. Harris, and was an active participant in the Rebellion until 1863, at which time he was captured, and, after being kept a prisoner at Nashville for months, was released on parole. In his early life he commanded the Central State militia, and during a big rally he commanded 10,000 men, being made general at that time. He was very active in church and school matters in his youth, and for many years was one of the chief props of his church. He was finely educated, was a great reader, and up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1882, at the age of seventy-nine years, he kept thoroughly posted with the current literature [p.573] of the day. He and his wife were blessed in the birth of eleven children, nine of whom lived to be grown. DeWitt Anderson is the ninth in order of birth, and is one of the three who are now living. Six of the seven sons served in the Confederate army, also two nephews and eight first cousins, and only one of the entire lot was killed, Capt. Dick Anderson, who lost his life at the battle of Murfreesboro. None of the rest were even wounded. DeWitt Anderson commanded a company the first three years of the war, being first lieutenant of Company K, Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, and participated in the battles of Shiloh, the first and second battles of Murfreesboro, Chickamanga and Perryville; was in the Georgia campaign, and was taken prisoner near Rome, Ga., being kept in captivity at Johnson's Island for nine months. After the surrender he was released and came home, again taking up his farming implements. He is now one of the prosperous farmers of Arkansas, and, as shove stated, his home farm consists of 400 acres, although he owns 6,000 acres in the State, a considerable portion of which is rich bottom land. This property has all been acquired since coming to this State, as he then had no capital whatever, but his native energy and pluck. He was married in 1868 to Miss Chloe Davis, daughter of James Davis, a leading resident of Wilson County, Tenn., but he was called upon to mourn her death in 1870, her infant daughter dying soon after, at the age of six weeks. She was a consistent Christian, being a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was a faithful, loving and helpful wife-so much so, that Mr. Anderson has since remained faithful to her memory, and is a widower. Death: Aug. 21, 1902 Burial::Maple Hill Cemetery HelenaPhillips CountyArkansas, USAPlot: Confederate Section MAPLE HILL CEMETERY
ANDERSON DICK CSA-CAPTAIN-DIED IN BATTLE OF MURFREESBORO-CIVIL WAR LEE CO.-page 573
SEE DEWITT ANDERSON
ANDERSON MARGRET E. (HOUSTON)-MRS ST.FRANCIS
On the first day of January, 1839, was born in St. Francis County the subject of this sketch. Her father, Alfred K. Houston, first saw the light of this world in South Carolina, December 21, 1814, and came to Arkansas with his parents at the age of five years, who settled in St. Francis County, Ark., where he was reared, and followed the occupation of a farmer, dying in this county in March, 1879. He was married to Miss Sallie Evans, of North Carolina origin, who came to Arkansas when a girl, and who departed this life in 1860. The issue of this union was seven children, four of whom are living: Margret E. (the principal of this sketch), Wellman C. (a farmer of this county), Hiram (living in this county, whose sketch is given elsewhere), Francis M. (also a resident of this county). Mrs. Anderson has been twice married, and is now a widow, her second husband dying some ten years ago. Her first marriage, on June 20, 1855, was to Aaron M. Hughes, of Georgian birth, and who died May 18, 1862; by this marriage were two sons, only one of whom is living, Wellman T., born November 15, 1860. She married again on June 20, 1867, to Robert Anderson, of South Carolina, and a son of Robert and Lucy (Beazley) Anderson, who died February 20, 1879. Four children were given to them, three of whom are still living: Sarah L., Robert K. and Nancy E. Of her husbands it can be said they were honest, industrious farmers, who succeeded in life and laid up some property for those who were dependent on them, and merited the great respect shown them. Mrs. Anderson is now living on her magnificent farm, situated on the banks of the St. Francis River, and in connection with this, owns a half-interest in 560 acres of valuable land, also the homestead, 115 acres. Her son, William T. Hughes, a model and rising young farmer, has the affairs of the farm under his supervision, and is making a decided success of it, and they have a happy home, wherein dwells ease, comfort and plenty. Mrs. Anderson is a member of and worships with the Methodist Episcopal Church. William T. Hughes is a member of the Knights of Honor.
APPERSON SAMUEL D. ST.FRANCIS
Samuel D. Apperson, the present popular and capable assessor of St. Francis County, was born in Marshall County, Miss., near Holly Springs, February 22, 1853, being the son of W. T. and Martha (Howes) Apperson, originally from Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. The parents had a family of six children, three now living, of whom Samuel D. is the third in order of birth. The latter accompanied his parents to Arkansas when quite young, and having settled near Forrest City before the present site was located, can justly be deemed a pioneer of the community. He remained here until 1873, attending the schools of the county, and then drove stock over the States of Tennessee, Indiana and Mississippi. In 1875 he returned home and came to Forrest City, where he conducted a general freight and dray business until 1880. His fitness for the position becoming recognized, he was elected marshal of Forrest City and served two terms of one year each. In 1886 he accepted the superintendency of trestle work on the Bald Knob Railroad from Bald Knob to Memphis, receiving a salary of $115 per month. Returning to Forrest City he found employment awaiting him as farm superintendent, which position he held for one year. Mr. Apperson was then elected county assessor to fill a vacancy, and is now discharging the manifold duties of that office in a highly creditable manner. He is a member of the K. of H. and I. O. O. F. fraternities, and a Democrat in his political views. He is of French descent, his grandfather having been a native of France. Mr. Apperson is progressive in his ideas, and many improvements in the city owe their existence to his liberal support and hearty co-operation. OBIT:DEATH OF SAM APPERSON=It was with feelings of geniune sorrow and regret the people of Forrest City and St.Francis county, received the tidings of the death of Mr.Samuel D. Apperson. Sam, as he was familiarly called by everybody who knew him, had been in failing health for some time, but nothing of a serious nature, and was preparing to go to Eureka Springs last Tuesday. On Thursday evening of last week he was on the streets as jovial as ever; during the night he was attacked by acute indigestion. He had the best of medical aid, and was apparently doing quite well, but Friday afternoon, congestion ensued and his spirit passed to its Maker. Sam D. Apperson was born in Marshall County, Mississippi, near Holly Springs, Feb.22,1853, being the son of W.T. and Martha Apperson, originally from Virginia and Tennessee respectively, came to St.Francis County, in 1860, and has lived here till his death. Sam was a familiar figure in political and otherwise, and always took an interest in anything which pertained to progress. Congenial, jovial, charitable to a fault, he was well known and liked by everybody. The funeral took place Saturday afternoon at the Forrest City cemetery under the auspices of the Knights of Honor, of which he was a member. Rev.B.L.Wilford closing the ceremony. Amidst tears, regrets, and showers of flowers all that was earthly of Sam D.Apperson were consigned to the grave. CITY CEMETERY
ARMSTRONG JOHN J. CSA-Army-Wounded in Corinth Battle-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1175
AUSTELL S.L. CROSS CO.
S. L. Austell, farmer, Wittsburg, Ark. This successful agriculturist owes his nativity to Cross County, Ark., where his birth occurred in 1848, and is the son of Samuel and Mabel Caroline (Wofford) Austell, natives of South Carolina, but who came to Arkansas at an early date. The Woffords were early pioneers, and Grandfather Isaac Wofford built the first house in Wittsburg. He opened a large farm, and there passed his last days, his death occurring in 1849. Samuel L. Austell at first settled on Crowley's Ridge, near the present city of Wynne, but removed to the bottoms, about one mile from Wittsburg, where he cleared about 100 Acres. Mr. Audell was for many years one of the leading spirits of that section. He took a prominent part in politics, and was elected the first county judge of Cross County. He was also quite prominently spoken of as Governor of Arkansas. He died in 1866, and the mother in 1870. At one time he owned nearly all the land around Wynne, and speculated largely in real estate. S. L. Austell was reared principally to farm labor, and received his education in the public schools. After the death of his father, he, with his brothers, Managed the farm until 1880, when he bought out the only remaining heir. This farm consists of about 1,100 acres, with 140 under cultivation. Mr. Austell also owns about 100 acres near Wittsburg, and in 1884 he bought the old home of the widow of Maurice Block, at Wittsburg. Mr. Austell owns, aside from this, 500 acres on Crowley's Ridge, 175 of which are under cultivation. This land he rents out, but farms the principal part of the balance himself. In 1860 his father built a cotton gin, and this our subject still runs. In the early days of the country, Grandfather Wofford started a ferry across the St. Francis River, at Wittsburg, and this descended by inheritance to S. L. Austell, having been in the family for many years, as may be seen. In 1877 Mr. Austell married Miss Page Johnson, a daughter of Thomas Johnson, who moved to Cross County, Ark., in 1864, and here followed farming until his death, which occurred in 1875. The mother is still living. Mr. and Mrs. Austell became the parents of five children, three of whom are deceased: Blanche (deceased), Samuel (deceased), Pearl and Thomas (living) and Clay (deceased). The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Wittsburg. Mr. Austell is only moderately active in politics, but takes a deep interest in school matters, being at present one of the directors. He is an active, energetic citizen.
BAGWELL JORDAN CSA-Forrest's Cavalry-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1175
SEE JOHN J. ARMSTRONG
BAILES ELI CROSS CO.
Eli Bailes, farmer and treasurer of Cross County, is prominent among the comparatively young men of Cross County, whose career thus far has been both honorable and successful. He isinformed on the general topics of the day, he can not but impart to those with whom he comes in contact something of the truths with which his mind is stored. He was born in York County, S. C., in 1810, and was the youngeat of a family of seven children born to Eli and Mary A. (Alexander) Bailes, natives, respectively, of South Carolina and North Carolina. The father was a tiller of the soil and died in his native State in 1886. The mother died in 1887. Eli Bailes was reared in South Carolina and his time was divided in early life between assisting on the home place and in getting a limited education in the common schools. During the war his father and two brothers were in the Confederate army and one brother was killed. Eli Bailes came to Arkansas in 1867, located in St. Francis, bought a farm of 110 acres, erected buildings, cleared land and remained there until 1877, when he oame to Cross County and located on the Bay Ridge farm. He remained there for four years and then removed to the McCrae farm, where from overflow and several bad speculations he met with temporary financial embarrassment. He remained on this farm until 1885, and then came to Deadrick, now known as Levesque, where he farmed about 450 acres. On this farm he has a store, mostly intended for his own plantation supplies, but has a fair stock of goods and is doing a good business. On December 1, 1888, he was appointed postmaster at Levesque and on the first of the following year, at a special election, he was made treasurer of Cross County. He has always taken a deep interest in politics and is known as one of the hardest workers for the Democratic party. He has been married twice, first in March, 1869, to Miss Dovie Lembler, a native of South Carolina, but who was reared in St. Francis County. She died in September, 1875, and left two children, a son and daughter: Charles Edward and Dovie Ethel. His second marriage took place on January 19, 1871, to Miss Maggie Wood, who was born and reared in St. Francis County. The fruits of this union were four children, two of whom are living: Robert H. and Lucile. Those deceased were unnamed. Mr. Bailes is a good farmer and a respectable citizen.
BAILES ELI SR. CROSS CO.
SEE ELI BAILES
BAMSON R.B. CROSS CO.
R. B. Bamson, one of the prominent citizens of Bedford Township, was born in Devonshire, England, in 1838, being a son of William and Sarah (Louis) Bamson, also natives of England, who became the parents of four children:William, Mary, John (who served twelve years in the English army, and was taken with dropsy and died at Canton, China, in 1864) and R. B. (our subject). Mr.and Mrs. Bamson both died in 1874, in their seventy-second year, having never been outside their native country. R. B. Bamson was apprenticed to a gunsmith at the age of fourteen, with whom he worked seven eyars, after which he followed his trade in England until twenty-seven years of age. Coming thence to America, and landing in New York September 1, 1860, he worked in a machine shop on Fifty-second Street for $5.50 per day, and the following year went to Savannah, Ga., where he was employed in a carriage shop at $6 per day, there remaining until May, 1862, when he joined the Confederate army, in the Fulton Dragoons, commanded by Capt. Waley. He served until May 6, 1865 (when he was paroled), most of the time acting as a sharpshooter and scout, and was one of the "boys" who captured Gen. Crittenden, and was the possessor of that officer's pistols. After the war, Mr. Bamson returned to Georgia and settled in Decatur, where he was married in 1866 to Mrs. S. T. Puitte, nee Moore. After his marriage he opened a shop and was engaged in the repair and manufacture of guns. In 1870 Mr. Bamson came to Arkansas, and bought a farm in Cross County, where he resided for three years, then removing to Douglas County, Mo., buying a farm there. He sold out two years later and went to Baxter County, where he was engaged in farming and also opened up a shop. Four years afterward he settled at Rome, Ga., resuming farming, and also ran a grist-mill and saw-mill for three years. In 1879 Mr. Bamson returned to this county and purchased a farm, also opening a gunsmith shop, in which business he is still engaged. He owns a farm of eighty acres, with thirty acres under cultivation. Mr. Bamson owns a one-thrid interest in a steam-gin, which turns out annually 375 bales of cotton. Himself and wife are the parents of four children, three of whom are stillliving: W. B. and M. E. (twins) and Neoma. Mr. and Mrs. Bamson are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The former is also a member of theCounty Wheel, and is an enterprising citizen, lending his aid to all work for the public welfare, and extending a welcome to anyone seeking a home in this community.
BARLOW J.C. -CAPTAIN CSA-Second Arkansas Battery-Captain-Civil War PHILLIPS CO.
Capt. J. C. Barlow, dealer in hardware, stoves, etc., of Helena, Ark., was born in Scott County, Ky., January 3, 1836, and is a son of Thomas J. and Mildred (Cantrell) Barlow, natives of Scott and Bourbon Counties, Ky., respectively. The paternal grandfather was born in Old Virginia and the grandmother in North Carolina, but at an early period they moved to the wilds of Kentucky, making their way thither on horseback, the grandmother carrying a large cane which she pretended was a gun, and used in frightening away the Indians. [p.750] She was reared on the farm once owned by Daniel Boone in the "Old North State." The grandparents on both sides died in Kentucky, and were farmers by occupation. Thomas J. Barlow was also a farmer, and after living a useful and well-spent life, quietly breathed his last in Ballard County, Ky., in 1873, his wife's death occurring in Scott County, Ky., she having borne him six children, three of whom are now living: Frances A. (wife of John W. Allison, of Bourbon County, Ky.), Joseph C. and James M. Edward was in the Confederate army and died at Montgomery, Ala. Thomas died in Kentucky and William also died there when quite young. Mr. Barlow was married twice and by his last wife had a family of three children, Clifton J. being the only one alive. J. C. Barlow was reared and favored with the advantages of the common schools in Scott County, Ky., but in 1859 came to Helena, Ark., and became a salesman in a dry-goods establishment, this work receiving his attention until the opening of the war, when he enlisted in the Phillips County Guards, and subsequently got a transfer to the Yell Rifles, with which he served until the fall of 1861, when he joined the Second Arkansas Battery, remaining with them until the close of the war. After serving for some time as first lientenant of artillery he was appointed to the rank of captain by the secretary of war, and was a participant in all the engagements of his regiment. After the war he clerked in Memphis, Tenn., for about one year, then returned to Helena and has since been conducting a hardware establishment, this enterprise meeting with good success under his able management. He has the largest stock of goods in the town, and receives a most liberal share of public favor. He filled an unexpired term as mayor of Helena, is president of the Phillips County Fair Association, and since August 22, 1882, has held the position of colonel of the Arkansas State Guards, receiving his appointment from Gov. F. J. Churchill during the political troubles of that year. He was married in 1869 to Miss Mary J. Porter, a native of Helena, and in 1876 took for hissecond wife Mrs. Mary Grant, by whom he has three children: Fannie A., Harrell E. and Joseph C., Jr. Capt and Mrs. Barlow are members of the Episcopal Church.
BARNES THOMAS H. USARMY-Forty Seventh Kentucky Volunteer Inf-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1291
FT.SMITH
BARNES THOMAS H.-COLONEL USARMY-Eighth Kentucky Inf-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1291
FT.SMITH
BARTON JAMES F.- MAJOR CRITTENDEN CO. CSA-Dobbin's Regiment-Major-Civil War
Maj. James F. Barton (deceased), whose portrait appears in this volume, was one of the most prominent citizens of this county as well as of the State. The Barton family is one that is well known in connection with the history of Arkansas, and is of English-Irish lineage. The first history that we have of them is a Barton, whose given name is unknown, that came to this country and settled in Charlotte County, Va., long before the Revolutionary War, where his son, James Barton, is supposed to have been born, and he is known to have immigrated to Abbeville District, S. C. He also had a son, James, who was born February 22, 1772, in Charlotte County, Va. He left his native State in 1784, going to South Carolina with his father, where he remained for ten years, when he married and went to Mercer County in 1794; in 1796 to Barren County, where he died September 24, 1846. He was a self-made man, having started with little but his hands, and a determined mind to make his fortune, which he did, for he was very wealthy when he died. He was an earnest worker in the Christian Baptist Church, very charitable, of a pushing and energetic turn of mind. James Barton, son of the above, was born July 5, 1794, in Mercer County, Ky., and in 1823 he moved to Henry County, Tenn., where he remained till 1835, when he moved to Tipton County, Tenn., where he died March 5, 1852. James Forbes Barton, son of the above and subject of our sketch, was born in Henry County Tenn., December 7, 1824. He went to Barren County, Ky., where he reached his majority, and received the last years of his educational training. While in this county he was married [p.400] December 7, 1847, to Frances B. Edmunds, who was born December 7, 1831. In 1850 they moved to Texas, but at the request of his father returned in 1852, and settled in Crittenden County, where he purchased large tracts of land, on which he made many valuable improvements. He also engaged in steamboating, and having become very prominent in politics was elected to the legislature and was afterward county and probate judge. At the outbreak of the Civil War he was a sympathizer of the Union, but when the South seceded, he took sides with his State and joined the Confederate army, and after casting his lot with the South, he took active part and served with great credit. He organized a company in Crittenden County, of which he was made captain of the rank of major. He was assistant quartermaster under the then chief quartermaster of the Trans-Mississippi Department, Maj. John D. Adams, of Little Rock, Ark. He held the position of collector of cotton-tax till 1863, when he was recommissioned to organize a battalion in the Confederate States. Going into the service as a captain in Col. Dobbin's regiment, he was commissioned by the department to go into Georgia to secure arms for the soldiers. After making four trips, he secured enough arms to equip nearly all of Gen. Price's army, previous to the last raid through Missouri, Kansas and Indian Territory. Near the close of the war he was made major, which office he filled till the close, when he surrendered at Mound City, this county, in 1865. During the war the Federal troops burned his home, leaving his family in very destitute circumstances, having neither food nor clothing. The war ended, he returned to his family and took active part in righting the wrongs brought on by the long contest. He held the office of county judge till the reconstruction, when he was disqualified. He then moved to Memphis, Tenn., where he owned considerable property, and lived there till his death, which occurred October 11, 1873, of yellow fever. While in Memphis he became very prominently engaged in the manufacture of cotton-seed oil, and was the cause of the establishing of the second cotton-seed-oil mill in the city of Memphis, and at the time of his death was superintendent of the Memphis Cotton Seed Oil Company. He never raised a bale of cotton in his life, but was mostly engaged in buying and selling real estate, and before the war owned quite a number of slaves; he also o
BARTON ROBERT W.- DR. CRITTENDEN CO.
Robert W. Barton, M.D., considered among the profession as one of the leading physicans, and an upright and honest citizen of Crittenden County, was born in this county, March 17, 1860, to the union of James F. and Frances (Edmonds) Barton. [See sketch.] Robert W. Barton spent most of his youth in Memphis, Tenn., and was educated in the common schools of Louisville, Ky., and the Lincoln public school of St. Louis, Mo. In 1876, during the big strike in St. Louis, he volunteered as a soldier and served throughout that affray in that city, the youngest of 3,000 volunteers, and did active and honorable service for eleven days while quelling the riot. He was requested and urged by his officers to become a West Point cadet at large from Missouri, but owing to the fact that he was a son of a Confederate soldier he could not be appointed, although endorsed by Capt. Elerby, Lieut. Barlow and other officers, and quite a number of prominent men of both Nashville and Memphis, Tenn. In 1879 he entered the State University of Tennessee, and owing to his ill health remained for [p.405] only two years, and commenced the study of medicine in Memphis with Dr. Rogers as his preceptor, in 1882, and later he assisted R. D. Murray, United States army surgeon for four months. In 1883, he was appointed interne in the city hospital of Physicians and Surgeons of Baltimore, Md., from which school he graduated in 1884, and returned to Memphis, Tenn., where he commenced the practice of his profession. In July of that year he came to this county, where he has since practiced. While in Memphis he was a member of the State Medical Association of Tennessee, and is now of the Tri-State Medical Society of Mississippi, Arkansas and Tennessee, and president of the board of medical examiners of this county. Dr. Barton was married to Miss Mamie G. Grasty, who was born in Danville, Va., and was reared in Baltimore, Md., where she graduated from the Western Female High School, taking the Peabody medal. She then graduated from the Maryland Musical Institute, under Prof. May. Mrs. Barton is a very highly educated lady and is in every way an estimable woman. She is the mother of two children: Phebe Housen and Francis Edmunds. She is an active and prominent member of the Second Presbyterian Church of Memphis, Tenn.
BEDFORD T.A. CROSS CO.
T. A. Bedford, druggist, Wynne, Ark. A very reliable as well as popular drug store is that of Mr. Bedford, who engaged in the drug business in Wynne, in February, 1889, and who has every requisite and convenience in this line. He is a native of Middle Tennessee, where his birth occurred in 1842, and is the second of four children born to John H. and Lizzie(Allen) Bedford, natives of Tennessee, where the father was for many [p.336] years engaged in farming, manufacturing tobacco and merchandising. In 1849 he and family moved to West Tennessee, nine miles from Memphis, and there he engaged in the cultivation of cotton, continuing at this until his death, in 1851. After this his widow moved with the family to Columbia, Tenn., where she remained for three years for the purpose of educating her children. They were then sent to Lebanon to complete their education. The mother died in 1870. T. A.Bedford attended school until the end of 1860, when he came to Arkansas and purchased a farm in what is now Cross County, about five miles west of Wynne, bought about thirty negroes and embarked in the cotton raising business. After making one crop he went to Tennessee to visit his mother, and while there enlisted in the Confederate army, Company K,Fourth Tennessee Cavalry, commanded by Col. Paul Anderson, and was assigned to duty in Gen. Bragg's army. He was in the battles of Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Perryville, Dalton and Resaca, and was captured in May, 1864, while bearing a dispatch from Gen. Hood, would not take the oath and was sent as a prisoner to Alton, Ill. There he remained until peace was declared. In 1866 he returned to Arkansas to look after the property he had left there, and found his slaves, mules and horses gone and the plantation overgrown with underbrush. He settled here, however, and returned to agricultural pursuits. In January, 1868, he married Miss Mary Rebecca Cogbill, a native of Tennessee and a daughter of George Cogbill, who came to Arkansas, in 1860, settled in Cross County, and followed farming until his death, in 1867. Mr. Bedford also tilled the soil until the death of his wife, in 1882, and in the following year he went to Wittsburg, and was in the drug business at that place for some time. He was then in the warehouse and shippingbusiness, which occupation he still continues. To his marriage were born three children: Thomas A. J. (is at present postal clerk on the Memphis& Bald Knob Railroad), Mattie R. (is a graduate of Shelbyville, Tenn.,in the class of 1889), and Mamie (is attending school at Nashville, with the same teacher under whom the elder sister graduated). In 1886 Mr.Bedford was appointed postmaster of Wittsburg, and opened the office in his drug store. He remained at Wittsburg until 1888, when he resigned the postoffice (having sold the drug store in 1887) and went to Wynne, where he purchased the drug stock of Bunch & Hamilton. He now has as fine a drug store as can be found in Eastern Arkansas, and carries a complete line of pure drugs and chemicals, toilet articles, paints and oils and the usual druggists' sundries. For compounding and putting upprescriptions he has the assistance of S. A. Miller, a graduate of the Pennsylvania School of Pharmacy, at Philadelphia and York (Penn.) School of Sciences. This assistant has a complete chemical outfit and is thus prepared to analyze water, mineral ores and chemical compounds. Mr.Bedford owns a farm one and a half miles east of Wynne.
BERRY ALONZO A.-DR CROSS CO.
Alonzo A. Berry, M. D., numbered among the rising young medical practitioners in this portion of Arkansas, is a worthy son of Bartlett A. and Elmira (Hennasu) Berry, natives of North Carolina. The former, now in his fifty-seventh year, has held a public office since twenty-one years of age. He was first sheriff of his county (Burke), which position he held during the war, and was again elected in 1887, discharging his duties of trust at the present time. He was a representative to the State legislature two terms in the Lower House, and also represented his district in the State senate from 1880 to 1884. Mr.and Mrs. Berry are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and the parents of ten children: Lenore, Letitia (wife of Dr. Flow, of NorthCarolina), Alonzo A. (our subject), Clara E. (wife of Dave Berry, of North Carolina), Robert B., Lillie P., Bartlett A., Jethroe W., Forrest C. and Marvin G. A. A. Berry was born in North Carolina in 1865, and was educated in the common schools of his county, attending Rutherford College, and Finley High School, at Lenoir, N. C., from which he graduated at the age of eighteen years. Following his literary course, he entered the Louisville Medical College, and the Kentucky School of Medicine, at Louisville, Ky., graduating in 1887. He then returned to North Carolina, where he commenced practicing, but remained only a short time, coming the same year to Arkansas, and locating in Bay Village, Cross County, where he now enjoys a large and lucrative practice. He is rapidly becoming one of the leading physicians of the community.
BICKERSTAFF ROBERT J. CSA-CO. C.Twenty-third Arkansas Infantry-CIVIL WAR LEE CO.-page 573
Robert J. Bickerstaff is a native of Georgia, in which State he remained until thirteen years of age, going thence to Chambers County, Ala. After a twenty-three years' residence there he came to Arkansas, and settled in this county (then a part of Monroe), arriving February 26, 1859. Here he first engaged in farming, but later carried on the mercantile business in Moro, from 1871 to 1874, since which time he has resumed tilling the soil. Mr. Bickerstaff was born in Jasper County November 28, 1823, and was a son of Robert and Nancy (Roberson) Bickerstaff. Robert Bickerstaff was born in the State of Pennsylvania in 1774, but removed to Georgia about 1790, where he was married in 1797 or 1798. He was a son of a colonel in the Revolutionary War, and he himself was a soldier in the Indian War under Gen. Jackson, and was killed by the Indians at Fort Henderson in May, 1836. Mrs. Bickerstaff was born in Ireland in 1778, came to this country at the age of fourteen, and died in Georgia in 1834. They were the parents of fifteen children, six sons and nine daughters; two of the sons only are living, the subject of this sketch, and Pollard B., a farmer of Montgomery County, Ala. Robert J. Bickerstaff was married in Alabama, on January 31, 1848, to Miss Mary Dazier, of the same county as himself, she having been born June 28, 1828, as a daughter of Woody and Eliza (Compton) Dazier. They became the parents of eight children, seven sons and one daughter, four of whom are still living: Herschel, Robert, Mary L. (wife of John H. Sims) and Andrew, all farmers of this county, though the latter is also employed in Government work. Mr. Bickerstaff enlisted in 1862 in Company C. of the Twenty-third Arkansas Infantry, and after the reorganization was in the Trans-Mississippi Department, serving until the close of the war, having been thrice captured but each time made his escape. Mr. Bickerstaff owns a 240-acre farm, covered with valuable timber, with the exception of ninety acres under cultivation, and he also owns land in Van Zandt County, Tex. Although not taking an active part in politics, Mr. Bickerstaff has held the office of justice of the peace for the past two years. He has been a member of the Masonic order for forty years, and has also belonged to the Missionary Baptist Church the same length of time. Mrs. Bickerstaff is connected with the same church. MANY DESCENDANTS BURIED HERE:Oak Grove Cemetery-Moro, Lee County, Arkansas, USA
BIGHAM VIRGIL C. CSA-CO.B.First Arkansas Infantry Battalion-Civil War LEE CO.-page 574
Virgil C. Bigham owes his nativity to Tennessee, though he commenced farming at the age of nineteen years in Monroe County, Ark., and has been engaged in this occupation to the present. He has also carried on the mercantile business since November, 1888. Mr. Bigham now owns 380 acres of land, with eighty acres under cultivation. [p.574] He was born December 17, 1835, a son of Martin Bigham and Sallie (Breeding) Bigham, natives of the State of Tennessee. They were the parents of seven children, Virgil C. being the only one living. The father died in 1854, ten years after the death of his wife. Virgil C. Bigham was married in December, 1857, in Monroe County, to Miss Rachel Breeding, who died in 1858, leaving two children, both deceased. He married his second wife, formerly Miss Eli****beth Caplinn, of this State, in 1863. She became the mother of one daughter, also deceased. Mr. Bigham enlisted in the Confederate army, in 1862, in Company B, of the First Arkansas Battalion (Infantry), and took part in several hard fought battles, but was mostly on scout duty. He has been postmaster of Moro since October, 1889. He is well-known throughout the township as an honest and upright man.
BISHOP S. A. LEE CO.-page 574
S. A. Bishop, the subject of this sketch, was born in New Berne, N. C., April 11, 1835, his parents being Samuel and Phobe (Hilbert) Bishop, both of New Berne, N. C., the latter dying in New Berne, N. C., at the advanced age of sighty-three years. S. A. Bishop received a high school education, and at the age of nineteen accepted a position as chief salesman in his brother's furniture store at New Berne, where he remained until December, 1857, after which he removed to Haywood County, Tenn. There on April 13, 1858, he was married to Miss Sarah W. Jones, of New Berne, N. C., she being the daughter of Dr. William M. and Rouncy Jones, nee Miss Rouncy Cooper, the two last named of Haywood County, Tenn. The result of this union was one daughter who, in 1878, married Mr. T. E. Bond, of Brownsville, Tenn., where they now reside. Mrs. Sarah W. Bishop died December 24, 1872. On October 15, 1873, Mr. Bishop was married to Miss Ida Peebles, at Brownsville, Tenn., she being the daughter of Mr. Bobert and Mrs. Ann Peebles. The result of this union was four children, viz.: Samuel A. (born July 21, 1874), Luey C. (born March 7, 1877), Robert P. (born July 14, 1879), and Ann Hilbert (born October 20, 1881). Mrs. Ida Bishop died at Marianna, Ark., October 6, 1888, and was buried at Brownsville, Tenn. Robert P. Bishop died August 3, 1885; the other children are living, Samuel' being a student of the Christian Brothers' College, St. Louis, Mo., and Lucy C. and Ann H. are with their aunt, Mrs. Lelia A. Blackwell, of Dallas, Tex. Mr. Bishop was engaged in the mercantile business first in 1865, at Dancyville, Tenn., remaining there until the spring of 1872, when he removed to Brownsville, Tenn., and continued merchandising. In the spring of 1883 he removed to Marianna, Ark., where he did a profitable and prosperous business until 1889, when he retired from business and is now engaged in collecting up his claims and winding up his business affairs. He is an example of a successful business man, of high social qualities, and is an honorable and affable gentleman.
BLOCK ISAAC CROSS CO.
I. Block, one of the prominent business men and planters, of Cross County, Ark., was originally from St. Louis County, Mo., where his birth occurred in March, 1851, and is the son of Maurice and Anna (Woubilman) Block. [See sketch of Maurice Block.] I. Block attended school at Harrisburg, in Poinsett County, until the outbreak of the war, and during those troublesome times he assisted his father in many expeditions,smuggling cotton into Memphis, and goods and provisions to the people back home on his return. During those trips they met with adventures,and endured much hardship, but with cotton at $500 per bale, and all goods that could be brought home yielding an enormous profit, they continued this business until the end of the war. In 1866 I. Block attended school for one year at Wittsburg, and during the next three years he assisted his father on the farm. During 1808 he spent another year in school at Covington, Tenn., and then his father gave him a farm, after which for five years he was engaged in cultivating the soil, "baching it" on the farm. He was quite successful, raising a great deal of cotton, corn and live-stock. In 1875 he went to Wittsburg, and engaged as clerk with his brother, L. N. Block & Co., continuing with this firm for about eight months. At that time his father dying, he entered the firm of D. Block & Co., representing his mother's interest in that business, and continued with the same for about three years,or until 1879, when the firm dissolved partnership. After this he became a member of the firm of L. N. Block & Co., and the title was changed to Block Bros. & Co. This firm immediately began to do a large trade, the first year handling $85,000 worth of cotton, dealing extensively in live-stock and machinery. This firm continued in business until the decline of Wittsburg as a trading point, when they dissolved. For about two years they ran a branch store at Wynne, under the title of Block & Co., and these two stores were connected by a Bell telephone, the only one ever used in Cross County. These stores were closed out together. In 1882 Mr. Block bought 160 acres on the Helena branch of the Iron Mountain Railroad, at Wynne, and continued to add to this tract of land until now he is the owner of 766 acres. In 1884 he built a sawmill and ginnery at Wynne, and the sawmill soon became valuable property, as the railroad creates a large market for lumber,and during this time Mr. Block acquired the reputation of being the shrewdest sawmill man in Cross County. They sold this mill in 1888. After clearing out the commercial interests at both Wittsburg and Wynne,Mr. Block applied himself diligently to clearing his large farm adjoining the town of Wynne. In four years time he had cleared up, and reduced to a state of perfect cultivation, 400 acres, and made improvements on the same, which have at once placed this plantation among the highest improved places in the State. This fine piece of land adjoins the town of Wynne, and extends two miles along the railroad, being enclosed for over two miles by solid plank fence. Along the front every twenty acres has a neatly constructed tenant house each 40 acres has a double four-roomed cottage, and each house is surrounded by a plank fence. This row of cottages, extended for two miles along the road, each one painted white with red trimmings, present the appearance of a street in a town. There is no plantation in Eastern Arkansas that is better improved, or shows better taste, or business judgment inimproving or erecting buildings than this. In addition to this place,Mr. Block owns 1,000 acres in all parts of Cross County, and on those tracts there are about 150 acres under cultivation. Mr. Block now spends most of his time in looking after his extensive farms, and occupies as a residence an attractive home in the city of Wynne. This residence was constructed in 1884 and 1885, and is furnished with taste and care. He was married in 1878, to Mrs. Fannie Puryear, a widow and daughter of J. M. Levesque [see sketch], and his wife, with her many social graces, is a true help-mate to her husband, and his home-life is a pattern of domestic peace. Mr. Block has also built in Wynne a large two-story brick house, with a hall for exhibitions, and the store rooms are elegantly fitted up, and are very attractive. He has also built a number of the houses in the town and several smallstores. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and the Odd Fellows Lodge.
BLOCK JEFFERSON DAVIS CROSS CO.
J. D. Block. To the thoughtful mind a contrast between the work of the bar of the present day, and a lawyer's life journey fifty years ago in Arkansas, is something worthy of more than passing interest. The great task necessarily performed by those faithful practitioners of years gone by, did not combine to form a smooth path of gentle declivity leading to a beautiful temple of justice, elaborately arranged with all the comforts and belongings of the present. Neither is success in the legal profession now, won by lackof energy or persevering effort, in the line of this gifted calling. Mr. Block, one of the younger attorneys of Cross County, and its present prosecutor, has attained to a front rank as a member of the bar of the Second judicial district. Born in Poinsett County, Ark., he is the son of Maurice and Anna W. Block, representative people of this county, to whom mention is made elsewhere in this volume. A thorough Arkansas by bringing up, as well as by birth, he secured a good common school education, which only served to fit him more thoroughly for the study of law, whose practice he had decided to make his life vocation. After a careful course he was admitted to the bar and at once entered upon what was destined to be a remarkable experience, for one so young in years. From his majority the field of politics seemed to offer unusual attractions for him, and at an early age hewas found active in local political movements throughout the Cross County. In 1886 he was elected to the State legislature, and had the distinction of being the youngest member in that important body. His term of service was marked by such decided ability and fitness for the position, that he was subsequently honored by being made prosecuting attorney of his district, receiving the largest vote given any man on the ticket. Mr. Block has also helped the office of county school examiner. His public life has already been one to which he may refer with credit. Brave, candid, truthful, with decided opinion, his moral and political convictions have been strong and unwavering. His manners stamp him a gentleman, and his career thus far promises to render him one of the most distinguished of Arkansas' lawyers. Mr. Block if for no other reason would be prominently recognized on account of his connection with that well-known family of Cross County, whose name he bears.
BLOCK JOSEPH CROSS CO.
Joseph Block , freight agent for the Missouri Pacific railroad, is a son of Maurice and Anna Block, his birth occurring in Poinsett County,Ark., in 1853. He is unfortunately a deaf mute, but has a bright mind,and is perfectly capable of filling the position of responsibility conferred upon him by the railroad company. He entered the Little Rock Deaf and Dumb Asylum at the age of fourteen years, and continued in this institution until eighteen years of age, when he began to learn the saddler's trade, serving and apprenticeship of three years in Memphis.He then worked at his trade a short time as journeyman, and received very good wages. After this he engaged in business for himself at Wittsburg as a saddler, but soon began and conducted a saloon under the firm title of Joseph Block & Co. for two years at the above mentioned place. In 1884 he secured a situation as express agent for the Southern Express Company, and held this position for one year to the universal satisfaction of the company and all its patrons. Later he became assistant freight agent, and in 1888 he was promoted to general freight agent for the station of Wynne. This railroad company employs over 8,000 men, and Mr. Block is the only mute in their employ. He is exceptionally brilliant,and, but for his infirmity, would long ere this have been included among the prominent businessmen of this section. He is moral, reliable and temperate in all his habits.
BLOCK MAURICE CROSS CO.
Maurice Block, deceased, was for many years a leading merchant in what is now Cross County. He was born in Germany in 1819, and spent his youth until fifteen years of age at home with his father, who was a merchant, and in attending school. At the above mentioned age his father wished him to learn the baker's trade, but this not proving satisfactory to Maurice, the latter left home and went to Paris, where he worked in a clock factory, doing the fine ornamental brass work and putting on the finishing touches. He worked at this until twenty-two years of age. The year previous, he wedded Miss Bettie Bloon, a native of Paris. In 1842, he came to the United States, landing at New Orleans, where he started out by selling goods through the country, and remained in that city for four or five years. While there Mrs. Block was stricken with the yellow fever and died, leaving two sons: Losso (who died in St. Louis in 1849) and Nathan (who is a merchant in Memphis). Soon after the loss of his wife, Mr. Block took his children and removed to Memphis, Tenn., where he continued his business of selling goods through the country for nearly a year. On May 17, 1849, he married Miss Anna Woubilman, also a native of Germany, and in July of the same year, they moved to St. Louis, where they resided for two years. In 1851 they moved to Arkansas, settled in Bolivar, the old county seat of Poinsett County, and here made their home for little more than a year. After this they removed to the Cold Water Spring, and here Mr. Block began clerking for David Block (a man of the same name but no relation), and remained in that capacity for two years,when he became a partner in the business, doing the largest cross roads trade on Crowley's Ridge. In 1859 they shipped 700 bales of cotton and over 10,000 coonskins. During the year 1858 this firm had the contract to furnish the city of Memphis with beef, and during that year they shipped over 2,600 head. This firm was dissolved in 1859 by Mr. David Block retiring, and the subject of this sketch moved to Farm Hill in 1860, and there started a store. He soon built up a large trade by his honest upright dealings, and bought a farm which promised to give good returns,but the war breaking out he was compelled to close the store in August,1861. In the fall of that year the Confederate soldiers burned 139 bales of cotton for him and a large quantity still in the seed, amounting in all to nearly 300 bales. Mrs. Block, with the assistance of two negro women, succeeded in saving a quantity of cotton by throwing the strawout of the bed ticks and filling them with cotton. Five months later this was taken from the ticks and made into two bales which Mr. Block,with the assistance of his son Isaac, took to Island No. 87, where they sold it for $1.20 per pound. During the years of the war, Mr. Block bought cotton and cattle, which he succeeded in smuggling into Memphis,and which resulted in immense profits, as he often sold calico at $1 peryard, coffee at $1 per pound and salt at $100 per barrel. These goods and others he would buy in exchange for cattle and cotton. In 1865 Mr.Block formed a partnership with his old partner, David Block, J. J. Hamilton and A. A. Luckey, and started a large store in Wittsburg, at the head of navigation of the St. Francis River. Mr. Luckey retired after six months. This firm, known as D. Block & Co., soon became one of the largest commercial firms this section has ever known, doing over$100,000 annually, and during the last year, 1875, their sales were over$175,000. Mr. Hamilton withdrew in 1874, and the subject of this sketch died on October 14, 1875. His widow continued his interest in the business until 1878, when David Block died, and the firm was dissolved, the business being sold out to J. Hall & Co. To the union of Maurice Block and his estimable wife were born ten children, seven sons and three daughters: Adam (died in infancy), Isaac (is a retired merchant and farmer residing in Wynne), William M. (is a real-estate agent at Vanndale),Joseph (a mute, has the position of manager at the freight department of the Missouri Pacific Railroad, at Wynne), Samuel (died in 1870 at the age of 13 years), Julia (is the wife of Ben Block, a merchant at Memphis), Jefferson Davis (a lawyer, present prosecuting attorney from the Second judicial district of Eastern Arkansas), Callie (wife of B. T.King, real-estate agent of Springfield), Robert E. Lee (county schoolexaminer of Cross County) and Fannie, who died at the age of ten yearsin 1880. Maurice Block was long a leading merchant in this section,and was an active energetic citizen. He was the father of a family of children, all of whom are noted for their success in life, and most of whom have been the author of their own fortunes. His widow, hale and hearty, is still living and enjoying the ample means of her husband's estate, makes her home alternately with one or other of her children.
BLOCK RAPHAEL CROSS CO.
Raphael Block is a leading merchant of Vanndale, was born in the town of Tremblade, Alsace, France, in May, 1852, and was the fourth in a family of five children, born to Herman and Rebecca Block, the father a successful businessman of the old country. Raphael remained at home attending schools, until thirteen years of age, and in 1871 determined to seek his fortune in America, and came to Wittsburg, Cross County, Ark., and engaged as a clerk for D. Block & Co., but about two years later, became an employee of G. M. Arnold & Co., general merchants of the same place. In1874 he engaged in general merchandising at Wittsburg, being associated with B. Block, and they immediately began doing an extensive trade, the largest in all probability that has ever been done by any one firm in Cross County. This partnership was dissolved in 1886, and our subject became sole proprietor, and in 1887 he bought the interest of J. W.Killough, of that well-known mercantile firm of Killough & Erwin of Vanndale, and since January 1, 1889, has been sole proprietor of this establishment also. He has a large and well-selected stock of general merchandise, amounting to about $10,000, and he commands a large and consistently improving trade. He is quite extensively engaged in buying and shipping cotton, and is an enterprising and wonderfully successful young businessman, and is courteous, pleasant and cheerful, a leading spirit in the commercial affairs of the county. He is quite an active politician, and is always found at the polls on election day. Socially he belongs to Arcadia Lodge No. 183, of the A. F. & A. M., at Vanndale,and he also belongs to the K. of H. and the K. & L. of H. December 28,1874, he was married to Mrs. Hester C. (Hamilton) Perry, a daughter of J. G. Hamilton, a member of the firm of D. Block & Co. They have had five children: Herman (attending school at the Christian Brothers' College of Memphis), Felix, Nina, David and Mary (who died in infancy).
BLOCK ROBERT LEE CROSS CO.
Robert Lee Block, county school examiner, of Cross County, Ark., was born in 1866, about sixteen miles northeast of Vanndale, being the youngest child born to Maurice and Anna Block [see sketch]. At the age of six years he was taken by his parents to Wittsburg, where he received the benefits of the schools of that place for eight years. The three following years he spent in the Christian Brothers' Institute in Memphis, and, being of a studious turn of mind and very industrious, he succeeded in acquiring an excellent education, and graduated from that institution as an A. B. in June,1884. His first start in life for himself was in the capacity of clerk in a drug store, at Jonesboro, where he continued to remain until September 28,1884, after which he went to Springfield, Mo., to accept a position as cashier and bookkeeper for Priest & King, remaining with them until August,1885. His next position was as bill clerk with the Springfield Grocery Company, and after continuing in their employ until May, 1886, he went to Memphis and became store clerk for Robson, Block & Co., remaining with them until October 12, 1886, when failing health compelled him to seek change of employment. From that time until January 16, 1887, he was an employee of Buck & Trexler, at Crawfordsville, Ark., and then worked for C. O. Richards& Co., as commissary clerk on the Memphis branch of the Iron Mountain Railroad. On June 10, 1887, the work on the west end of the road was finished, and the day following he became bookkeeper and clerk for William M. Block, real-estate agent at Vanndale, and with him still remains. January12, 1889, he was appointed county school examiner, and since filling this position has striven to raise the grade of teachers and the standard of schools by recommending only those who hold the higher grade certificates, and the excellent education which he has eminently fits him for this responsible place. Being enterprising and ambitious to rise in the world, he, in part-nership with E. L. Applewhite, on September 9, 1889, started a stock farm on a tract of 700 acres of land, they being joint owners of the same, which they stocked with 180 head of cattle, one-half Norman horse, seven brood mares, four horses, two Kentucky jacks and eight mules. They have recently put up twenty-five tons of hay, for winter use, besides 1,000 bushels of corn, and,as can readily be seen, are admirably equipped to keep their stock in good condition throughout the winter. They have seventy acres planted in rye, timothy and clover for spring pasture. Mr. Block belongs to an old and influential family of the county, and has five brothers, all prosperous and intelligent men, and, like himself, are progressive and enterprising in their views.
BLOCK SOLOMON CROSS CO.
Sol. Block, senior member of the firm of Block & Ralph, merchants and planters, at Bay Ridge, Ark., is a native of Baden, Germany, where his birth occurred in 1827. He was educated in the common schools and under a private tutor, until about twenty-one years of age, when he came to the United States (1849). Here he engaged in business for himself in the State of Illinois, remained there until about 1860, when he moved to St. Louis and there engaged in the insurance business (life, fire andaccident). After residing in that city for about ten years he removed to Memphis, where he followed the same business for about the same length of time. In 1878 he came to Forrest City, Ark., was engaged as bookkeeper for two years, and then, after making a trip to Europe, returned to Chicago, where he made his home for several years and was engaged in the insurance business. Later he returned to St. Louis, where he embarked in the cigar and tobacco business, continuing until 1886, when he came to Cross County, Ark., and in company with J. Ralph, erected a fine store-house on the farm, which had recently been purchased by Mr. Raphaelski, and which Block & Ralph manage. This farm embraces a tract of 1,400 acres of land and at one time was valuable property, but had been allowed to rundown and needed everything in the way of improvement. They at once began to make extensive improvements, soon had 500 acres under cultivation, some of which they cleared from the timber. They rebuilt the dwelling, erected a large brick stable and a first-class cotton-gin, saw and grist mill. This gin and mill is the best in the county, costing about $8,000. Theyhave an engine of sixty-five horse power and can gin twenty-five bales ofcotton, and saw 20,000 feet of lumber per day. The lumber is shipped to St. Louis. In the store, they keep a full line of general merchandise, buy and ship cotton and all country produce. They carry a stock of goods valued at $6,000 and have a rapidly increasing trade. Mr. Block was married, in 1863, to Miss Amelia Raphaelski, of English and German parentage. She was born in Liverpool, England, and came to the United Stated with her parents in childhood. Mr. Jacob Ralph, Mr. Block's partner, was born in Memphis, is still a young man, and was in business in Chicago for a short time. he was married, in 1886, to Miss May Bronson, and the fruits of this union have been one child, a daughter named Mabel. This large farm is one of the prettiest as well as the most valuable to be found in this part of the country, and by it may be seen what can be accomplished when the right steps are taken and a proper amount of energy is brought to bear.
BLOCK WILLIAM M. CROSS CO.
William M. Block, the present efficient and esteemed deputy treasurer of Cross County, and real-estate dealer at Vanndale, was born on the place known as the Bond Farm, in Poinsett (now Cross) County, about eight miles northeast of Vanndale, March 9, 1853, being the third son in a family of eight children born to Maurice and Anna (Woubilman) Block. He was educated in the common schools of this county, and in 1871-72 attended the Tipton County high school, at Covington, Tenn., subsequently taking a course in 1872-73 at the University of Mississippi at Oxford. Upon his return home in September, 1873, Mr. Block was appointed deputy county clerk, under Thomas O. Fitzpatrick, which office he creditably held until the following March, when he became engaged in the livery business at Wittsburg, and the following November was again appointed deputy clerk under James N. Dobson. In this position he served until the death of Mr. Dobson in December 1875, at which time he was appointed deputy collector of taxes, under James M. Levesque, remaining so occupied until the following June. Mr. Block engaged in his present business as real-estate agent and abstractor of titles, in June, 1876, and has made and owns the only set of abstract books in Cross County. On May 19, 1880, he was appointed clerk of Cross County, to fill an unexpired term, and also has held office as justice of the peace for six years, having been a notary public the same length of time. The abstracts of Mr. Block's are a model of neatness, by which the transfers of title, and all liens affecting the title of any property in the county can be readily found. He owns considerable property in this and adjoining counties, and also a fine residence in Vanndale, and has no superior as a thoroughly posted man on the real-estate of this county. Mr. Block was married on December 18, 1878, to Miss Alice Austell. The are the parentsof three children.
BOETZKES J. M. -REV. PHILLIPS CO.
Rev. J. M. Boetzkes, rector of St. Mary's Church, at Helena, Ark., was born in Prussia, Germany, and received his edncation at Muenster University, Westphalia, from which institution he was graduated in 1855, and was ordained subdeacon September 8 of the same year. The following year he embarked to America, taking passage at Havre, France, and landed at New York City after a two weeks' ocean voyage, and came directly to St. Louis, where he was ordained descon a few months after his arrival. On September 8, 1856, he was ordained a priest of the Catholic Church, and during the late Civil War was in the service for some time in Scott County, Mo., acting as chaplain. Here he built a stone church, which was demolished during the latter part of the war. He was in the hospital service in St. Louis for about a year, and in 1865 returned to Europe, but a few months later came back to the United States and settled in the city of Philadelphia, where he occupied a position in the diocese until 1875, at which time he came to Helena, Ark. Here he was the means of erecting a fine brick church at a cost of $12,000, and on July 21, 1889, it was dedicated, the corner-stone being laid July 22, 1888. The convent at Heleua has been built several years, but since Father Boetzkes' arrival he has improved it wonderfully. It is a day and boarding school and is controlled and managed by nine Sisters of Charity who have made it one of the best institutions of the kind in the West. The training includes a comprehensive collegiate course and thoroughly fits a young lady for any position or vocation in life, the branches taught being music, the languages, all branches of mathematics, chemistry, botany, calisthanics, etc. The building is beautifully situated and commands a view of the Mississippi River, as well as the surrounding country and the grounds are tastefully laid out with magnolia and other shade trees.
BONNER CHARLES L. PHILLIPS CO.
Charles L. Bonner, son of Charles S. Bonner, one of the pioneer settlers of this county, was born on his present place of residence in Phillips County, in 1862. His father was a native of Tennessee, as was also his mother, whose maiden name was Miss Margaret J. Gamble, and the former came to Phillips County, Ark., in 1835, when there were very few settlers. His father bought land on Big Creek, but in 1844 Charles S. purchased the place on which his son Charles L. is now residing, and which at that time consisted of 160 acres of land. He and wife were the parents of eight children, five of whom are now living: Nettie (widow of T. N. Conley), B. F., Chellie J. (wife of John W. Terry), C. L. and Loutie L. (a teacher in the Galloway Female College of Searcy, Ark.). The eldest child, Sallie E. (deceased, was the wife of W. S. Ferrill). She left one child, Charles. The father of these children died in 1876, but the mother is still living, and makes her home with her son Charles L. The latter received a good common-school education in Phillips County, and at the age of nineteen years began work for himself as a farmer, having followed this occupation the principal part of the time since. He was also engaged in the saw-mill business for some time. In 1888 he was married to Miss Sallie Allison, of Phillips County, and of the city of Helena. The maternal grandfather of Charles L. Bonner was among the early settlers of Eastern Tennessee, and was in the wars with the Indians in that section of the country. He came to Phillips County in 1840, where he resided until his death in 1874. Mr. and Mrs. Bonner and Mr. Bonner's mother are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.
BONNER EDWARD ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.G-Fifth South Carolina Regiment-Civil War
Edward Bonner was born in Spartanburg, District, S.C., in 1841, being the son of Andrew and Louisa Bonner, also natives of that state. Young Edward remained in the vicinity of his birthplace until grown to manhood, receiving but limited advantages for an education, and attending school only a portion of each year. When nineteen years of age he assumed charge of his father's farm, and after the latter's death remained with his mother conducting the business in a most satisfactory manner. When twenty years old he enlisted in the Confederate Army in Company G, Fifth South Carolina Regiment under, Captain Carpenter, commanded by Col.Jenkins, and participated in the first battle of Manassas, but being taken ill shortly thereafter, he was detailed to manage the Magnetic iron works, located at Cherokee Ford, S.C. This was one of the most important branches of industry in connection with the Southern cause. Mr.Bonner remained in this position until the close of the war, after which he commenced business as a merchant at Limestone Springs, S.C. After one year, at his mother's earnest solicitation, he returned to her home and resumed control of her extensive business. In 1869 he was married to Miss Julia G., daughter of Elijah and Julia (Ray) Harris, and their marriage has been blessed with three interesting children:Edward L., Carl Ray and Erma. The oldest child, Edward is a promising young man, and bids fair to be a leader among men, standing intellectually far above the average, a young man whose example is worthy of imitation. Mr.Bonner moved to St.Francis Co. in 1984, locating in Forrest City, and four years later was appointed postmaster at that place, serving in that capacity for five years, and also as agent for the Southern Express Company. The change of administration in 1883, or President Garfield's reign, caused his removal from the position of postmaster. Since leaving the office Mr.Bonner has been merchandising, and at present managing the co-operative store at Forrest City inaugurated by the people for their benefit. The stock is valued at $45,000 and under his efficient control is rapidly increasing in value, and is one of the city's leading enterprises. In politics our subject is a Democrat, and in religious belief a Baptist, as is also his wife. Mr.Bonner is a liberal contributor to all charitable movements, and, in fact, every act that betokens the good or growth of the county finds him a staunch supporter. Previous to the war his parents were quite wealthy, but the ravages incident to that period robbed them of nearly everything, their land being about all that they possessed. The paternal grandfather was a native of Virginia, born near Petersburg, but afterward moving to South Carolina, died there at the age of sixty three. The maternal grandfather was Joseph Camp, of South Carolina nativity, who was called to his final home at an advanced age. Mrs.Bonner's father was Rev.Elijah Ray, a Baptist minister of South Carolina. Her mother's father, Col.William Washington Harris, a native of North Carolina, was a soldier in the War of 1812, serving as Colonel in the volunteer service, and died at the age of eighty-eight years. He was one of the first settlers of Spartanburg, S.C. CITY CEMETERY
BONNER GEORGE W. USARMY-TAYLOR'S DIVISION-MEXICAN WAR LEE CO.-page 575
George W. Bonner, who is one of the most successful farmers in Spring Creek Township, has been a resident of this county since 1869. He is a native of Tennessee, and the son of Williamson and Maria (Reddith) Bonner, originally from Virginia and North Carolina, respectively. Mr. Bonner was a man of considerable education, and for a number of years followed the occupation of school-teaching, during his latter days being recognized as a public man of considerable importance. For many years he was an elder in the Presbyterian Church. He was a soldier in the War of 1812. John Bouner, his father, a Virginian by birth, and a farmer and mechanic by occupation, lived to the age of eighty years. He participated in the Revolutionary War. Mrs. Bonner was the daughter of Aquilla Reddith, a native of North Carolina, who lived in that State until his death, at the age of ninety years. The subject of this sketch was born in Wilson County, Tenn., in 1828, but his early boyhood was spent in Shelby County, where his father had moved in 1882. He learned the carpenter's trade in youth, and followed that occupation for thirty years, but since that time has been engaged in farming. During the Mexican War he served seven months in Taylor's division. In 1869, moving to Arkansas, Mr. Bonner settled in what was then a part of Phillips (now Lee) County, and three years later located on the farm [p.575] which he has since occupied. He was married, in 1854, to Miss Oliva A. F. Mason, who died nine years after their marriage, leaving four children, one of whom, Williamson E., only is living. Mr. Bonner was later married to Miss Mary E. Newsom, in 1865, a daughter of David Newsom, of Virginia. She was the mother of seven children at the time of her death, in 1881, six of whom are living: David T., George W., Charles Henry J., Carra A., Claudius H. and Fredonia L. He married his third and present wife, Mrs. Elizabeth J. Robertson (nee Tiller), daughter of Benjamin and Ann Tiller, natives of Alabama, in 1882. Mr. Bonner owns a farm of eighty acres, and has about fifty acres under cultivation, giving his attention to stock raising to a large extent. Himself and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to which he has belonged for over forty years, and of which he has been a local minister for fifteen years. He has also been a member of the Masonic fraternity for thirty-nine years. A Democrat in polities, he takes an active interest in enterprises for the good of the community, to all of which he contributes largely, and is considered one of the leading farmers of Lee County.
BONNER JOHN USARMY-REVOLUTIONARY WAR LEE CO.-page 575
SEE GEORGE W.BONNER
BONNER R. S. CSA-CO.A-Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry-Gen. Tappan-Civil War PHILLIPS CO.
R. S. Bonner, carpenter, Poplar Grove, Ark. Were it necessary for us to include in the sketch of Mr. Bonner's life any items pertaining to his ability and skill as a builder, perhaps the greatest [p.751] compliment that could be paid him would be to point out those monnments of his handiwork, which now grace so many of the homesteads in this portion of the State. He was born in Alabama, in 1844, and is the fifth of ten children, the result of the union of Thomas T. and Elizabeth (Schackel. ford) Bonner, the father a native of North Carolina, and the mother of Alabama. Thomas T. Bonner was a carpenter and ginwright by trade, and came to Alabama when a young man. He was there married to Miss Schackelford in 1834, and of the ten children born to this union, five are now living: R. S., J. C., W. H., E. C. and R. K. Mr. Bonner was a member of the I. O. O. F., and was a much-respected citizen. He died on December 31, 1849, and the mother died in 1871. The maternal grandfather, John L. Schackelford, was a native of the Old Dominion, and moved to Alabama at an early day. His death occurred in Phillips County (now Lee County) in 1863, at the age of seventy-nine years. He was a soldier in the War of 1812. His wife died in 1874, at the age of eighty-five years. R. S. Bonner came to Arkansas in 1856, received his education in this State and Alahama, and at the age of sixteen years, or in 1861, enlisted in Company A, Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry, under Capt. Tappan (afterward Gen. Tappan), in what was known as Tappan's guards. He served in Gen. Bragg's command and was engaged in quite a number of battles, prominent among which were: Belmont, Corinth, Shiloh, Richmond, Perryville, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Murfreesboro and Bell Buckle Station. He was captured close to Atlanta, in 1864, was confined at Rock Island, III., for four months, after which he was exchanged and returned to Arkansas. Later he served in Capt. Westherly's company. He surrendered in 1865, and afterward engaged in farming on rented land in Phillips County, until 1876. He then bought his present place, at that time consisting of forty acres, principally wood land, and to this he has added eighty acres, with 100 acres under cultivation. However he devotes the greater part of his time to carpenter work and is the only contractor at this place, doing a large amount of building. His marriage occurred in October, 1869, to Miss Jennie Allison, who bore him seven children, two only now living: Hettie R. and Mamie L. Five died while small. Mrs. Bonner died in 1881. She was a worthy member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. In October, 1883, Mr. Bonner married Miss Mamie Allison, a sister of his first wife, and they have two children: Olivett and Eveline H.
BONNER WILLIAMSON USARMY-WAR OF 1812 LEE CO.-page 575
SEE GEORGE W.BONNER
BOWDON FRANCIS M. LEE CO.-page 575
Francis M. Bowdon is a native of Tennessee, and a son of Thomas and Parmelia (Jenkins) Bowdon, natives of South Carolina. The father was engaged in farming in Western Tennessee for a number of years, and move from there to Landerdale County, Ala., when our subject was a small boy, there acting as deputy sheriff. In 1841 he went to De Soto County, Miss., and remained eight years, then coming to Arkansas and locating in Lee County, where he bought timbered land and cleared up a good farm. He was a prominent politician of his community, holding the office of justice of the peace in Mississippi and also in this county. He died in Evanston, Ind., while on a trip to Lexington, Ky. He and wife were members of the Baptist Church, and were the parents of eleven children, three of whom are still living: Benjamin F. (a farmer of Randolph County, Ark.), Columbia (wife of John J. Felton, a farmer of this county) and Francis M. The latter, the principal of this sketch, and the eldest of those now living, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., on May 23, 1827. He was married in 1855 to Miss Caroline Elders, a native of Mississippi, who died in 1862, leaving four children, one son, H. J., being the only one living, and who now has charge of his father's farm. Marish Gilbert became his next wife, but died three years after without issue. Mr. Bowdon was married again to Miss Mollie Arnold, in 1867, who was the mother of three children: Ethel B., Francis M. and James L. He married Melvina. Bertran, a native of this county, in 1869. Mr. Bowdon owns 580 acres in the county, 300 acres in the farm on which he lives, 150 acres in a good state of cultivation and well improved. All this he has made himself, by hard work and close economy.
BOYKIN DAVID W. CSA-ARMY-Discharge in 1865, at Appomattox Court-House, Va-Civil War LEE CO.-page 575
David W. Boykin, son of Edwin and Elizabeth J. Boykin, was born in Smithfield, N. C., in August, 1839. He was educated at Trinity College, of that State, and enlisted in the Confederate army in 1862, receiving his discharge in 1865, at Appomattox Court-House, Va. In September, 1866, he removed to Arkansas and settled in Marianna, Lee County, then Phillips County, where he was for several years employed as book-keeper and salesman in a general dry-goods and grocery business. Mr. Boykin has now been living upon a fine and productive farm in Lee County, owned by his brother, Edwin A. Boykin, and himself, and is engaged in general farming and stock-raising. He has been twice married; first, to Miss Agnes Snead, of Smithfield, N. C.; next, to Mrs. Joanna M. Saunders, of Brownsville, Tenn. Mr. Boykin is of Irish descent
BRADFORD WILLIAM S.-DR. LEE CO.-page 576
William S. Bradford, M. D., prominently identified with the professional affairs of this section, owes his nativity to Tennessee, being a son of John W. and Emily (Nuckols) Bradford, also originally from that State. The Bradfords are an old family, and can trace their ancestors back to the time of their arrival in the Mayflower. William S. Bradord, the only son in a family of three children, was born in Hardeman County, Tenn., February 11, 1859. He spent his early life on the farm, and at the age of sixteen commenced clerking in a store in that county, becoming, when eighteen, proprietor of a grocery, in which business he was engaged [p.576] for two years. During that time he studied medicine, and the next year attended a course of lectures at Vanderbilt College. He subsequently turned his attention to traveling, and was employed by a publishing company for eighteen months in selling their publications through Illinois, Iowa, Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Kentucky and Tennessee. In the spring of 1882 he went to Parker County, Tex., where he was engaged in the practice of medicine for a short time. Returning to Tennessee, he followed his profession in Hardeman County one year, and in the winter of 1883-84 attended a course of lectures at Vanderbilt College, from which he graduated in March, 1884. He then came to Arkansas and located in Lee County, where he has since been successfully occupied in the duties of his adopted calling. Dr. Bradford was married on December 2, 1885, to Miss Ida F. Halton, of Nevada County, Ark. They have one son, Wiley E. Dr. Bradford has a large and lucrative practice, and is highly thought of by the citizens of Lee County. He is a member of the Knights of Honor, and also of the Lee County Medical Association, and of the State Medical Society, having represented his county in the spring of 1888 at Fort Smith.
BRAME JAMES T. CSA-CO.A-First Virginia Regiment-Civil War PHILLIPS CO.
James T. Brame. About four generations ago, three sons named Brame, who lived in England, their native country, separated, one remaining at [p.752] home, another going to Canada, and the third coming to America, choosing for his residence the State of Virginia. From this son, James T. Brame, the subject of this sketch, is a direct descendant. James T. Brame was born in Virginia November 26, 1848 and is the son of James H. Brame, a celebrated profeasor, for many years connected with the prominent colleges of Virginia, but is now retired. He is the son of Thomas Brame, and was born in Mecklenburgh County, Va., in 1816. James H. Brame was married in 1847 to Miss Martha Baptist, born in Virginia in 1826, and a daughter of Richard H. Baptist. Mr. Baptist was a prominent politician, having served as State senator for sixteen years, and was filling that position at the date of his death. He was an uncle of Gen. A. P. Hill. Mrs. Baptist's maiden name was Sally Goode, she being a daughter of Dr. Thomas Goode, of Virginia. James T., our subject, was one of eight children, five sons and three daughters, born to his parents. He was reared in Virginia, and at the age of fifteen years enlisted in the Confederate army, Company A, First Virginia Regiment, and served until the surrender of Gen. Lee. At the battle of Stanton River Bridge he received a slight wound, that being the only time he was injured, notwithstanding that he was always in the thick of some of the most important engagements. At the age of twenty-one he left his native home and came to Arkansas, locating in Phillips (now Lee) County, at Council Bend. He chose the independent occupation of farming, which has been his work ever since, and has resided on his present farm since 1881, under his careful management it being second to none in the county. It consists of 400 acres, nearly all cultivated. Mr. Brame also oversees and cultivates 1,000 acres. In January, 1875, he was married in Memphis, Tenn., to Miss Anna J. Peters, who was born in Camden, Ark., in 1855, and the daughter of John B. Peters. He was of Tennessee birth, but came to Arkansas at an early date, and died during the war. Mrs. Peters was Miss Paralee Jackson, of Florence County, Ala. To Mr. and Mrs. Brame three children have been born: Ellen G., Mary P. and Anna. Mr. Brame is a member of the K. of P. and A. L. of H., and in his political views is a Democrat, though not an enthusiast, his first presidential vote having been cast for Samuel J. Tilden. Mr. Brame and wife are members of the Presbyterian Church.
BRASHER ELBRIDGE GERRY CSA-ARMY-COLONELKILLED AT THE BATTLE OF SHELBYVILLE, KY.-CIVIL WAR LEE CO.-page 577
SEE T.J.BRASHER
BRASHER T. J. -DR. CSA-CO.D.-Hindman's Legion-1ST LT.-CIVIL WAR LEE CO.-page 577
Dr. T. J. Brasher. An undeniable truth is that the life of any man, temperately lived, is of great benefit to the community in which he resides, when all his efforts are directed to advancing its interests, and whose career is according to the higher principles of what he conceives to be right, helping others and caring for those who are unable to do for themselves. Such a man is Dr. Brasher. Born in Christian County, Ky., on November 1, 1835, he is a son of Alexander and Margaret (Brown) Brasher, natives of Kentucky and North Carolina, respectively. The father's birth occurred in the year 1811, and during life he was engaged in that most important occupation to Kentuckians, the breeding and rearing of fine blooded horses. Being a wide-awake and prominent man, he took an active part in politics, and for many years filled the offices of probate judge and justice of the peace. He belonged to the Christian Church, and was a Mason of high degree. To him and wife were born a family of seven children, as follows: Alonzo W. (a prominent practicing physician of Hopkins County, Ky.), Rachel (the widow of Dr. T. A. Yarrell, of Kentucky), the immediate subject of this sketch, Melissa (wife of Dr. James M. Long, of Crofton, Ky.), William A., M. D. (killed at the battle of Franklin, Tenn.), Elbridge Gerry (a colonel in the Confederate army, who was killed at the battle of Shelbyville, Ky.) and Altazera (wife of David Wooldridge, a wealthy ranchman of Oregon). T. J. Brasher grew to manhood in Hopkins County, of the Blue Grass State, and after receiving a thorough practical education in the subordinate schools, took a classical course at Georgetown College, and later a medical course in the Eclectic Medical Institute of Cincinnati, Ohio, which graduated him with honors at the age of twenty-one years. After practicing his profession in the neighborhood of his nativity for about five years, he removed to Arkansas, in 1860, and located in Lee County, a portion of which at that time belonged to Monroe County. He was not long permitted to follow his peaceful pursuits, but in 1861 enrolled his services for the Confederate cause, and was made a first lieutenant in Company D. of Hindman's Legion. He participated in the engagements of Shiloh, Perryville, Franklin, Clarksville, Uniontown, and many other hotly contested battles, and in the first and two last mentioned actions received severe wounds. Because of these injuries he was rendered unfit for further active military duty, but on account of his recognized ability and worth, was appointed under Jefferson Davis, to a position in the secret service of the treasury department of the Confederate States. This important position he filled with credit to himself and honor to the cause, displaying great adaptability to the important duties devolved upon him. The year following the end of the great conflict, Dr. Brasher wedded Miss Nannie L. Edwards, a native of Tennessee, and a daughter of Charles A. Edwards. One daughter, Kate A. (the wife of James M. Maclin, of the firm of P. E. Northern & Co., of Marianna), is the result of this union. Since being a resident of Arkansas, the Doctor has practiced his profession, farmed and merchandised, and in a financial way, as well as otherwise, has made his life a success. His portrait appropriately graces this volume. In addition to his other interests he has found time to enter quite actively into literary pursuits, contributing frequently to all local newspapers. He has also attained to considerable reputation as a writer upon romance, the woodpecker, squirrel, dog, highland terrapin, opossum, etc., these articles being widely copied throughout the Southern States.
BRASHER WILLIAM A.- DR. CSA-ARMY-KILLED AT THE BATTLE OF FRANKLIN,TENN.-CIVIL WAR LEE CO.-page 577
SEE T.J.BRASHER
BRICKELL NICHOLAS CSA-CO.G-Col. Wilcoxson's Regiment of State cavairy PHILLIPS CO.
Nicholas Brickell, undertaker, Poplar Grove, Ark. There are few branches of business, if any, that require more consideration and sympathetic feeling than that of the undertaker. Their services are only called under the most trying circumstances that can befall a family or friends, and the utmost tact, coupled with decision and perfect, unostentatious knowledge of the business, is required. In these points Mr. Nicholas Brickell is well-grounded by nature and experience. He was born in Surry County, N. C., in 1824, and is the eldest of five children born to the union of J. B. and Frances (Harrison) Brickell, the father a native of South Carolina, and the mother of North Carolina. J. B. Brickell was a cabinet workman, and always followed that trade after his marriage. Previous to that, however, he had followed merchandising. He was a soldier in the War of 1812, having joined while quite young. He was married in 1822, and of the five children born to his union, five are now living: Nicholas, D. C. (is a manufacturer of carriages in Atlanta, Ga.), Mathias (died in White County, Ark., and his family reside in that county), Andrew J. (resides in Tennessee), and Emma (wife of E. A. Peal, of North Carolina). Mr. Brickell died in 1850. He was a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mrs. Brickell died in 1870, and was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Nicholas Brickell passed his yonthful days and received his education inhis native county, where, in later years, he learned the cabinet-maker's trade. He began working at his trade at the age of twenty-one years, and continued the same in North Carolina until 1846, when, in December of that year, he moved to Georgia, settling where Palmetto now stands, and followed the furniture business. This he continued until 1856, when he moved to Franklin, Heard County, Ga., and there followed the same business. In 1870 he moved to Trenton, Big Creek Township, Phillips County, Ark., remained there until 1871, when [p.753] he moved into the country, and farmed on rented land for three years. In 1875 he moved to his present place of residence, and here built his shop and house, besides two stors houses, and has forty acres of land well improved. He was married December 2, 1847, to Miss Martha A. Sanders, daughter of Joel and Fannie (Harris) Sanders, natives, respectively, of North Carolina. Mr. and Mrs. Sanders became the parents of eight children, five now living: G. H., John, Martha A. (wife of Mr. Brickell), Margaret (widow of John Edwards, who was killed at the second battle of Manasses), and Mary. All, with one exception, residing in Georgia, whither the father had moved when his children were quite small. Mr. Sanders died in 1849, and his widow in 1856, Mrs. Brickell was born February 4, 1830, and by her marriage to Mr. Brickell became the mother of ten children, seven now living: T. J. (resides at Brinkley, Monroe County, Ark.), John C. (deceased), Georgia R. (wife of J. H. Miller, of Holly Grove, Ark.), C. W. (resides in Clarendon, Monroe County), W. P. (resides in Phillips County), J. B. (resides at Helena), Martha A. (wife of J. J. Raleigh, of Poplar Grove), Robert L., C. W. (of Clarendon, who was State senator from that senatorial district, and T. J. (who is a local minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church at Brinkley). In 1861 Mr. Brickell joined the State service in Company G, Col. Wilcoxson's regiment of State cavairy, and was in the State service for six months. He only served a short time in the regular service, being detailed to stay at home and work at his trade, making spinning wheels and looms for making cloth. Mr. Brickell is a demitted member of the Masonic fraternity, Chattahoochee Lodge No. 61, and he and wife are both members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of this place. He favors all improvements for the good of the county, and extends a hearty welcome to all white immigration. He and his wife are the grandparents of thirteen children.
BRILEY JESSE LEE CO.-page 579
Jesse Briley came to Arkansas in the fall of 1851, first locating in St. Francis County, and later in Lee County, being employed as a farm hand for seven or eight years. In 1859 he bought a quarter section of land, on which he lived until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in the Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry, but was soon after transferred to the Second Arkansas Cavalry, serving in Price's raid through Missouri. After the war he returned to his farm, which he found badly dilapidated, and was obliged to start from the bottom of the ladder, but has been very successful, now owning 700 acres of land, with 400 acres under cultivation. Besides this he owns a house and lot at Haynes, and is a stockholder in the Haynes Mercantile Company. Mr. Briley was born in North Carolina, in 1834, and was married in 1859, to Miss Emma Daniel. They are the parents of four children: Sallie, Laniar, Katie and Ida. He is a member of the Masonic order, and also of the Knights of Honor. He is a Democrat in politics, and is well known and highly respected as a citizen.
BRITTAIN JOHN A. CSA-CO.C. Dobbins' Regiment-Civil War-Civil War LEE CO.-page 580
John A. Brittain is a progressive agriculturist and stockman of Union Township, Lee County, Ark., but was born in Franklin County, Tenn, in 1828, being the eldest of four children born to James and Frances (Stoveall) Brittain, who were also Tennesseeans. The family first came to St. Francis County, Ark., in 1845, and here Mr. Brittain purchased a farm on which a few improvements had been made, it being situated about one-half mile from Forrest City, which was then called Mt. Vernon. He lived in this settlement until his death April 9, 1849. He had been married twice, his first wife being the mother of our subject, but she died in 18*6, and of her four children three are yet living: John A., Susan (wife of Abram Noah, resides in Texas) and Frances (the widow of Rufus Williams, lives in Tennessee). Benjamin died in 1881, and his family still reside in Lee County. After the death of his first wife Mr. Brittain was married, in 1838, to Miss Annie Staples, of Tennessee, and the three children which were born to them are now deceased: Martha A. was the wife of Aaron G. McDaniels, and died in 1867, and the other two died in infancy. Mrs. Brittain died in September, 1844. John A. Brittain remained in the county of his birth, acquiring there a fair education, until 1845, when he came to this State with his father, and, after assisting him on the farm until he was twenty-one years of age, he followed clerking for a short while. Since that time he has followed the life of a farmer, and in 1851 purchased a portion of the farm on which he now resides, then consisting of forty acres. Very few improvements had at that time been made upon it, but he has since erected buildings, fences, etc., and now has his farm in a splendid condition for agricultural purposes. He has added 120 acres and has eighty acres under the plow. Cotton and corn are among his main products, but he also gives much of his attention to the propagation of stock. He was married in 1849 to Miss Mary McDaniel, a native of Arkansas, born in 1835. She has lived in three counties in this State, without having moved. She was born in Phillips County, which afterward became St. Francis County, and is now Lee County. She is a daughter of Archibald G. and Mary (Davis) McDaniel, who were born in Kentucky and moved to Arkansas in 1828, being among the first settlers of Phillips County, Mr. McDaniel being also one of the first postmasters in this portion of the State, a position he held until 1857. He and wife became the parents of thirteen children, eleven of whom lived to be over fourteen years of age, only two of whom are now living: Mary (Mrs. Brittain) and Harriett (the widow of Robert Shell). Mrs. McDaniel died in 1869. An uncle of Mrs. Brittain's, John Calvert, was one of the first settlers of this region, and was a soldier in the War of 1812. Her mother came from Kentucky to Arkansas via Memphis, Tenn., [p.580] which at that time was only a camp, said to be one of the camps of the noted bandit Murrell. Mr. and Mrs. Brittain are the parents of ten children, G. B., Robert McD., Mary W., M. L., and Eliza A. being the only ones living. A. T. died at the age of twenty years, and J. B. when twenty-four years of age. In 1864 Mr. Brittain joined the Confederate army, becoming a member of Company C, Dobbins' Regiment, and was with Gen. Price through Missouri, and was in the battles of Pilot Knob, Lexington, and in numerous skirmishes. He was paroled in June, 1865, at Wittsburg,Ark. He and wife are worthy members of society and his wife is a member of the Methodist Church.
BROADLEY WILLIAM J. LEE CO.-page 580
William J. Broadley is a son of Samuel W. Broadley, a native of Liverpool, England, whose father, Ferrell Broadley, also came originally from England, being proprietor of the "Fax Hall Spinning Company;" of the interests of that concern, still extensive and profitable, our subject is one of the heirs. Samuel Broadley came to America in 1849, a few years after his marriage, and was occupied in the mercantile business in the State of New York the following year. He then took the "gold fever" and went to California, leaving his family in New York, and engaged in the mining of the precious metal until 1853, when he was killed by an accident in a mine in which he was working. He was married in Liverpool to Miss Phobe Covington, a native of that country and a daughter of Frederick Covington, a merchant, and, at the time of his death, at an advanced age, a man of considerable means. Mrs. Broadley is still living and a resident of New Orleans. She also has a brother in this country, a member of the firm of Covington & Co., of Salt Lake City. Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Broadley, five are still living: Ida (wife of Frank S. Snell, a prominent real estate agent and broker of Denver, Colo.), Alice M. (wife of a Mr. Patton, a merchant of Memphis, Tenn.), William T. (an attorney of New Orleans), Henry J. (who is in the employ of the Government as a chemist) and William J. (the principal of this sketch). The latter was born in Steuben County, N. Y., in 1852. After his father's death his mother moved from New York, going to several places, and finally, in 1862, to Memphis, Tenn., where they lived one year; later she became located at New Orleans and still lives there. Mr. Broadley learned the trade of a machinist when a young man, at which he worked in different States, but finally settled in Lee County, where he was employed at his chosen occupation until 1887. Then he purchased his present farm, and has since turned his attention to farming. He was married, in 1879, to Miss Lorena O'Kelley, a daughter of Overton and Mary O'Kelley, natives of Alabama and Georgia, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Broadley have four children: Frederick C., Charles O., Ida L. and William S. (now deceased). Mr. Broadley owns a fine farm of 440 acres, with nearly 300 acres under cultivation, and is engaged in raising stock. He and wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a prominent man of Spring Creek Township. He belongs to no secret societies, but before entering the agricultural list of Lee County, belonged to the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers.
BROOKS SAMUEL H. USARMY-Second Tennessee Federal Troops-Col.Curry-Civil War PHILLIPS CO.
Hon. Samuel H. Brooks. Since locating in this county in 1866 Mr. Brooks has enjoyed the reputation of being not only a substantial and progressive farmer, but an intelligent and thoroughly posted man in all public affairs as well. He was born in Philadelphia, Penn., October 17, 1839, and is a son of John and Amelia (Fletcher) Brooks, the former a native of Bristol, Penn., and the latter of London, England. John Brooks was a merchant by occupation, and died in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1840, at the untimely age of thirty-one years. His widow afterward married Jacob B. Furrow, of Piqua, Ohio, who followed merchandising until his death in 1884. His widow survives him, and is an earnest and devout member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. She was a child of six years when brought by her parents to the United States, and their location was made at Philadelphia, Penn., where their death occurred many years later. Mr. and Mrs. Brooks became the parents of two children; Samuel H., and Thomas P., who died in Cincinnati in 1885, being county recorder of Hamilton County at the time of his decease. Samuel H. Brooks was educated in the schools of Saint Paris, Ohio, and at the age of fourteen years left home to become a salesman in a hardware store at Piqua, Ohio, but two years later he turned his attention to the railroad business, and was ticket agent at that point for one year. He next went to Indianspolis, Ind., and became conductor on the old Belfontaine line, which is now known as the Bee line, and after serving in this capacity for about ten years he worked on the Ohio & Mississippi Railroad for a short time. He then (in 1863) joined the Second Tennessee Federal troops, organized at Memphis, Tenn., under Col. Curry, but at the and of one year he went to Mississippi and located in Coahoma County, and a year later came to Phillips County, Ark., where he has since been engaged in planting; and his well established characteristics of energy, perseverance and unbounded industry have brought him safe returns. His neat farm embraces 420 scres, and to this he is enabled to give intelligent management, but he is at present giving the most of his attention to the management of Dr. A. A. Hornor's plantstion of 1,350 acres. He has always been a Democrat in politics, and in 1868 was elected county treasurer, in which capacity he served four years. In 1882 he was chosen to represent Phillips County in the State legislature. In [p.754] 1862 he was united in marriage to Miss Caroline S. Shock, a daughter of Abel Shock, who made the first steam fire-engine in the United States, and discovered the fine copper fields in the region of Lake Superior. He was a native of Pennsylvania, and died in Missouri in 1874. Mrs. Brooks was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 28, 1840, and she and Mr. Brooks have one daughter, Amelia A., who made a roll of butter that took the preminm at the Centennial Exhibition at Philadelphia in 1876. Mrs. Brooks is a member of hePresbyterian Church, and Mr. Brooks is a Mason, and belongs to the I. O. O. F.
BROWN JOHN L. PHILLIPS CO.
John L. Brown is a native of this county, and has always resided here. He was educated at the common schools, acquiring a good practical learning and resided with his parents until their death, in 1869, being married to Miss Mary E. Yates, who was born in Mississippi in 1845, and died in 1884. He married his second wife in 1885, formerly Miss Lenora Phillips, of South Carolina origin. Mr. Brown was born on April 24, 1847, a son of Richard Brown, who first saw the light in White County, S. C., in 1800. In 1839 he immigrated from South Carolina to this county, where he purchased a tract of wild land, and at the time of his death, which occurred in 1864, he owned a well-improved farm. His wife was Polly Ann Stumb, who was born in Illinois in 1817, and died in 1851, leaving nine children, five of whom are still living. John L. Brown and wife are the parents of one child, Idalgo S. He owns a farm of 200 acres of land, of which 130 acres are under oultivation. His principal crop is cotton and he raises about forty bales per annum. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a highly respected citizen.
BRUNER JOHN B. CROSS CO.
John B, Bruner was born in Springfield, Ohio, in 1844, and is the fourth of nine children, born to Daniel and Eunice (Bond) Bruner, the father a native of Ohio, and the mother the first female child born in Dunkirk, N. Y.John B. Bruner was reared and attended school in Springfield, Ohio, Jamestown,N. Y. and Meadville, Penn., in all of which places his father was engaged in merchant tailoring. He acquired a good education, and at the age of sixteen years began clerking in a drug store in Dunkirk, and later served in the same capacity in Jamestown, N. Y. and Franklin, Penn. In 1860 he went to the "Hoosier State," and embarked in the lumber business, but after a year or two returned to Jamestown and resumed clerking; after a short time he became dissatisfied with his location and went to Michigan, and served in the same capacity for a grocery firm. In 1871 he went to Memphis, and became a traveling salesman for a liquor house, but discontinued this about four years later and engaged in business for himself. After remaining there about two years he began traveling for a St. Louis firm, remaining with them seven years, purchasing in the meantime, in 1881, a farm of 200 acres, one mile north of Vanndale; 160 acres are under cultivation, and is excellently adapted to raising cotton, corn, grass, etc. He has some thoroughbred Durham cattle, a high grade of Jerseys, and his hogs are a cross between the Berkshire and Poland China. On this farm, in 1887, he erected a fine residence, it being a two story frame, 60x42 feet, containing nine rooms, ornamented by a number of handsome double porches, and presenting a handsome view from the road. He made other improvements in the way of buildings, and has a fine new barn and other substantial outbuildings. His farm is nearly all under fence and he has recently set out over a mile of hedge. He is a thoroughgoing and thrifty farmer, who sees the advantage of raising the best of everything for his family's use, including fruit and berries. With his introduction of blooded stock, new seed grains, different and improved methods of farming, the community will at least have an opportunity of seeing what taste and enterprise, combined with skill and industry, can accomplish. In manner he is agreeable and courteous, and his wife, whose maiden name was Bettie Mansford,and whom he married on February 1, 1875, is an educated and accomplished lady.She was born in Madison County, Tenn., and her father has for a long time been a well-known farmer of Gibson County, and is still residing there.
BRYANT T.D.-REV CROSS CO. CSA-First Regiment of South Carolina Heavy Artillery-Civil War
T. D. Bryant, pastor of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of Nolton, and a man thoroughly respected by his fellow citizens, is originally from South Carolina, as were also his parents, Joab and Mary (Stewart) Bryant, of Scotch and English descent. Joab Bryant was a leading farmer of his county, and though not educated was a well-informed and a good businessman. Mr. and Mrs. Bryant were married in 1831, and were the parents of twelve children, nine of whom are living: Louisa (now Mrs. Reid), F. A.(a Methodist ministor of Texas), J. R. (also of Texas), Minerva (now Mrs.Hemphis), Elizabeth (who married F. L. Dullard), W. J., J. W., T. D. (our subject), M. L., B. W. (a manufacturer of Mississippi), G. W. (a resident of South America) and Joseph (a resident of this county). The grandfather (on the father's side), James Bryant, was a solder in the War of 1812. Joab Bryant and wife were connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The senior Bryant died in 1874, and his wife in 1889. He was a Mason. T. D. Bryant was reared to farm life. In his boyhood days the advantages for schooling were very limited, but by close application to study he has educated himself, mostly at home. At the age of fourteen Mr. Bryant enlisted in the Confederate service, joining the First Regiment of Heavy Artillery of South Carolina, which was stationed at Fort Sumpter, and in 1862 joined the regular army; was in a number of hard-fought battles, and witnessed the bombardment of Fort Sumpter on April 7, 1863, and was present at its capitulation. He was captured at Smithfield, but escaping, was recaptured the same night. Mr. Bryant served as orderly and was promoted to sergeant. While in the army he was wounded four times, once in the head by a piece of shell, again on James Island, by a bayonet thrust into his leftside, which entered between the fifth and sixth rib; then again in the knee joint and also in the arm by a bayonet. After the war he returned home and the following year moved to Kentucky, where he engaged in farming in the eastern part of the State and also taught school. In 1867 he removed to Dwyer County, Tenn., where he farmed, following this for two years, then taught for two years in McNairy County, Tenn. He returned to South Carolina and busied himself with farming and teaching for twelve years. In 1882 he removed to Arkansas, settling on his present property, which comprises 120 acres of land, with thirty-five under cultivation. Mr. Bryant was born in 1846. He has been twice married, first in 1866 to Miss N. J. Fitzgerald, of South Carolina, who died in 1871, and who was the mother of three children:George (a resident of this county), Edgar (a resident of South Carolina) andElector (a teacher in South Carolina). Mr. Bryant was married the second time to Miss D. E. Fitzgerald, in 1872. They have been given seven children,all living: Lillie, Joseph, Milas, Lelier, Lulu, Thomas and Talmage. Mr.Bryant began preaching in 1885, three months before joining the presbytery,and he is the founder of the Creek Cumberland Presbyterian Church, as well as the Cumberland Presbyterian Church of Woodruff County. Mr. Bryant preaches in Cross, Woodruff, Poinsett and Jackson Counties, and is very active in all religious and educational enterprises. He is a Royal Arch Mason.
BULLARD GEORGE W. LEE CO.-page 581
George W. Bullard ranks among the leading agriculturists of Lee County, and although he was born in Tennessee in 1853, he has been a resident of Arkansas since he was three years old, at which time his father and mother, George T. and Elizabeth (Curts) Bullard, came here from their native State of Tennessee. They settled in St. Francis County and bought some unimproved land at $5 and $7 per acre, but rented land the first year of his stay. On this farm he resided until his death in 1875, and witnessed many changes in the growth and prosperity of the county as it was a very wild and unsettled region at the time of his locating. During the Civil War he suffered much at the hands of bushrangers who claimed to belong to the Union and Confederate armies, but did not himself serve in either army. Seven of his ten children lived to be grown and five are living at the present time: George W., Mattie J. (wife of John Lindsey), Octavia A. (wife of W. T. Inge), Margaret H. (wife of F. C. Danerhougher) and Alice L. The mother of these children still resides on the old homestead and manages her farm successfully. She is, as was her husband, a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he was a member of Bethel Lodge No. 254, A. F. & A. M. George W. Bullard attended the common schools near his home in his youth and in 1870 entered Abernathy's School in Montgomery County, Tenn., where he acquired a sufficiently good education to fit him for the toils and cares of business life. At the age of twenty-one years he commenced the battle of life for himself but did not leave home until he was married, in 1882, to Miss Ella Davis, she being a daughter of J. P. and Mollie (Jackson) Davis, of Alabama, who came to Arkansas about 1870. She was born in 1865 and is one of two surviving members of their family of three children: Ella, Willie and James, the latter being deceased. Mr. Davis died in 1879 and Mrs. Davis in 1877, both being worthy members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, the former also a member ofthe I. O. O. F. Mr. and Mrs. Bullard have a family of three children: George W. (who was born February 11, 1884, and died Angust 23, 1886), Daisy Lee (born February 1, 1886) and Renben E. (born October 21, 1889). Mr.Bullard owns a fine farm of 240 acres, of which 175 acres are nicely improved with good buildings of all descriptions. He raises annually from sixty to seventy-five bales of cotton, besides plenty of corn and hay, stock-raising also receiving a considerable portion of his attention. He is a rising young farmer and in all matters pertaining to the welfare of the county he is deeply interested. He is a member of Bethel Lodge No. 254, of the A. F. and A. M., and Lodge No. 1861, of the K. of H., at Haynes. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. MEMO:SEVERAL BULLARDS IN CLAY HILL CEMETERY-LEE CO.
BURKE MOSES PHILLIPS CO.
Moses Burke has been long and worthily identified with the interests of Phillips County, and no worthy history of this immediate vicinity would be complete which failed to make proper mention of his life. He was born in the house in which he now resides March 1, 1848, and is a son of Elisha and Elisa (Cail) Burke, both natives of North Carolina, the former's birth occurring July 13, 1798, and his death in Phillips County, Ark., June 21, 1860. His marriage took place March 24, 1825, and until 1835 or 1836 they resided in their native State, moving then to Arkansas, and soon after located on the farm on which our subject is now living. The father was a farmer all his life, and was very successful, and in connection with this work was engaged in milling, ginning, blacksmithing and wagon making, being successful in all these undertakings. While in North Carolina he represented his county several times in the State legislature, and after coming to Arkansas he represented his district in the senate three or four terms, and later was a member of the legislature from Phillips County. He was also colonel of militia in North Carolina and Arkansas for many years, and while the Whig party was in existence affiliated withthat party. He was born of Irish parents, and his wife was of Scotch descent, her birth occurring on July 9, 1807. She bore her husband the following children: Eliza (wife of Dr. James H. Gibson, of La Grange, Ark.) and Moses being the only ones living. Those deceased are: Richard C. (who died in 1870 when about forty years of age), Sallie F. (wife of Joseph Neville, died in 1857 at the age of twenty years), Elisha was accidentally killed at Helena in 1856 at the age of fourteen years), and the rest of the children, numbering three, died in infancy. Moses Burke received his early education at his home, and when only nineteen years of age he assumed the management of his mother's property, and has continued to successfully conduct it up to the present time. They now jointly own 740 acres of land, of which 400 acres are under cultivation, nearly all of it having been obtained since the war, as during that time the most of their property was demolished. Mr. Burke was married in 1878 to Miss Jenny E. Goodwin, a daughter of Sanford E. Goodwin, her birth occurring in Phillips County, in 1852, and by her he has a family of five children: Aubrey, Elisha B., Ethel, Moses Osear and Jennie E. Mrs. Burke is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in his political views Mr. Burke is a Democrat. He is a live and enterprising agriculturist, and his long residence in this county, his industrious habits and perseverance, [p.755] as well as his strict integrity and honesty of purpose, have contributed to place around him a host of friende and acquaintances.
BURNETT JOHN O. CROSS CO. CSA-Army-Died from Wounds-Civil War
SEE WILLIAM J.COBB
BURNETT WILLIAM S. PHILLIPS CO.
William S. Burnett is the able editor and proprietor of the Helena Daily and Weekly World, which paper is flrmly established as a representative journal of this portion of the State. Mr. Burnett's birth occurred in this county, and he has become well known for his perseverance, enterprise and progress, as well as for many other admirable traits of character, and to a very great extent he enjoys the esteem and confidence of his fellow-man. After acquiring a common-school education, heentered the office of the Democratic Star of Helena as an apprentice at the printer's trade, but completed his knowledge of the business in the Southern Shield office. He then began an independent career as publisher of the Helena Clonen, in 1864, but after conducting this paper for a short time, he sold out, and established the Des Arc Crescent, of which paper he had the management from 1866 to 1869. At the latter date, he sold this paper also and returned to Helena, where, in conjunction with Mulkey & Burke, he established the Weekly World in 1871, and afterward also began the publication of the Daily World. At a later period he sold his interest in these journals, and in 1874 he began editing the Daily Mail, but in 1876, again disposed of his paper. From that time until 1885 he gave his attention to other branches of business, then purchased the Daily World, which he is now successfully conducting, it being the second oldest daily in the State. Under his judicious management it has become recognized as an influential paper, and has done good work inadvancing the interests of Eastern Arkansas. Its editorial policy has been directed by a man of good judgment, and its columns always contain something instructive and interesting. He has always supported the men and mcasuros of the Democrat party, and has himself held responsible positions as a township and county officer.
BUSH JAMES A. CSA-Dobbin's regiment-Civil War PHILLIPS CO.
James A. Bush, planter, Latour, Ark. Of that sturdy and independent class, the farmers of Arkansas, none are possessed of more genuine merit and a stronger character than he whose name stands at the head of this sketch; he has risen to more than an ordinary degree of success in his calling of an agriculturist and stock man, and wherever known, he is conceded to be an energetic and progressive tiller of the soil, imbued with all those qualities of go-a-head-ativeness which have characterized his ancestors. His birth occurred in Knorville, Tenn., January 2, 1832, and he is of German descent. He remained with his parents until eighteen years of age, when he commenced to learn the blacksmith trade, working at his trade until 1860, and accumulating considerable money. He then commenced to speculate, and has continued this ever since. During the late war he served some time in Dobbin's regiment, and was in a number of sharp skirmishes. He was on picket duty when the first gunboat passed Helena, and was a brave and gallant soldier. He was discharged three times for sickness before leaving the army. His property was burned and otherwise destroyed during the late war, and he was a heavy loser. He was the owner of twenty-seven picked slaves, worth on an average of $1,500 apiece. After the war he commenced to farm, which occupation he has since continued. He is now the owner of 1,800 acres, with 1,200 under cultivation, and uses convict labor of Phillips, Monroe, Lee and St. Francis Counties. He has used this kind of labor for six years, and during that time has used 2,000 negroes, only losing one by death, and he meeting his death by burning, while trying to escape. In 1860 Mr. Bush married Miss Jennie McKineick, a native of Marshall County, Miss., born in 1834, and the daughter of Robert McKinsick. The fruits of this union have been five living children: Lucy C. (wife of John D. Binley, of Covington, Ky., merchant, formerly traveling for a firm in St. Louis), James R. (with the East Arkansas Hedge Company, in the capacity of book-keeper), Jesse and Walter (twins, both at home) and Mande (at school, in Memphis). Mr. Bush was formerly a Whig in politics, and is one of the enterprising citizens of the county. Although he commenced without means, by his energy and good business ability he has become one of the most suecessful and substantial men of the county. He is a [p.756] liberal contributor to all laudable enterprises, and has recently donated a house to be used as a Union Church. He is the son of Andrew and Nancy (Agnew) Bush, and the grandson of George Bush, who was one of the most substantial men of Tennessee, and died in Knox County of that State. Andrew Bush and wife were natives of Knox County, Tenn., and North Carolina, reepectively, and were married in Knoxville, Tenn., where they remained until their son, James A., was eleven years of age. Then they moved to Northern Alabama, Madison County, and later came to Arkansas, where they passed the remainder of their lives, the father dying in 1860, when sixty years of age, and the mother dying in 1878, at the age of seventyeight years. Both were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and he was a Whig in politics. He had followed agricultural pursuits all his life, was a soldier in the War of 1812, and was in the battle of the Horse Shoe. To his marriage were born seven children, all now deceased but the subject of this sketch.
BYNUM CALVIN N. ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.G-Hart's Regiment-Civil War
Calvin N. Bynum, an extensive stock raiser and tiller of the soil. Born in Hickman County, Tenn., in 1838, is the son of James and Rebecca Bynum, natives of Virginia, who moved to St.Francis Co., Ark., in 1848. Mrs.Bynum only living a few months after their arrival. Mr. Bynum died the year following. Calvin N. began life on his own responsibility at the age of eleven, and in 1861 settled his present farm, which consists of 326 acres, with 225 under cultivation. From this land he receives excellent crops, and is also extensively engaged in stock raising. He enlisted during the war, in 1863, in Co.G, Hart's Regiment, serving until the final surrender. Mr. Bynum has been married three times; first in 1865 to Miss Emeline Price, who bore him three children; James H., Laura A., and Josephine. Mrs.Bynum died in 1870, and again Mr.Bynum was again married, his second choice was Miss Louise Price. By this union, there were five children, two now living:Sinah E. and Martha E. In 1877 Mrs.Bynum was called to her final home, and his third and present wife was formerly Lucy J. Price. To them seven children have been given, five surviving: Sara I., Francis C., William H., Charlie and John C. In politics Mr.Bynum is a Democrat, in in his religious faith is a Presbyterian. He contributes liberally to all public enterprises, and is regarded as one of the representative men of the county. HUGHES CEMETERY
CALDWELL JAMES L. ST.FRANCIS CSA-FIFTH ARKANSAS REGIMENT-Civil War
James L. Caldwell is a native of Tennessee and a son of William and Amanda (Christan) Caldwell, who came originally from South Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. William Caldwell was born in 1811 and was reared on a farm, removing to Bedford Co., Tenn, when a young man, where he was married in 1844 to the mother of our subject. In 1861 they came to this county, and here the father engaged in farming and also in the milling business, in which he was occupied until his death in 1865. He was a prominent citizen of his county, a member of the Masonic order and of the I.O.O.F, and belonged to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and at one time, while a resident of Bedford Co.Tenn., represented that county in the State legislature. Mrs.Caldwell was born in Bedford Co.,Tenn. in Feb.,1816, and died in April, 1888. James L. Caldwell also first saw the light of day in Bedford County, his natal day being March 23,1846, and when a young man he took charge of his father's mill, continuing it until 1864. Then he enlisted in a company raised by C.M.Biscoe, which formed a part of McGee's regiment,(The Fifth Arkansas Cavalry), was elected second lieutenant, and a short time after promoted to First Lieutenant. After the war he returned home and engaged in merchandising for about a year, subsequently entering into the saw mill business, which he followed in this and Cross Counties until selling out to his brother in 1887. He erected a mill two miles west of Caldwell, and also took a contract for building ten miles of the Bald Knob Railroad which he completed the following year. Mr. Caldwell has built and owned fourteen different mills in St.Francis and Crittenden Counties, and now owns the mill near Caldwell and a half interest in a mill in the last named county; besides this he has and operates several farms in these two counties and Cross County, in all about 1,800 acres, with over 100 acres under cultivation, the rest being fine timber land. He aided largely in putting in most of the bridges in St.Francis and Crittenden Counties, and now has taken the contract for the erection of the buildings for the Little Rock Oil Company. He was married November 20,1974, to Miss Annie Halbert, a daughter of John Halbert, a native of Missouri. They are the parents of six children:Willie J., Lillie A., Mary Ann, Henry H., Tennie and James L. Mr. Caldwell was justice of the peace of Johnson Township for six years, and is one of the prominent men of his county. He is a member of the Masonic order, and belongs to the County Wheel, being made vice-president at its organization here. PROB.IN HUGHES CEMETERY
CALVERT JOHN USARMY-WAR OF 1812 LEE CO.-page 580
SEE JOHN BRITTAIN
CARAWAY TOLBERT F.- DR CSA-Army-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1191
CARPENTER S.B. PHILLIPS CO.
S. B. Carpenter, druggist, Helena, Ark. There is no branch of business more important in the whole list of occupations than that of the druggist. A prominent and representative establishment devoted to this branch of industry is that of Mr. S. B. Carpenter, who for a number of years has been before the public in this line. He carries a large stock of drugs, etc., and does a good business. He is a native of this county, his birth occurring in 1854, and is the son of S. B. and Margaret (Owen) Carpenter, both natives of Alabama, where their families were very prominent. The parents moved to Arkansas at a very early day, entered land, and were pioneers of the county. The father was a very successful planter, and was the owner of a great many negroes. His death occurred in 1874. Of the ten children born to this marriage our subject was the eldest, and five are now living. S. B. Carpenter, Jr., was reared in Phillips County, received his preparatory education there and then studied pharmacy in the School of Pharmacy at Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1878. Since that time he has been engaged in business for himself, and although he started on a small capital he is now in very comfortable circumstances. He is a bright young business man, and prescriptions are compounded with care and dispatch. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity.
CASBEER ARCHIE S. CROSS CO. CSA-Cavalry-Civil War
Archie S. Casbeer began life as a saloon keeper at Wittsburg in 1870. In 1874 he commenced clerking in the store, and in March 1879, opened ageneral merchandise establishment, which he continued for three years,after which he conducted a saloon and grocery combined. In 1886 he started his present store, carrying a small stock of general merchandise valued at about $1,000. He also owns 587 acres of land in this county, and forty acres in St. Francis County. Mr. Casbeer was born in St. Francis County, October 13, 1844, being a son of Thomas M. and Martha A. (May). The former was born in Maury County, Tenn., on July 4, 1813, and was of German parentage. Thomas Casbeer, Sr., the grandfather of our subject, immigrated to Arkansas in 1817, and was one of the early settlers of St. Francis County. Thomas Casbeer, Sr., was a farmer, blacksmith and proprietor of a large saw-mill. He was married Sepember 13, 1838, and died on September 25, 1872. Mrs. Casbeer first saw the light in North Carolina, September 25, 1820, and died October 2, 1867; she was the mother of thirteen children, five of whom are now living. Archie S. Casbeer enlisted in the Confederate service in a cavalry regiment during the war, in which he served one year, and was in the battles of Big Creek, near Helena, Pilot Knob, Fort Scott, and a number of skirmishes. Mr. Casbeer is a Royal Arch Mason, a member of the I. O. O. F., also of the Knights of Honor and Knights and Ladies of Honor. He is a strong Democrat, and has held the offices of constable and debuty sheriff. January 7, 1874, he was married to Delana Block, a native of this county, who died June 28, 1887, having become the mother of two children, one of whom is living. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr.Casbeer has a goard dated 1766, which was used as a powder-flask by his grandfather, T. M. Casbeer, Sr., at the battle of New Orleans.
CASBEER T. M. SR. CROSS CO. USARMY-War of 1812-New Orleans
SEE ARCHIE S.CASBEER
CLARK CALVIN PHILLIPS CO.
Calvin Clark, Helena, Ark. Indiana has given to Phillips County, Ark., many estimable citizens, but she has contributed none more highly respected, or, for conscientious discharge of duty in every relation of life, more worthy of respect and esteem than the subject of this sketch. He was born in Wayne County on July 21, 1820, and is the son of John and Anna (Price) Clark, natives of North Carolina. The father moved to Indiana from North Carolina when eighteen years of age (or in 1836) and located in Wayne County, being among the very first settlers. He first followed farming, but in later years engaged in the milling and carding business, which he carried on until his death. His wife died in 1882, and both were members of the Friends Church. Their family consisted of five children, three of whom are now living: Calvin (the eldest child), Alfred (a farmer in Indiana was formerly a merchant) and Mary Ann Hadley (wife of Jesse Hadley, of Morgan County, Ind.). Those deceased were named: Sarah (wife of William Thornburg, of Rush County, died when about thirty years of age) and Lydia (who died when twenty years old). Calvin Clark received his education in the schools of Wayne and Morgan Counties, Ind., and was but fifteen years of age when his father died. His father had married again after the death of the mother, and Calvin made his home with his step-mother until after the father's death, when he went to live with an uncle. Soon after he went to Monrovia, attended school for a time, and when eighteen years of age began teaching school in Henry County. This he continued for a number of years in the wiuter season, and followed farming in the summer. Later he engaged in farming near Richmond, Ind., which he continued until 1864, when he came to Arkansas and took charge of what was then known as the Orphans' Asylum, taking charge of the same until 1886. This was a school for th colored orphans, and is now known as the Southland College, under the auspices of the Friends of the United [p.757] States. Mr. Clark was married in 1844 to Miss Elida Clawson, of Indiana, who was born in 1822, and is the daughter of William and Keziah (Ward) Clawson, of North Carolina. To this union was born one living child, Eliza C. (wife of Theodore F. Wright, banker and miller of Granville, Ohio, and a partner with our subject in a plantation in this county. The children deceased were named as follows: Myra (born in 1845, and died in 1864, when a young lady) and Annie (who died in Indiann when in her sixth year). The above mentioned school was first organized by a Mrs. Clark, and her husband co-operated with her. This has been their life's work, and they can justly be proud of the same. Their school was located at Helena for two years, and in 1867they changed it to its present location, nine miles northwest of Helena. Mrs. Clark received her education in the best schools of Indiana (at that time) and is a recorded minister in the Friends' Church. Mr. Clark is also a member of that church, being an elder in the same, and is a Republican in politics. Clark & Wright are the owners of about 1,700 acres of land, with 1,000 scres cleared.
CLARK JAMES PRESTON CSA-DIED IN PRISON-CIVIL WAR LEE CO.-page 582
SEE WILLIAM H.CLARK
CLARK THOMAS GOODE ST.FRANCIS CSA-CIVIL WAR
SEE WILLIAM THOMAS CLIFTON
CLARK WILLIAM H.-CAPTAIN (STEAMBOAT) CSA-CO.B-One Hundred Fifty-fourth Senior Tennessee Regiment-Private (Bluff City Greys)-Civil War LEE CO.-page 582
Capt. William H. Clark, of Marianna, Ark., was born in North Carolina in 1841, and in 1846 moved with his parents (James and Virginia L. (Pinnell) Clark), to Memphis, Tenn., and from there, in 1857, to Walnut Bend, Ark., where the father purchased land. The latter was born in Guilford County, N. C., in 1816, and was a painter by trade. This he followed until after he moved to Walnut Bend, where he resided up to 1867, when he died of yellow fever. He followed merchandising, and owned some land in Walnut Bend. Clark's Landing was named in honor of him, and he owned the same. The mother was born in Virginia, in 1824, and died in Memphis, Tenn., in 1854. They were the parents of three children, Capt. William H. Clark being the eldest; and the second, James Preston, was captured in Walnut Bend during the war, and died from a fever contracted in prison. He was a member of Capt. Cowley's company, C. S. A. The youngest child died when young. Capt. William H. Clark was reared and educated in Memphis. He commenced steamboating in 1856, as clerk on the steamer Katie Frishee, and followed this in different capacities until 1861, when he joined the Confederate army at Memphis. Previous to this, in 1859, he was appointed route agent for the United States mail, between Memphis, Tenn., and Vicksburg, Miss., and was serving in that capacity when the war broke out. He joined the One Hundred Fifty-fourth Senior Tennessee Regiment as private, in Company B (Bluff City Greys), was a clerk in Adj.-Gen. Bragg's office, of the Army of Tennessee, under command of Gens. Bragg, J. E. Johnston and Hood, at department headquarters, and served from May, 1863, until the close of the war. He participated in the battles of Belmont, Shiloh, Corinth, Richmond (Ky.) and Perryville, with his company, the Bluff City Greys. During the fight at Richmond there were seventy-five in the company, and they captured from 125 to 150 of the enemy, and were in front all day. After the battle nearly all had their clothes torn by bullets, but no man of the company was wounded. They were sharp-shooters of Gen. Preston Smith's brigade. Capt. Clark was with the Army of Tennessee while under the commands of Gens. Braxton Bragg, J. E. Johnston, John B. Hood, G. T. Beauregard and Dick Taylor, from Murfreesboro, Tenn., to the surrender at Greensboro, N. C., serving continually in the adjutant-general's office under the different commanders. After the surrender he returned to Memphis and followed steamboating until 1876, part of the time being engaged in the cottn seed business. He was married in 1866, to Miss Maggie Harrison, who was born in Paducah, Ky. Her grandfather moved to Christian County, [p.582] Ky., in 1809 from Virginia, and was one of the owners and founders of Paducah. Her grandfather and William H. Harrison were first cousins, and the subject of this sketch was named for that president. Capt. Clark came here in 1876, and engaged in the receiving and forwarding business. By his marriage he became the father of seven children: William H., Jr., Dudley S., Emma, Maggie, Benigna, Ruth and Charles Preston. Capt. Clark is a member of the Masonic fraternity-Chapter, Council and Commandery-K. of H., and K. & L. of H. and K. of P. He and wife and all the family are members of the Episcopal Church. G. F. Clark was born in Guilford County, N. C., and was a first cousin of Abraham Clark, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, and was of Scotch descent. The grandmother on his father's side was a Lilly, and a relative of the Lillys of Halifax County, Va. The Carringtons, of Cumberland County, were relatives to the wife's father
CLARKE JAMES P. PHILLIPS CO.
Hon. James P. Clarke is an able lawyer of Helena, Ark., and ever since starting in this profession his career has been one of distinction and success. He is active, intelligent and energetic by nature, public-spirited, liberal-minded and generous in disposition; it is not to be wondered at that his career has been successful and honorable. He was born in Yazoo County, Miss., August 18, 1854, and is a son of Walter and Ellen (White) Clarke, who were early residents of the State of Mississippi, and there the father's death occurred in 1861, his wife also passing away in that State. Mr. Clarke was a civil engineer and contractor, and he and his wife became the parents of three children, only two of whom are living, of whom Hon. James P. is one. He received the principal part of his education and rearing in Mississippi, but also attended school in Alabama and Virginia, thus becoming quite familiar with the "world of books." He graduated from the Law Department of the University of Virginia, and since coming to Helena in 1879 has given his profession his undivided attention, and owing to his sound views, his intelligence, and his ability as a lawyer, business has come to him unsolicited. The people of the county have not been slow to recognize his worth, and in 1886 he was elected to the State legislature, and to the State senate in 1888.
CLEBURNE PATRICK RONAYNE-MAJOR GENERAL CSA-Army of Tennessee-Killed at Battle of Franklin-Civil War PHILLIPS CO.
MAJOR-GEN. P. R. CLEBURNE, Of the Confederate Army, born in County Cork, Ireland. Killed at the battle of Franklin, NOVEMBER 30, 1864. Gen. Patrick Ronayne Cleburne. The career of this gentleman and his ability as a commander, which is so noted in the annals of Confederate history, has been justly admired by friend and foe, and although erroneous impressions regarding his early life have existed, the following sketch of his career is founded on fact. He was born in Ireland, ten miles west from the the city of Cork, on St. Patrick's Day, March 17, 1828, and was a son of a popular and successful physician, who made a good living by his profession, but who spent his money too freely for the acquisition of wealth, in his favorite pursuit of amateur farming. He was married to Mary Anne Ronayne, and the subject of this sketch was named after her father, Patrick Ronayne, Esq., of Cork. Dr. Cleburne was descended from an old Tipperary family of English and Quaker stock, which settled in Ireland during Cromwell's reign. He was finely educated and was a graduate of some of the best colleges of medicine and surgery. After the death of his wife, which occurred when Patrick was about a year old, he married a Miss Stuart, a daughter of a Scotch clergyman of that name, their union being a very happy one, and his children never lacked the kind ministrations and gentle love of a mother, Patrick being an especial favorite of hers, and she was always remembered by him with veneration. The Doctor's first union resulted in the birth of three children, and the second in the birth of four. Of these, Joseph (the issue of the first marriage) died of yellow fever contracted on the west coast of Africa during a voyage, and Christopher (issue of the second marriage) was a gallant captain in the Second Kentucky Cavalry of Morgan's command, and fell at the battle of Cloyd's Farm, May 10, 1864, aged twenty-one years. The rest, with perception of Patrick, still survive and live in this country. William, the oldest brother, is engineer of the Oregon Short Line at Omaha, Neb., and [p.758] Anne is now Mrs. Sherlock, formerly of Cincinnati, Ohio. Patrick Cleburne received his early instructions from a private tutor, and at the age of twelve years was sent to a private school kept by a Rev. Mr. Spedden, but as he was a man of very harsh measures, Patrick's efforts at acquiring a classical education were a failure. At the age of sixteen, his father died, and he then determined to turn his attention to pharmacy and apprenticed himself to a Mr. Justin, of Mallow, but upon his failure to pass the examination at Apothecary's Hall, Trinity College, Dublin, after what he considered a thorough preparation, he was so disheartened and mortifled that he enlisted in the Forty-first Regiment of Infantry, then stationed at Dublin, hoping that it would soon be ordered to foreign service. His anticipations were not realized, however, and owing to the monotony and dull routine of barrack life, he turned his thoughts to America, where adventurous and ambitious spirits could find a wider scope for their talents, and although his withdrawal was decidedly opposed by Capt. (afterward Gen.) Pratt, who distinguished himself in India and the Crimea, he was immovable and purchased his discharge through the intervention of his family. In company with his brothers William and Christopher, and his sister Anne, he embarked on the vessel Bridgetown, and on the following Christmas day entered the mouth of the Mississippi River. Leaving his friends in New Orleans, he went at once to Cincinnati and engaged in business on Broadway with a druggist named Salter, but soon after left this place and located in Helena, Ark., commencing his career here as a prescription clerk in the store of Grant & Nash, purchasing, two years afterward, Mr. Grant's interest. During this time he devoted himself to the study of his profession, and also general literature, and being particularly fond of oratory became a conspicuous member of literary and debating societies. As orator of the day at a Masonic celebrat
CLIFTON WILLIAM THOMAS ST.FRANCIS
William Thomas Clifton, an active carpenter of Forrest City, was born in Elerton, Jefferson Co., Alabama, near Birmingham, March 23,1823, being a son of Amza H. and Adeliss (Goode) Clifton, natives of Virginia and North Carolina, respectively. The paternal grandfather of our subject, William Clifton was a Scotchman by birth and came to America about the close of the Revolutionary War, settling in North Carolina, where he married a Miss Martha Rice, daughter of John Rice. Mr.Rice was in the employ of the United States Government as a surveyor under President Monroe, and assisted in moving the Indians west, receiving 5,000 acres of land for his services, part of which tract is the land on which Memphis in now situated, and to this day it is known as the Rice grant. The father of Adelissa Goode (Thomas Goode), was a soldier and served seven years in the Revolutionary War, and was commissioned colonel in Gen.Washington's body guard, and his grandson, Thomas Goode Clark, was a soldier in the late war, and fell at the battle of Gettysburg, together with his son; the pine boards which marked their resting place are now among the relics at the Libby Prison War Museum. Mr.Amza H. Clifton was born in Caswell County, N.C., and was married in 1821 at Hopkinsville, Ky. he settled in Jefferson County, Alabama, moved to Tennessee about 1828 and located in Covington, Tenn. where he lived about ten years, and then moved to Mississippi in 1837. In 1840 going to Memphis, Tenn., he resided their until his death in 1849. William T. Clifton gave his attention to the carpenter's trade under his father's instruction until of age, and in 1845 came to Arkansas, but remained only a short time, in 1847 making another trip. IN 1848 he was married to Miss Araminta Cathey, and settled in Mount Vernon near the present site of Forrest City, where he has since lived. He and wife are the parents of three children:Mattie C. (wife fo Joseph M.Davis, of this city), William a. ( a confectioner of Morrllton, Ark.), and Mollie, now Mrs.Ritter of the same place. Mr. and Mrs. Clifton are members of the Baptist church. He is a strong Democrat and a prominent citizen. OBIT:Death of An Old Citizen-On Monday night, Oct.16,1905, our people were startled and shocked to learn of the death of Mr.W.T.Clifton, one of the oldest residents of Forrest City. At 8 o'clock, his son, Mr.W.A.Clifton left home for a walk uptown, and at that time, his father was in his customary health. But shortly thereafter, he became ill and in less than two hours was dead of a heart attack. William Thomas Clifton was born on March 28,1823, at Halleyville, the present site of Birmingham, Alabama. In 1848, after his marriage, he left for Arkansas, making his home at Helena. Soon after the foundation of Forrest City in 1869, he came to this place, where he since resided. His wife died in 1899, and at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning he was laid to rest by her side. Three children-W.A.Clifton, Mrs.Mattie Davis, and Mrs.Mollie Ritter survive him. He was a good man, and a good citizen. SEE BIO. CITY CEMETERY
CLOPTON HOGGATT-COLONEL CSA-Albert W. Johnson's regiment-Civil War PHILLIPS CO.
Col. Hoggatt Clopton, Helena, Ark. A glance at the lives of many representative men, whose names appear in this volume, will reveal sketches of some honored, influential citizens, but none more worthy or deserving of mention than Col. Hoggatt Clopton. This gentleman resides three miles west of Helena, and is the owner of Clopton Hall plantations, among the largest in the county, consisting of 4,500 acres of land, with 1,700 acres under cultivation. He is also a capitalist. Col. Clopton was born near Nashville, Tenn., February 6, 1831, and is the son of John Hoggatt and Matilda C. (Drake) Clopton, the grandson of Anthony Clopton, and the great-grandson of Hugh Clopton, of Virginia. The latter, with two brothers, Will and Anthony, left England and came to America, locating in Virginia about 1700. Afterward Will returned to the land of his birth, and being the oldest of the three brothers, fell heir to Clopton Hall Manor, at Stratford-on-Avon. Anthony Clopton, grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was a native Virginian, and died in De Soto County, Miss., in 1848, when eighty-seven years of age. He was a very successful farmer, and was among the first settlere of Davidson County, Tenn., locating at Nashville when that city was but a small trading point. He moved to Tipton County, Tenn., in 1836, and resided there until 1846, when he broke up housekeeping on account of the death of his wife, whose maiden name was Rhoda Hoggatt, and moved to Marshall County, Miss. Later he moved to De Soto County of the same State, where he passed the closing scenes of his life. He was a Whig, but took very little interest in politics. He was at one time a partner in a race course at Clover Bottom, near Nashville, Tenn., with Gen. Andrew Jackson. John Hoggatt Clopton, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Davidson County, Tenn., on Aug. 31, 1805, and died on July 26, 1855, in Phillips County, Ark. He was married in March, 1830, to Miss Matilda C. Drake, a native of Wilson County, Tenn., born September 15, 1813, and died June 6, 1865. They lived near Nashville, Tenn., until 1839, when they moved near Holly Springs, Marshall County, Miss., where they resided until December, 1851. After this the family moved to Phillips County, Ark. While living at Nashville Mr. Clopton was engaged in raising fine stock, especially racing stock, but also raised blooded stock of all kinds. He was the owner of a great many slaves, but sold his property at Nashville, moved to Mississippi with his slaves, and from that time until his death was occupied as a cotton planter. He was unusually successful, and although starting life with rather limited means, by his superior business ability and great energy was the possessor of a great deal of property at his death. He and wife were worthy members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and on coming to Phillips County were instrumental in the building up of the Methodist Episcopal Church at Helena. He was a Whig in politics. Matilda C. (Drake) Clopton was the daughter of Brittain Drake, a native of North Carolina, whose aucestors were also English, and an old settler of Wilson County, Tenn. He was a farmer, and in his political views was a Whig. There were born to the union of John Hoggatt Clopton and wife, eight sons and two daughters, four of whom are now living: Col. [p.764] Hoggatt, Jesse P. (a prominent planter and merchant of Phillips County, Ark.), James W. (a successful merchant and planter of Phillips County, now residing in Helena), and William C. (an eminent attorney of New York City, a graduate of the University of Virginia, and also a graduate of the University of Berlin, Germany). The childrendeceased were named as follows: John Anthony (was born January 23, 1833, and died on July 19, 1854; he was a merchant at Helena, Ark.), Brittain D. Clopton (was born March 9, 1835, and died February 4, 1831, at Columbia. Tenn.), Charles C. (was born March 16, 1837, and died near Memphis, Tenn., December 24, 1854, while on a visit), Jack Hoggatt (was born in October, 1843, and died on May 28, 1855), Matilda L., Helena (died in April, 1858), and Fannie (who was the first of the children to die, her death occurring when but two years of age). Col. Hoggatt Clopton graduated at the University of Mississippi, in 1851, and was elected speaker to represent the Hermean Society at commencement, in which he bore the highest honor as speaker, and soon after turned his attention to planting and merchandising. He started the latter business in 1853, continued one year, and being the oldest son it became his duty to assist his father and family in planting operations. His three brothers, Jesse P., James W. and William C. were in the Confederate army, Jesse P. holding the rank of major, and James W. being in the commissary department on account of a wound received at the battle of Shiloh. William C. was but fourteen years of age when he enlisted. Col. Hoggatt Clopton entered the service in 1862, in Albert W. Johnson's regiment as lieutenant. After the war he again turned his attention to planting, and although he has experienced many heavy losses, he is now in a prosperous condition, and is one of the representative and substantial citizens of the county. His marriage to Miss Ellen S. Booker took place December 19, 1867. She was born in Columbia, Tenn., and was the daughter of James G. Booker, a Virginian by descent. She was a member of the Episcopal Church, and died in full communion with the same on May 20, 1869. Mr. Clopton has remained single since. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and in politics he affiliates with the Democratic party. He is of purely English origin, and may well be proud of his ancestors, as many of them have been distinguished men. One of them, Sir Hugh Clopton by name, was Lord Mayor of London in the reign of King Henry the Eighth, and lies entombed by the side of Shakespeare, in Stratford Church on Avon. And another ancestor, Capt. John Hoggatt, his great-grandfather, commanded a company in the War for Independence, and now lies buried near Nashville, Tenn., with a record of his career written on his monument. He was of English descent, and a native of Virginia, and was a farmer by occupation. Mr. Clopton took an extensive trip all over England, Ireland, Wales and Scotland, and Continental Europe the past spring, summer and fall, and was at the tomb of Shakespeare and Sir Hugh Clopton. They were contemporaries, and are buried side by side in Stratford Church on (the river) Avon, in Warwick County, England, about 100 miles west of London.
CLOPTON J. W. CSA-Yell Rifles-Captain P.R.Cleburne-Civil War PHILLIPS CO.
J. W. Clopton, wholesale grocer and cotton factor, Helena, Ark. This most enterprising and successful business man is the son of John H. and Matilda (Drake) Clopton, both of whom were born near Nashville, Tenn. They were married in that State, and in 1841 moved to Marshall County, Miss., where they resided until 1851, and then moved to Phillips County, Ark., where the father died in 1856. The mother died in 1865. Of the ten children born to their union, four are now living; Hoggatt, Jesse P., James W. (in Phillips County) and William C. (in New York City). James W. Clopton, was born in Marshall County, Miss., on March 16, 1841, and was ten years of age when he came to this county with his parents. He was educated principally in Helena, was reared partly on the farm, and at an early age began clerking, which enterprise he continued until the late Civil War. He [p.763] then enlisted in the Yell Rifles, of which the late Maj.-Gen. Cleburne was captain, and served until the close of the war, He received a gunshot in the right hand and left wrist at the battle of Shiloh, came home on a furlough, and while here he was captured and taken to Alton, Ill. After being retained for about four months, he was exchanged, and fortunately fell in with the first lot of prisoners that got through. He joined his regiment at Murfreeshoro, and was secoud sergeaut. He was in all the principal engagements, and served his canse faithfully and well. Returning home he farmed for two years, and then embarked in mercantile pursuits which he has since carried on. He has an exterisive wholesale business, and is a successful business man. He was married, in 1869, to Miss Bettie Rainey, a native of Macon, Miss., by whom he has five children: Mary, Edna, Alice, James W. and Bess. Mr. Clopton is a member of the K. of P. and American Legion of Honor, is a stockholder in the People's Saving Bank and Helena Compress Company, also the Fair Association, and is president of the Chamber of Commerce.
CLOPTON JAMES W. CSA-Army-Civil War PHILLIPS CO.
BROTHERS OF HOGGATT CLOPTON
CLOPTON JESSE P.-MAJOR CSA-Fifteenth Arkansas Regiment-Gen.Cleburne Div-Civil War PHILLIPS CO.
Jesse P. Clopton, planter, Marvell, Ark. The principal part of his life Mr. Clopton has followed, with substantial success, the occupation to which he was reared and in which he is now engaged, farming. He is one of the largest land owners in Phillips County, is also one of its recognized leading agriculturists and merchants, and as a man, no less than a citizen, is highly esteemed. His birth occurred near the old Jackson Hermitage, Davidson County, Tenn., March 4, 1839, and is the son of John Haggatt and Matilda C. (Drake) Clopton, both natives of Tennessee. The parents were married in their native State but immigrated to North Mississippi in 1844 and there the father died July 26, 1855. The mother was a descendant of Sir Francis Drake, and died in this county June 6, 1865. Their marriage resulted in the birth of ten children: Haggatt (born February 6, 1831), John A. (deceased, born January 23, 1833), Brittain D. (deceased, born March 9, 1835), Charles C. (deceased, born March 28, 1837), Jesse P., James M. (born March 16, 1841), Jack M. (born October 8, 1843), Matilda L. (deceased, born November 29, 1845), William C. (born March 16, 1848) and Fannie [p.765] (deceased, born January 29, 1851). Jesse P. was but twelve years of age when he moved with his parents from Mississippi to this county and here he finished his growth. He received such educational advantages as were attainable in the common schools, but afterward completed his schooling by attending Lebanon College, Tenn. After this he began the study of medicine, but the war broke out and he enlisted in the Confederate service in 1861, under Gen. Cleburne's demand, Fifteenth Arkansas Regiment. He served until he was disabled, was then discharged and was out of service for four months. He then again joined the army, was soon after captured and almost directly exchanged, being on parole for about two months. He was at the battle of Helena and was the first man shot at while performing the duties of adjutant-general. At the close of the war he returned home and engaged in tilling the soil. He was married January 7, 1864, to Miss Virginia C. Swan, a native of Phillips County, Ark. (born February 5, 1846, and the daughter of Major John C. Swan, who was born in Frankfort, Ky., on April 1, 1800. Major Swan came to this county in 1836, located eighteen miles west of Helena on what is known as the military road, and here he was extensively engaged in cultivating the soil, owning at one time over 1,000 acres in this county and as much in the State of Mississippi. He helped survey the military road at an early day and was one of the prominent and useful citizens. He was marrled in Helena, Ark., to Miss Permelia B. Raleigh, a native of Virginia (born November 7, 1817), and the daughter of Charles V. Raleigh. Mr. Raleigh was a native of North Carolina, and the capital of that State was named in his honor. He was a descendant of Sir Walter Raleigh. Maj. Swan died in this county December 25, 1849, and his wife died September 9, 1867. They were the parents of three daughters and one son: John R. (was a captain in the Confederate army and died at his home, a number of years after the war). Mary J. (deceased), Fannie A. (deceased) and Virginia C. (who is the youngest child). To Mr. and Mrs. Clopton were born five children, two now living: Jesse P. (deceased), Virginia (deceased), John H. (deceased), Agnes C. and Eugenia (both at home). Mr. Clopton is the owner of 1,776 acres of land, 1,100 acres under cultivation, and raises annually from 250 to 400 bales of cotton. In March, 1872, he opened a store of general merchandise in Marvell and carries a stock of goods valued at $5,000. He buys and ships cotton and is the leading business man of Marvell. In politics, he is Democratic, casting his first presidential vote for H. Seymour, and he held the office of circuit clerk for two years. He is a member of the K. of H. and the K. & L. of H. He and his family are members of the Episcopal Church. Mr. Clopton has a large cotton-gin and saw-mill on his plantation.
CLOPTON WILLIAM C. CSA-Army-Civil War PHILLIPS CO.
BROTHERS OF HOGGATT CLOPTON
COBB WILLIAM J. CROSS CO. CSA-Gen.Price's Command-Civil War
William J. Cobb, Vanndale, Ark. The entire life of Mr. Cobb has been passed in an industrious manner, and not without fairly substantial results of success. He was born in Washington County, Ark., in 1846, was the second in a family of eight children born to William A. and Susan (Brodie), the father a native of North Carolina, and the mother of Tennessee. The father was reared to farm life and attended school in his native State until about twenty-one years of age, when he went to La Grange, Tenn. There he attended school for about a year, and was then ordained a minister in the Methodist Episcopal Church by Tennessee Conference. He then began preaching on a circuit in North Alabama, and was engaged in this work about one year. In about 1838 he came to Arkansas, followed his ministerial duties in this State,and after a year or two was sent by the Conference of Arkansas to the Indian Nation, where he preached, and had charge of the mission school of thatTerritory until about 1854. Prior to that time, about 1844, he had married in Washington County, Ark., the daughter of Ludwick Brodie, a pioneer from Middle Tennessee, to Northwestern Arkansas. After giving up the work in the Indian Nation, he was on the retired list for a year or so, and in 1857, he, with his family, went to Florida, where after residing about a year, they came further north, and located at Trenton, Tenn., in order to educate their children. Here he followed farming, was also engaged in merchandising,continuing at this until 1862, when the family returned to Poinsett, now Cross County, and settled about two miles southeast of the present village of Vanndale. Here he at once took charge of the Poinsett Male and FemaleAcademy, which educational institution he conducted during war times, the last session of this school being held in 1865-66. He then joined the conference, and was immediately placed in charge of the Harrisburg Circuit, preaching from that time until 1873, in various districts and circuits of Eastern Arkansas. About that time he retired, and soon after died from a cancer, which troubled him for many years. W. J. Cobb was attending school at Trenton, Tenn., at the breaking out of the war, but came with his parents to Arkansas, in 1862. In 1863, at the age of sixteen years, he enlisted in the Confederate army, and was assigned duty in Eastern Arkansas,participating in his first engagement near Augusta, on White River. He was with Gen. Price on his Missouri raid, and was in every engagement of that campaign. After that he returned with his regiment to Arkansas, and on May 25, 1865, surrendered at Wittsburg. He then at once began farming in Cross County, on his father's place, and here he remained until 1878, after which he went to Northwest Arkansas, and was engaged as a clerk for A. A. Brodie,a merchant at Huntsville, Madison County. Here he remained for four years, when he returned to Cross County, and again followed agricultural pursuits on the old homestead. He remained there until 1887, when he moved to Vanndale, bought a lot, erected a dwelling, and has since made his home there,following the carpenter's trade. In February, 1889, he engaged with Killough& Erwin as clerk in the store at Vanndale. He was married, in 1874, to Miss Alice E. Burnett, a native of Tennessee, but who was principally reared in Arkansas, and who is a daughter of John O. Burnett. Mr. Burnett was a solder in the Confederate army, was wounded in the battle of Prairie Grove, and died from the effects. His family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church,South.
COFFEY W.H.-JUDGE ST.FRANCIS CSA-Fourth Tennessee Infantry-Civil War
Judge W.H.Coffey, an eminent lawyer of St.Francis County, widely known and highly esteemed by his associates on the bench, is originally of Fayette Co., Tenn, but was taken by his parents when an infant, to DeSoto, County, Mississippi, in which state his father died two years later. His mother then returned to her father's home in Hardeman County, Tenn., and afterward married John Coates, of that county. In 1861 Mr.Coffey enlisted in the Fourth Tennessee Infantry, taking an active part in the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga, and a number of others. He was captured and taken prisoner at the battle of Missionary Ridge, thence conveyed to Camp Morton, Ind., held in captivity for nine months, when he was exchanged, and receiving a furlough turned his face toward his native land, walking over 225 miles, and reaching home a short time before the surrender. He then took up farming for his livelihood, and in 1869 was married to Miss Mary E.Haris, who died in 1870, leaving one son, James W. In 1872 Mr.Coffey removed to Arkansas, and settled in St.Francis Co.,, on a farm nine miles from Forrest City, purchasing the first 160 acres of land, to which he has added from time to time, until know he owns 1,120 acres, and besides these he has his home farm, 225 acres, which are under cultivation.Two years after his removal to this county, he was elected justice of the peace, holding this office until 1886, when he was elected county judge, and was again elected to this office in 1888, and is now finishing his second term. In December, 1873, he was agin married to Mary A. Houston, a daughter of James M. Houston. They are the parents of eight children, five of whom are still living:Mary E., Martha T., Noma, Nora Belle and Clarence Elbert. Mr.Coffey affiliates with the Masonic fraternity, in which order he has taken the degree of Royal Arch., and in the thirteen years of membership, he has not missed but four regular meetings. He is also a charter member of the County Wheel, being one of the charter members of this lodge, and was its first president..
COLE JOHN H. ST.FRANCIS USARMY-MEXICAN WAR
In passing through Eastern Arkansas it would be impossible to meet a gentleman of more marked characteristics than J. H. Cole, the subject of this sketch. He is a typical Tennessean, and a man of more than ordinary physical strength and activity, and the observer needs to be no expert to recognize in him a person of unyielding determination and will. He still stands erect and walks with the agility of a man of forty years, although three score years and two have passed their mantle upon him, his birth occurring in 1827. He spent his boyhood days in Stewart and Humphries Counties, Tenn., but the monotony of his quiet life made him restless and the opening of the Mexican War gave him an opportunity to see life in its most exciting phase. Eagerly embracing the opportunity, he enlisted in 1846, and followed the fortunes of the war until its close, participating in the famous battles of Monterey and Buena Vista At the close of hostilities he went to New Orleans, and for two years engaged in the drug business. Returning thence to Tennessee, shortly after he was married in Carroll County to Miss May Mathews, and moved to Hickman, Ky., where he accepted a position as marshal and wharf master. He then came to Madison, the old county seat of Arkansas, landing there in September of 1857, having made the journey from Helena in a dugout or canoe. In Madison he opened a livery business, acting as agent for the line to Hot Springs, and contractor for the lines from Helena to Cherokee Bluff. At the breaking out of the war he joined the Fifth Arkansas State Troops, under Ristor, but when they joined the Confederate army he left and took charge of Hardee's wagon train for Missouri. He was suddenly taken ill, and obliged to come home, but afterward reported to Col. Walker, and was with him in the fight at Helena. He was taken prisoner by Powell Clayton, a short time after receiving his parole; and was once charged with the burning of a boat, and on trial for his life, but Clayton proved him in his hands as a prisoner at the time, which act saved his life as soon as the war closed he opened at Madison the first store in St. Francis County, under the firm name of Cole & Prewett. He received all the goods with which to conduct it from New Orleans on credit, through the influence of friends, and from that departure made a fortune, The firm continued till the Governor of the State called for civil instead of marshal law. A committee was appointed to select some reliable man to go and secure the commission from the Governor, but, although various parties were appointed, no one would undertake the venture; accordingly Mr. Cole-always fearless as he was shrewd-started without telling any one of his intention. He went on horseback to Memphis, and from there by boat to Little Rock, where he secured an interview with the Governor, and received the commission. He then returned home and immediately called together some of the most reliable men of the county, appointing them to the various offices. Then in a field close to an old court house, he organized the first county court after the war. The records had been buried there during the war. The commissioner of the post came and ordered him to jail, but he read him the commission from the Governor, showing him that his time of service had expired the day before. Mr. Cole was not in favor of secession, but went with his State when it seceded. A man by the name of Inge was sent from Mississippi before the war for the purpose of preaching secession. Mr. Cole made the remark to Judge Pierce of the county, that it would have been better if South Carolina had slipped into the sea than to have slipped out of the Union. The secessionist procured a pistol and cowhide, and began to whip Mr. Cole. A fight ensued, in which Mr. Inge was killed. Our subject was afterward wholly exonerated by the court. When Forrest City became the county seat of St. Francis County, Mr. Cole closed up his business and came here. At this place Hugh H., the only child, died. He was a rising young attorney of the place, and a graduate of Lebanon Law School. Since his death Mr. Cole and wife have been disconsolate, and have tried to forget their sorrow in traveling. They have gone as far North as possible, visiting every point of interest mention able. They were for a period abroad, spending some time in Dublin, Ireland. Mr. Cole recently united with the church, a large audience congregating to hear his experience. He is beloved by all who know him, and is well worthy the respect and deference paid him, for though he is perhaps a trifle eccentric, a mean act is something he has yet to do. He is a favorite in society and business circles, and though witty and quick at repartee, he never wounds a friend and there is no sting in his mirth. He, with his honored wife enjoys that which is so much to be desired-an unsullied name, and the sincere love of a host of friends. His grandfather was a native of Virginia and the third settler of Nashville, Tenn. . 1880-FORREST CITY 46 John H. COLE Self M M W 52 TN Occ: Banker Fa: TN Mo: SC
COLE WILLIAM H. CROSS CO.
William H. Cole, one of the genial members of the enterprising firm of Smith, Cole & Davis, also the general manager of the three mills owned by this firm, is a Pennsylvanian by birth, being a son of Joseph and Ellen (Yost) Cole, of German descent, the paternal grandfather, Joseph Cole, was a hotelkeeper and also owned an interest in a lumber business. He moved to Iowa, living in this State about four years, then in 1870 came to Mississippi County, Ark., where he busied himself in farming until his death, which occurred in 1872. To the parents were given seven children, five of whom are still living: William H., Clemenza E. (the wife of John J. Merrison), J. C., James R. and Edward F. William H. Cole (whose biography is heregiven) was born in 1852, and lived at home with his mother until 1875, when he started in the mercantile business at Richardson's Landing, Tenn., which he followed for four years, losing in this business some $10,000, after which he went into the lumber business, being very successful. In October, 1888, he removed his mill and family to this county and located near Bay Village,erected a saw-mill in charge of the firm of Cole & Davis, which was moved from Tipton County, Tenn., where it had been operated six or seven years by said firm. They bought 260 acres of timber land and erected their first mill, which turns out annually about 1,500,000 feet of lumber, the capacity of this mill being 20,000 to 22,000 feet daily. In June, 1889, they bought the mill at Levesque, of John N. White, which has been inproved and now turns out 2,000,000 feet annually. Messrs. Smith, Cole & Davis have now under lease another mill, which has about the same capacity as the one at Levesque. They also have a planing-mill connected with one of their mills. Mr. Cole was married on September 25, 1877, to Miss Martha Isabelle Davis, and they are the parents of four children, two of whom are living: Elizabeth and John. Mrs. Cole is a member of the Old School Presbyterian Church. Mr. Cole is one of the prominent men of his county, known and respected by all.
COOKE ROLAND J. PHILLIPS CO.
Roland J. Cook, planter, Barton, Ark. Phillips County is acknowledged by all to be one of the best agricultural portions of the State, and as such its citizens are men of advanced ideas and considerable prominence. A worthy man of this class is found in the person of Roland J. Cook. He was originally from Yalobusha County, Miss., where his birth occurred October 27, 1839, and is the son of James and Frances (Brooks) Cook, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The father was born in 1810 and the mother in 1814. They were married in Mississippi, moved from there to Phillips County, Ark., in 1856, and located on the farm where Roland J. now resides. The principal part of this land was then covered with wood, but it was cleared by Mr. Cook and his son. James Cook was a carpenter by trade, and built the house in which our subject is now living. After coming to Arkansas he turned his attention exclusively to farming, and this continued up to the time of his death, which occurred in 1873. The mother died in 1866. The father was a Whig in politics, sympathized with the South, but never approved of secession. There were born to their marriage eight children, six now living, Roland J. being the eldest. The latter spent his school days in Mississippi and Arkansas, and in June, 1861, enlisted in the Second Arkansas (Confederate) Infantry, serving in the same until after the battle of Chickamauga, when he was severely wounded by a gunshot in the right hand and the left breast. He was orderly sergeant, and was in [p.766] many prominent engagements: Shiloh, Murfreesboro and Perryville, Ky. After being wounded he was taken prisoner, but only retained for a short time. Returning home after the war, he turned his attention to farming, following the same for one year in Mississippi, and subsequently resumed agricultural pursuits on the old homestead, where he now lives. He is the owner of 300 acres of good land, and has 150 acres under cultivation. In 1866 he married Miss Lucy Winbourn, daughter of Rev. A. K. Winbourn, of De Soto County, Miss. The result of this union has been five children. Mr. and Mrs. Cook are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and Mr. Cook is steward in the same. He is a member of the masonic fraternity, the K. of H., and in politics is a Democrat, but is conservative in his views.
COOKE WILLIAM C. CSA-Mississippi Cavalry-Civil War PHILLIPS CO.
William C. Cooke, who has been a resident of this county since 1873, removed here from Mississippi, settling in Cypress Township, where he purchased 160 acres of land. To this he has added other tracts, and now owns a farm of 220 acres, with 140 acres under cultivation. Mr. Cooke was a son of Thomas Cooke, who was born in March, 1800, and died in 1846, when our subject was a boy. He was married in Tennessee to Miss Alice Cathey, whose birth occurred in Tennessee, in about 1800, he dying in May, 1874, and leaving eleven children, only two of whom are living: Elizabeth O. (residing in Monroe County) and William C. (the principal of this sketch). The latter was born in Maury County, Tenn., March 17, 1830. He has been married five times; first, in 1852, to Miss Mary Graham, a native of North Carolina, who died in 1855, leaving one daughter, Alice (now Mrs. Jackson, a widow). His second marriage was in 1856 to Nancy Lock, of Mississippi; she departed this life in 1862, leaving three children, two of whom survive: Thomas and Samuel L. His third marriage, in 1865, was to the widow McCloud, who died in 1871, having borne three children, two living: Jenette and Virgil. In 1873 Cynthia Wright, of this county, became his wife, and at her death, in 1876, she was the mother of two children: Margaret A. and Jennie. Mr. Cooke's present wife was formerly Mrs. Robinson, to whom he was married in 1881. They are the parents of three children, two girls and one son: Cecil, Roy and Lucy. During the war Mr. Cooke enlisted in the Confederate army, in the Mississippi Cavalry, in 1862, in which he served until the close of hostilities. He is a stanch Democrat, and served one term as justice of the peace. He and wife are members of the Christian Church.
COPLAND WILLIAM H. CROSS CO. CSA-Gen.Price's Command-Civil War
William H. Copland, a prominent and energetic farmer of Searcy Township,was born in Tennessee in 1827, and was the younger of two children, the result of the union of Thomas and Elizabeth (Huey) Copland, respectively of North Carolina and South Carolina origin. The father was a farmer by occupation principally, but for a long time found employment in overseeing and railroad contracting. In 1840 he was under contract to build three miles on the Georgia Railroad, and after that he followed agricultural pursuits in the last named State, but before he had gathered the crops, sold out and in 1843 came to Arkansas. He remained in this State but a few months when he went to Memphis and there resided for one year. From there he went to Georgia, thence to Mississippi, but not finding a location to suit him he returned to Tennessee, where he bought land and remained until 1840. He then went to Memphis, and later spent a number of months in various parts of Arkansas,settling eventually in Poinsett County, where he died in 1872 at the age of seventy-three years. William H. Copland remained with his father until 1846, when he came to Arkansas and located in what is now Cross County, where he farmed for a number of years on rented land. In May, 1859, he married Mrs.Hester Stanley (nee Hamilton), a daughter of Theopolis and Mary Hamilton, natives of Georgia and South Carolina, respectively. Mrs. Hamilton was born in a fort which the men protected from the Indians. Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton came to Cross County, Ark., in 1836, and settled on what is now known as the Bay Road. They were obliged to go a long way to mill and endured many hardships. Mr. Hamilton bought 160 acres of land in 1837, cleared about forty acres, erected buildings and made quite a pleasant home. He did much to improve the county, and took a great interest in politics, and in fact all that pertained to the good of the country. He died in 1849. His daughter Hester, the wife of the subject of this sketch, was married first to Mr. George Shaver, also a descendant of one of the pioneer families. He died in 1846 leaving his wife with three children: Obediah, Charles and Mary, all deceased and the sons dying in the army. In 1852 Mrs. Shaver married Mr. S. Stanley,who died in 1859 leaving her with two children, Nancy and Leander, both of whom died in childhood, and the father and children dying within two weeks of each other. At the time of his marriage Mr. Copland had about 100 acres under cultivation, and now has another 100 acres also under cultivation. He has made many improvements, and in 1863 planted an orchard which is still the best in the county. His fine residence was erected in 1855. In 1870 Mr.Copland erected a horse-gin, which he ran for ten years, when it was replacedby a steam-gin. This he sold in 1886. He is the owner of 440 acres of land, 200 of which are under cultivation. In 1863 he enlisted in the Confederate army, was in all the battles of Gen. Price's raid through Missouri and never received a wound. In November, 1864, he returned home, surrendering at Wittsburg in the spring of 1865. Mrs. Copland is a member of the Baptist Church, and Mr. Copland is a member of the K. of H. In 1876 he fell from a horse and hurt his leg, rendering amputation necessary, the following year.To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Copland has been born one child, a son, Willie,whose birth occurred in 1861. He is living at home, and has control and management of the farm. Mr. and Mrs. Copland are among the intelligent and much respected citizens of Cross County and are universally respected.
COTTON J.N. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Twenty-Third Arkansas Infantry-Civil War
SEE MARK WILSON IZARD
COUNCIL WILLIAM A. ST.FRANCIS USARMY-Twenty Fifth Wisconsin Infanty-Civil War.
The village of Council Bend was named after Redwick Council, who built the first house in that locality, and who was the grandfather of the subject of this biography. His son Simeon, was born in North Caroliina, in 1805, and removed to Arkansas in April, 1822, settling in Crittenden county for a short time and then removed to Walnut Bend on the Mississippi River, being married in St.Francis county, in 1827, to Rebecca Lane, who was born in Alabama in April, 1811. He died in April 1848, and his wife in 1879. They were the parents of eleven children, three of whom are still living:Allen ( a farmer of St.Francis county), Mary J. (now Mrs.McKay, of Hood County, Texas), and William A. The latter was reared in this county and began life for himself at the age of nineteen. He was born here on December 28,1847, and was married, February 22,1874, to Miss Anna M.Smith, who died in July of that year. The following April, Miss Elizabeth Filingim became his wife, who died April 22,1881, leaving one child, now deceased. Mr. Council's third matrimonial venture was in February 1883, to Miss Margaret L. Hubbard, of Alabama nativity, who died two years later, having borne one child, that died in infancy. He joined the Union army at the age of 16, enlisting in the Twenty-fifth Wisconsin Infantry, participating in the battles of Buzzard's Roost, Big Shanty, Kenesaw Montain, Atlanta, and a number of others. After the conflict Mr.Council went to Wisconsin, and remained two years, then returning to Arkansas and settling in St.Francis County. He is now engaged in the timber business in connection with farming, and owns 160 acres on the St.Francis river, which is very fertile and well timbered. OBIT:John Stevens, of near Widener, was in town yesterday to secure a coffin for the remains of William Council, who died, at his (Steven's) residence the same morning of congestion. Mr.Council was taken sick at 11 o'clock Saturday morning, and died Sunday, Feb.5,1899, morning at 4:50. He was an old Union soldier and was employed by Mr.Stevens to take care of his cattle and hogs. It will be remembered that a Mr.Flowers, who was employed in the same capacity, died two weeks ago.2-10-1899 CEMETERY UNKNOWN
CURTIS J. P. CSA-CO.D-Fortieth Tennessee-Later Col.Dobbins Command-Civil War LEE CO.-page 582
J. P. Curtis belongs to the firm of Hughes & Curtis, of Haynes, Ark., general merchants, the former being also engaged in farming. He was the fifth of eight children born to William and Mary (Porchman) Curtis, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively, the former of whom came to Arkansas in 1856, and settled in what was then St. Francis County, but is now Lee, where he improved an excellent farm, on which he died in 1878. Of his eight children only two are living: Elisabeth (Mrs. Bullard of Lee County) and J. P. Curtis. Two children died in infancy, and three died between the ages of thirteen and twenty-one. A sister, Mary, was the wife of Buck Dawson at the time of her death. The mother of these children died in 1875, she and her husband having been earnest members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, at the time of their death. J. P. Curtis was sixteen years of age upon his removal to this State, but the most of his education was received in Lee County. He was in his twenty-first year at the breaking out of the late war, and he immediately donned a suit of gray clothes, and became a member of Company D, Fortieth Tennessee, and was on active duty with the Army of Tennessee, until 1862, when he was transferred to the Fifteenth Arkansas In. fantry, and served on the east side of the Mississippi River, until the fall of Port Hudson. He was captured at Island No. 10, and was sent to Camp Butler, Ill., but at the end of six months was exchanged at Vicksburg, and rejoined his command near that place. He surrendered, and was paroled at Port Hudson, July 8, 1863, and reached home on the 23d day of the same month. After remaining at home for eight months, he, in 1864, joined Col. Dobbins' command, and was with Gen. Price on his raid through Missouri, participating in a number of engagements in that State. He surrendered at Wittsburg, in January, 1865, and returned to his home, where he commenced to cultivate his father's farm, and continued so to do until the latter's death. In February, 1889, he became a member of the above named firm, doing an annual business of about $35,000, and in addition to this they also deal in cotton, and in the year 1888 ginned 1,300 bales, but only ginned about 800 bales last year, on account of poor crops. Mr. Curtis was married in 1867, to Miss M. C. Casteel, of St. Fraucis County, a daughter of Calloway and Isabel (Simpson) Casteel, who were among the early settlers of the county, and by her has reared a family of five children, three dying when small. Those living are: Mary (wife of Charles Higginbotham, of this county), Walter B. (who is attending school in Madisonville, Ky.), William, A. E. and B. E. Mr. Curtis belongs to Bethel Lodge No. 2168, of the K. of H.
DALTROFF S. CROSS CO.
S. Daltroff, of the firm of Daltroff, Sparks & Oliver, merchands at Wynne, Ark., is an affable, pleasant gentleman, and is now at the head of one of the largest firms in Eastern Arkansas. He began his commercial life as an errand boy, and rose by rapid stages, until he occupied the highest places, and was always a trusted employee. His birth occurred in New Orleans, La., August 13, 1852, and he was the youngest in a family of six children born to the union of S. and Fannie (Seelig) Daltroff, natives of France and Germany, respectively. The parents were married in Mayence,Germany, in 1844, and immediately emigrated to the United States, landing in New Orleans early in 1845. The father started a private school of languages, teaching French, German and Hebrew, and continued this in New Orleans until 1853, when he went to Lake Providence, La. Here he started a general store, but soon discontinued, and proceeded to Vicksburg, where they remained until 1861. From there they went to Memphis, and here the mother died in 1880, and the father June 29, 1881. S. Daltroff, Sr., was very talented, and from the conclusion of the war until his death, taught languages, mostly in Memphis. While in that city, and during the war, he was foreman of the cannon molding of the Confederate army, and when Memphis fell he followed the fortunes of the Confederate cause, and was located at Meridian, Miss. Here he remained until 1864, when he returned to his family at Memphis. S. Daltroff, Jr., was reared principally in Memphis, where he attended the public schools, and later the Commercial College of Leddins, in the same city. After leaving school he began his mercantile career as errand boy, and advanced with this firm until he was made shipping and receiving clerk over the wholesale department. He remained with this firm for seven years, or until 1873, when he engaged with Lowenstein & Bros.,as shipping and receiving clerk. At the outbreak of yellow fever in Memphis Mr. Daltroff left this firm, made an extensive trip through the Southern States, and in 1875 came to Wittsburg, Cross County, where he accepted a position with D. Block & Co. He only remained with this firm two months,when he was transported to the first L. N. Block & Co., and remained withthe same until April, 1877, when he was admitted as a member of the firm.This partnership lasted until 1879, when it was dissolved, and Mr. Daltroffaccepted a position as book keeper for the firm of Block Bros. & Co.,remaining with them until 1883, when he became a member of that firm, remaining in this company until 1886, when it was dissolved. He then becamesenior member of the present firm of Daltroff, Sparks & Oliver, the successorsof Block Bros. & Co. This firm almost immediately removed to Wynne, where they started a large store, but this was burned out in 1887. After this theyerected a large brick building, covering 290 square feet of floow, which isthe finest arranged commercial building in Eastern Arkansas. They carry astock of goods valued at $15,000, which comprises a full line of dry goods,clothing, boots and shoes, hats and caps, groceries and general plantationsupplies. Mr. Daltroff was married, in 1879, to Miss Willie Malone, a daughter of Rev. W. C. Malone, of this county. She died in 1886, leaving three children, all daughters: Frederica, Bettie M. and Willie Florence. In December, 1887, Mr. Daltroff married Miss Rosa Ackerman, a native of Pennsylvania. On his arrival at Wynne Mr. Daltroff erected a fine resindece,which, after the death of his wife, in 1886, he sold to his partner, G. N.Sparks. In 1888 he erected another home, which is among the handsomest and best residences in Wynne. Mr. Daltroff is a member of the K. of P., Levesque Lodge No. 53, at Wynne, and he is Chancellor Commander of the same. He is a Royal Arch Mason, is a K. of H. and a K. & L. of H., belonging to John M Hewitt and Pearl Lodges. He is active in politics, and is a staunch Democrat.
DAVIS ANTHONY ST.FRANCIS CSA-31ST TENNESSEE REGIMENT-Civil War
Anthony D. Davis, also actively engaged in agricultural pursuits, was born in 1836 near the present site of Corinth, Miss., made historic during the war by one of the most famous battles of that period. His parents were Arthur and Elizabeth E. (Smith) Davis, natives of North Carolina. Anthony Davis did not receive many advantages from an education in youth, a few months passed in a neighboring school during the winter months, comprising the whole amount of his literary instruction. His first venture on his own account was at the age of nineteen, when he accepted a position as manager of a large plantation, discharging the manifold duties connected therewith in a most satisfactory manner. Soon becoming tired of this employment, and wishing to own land of his own, he resigned his position, much to the regret of his employers, and went to DeSoto County, Miss.. Not long after his arrival at that point the War broke out, which, of course, destroyed all his plans, for the time, at least. He enlisted Sept.15,1861, in Company G., Thirty-first Tennessee Regiment, Capt.Baker's company and Col.Bradford's regiment, and participated in the battles of Belmont, Chickamauga, Perryville, etc. At the close of the war Mr.Davis removed to St.Francis County, purchasing a farm of 240 acres, of which he has cleared and has in a good state of cultivation 140 acres. His improvements are such as would credit to any country, and his beautiful residence furnished in such excellent taste, gives evidence of culture and refinement. In addition to his farming operations he is an extensive stock raiser. In 1865 Mr.Davis was married to Miss Maria Prewett, and to them a family of four children were born:Daisy and Arthur now living, and Cheatham and William (deceased). In politics Mr.Davis is a Democrat, and in religious faith a Methodist. His wife is a Baptist, and a lady of many excellent traits and characteristics. mr.Davis is a liberal contributor to all worthy enterprises, but many of his generous acts never reach the ears of the world.
DAVIS D. W. LEE CO.-page 583
D. W. Davis, one of the old settlers of this county, and son of David W. Davis, who came to this State in 1829, was born in the Old Dominion in 1816, and accompanied his father to Arkansas in the above mentioned year, settling where the younger Davis is now living. This was at that time a wilderness, and there were, in what is now Lee County, about forty families on the east side of the L'Anguille, and none on the west. In about 1835 Hardy Williams and brother, Jefferson Ezell, and two brothers, and one Mr. Burris, settled west of Haynes, in what is now Texas Township. The remaining portion of the county was an unbroken [p.583] wilderness, filled with deer, bear, buffalo and many other wild animals. Where Marianna now stands there lived at that time two old Poles, Duskinuski and Coluski by name, and just south of them lived John Patterson, who was born in Helena in 1800. He lived to be eighty years of age. His sister, who was born previous to 1800, was the first white child born in Helena. Of all the early settlers of the county, Mr. Davis is the only one of the original families who is still living. He was one of eleven children born to his parents, five sons and six daughters, and is the only one surviving, although all lived to be grown and reared large families, except one sister and D. W. These children were named as follows: Mary (deceased, was the wife of A. G. McDaniel, family now resides in this and Monroe County), Solomon (deceased, family resides in Illinois), Nancy (deceased, wife of John W. Calvert, family deceased), Cornelius (deceased, family resides in this county and Arizona), Benjamin (deceased, family resides in St. Francis County), Rebecca (deceased), Rachel (deceased, wife of William West, family resides in Kansas), D. W., W. H. (deceased, family resides with D. W. Davis, except one daughter, Elizabeth, who married G. L. Rodgers), Harriet (deceased, wife of T. R. Harris) and Eliza (deceased, wife of Bryant Lynch, family resides in Lee County, Ark.). David W. Davis, Sr., died in 1837. He was born in1761, and participated in the Revolutionary War. He was on a war ship with Capt. Peterson during the principal part of the war, and was with Gen. Wayne in the war with the Indians, being wounded in the shoulder in the last engagements. His wife was born in 1777, and died in 1861. Our subject, D. W. Davis, was educated in the subscription schools of Kentucky, and after coming to Arkansas received instruction from his father, who was an unusually good scholar for his day, and a fine mathematician. After the death of his father D. W. remained at home and took care of his mother. He was not in the war himself, but his family supplied quite a number of soldiers for the Sonth. His father held the right of pre-emption on the and which he entered in 1836, there being about 160 acres in the original homestead, but to this our subject has added 300 acres more, which belongs to him and the heirs of W. H. Davis. The Davis family, while being among the prominent ones of the county, never aspired to office, though one, J. C. Davis, is sheriff of St. Francis County. He is a nephew of D. W. Davis (subject). While Mr. Davis does not seek for official prominence he still manifests considerable interest in the local elections, and is a thorough Democrat. He is a liberal contributor to all matters relating to the good of the county, and is a manuniversally respected. Amanda Davis, widow of W. H. Davis, and daughter of Noah and Mary (Hearty) Reed, natives, respectively, of Massachusetts and Kentucky, was one of two children born to her parents. The other child, Elizabeth, married J. L. Rowland. Previous to her marriage to Mr. Reed, Mrs. Reed had married a man by the name of Ramage, and by him became the mother of two children: Lucinda (deceased, wife of Beujamin Travis), and James (who resides in Paducah, Ky.). Mr. Reed died in 1845, and Mrs. Reed in 1842. Mrs. Amanda Davis was born in 1833, and came with her father to Arkansas when quite small. She had very limited educational advantages, and at the age of twenty-two years wa COULD BE:David Ward Davis Birth: 1816 Death: May 17, 1904 -CASTEEL CEMETERY
DAVIS D.W. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Crittenden's Rangers-Civil War
D.W.Davis, a brother of John M.Davis, whose sketch appears in this work, and a relative of Jeff.Davis, is a son of Cornelius Davis, the latter having come to Arkansas from Kentucky, his former home in 1828. At that time the Territory was but thinly settled, the forests were filled with bear, deer, wild turkey and other game, and the mode of traveling was in ox carts or on horseback. Our subject was reared to farm life, but had no advantages for acquiring and education when he was a boy, and it is a fact that, up to his eighteenth birthday, he could neither read nor write. He was born in this county December 9,1833. In 1851 he ran away from home, and went to Fulton County, Illinois, where he attended school for three years, working for his board and enough to keep him in clothes. Then returning home he commenced teaching school, and in that way earned means to take him through college, after which he took a course in civil engineering at the McKendrie College. Subsequently he went to Leavenworth, Kansas, and took part in the border wayfarer in Missouri and Kansas. Becoming located at Omaha, he was engaged in his profession of surveying a short time, but later returned to St.Francis County, and in 1857-58 held the position of deputy sheriff. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in the Crittenden Rangers, the first company raised in Arkansas. A few months later he helped Marsh Walker raise his regiment, of which he was made Captain and commissary. After the war, Mr.Davis came home and commenced farming, and also took up the study of law, afterward entering upon his practice, but soon abandoned the legal profession and resumed farming. This he still follows, and is also engaged in surveying, in addition being timber inspector of the Third district, comprising St.Francis, Cross and Poinsett Counties. He has the credit of sending in more money than any other inspector in the state. He has afine farm with over 100 acres under cultivation, upon which are good buildings and a fine orchard. His principal crop is cotton, but does not confine himself to that one product as do some. He has also tried introducing thoroughbred short-horned cattle, but the country is not yet educated up to seeing the value of fancy stock. Mr.Davis was married in 1863 to Mrs.McClintock. They are the parents of five children:Blanche (wife of James W.Steward, who was superintendent of the public schools for ten years), De Witt (nineteen years of age and who is studying surveying, of which he has practical knowledge, having at the State Fair at Little Rock competed and taken the prize for the best plot of a thirty-two sided farm and architectural drawings), Annie, David, and Mabel. Mr.Davis and wife are member of the Episcopal Church. He is also a member of the Knights of Honor, and is a strong Democrat. OBIT:Death of D.W.Davis=Two weeks ago today, Mr.D.W.Davis accidentally discharged his hammerless shotgun, the entire load of squirrel buckshot with which it was loaded passing into his foot. The wound was dressed by a local physician, and later, Dr.John Maury of Memphis, was called and he too dressed the wound. It was thought that he would survive, but ten days later, after the accident, June 27,1904, tetanus set in and in a few hours our friend and fellow citizen was a corpse. D.W.Davis was born in St.Francis county Dec.9,1833. He was son of Cornelius, a brother of John M. and T.J.Davis, Mrs.John C.Lynch, Mrs.F.D.Hayden, of Arizona, and a half brother of James M.Davis, formerly of this county. He was related to the Honorable Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, and was an exemplary citizen, who took a lively interest in all affairs which affected the people. His father came to this county from Kentucky in 1828, and our subject was reared in the wilds of this territory at that time. He spent a great deal of his time in the hunt and chase, and it is remarkable that he was always so careful with his guns and that at last he should lose his life accidentally by his own hand. Mr.Davis had meagre school advantages in his younger days, but as he grew older, and greater opportunities presented themselves, he took advantage of them, and at his death there was perhaps not a better posted man in this county. He taught school and earned the means to take him through college, and finally took a course in civil engineering in McKendrie college. From Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Eastern Arkansas, we learn that subsequently he went to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and took part in the border warfare in Missouri and Kansas. He then followed surveying in Nebraska for a short time, when he returned to this county and held several political positions. When his country called to arms, he enlisted in the Crittenden Rangers, the first company raised in Arkansas. A few months later, he aided Marah Walker in raising his regiment,of which he was made Captain and Commissary. After the war, he came home, took up the practice of law, but soon resumed farming, and was later engaged to some extent in politics. In 1873, he was President of the Board of Supervisors of this county, a position at the time was about the same as that of County Judge. The county seat was at Madison at that time, and he and Capt.John Parham, now deceased, devised a scheme whereby it could be lawfully done, and did it one night while the inhabitants were asleep and without their consent. The extended the corporate limitsof the town of Madison westward about ten miles to L'anguille river, which was accordingly done, and that night the records were removed to Forrest City at the courthouse on Front Street. He was married in 1863 to Mrs.McClintook, and five children blessed their union:Blanche, now Mrs.J.S.Stuart, of Texarkana; DeWitt, also of Texarkana; Annie, David and Mabel, the later now Mrs.S.G.Norton, all of whom survive him. All were at the funeral from the residence, to interment at the Forrest City Cemetery. Rev.George E. Hancock officiating. Mr.Davis was a member of the Episcopal church, the Knights and Ladies of Honor, and in politics, a Swamp Democrat. He served on the Board of Directors for the public schools here, and styled himself as father of free schools in one campaign. He leaves his wife in fortunate circumstances, and each of the children have deeded their interest to their mother.Stevens, of near Widener, was in town yesterday to secure a coffin for the remains of William Council, who died, at his (Steven's) residence the same morning of congestion. Mr.Council was taken sick at 11 o'clock Saturday morning, and died Sunday, Feb.5,1899, morning at 4:50. He was an old Union soldier and was employed by Mr.Stevens to take care of his cattle and hogs. It will be remembered that a Mr.Flowers, who was employed in the same capacity, died two weeks ago.2-10-1899 CITY CEMETERY
DAVIS DAVID W. SR. USARMY-REVOLUTIONARY WAR-INDIAN WARS WITH GEN.WAYNE LEE CO.-page 583
SEE D.W.DAVIS
DAVIS JOHN M. ST.FRANCIS
John M. Davis is numbered among the well-known farmers and stock raisers of Franks Township. He was born on the farm on which he still lives, in 1845. His parents Cornelius and Eliza (Holbert) Davis, were natives of Kentucky. The former came to Arkansas in 1828, and remained one year, then returning to Kentucky, where he was married in 1832, moving permanently to this county, and engaging in farming. At that time the country was very thinly settled, the nearest market being Helena. He first entered 160 acres of land, but at the time of his death, in 1868, at the age of sixty-three years, owned 600 or 700 acres. John M. Davis grew to manhood on his father's farm, his early educational opportunities being limited, as the senior Davis was one of those men who believed in acquiring a competency before spending it. When eighteen years old John went to Kentucky, and attended school for about two years. After the war, in which he did not take part on account of poor health, he returned to Arkansas and resumed farming, and is now conducting the old homestead which his father entered and improved on coming to this State, and where he was born. Mr. Davis has been twice united in the bonds of matrimony. First, in 1868, to Mary C. Folbre, who died in 1871, leaving one son, Thomas C., who was killed in a railroad wreck in 1887. Mr. Davis took for his second wife Miss Hester A. Davis, in January, 1874, a daughter of Rev. Arthur Davis, of Western Tennessee. They are the parents of ten children: Benjamin, Arthur W., Mattie P., Drucilla, John, Susie, Eliza, Myrtle, Claudia and Elizabeth. Mr. Davis is one of the most prominent Democrats of this locality, and is now the efficient sheriff of St. Francis County, and a man whose name is a terror to law breakers. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Davis is also connected with the Masonic order. CITY CEMETERY
DAVIS ROBERT C. CSA-CO.A-Twenty seventh Mississippi Infantry-Civil War LEE CO.-page 584
Robert C. Davis has been a resident of Arkansas since a short time after the close of the Civil War, in which conflict he took part on the Confederate [p.584] side, enlisting in Company A, of the Twenty seventh Mississippi Infantry, in 1861, when only seventeen years of age. After the close of hostilities he returned to Mississippi, his native State, where he remained until 1869, then coming to this State and locating in Phillips County, and in 1880 he came to Lee County and settled upon his present farm. Mr. Davis was born in Attala County, Miss., in 1843, being a son of J. G. A. and Elizabeth J. Davis, natives of Illinois and Tennessee, respectively. His educational advantages were limited to a few months' attendance at the common schools in each year. Mr. Davis has been twice married; first, in 1866, to Miss Sarah J. Cornish, daughter of William and Elizabeth Cornish, natives of North Carolina and Georgia, respectively. Mrs. Davis died in 1871, leaving three children, two of whom are still living: Cornish R. and Rightor C. He was married to his present wife, Miss Luivia J. Alexander, in 1872. He owns 560 acres of land, 130 acres cleared and in a good state of cultivation, with good improvements upon his place. Mr. Davis is a Democrat in politics, and was appointed postmaster of Lee in 1884, having held the office since that time. He and wife are members of the Primitive Baptist Church, in which they take an active part. W. T. Derrick, well known as the popular clerk of the circuit court of Lee County, is a native of Alabama, and a son of H. B. and Evaline (Beal) Derrick. H. B. Derrick is still living, a resident of this county, seventy-one years of age. His wife died in 1885, at the age of fifty-eight. W. T. Derrick was born in 1842, and came to Lee County with his father when a boy. He served four years in the Confederate army during the war, holding the position of lieutenant in the Army of Tennessee, and participated in seventeen different engagements. After the war be returned to this county and carried on farming until 1884, when he was elected county and circuit clerk, and was re-elected in 1886, and again in 1888, filling the offices with great credit to himself and satisfaction to his fellow-citizens. Mr. Derrick's wife was formerly Miss Mary S. Jones, also of Alabama origin. They are the parents of two children: Maria and Robert L. He is a member of the K. of P. and of the K. of H. It is unnecessary to add that Mr. Derrick is one of the leading Democrats of the county, having held prominent offices for the past six years. He is also highly esteemed not only by those of the same political party, but by all good citizens throughout this locality.
DAVIS SAMUEL K. CRITTENDEN CO.
Samuel K. Davis has for some time been occupied as a planter andmerchant of Bartonville. A native of Maryland, he was born in HartfordCounty in 1842, being the son of Philip and Louisa B. (King) Davis, both also of Maryland nativity. They moved to Vermilion County, Ill., in 1854, and remained till 1867, when they went to Missouri, locating in Barry County. Four years later Kingman, Kas., became their home, where the mother still lives. The father was born in 1811 and died in 1888; the mother was born in 1821. She is a good Christian lady and takes an active part in church and Sunday-school matters; she is a member of the Baptist Church and is superintendent of a Sunday-school. Mr. Davis was a member of the I. O. O. F. for many years before his death; was a Democrat in polities, and manifested a great interest in school matters and anything that would promote the welfare of the public. Himself and wife were the parents of ten children, of whom two died before leaving Maryland; one from a fall and one by drowning. The others lived to be grown and six are still living. Samuel K. Davis, the second born, attained his majority in Illinois, and moved to Memphis in 1862, entering the service of the Adams Express Company and remaining with them four years. He then commenced farming in Phillips County, Ark. (now Lee County), and in company with his brother Reece he tilled about 1,000 acres till 1874, and in 1875 he commenced merchandising. He was married in February, 1874, to Miss Augusta Holt, a native of Tennessee. Mr. Davis was engaged in merchandising at Phillips Bayou for several years, when he moved to Hot Springs, Ark., the year of the big fire at that place, and bought out Mr. King's interest in the firm of Gordon & King. The trade was made on Thursday and on Monday the establishment was in ashes. The morning after the fire his possessions consisted of but $6.15 upon which to again commence. His wife owned a house and lot, however, so he worked and sold goods for about six years, when he came to Crittenden County and started a store at Needmore, where he remained in business till he moved to Bartonville. He is now running a store with good success and a farm of 400 acres. Upon moving to this county from Hot Springs he had $800 and now owns a fine farm well equipped. Mr. and Mrs. Davis are the parents of two daughters and three sons: Fannie K., Florence Lee, Samuel K., and Claudie W. and Clarence W. (twins); one child is deceased, Effie May. Mrs. Davis is an active member of the Baptist Church, and her husband is a member of the Masonic fraternity, of which he has held several offices. He is a Democrat in polities, but takes little part in any party movement, giving his whole attention to his store and farm. Mr. Davis has been very successful in business and is a man of enterprise and decided business ability.
DERRICK H. B. JR. LEE CO.-page 584
H. B. Derrick, Jr., liveryman, Mariauna, Ark. Among the active enterprises of a town like Marianna, the business of a livery stable occupies necessarily an important place, contributing as they do to the pleasure, convenience and actual necessities of the community. Among the most notable of this class in Marianna is that conducted by Mr. Derrick, which was established at this place in 1873. Mr. Derrick was born September 30, 1852, in Alabama and emigrated with his father from that State to Arkansas in 1859. Here he grew to manhood and received his education in the common schools, and at Florence and Huntsville, Ala. He first engaged in tilling the soil but later entered a store as clerk. As above stated, he opened the livery business at Marianna in December, 1873, and was very successful at this until a snow storm came and crushed in his stable. He then rebuilt and in 1876, as misfortune seemed to cling to him, he had his stable destroyed by fire, sustaining a loss of about $1,500, and in 1883 the stable was again destroyed by fire with a loss much heavier than before. Neither disheartened nor discouraged he again engaged in the business, built a brick barn and now has the best livery business in Eastern Arkansas. He also had a farm of 300 acres, after having sold some, and is one of the most practical business men of the county. He was married first in 1876 to Mrs. Ella Campbell, who is deceased. The children by this marriage are also deceased. Mr. Derrick afterward married Miss Emma Longley. Mr. Derrick is the son of H. B., Sr., and Evalyn Beal, the father a native of Alabama, born April 10, 1819. He is a farmer by occupation but is now living with his son. The latter is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.
DERRICK W. T. CSA-Lieutenant in the Army of Tennessee-Civil War LEE CO.-page 584
W. T. Derrick, well known as the popular clerk of the circuit court of Lee County, is a native of Alabama, and a son of H. B. and Evaline (Beal) Derrick. H. B. Derrick is still living, a resident of this county, seventy-one years of age. His wife died in 1885, at the age of fifty-eight. W. T. Derrick was born in 1842, and came to Lee County with his father when a boy. He served four years in the Confederate army during the war, holding the position of lieutenant in the Army of Tennessee, and participated in seventeen different engagements. After the war be returned to this county and carried on farming until 1884, when he was elected county and circuit clerk, and was re-elected in 1886, and again in 1888, filling the offices with great credit to himself and satisfaction to his fellow-citizens. Mr. Derrick's wife was formerly Miss Mary S. Jones, also of Alabama origin. They are the parents of two children: Maria and Robert L. He is a member of the K. of P. and of the K. of H. It is unnecessary to add that Mr. Derrick is one of the leading Democrats of the county, having held prominent offices for the past six years. He is also highly esteemed not only by those of the same political party, but by all good citizens throughout this locality. William T Derrick- Birth: 1842 Death: 1916 member Co F 2nd Ark Inf CSA Burial::Cedar Heights Cemetery-Marianna, Lee County, Arkansas, USA CEDAR HEIGHTS CEMETERY
DIAMOND ELI T. LEE CO.-page 585
Eli T. Diamond. Of all the old settlers in Arkansas there is no one more deserving of a place in the history of his State than Eli T. Diamond, [p.585] who is also a descendant of Revolutionary heroes. His grandfather, John Diamond, was a native of Ireland and came to America in his boyhood days, being one of the first to respond to the call of his adopted country, and serving in the war for freedom until its close. He was a member of Gen. Marion's famous band in all of its brilliant achievements. After the close of the war he returned to his home in South Carolina, but, being surrounded by Tories, and unpleasantly and dangerously situated, he removed to Georgia and settled on the site of the present city of Milledgeville, once the capital, and where Robert Diamond, the father of our subject, was reared, he having been born in South Carolina during the stormy times of the Revolution. After his marriage Robert Diamond removed to Robertson County, Tenn., and then to Illinois, in 1816, under the Territorial Government, and settled in Bond County, where he died in 1852. He was one of the early settlers of that State. Nancy (Rice) Diamond, the mother of the principal of this sketch, was a daughter of James Rice, an Englishman. She was born in Virginia, on the banks of the Potomac River, and was there reared and educated, but later removed to Georgia, where she met, captured and married the father of Eli T. She died in Illinois in 1857, having borne eleven children, of whom the subject of this sketch is the only survivor. He was born in Robertson County, Tenn., April 22, 1807, and accompanied his parents to Illinois at the age of eight years, where he was brought up and educated. At the age of twenty years he went to Natchez, Miss., and lived with an uncle. Two years later he became employed as an overseer on a Mississippi plantation, being engaged in that occupation for eight years, when he bought an interest in a plantation in Washington County, Miss., but, putting too much confidence in his partner, he was bankrupted. He then moved to Chicot County, Ark., in 1840, where he was employed as overseer of a plantation until 1842, at which ime he went to Desha County, again becoming interested in a large plantation. For awhile he succeeded very well, but, another financial crash overtaking him, he again lost the greater part of the earnings of years of labor. He then (in 1844) removed to Walnut Bend, on the Mississippi River, in Phillips County. Here he lived for twenty-four years, clearing up one of the best-improved farms in that section of country, owning 700 acres of land, and while here he secured a large tract of land in the western part of Phillips (now Lee) County. A large negro debt swallowed up his Walnut Bend property, and for the third time he was sent adrift in the financial world. He then set out for his wild and untenanted home in the wilderness of Phillips County. In 1860 he bought a family of negroes, expecting to pay for them when he could sell cotton, as he had two crops unsold. When the war came on the cotton was burned by the Confederates, and the debt accumulated during the war. That struggle found him with a good home surrounded by every convenience and comfort. In 1862 Mr. Diamond brought hands to this section, which was then a wilderness, and improved some of his wild land, where he now lives, but still retained his home on the river. But the ravages of the war and the accumulation of debt compelled him to a compromise in giving up his river place, when he came west. Older in years, and with burdens and misfortunes sufficient to have paralyzed many a younger man, he began anew the work of making a home for his family, and soon the wilderness blossomed under his skill and husbandry. But the guns of Sumter were the death-knell of his high ambitions. The war gave freedom to his most valuable property, the negro, and the close of the war found him destitute of everything but the shattered remains of what had once been a magnificent property, and of which there only remains one-quarter section of land, on whic
DIAMOND JOHN USARMY-REVOLUTIONARY WAR LEE CO.-page 585
SEE ELI T.DIAMOND
DOOLEY HAMMOND PORTER -DR ST.FRANCIS CSA-McDonald's Company of Tennessee Cavalry-Civil War
Among those who have contributed liberally to the numerous enterprises of Forrest City, and are recognized as leading citizens the name of H. P. Dooley, dentist, is a familiar one. He is a native of Tennessee, his birth occurring in Maury County in 1847, being the son of W. A. and Sarah (Joyce) Dooley. W. A. Dooley was born in 1820, participated in the Civil War and died in 1877. The grandfather came originally from North Carolina and raised the first company of soldiers in Tennessee for the Creek War. He entered the service as captain, but came out as colonel, dying a few years afterward. The great-grandfather was of Ireland origin, and the great-grandmother from Scotland. H. P. Dooley, the subject of this sketch, received his literary education in the schools of his native State, afterward entering a seminary near Memphis, where the breaking out of the war found him. Putting away his books, despite his ambition to obtain a good education, he joined McDonald's Company of Tennessee Cavalry, serving in the Confederate army two and a half years. He was twice wounded, first receiving a severe wound in the leg, and the second time his arm was broken. Eighteen of his company were shot down, and a ball, which passed through his arm, knocked the mounting from his gun and injured him quite seriously. After recovering sufficiently to admit of his again entering the service, he returned and remained until the final surrender. The first year after the war Mr. Dooley engaged in farming, but attended school the winter of 1866, subsequently commencing the study of his profession under the tutelage of R. G. Edwards and next with one W. F. Southern. After one year spent in traveling in Northern Mississippi he came here, locating in Forrest City in 1870. When he began he had but very little, except undaunted courage and a determination to succeed, which is doubtless the secret of his present prosperity. He has amassed quite a fortune, and owns one of the most attractive residences in the city. He takes much interest in fine stock, paying careful attention to raising the same, and is trying to get the people interested generally in this industry. Mr. Dooley was married in Forrest City to Miss R. H. Johnson, a native of Arkansas and a daughter of G. V. C. Johnson. He was sheriff of this county at the time of his death. His father, John C. Johnson, was representative of St. Francis County for several years. Mr. Dooley has traveled quite extensively, and is a genial, courteous gentleman, one who makes friends wherever he may go. His business takes him in various parts of the State, and his reputation as an efficient dentist is an enviable one. He became a member of the Masonic lodge when it could boast of only seven members, and to him the lodge owes its present prosperous state. He was Worshipful Master four years, but recently refused to act any longer, though prevailed upon to accept the secretaryship; he has held an office ever since becoming identified with the order in 1872, in which year he was made Master Mason. He was married to Rhoda H. Johnson (daughter of G. V. C. Johnson and Cynthia A.) in 1872. Rhoda H. Johnson was born in 1851 in Arkansas. CITY CEMETERY
DORRISS HAMLET A. ST.FRANCIS USARMY-MEXICAN WAR
SEE O.E.DORRISS
DORRISS JAMES S. ST.FRANCIS USARMY-War of 1812
SEE O.E.DORRISS
DORRISS O.E. ST.FRANCIS CSA-FIFTH ARKANSAS REGIMENT-Civil War
O. E. Dorriss, one of the oldest and most prominent of the early settlers of St. Francis County, was born in Jackson County, Ill., in the year 1819, being the son of James S. and Catherine Dorriss, of English and Irish descent, respectively. James Dorriss was a soldier in the War of 1812, and his father was chaplain to Andrew Jackson during the Creek War, participating in the famous battle of Horseshoe. Hamlet F., a brother of O. E. Dorriss, served in the war between Mexico and Texas, taking an active part in all the engagements of note, and was present at the capture of Gen. Santa Anna at Santa Jacinto. O. E. Dorriss' advantages for an education were extremely limited, but his constant reading and keen sense of observation have made him a well-informed man, conversant on all the important topics of the past and present. At the age of fourteen he left home, starting out to make his own fortune. In 1834 he came to Arkansas on a trading expedition, going south west, and upon reaching the Saline River, in the southwest part of the State, he was suddenly taken ill, which put a quietus to his business prospects for some time. After recovering he discovered to his horror that his partner had absconded with all the finances. This left him entirely destitute and among strangers, but in time he made his way to Little Rock, suffering many privations during his long journey. At this point he was met by his father, who had come to him in response to an appeal, written in a trembling hand during his convalescence. He returned to his home in Missouri, but soon after returned to St. Francis County, arriving here in 1835, and locating on a farm of 320 acres, which he improved and has since made his home. Mr. Dorriss ran among the first steamboats that ever plied up the St. Francis River, in the years 1844-45. In 1847 he was married to Miss Julia Hanson, of Morgan County, Ga., and to their union nine children were born: Josephine, Georgia A., Lugene, Franklin, Jenette, Julia, Sallie Vick, Lou Kate and Lee, of whom four are now living. In March, 1865, Mrs. Dorriss died, and in 1866 Mr. Dorriss married Miss Ann T. Ellis, who bore him six children: James, Mary, Ada, Willmorth, George and Thomas; of these three are deceased. Mr. Dorriss was a member of the Fifth Arkansas Regiment, Confederate army, during the war, and represented his county in the legislature of 1866. for ten years he was justice of the peace, discharging the duties of that office in a highly commendable manner, and during his entire term of office, from 1856 to 1866, only one of his decisions were taken to a higher court. He filled the office of sheriff by appointment for several years, and in this, as in everything else, gave entire satisfaction. In his political opinion he favors the Democratic party, but is not an enthusiast. Mr. Dorriss assisted in the removal of the Indians to their present home in the Indian Territory, and also gave his valuable support in laying out and opening up the old military road in this county in 1835-36. In addition to Esquire Dorriss' many enterprises he is running a fine steam-gin, with a capacity of eighteen bales per day, and a self-acting, or automatic, press of the latest improvement. He is a liberal contributor to all movements that have for their object the advancement of educational and religious matters. Mrs. Dorriss is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. .
DOUGLAS JOHN E. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Twenty-third Arkansas Infantry-Civil War
John E. Douglas has attained to a position of credit as a farmer and surveyor of St. Francis County. A native of Tennessee, he is the son of John E. and Elizabeth (Sparks) Douglas, who came originally from Alabama and Tennessee, respectively. The principal of this sketch was born on January 18, 1837. His father died when he was less than two years old and his mother then came to Arkansas and settled in St. Francis County where she was shortly after married to Curtis G. Tyer. Young John lived with his mother after her second marriage, and had the advantages of a good education in the subscription schools of the county, at the age of seventeen engaging in teaching in order to raise money enough to enable him to continue his studies, as he was very desirous of taking a thorough course in civil engineering. Three years later he was offered the position of assistant teacher in St. Francis Academy, where he completed his education, acquiring a superior knowledge of surveying, in both its theoretical and practical phases. Following this he resumed teaching until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in the Twenty-third Arkansas Infantry and served in Price's famous raid through Missouri. After the war Mr. Douglas again turned his attention to the instruction of the young, continuing it until 1868, when he bought 120 acres of land and commenced farming. He was married on March 7, 1866, to Miss Mary A. Casbeer. They are the parents of six children: Charles M., Thomas E., Nathaniel E., Effie D., Lucy A. and Leta J. Mr. Douglas owns a fine farm with good buildings, his large orchard containing all kinds of choice fruit, and also owns forty acres of desirable land in Cross County. In 1880 he was elected census enumerator, and the same year was made county surveyor, which position he has held since that time with a faithfulness and ability which have redounded largely to his personal esteem and worth. Mr. Douglas is a member of the Knights of Honor and is an enterprising citizen, contributing liberally toward those enterprises which tend to the development or improvement of the community, physically, morally or intellectually. BURIED LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY, ST.FRANCIS CO.,ARK.
DOZIER JAMES J. CSA-Thirteenth Regiment Alabama Volunteers-NCO-Civil War LEE CO.-page 585
James J. Dozier came originally from Georgia, being a son of Woody and Eliza (Compton) Dozier, also natives of that State. The senior Dozier was born in Warren County in 1804, and his wife four years later in Jasper County. They were married in 1828, and became the parents of ten children, seven of whom are still living: Mary C. (wife of R. J. Bickerstaff, whose biography appears in this work), Sallie F. (Mrs. Sutton, of Forrest City), Emily V. (wife of R. P. Danart, a resident of Texas), Anna C. (wife of Rev. W. H. Pasley, also a resident of Forrest City), James J., the principal of this sketch), Elizabeth (the wife of Andrew C. Wood, a farmer of St. Francis County) and Annette E. (widow of William Henderson). James J. Dozier was born in Jasper County, Ga., on July 1, 1843, but passed his boyhood days in what is now Lee County, Ala. He enlisted in the Confederate army in July, 1861, in the Thirteenth Regiment Alabama Volunteers, in which he served until the close of the war, serving as a non-commissioned officer. He participated in the battles of Seven Pines, the seven days' fight before Richmond, South Mountain, Antietam, Sharpsburg, Fredericksburg, Chancelloraville and Gettysburg, at which battle he was wounded by the explosion of a shell; he was also slightly wounded at the battle of the Wilderness. He took part in the engagements of Spottsylvania Court-House, Petersburg, Turkey Ridge, and a number of others, and was captured at High Bridge, three days before Lee's surrender, being held for three months. He came to Arkansas in January, 1867, and settled near Moro, where he now resides, on a farm of 220 acres, with bout forty acres under cultivation. Mr. Dozier returned to Alabama in 1869, and was there married to Miss Olive I. Crabbe, of that State, and a daughter of Richard and Matilda (Love) Crabbe. Mr. and Mrs. Dozier are the parents of nine children, seven living: Nina, Charles E., Emma, Grover C., James R., Nora and Mattie. Mr. Dozier held the office of deputy sheriff during the years from 1880 to 1885. He is a member of the County Wheel.
DUNHAM J. P. USARMY-First Illinois Cavalry-Civil War LEE CO.-page 585
J. P. Dunham was born in Effingham County, Ill., in 1845, but was reared in Shelby County, and up to the breaking out of the late war his time was occupied in attending the common schools. He dropped his books to join the Federal army and protect the grand old stars and stripes, and was a member of the First Illinois Cavalry, but at the end of one year was transferred to the Trans-Mississippi Department, and was on detached service under Steele, and was with him at the fall of Little Rock. He went from there to Pilot Knob, and shortly after the close of the war he went to Kansas and embarked in the lumber business, and also owned and operated a saw-mill on Marie des Cygnes River. In 1875 he came to Arkansas and settled in Phillips County, where he operated a saw-mill for two and a half years, which enterprise did not prove a financial success. From that time until 1888 he owned and operated a mill in Lee County, his business partner being R. D. Griffis, who was connected with him for eleven years, or until 1888, after which they sold out to a lumber company, and Mr. Dunham has since remained its manager. He owns a good house and lot, and 13,000 acres of land on Spring Creek, and is also in the lumber business. He is a Republican, a member of the Episcopal Church, and belongs to the A. F. & A. M., being a Knight Templar, and is also a member of the Royal Arcanum and the Knights of Honor and the Knights and Ladies of Honor. He was married while a resident of Kansas, to Miss Kate Rouse, by whom he has one child, Capitola. He is a son of Hy. and Mary (Ramsey) Dunham, the former of whom was born in Tennessee and is now a resident of Shelby County, Ill., a farmer by occupation.
DUNN BENJAMIN USARMY-REVOLUTIONARY WAR LEE CO.-page 623
SEE ANDREW J.THOMPSON
ELLIOTT WILLIAM ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.A-FIFTH ARKANSAS REGIMENT-Civil War
Prominently identified with the prosperous and influential citizens of St. Francis County is William Elliott, who is a native of Alabama, his birth occurring in Huntsville, in 1826. He was the son of Allen and Jane Elliott, originally from the same State. When William was one year of age his parents moved to Arkansas, settling in St. Francis County, where his early boyhood days were passed in assisting his father on the farm. At the age of twenty-one years he homesteaded the place on which he now resides. This farm consists of 200 acres, with 125 acres under cultivation. Mr. Elliott is, aside from his many farming interests, quite extensively engaged in stock raising, and also has an interest in a good steam-gin, with a capacity of ten bales per day. He was united in marriage in 1851 to Miss Sarah Styres, and by her became the father of three children: John A., Sarah and Jane (all deceased). Mrs. Elliott died in 1854, and for his second wife Mr. Elliott chose Miss Adeline E. Adams, who bore him three children: James H. and Benjamin F. (both deceased) and William H. In 1861 Mr. Elliott enlisted in the Fifth Arkansas Regiment, Company A, and participated in several of the most important battles of the war, among them being Paducah, Tupelo, Prairie Grove and Union City. In 1863 he was married to Melissa J. Adams, and their union has been blessed by five children: Robert L., Elisha T. (deceased), Mary E. (deceased), Martha and Mary. Mr. Elliott is a Democrat, and with his wife is a member of the Baptist Church. He has held the office of magistrate, coroner and deputy sheriff in his township, serving acceptably in these various positions. He is one of the public-spirited citizens of the community.
ELLIS R.J. CROSS CO. CSA-CO.C-Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry-Civil War
R. J. Ellis, one of the oldest settlers of Mitchell Township, and among its leading farmers, is a native of Tennessee, and came to this county in 1856 with his father, where he purchased a farm of eighty acres, remaining upon it for three years. The he accepted a position as overseer of a large plantation owned by Jesse Cross, D. J. Burt and Maj. Wynne, a position that he held until the breaking out of the war, when he joined the Confederate army, in Company C,of the Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry, and participated in the battles of Shiloh,Corinth, Richmond, Murfreesboro and a number of others. He was taken sick at Murfreesboro and sent to the hospital, where he received his discharge and returned home. He was also shot at the battle of Belmont in the arm, by a minie ball. Mr. Ellis sold his farm in 1865, and moved to Shelby County,Tenn., where he remained until 1871, engaged in farming one year, and the rest of the time operating a saw and grist-mill. In 1871 he returned to Cross County, entered 103 acres unter the homestead laws, and now has sixty-one under cultivation, with good buildings. Born in Carroll County, Tenn., in 1833, he is the son of William and Elizabeth (Allin) Ellis, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively, and the parents of ten children. William Ellis moved to Arkansas in 1849, and located in this county, bought a farm of eighty acres, partially improved, and remained until 1865, then returning toTennessee, where he died the following year; his wife survived him until 1886.Both were members of the Presbyterian Church. R. J. Ellis was married in 1856,to Miss Sophia Burks, and they became the parents of five children, two of whom are living: W. A. and Elizabeth (wife of John Stephens). Mrs. Ellis died in1873, and Mrs. Ellis married his second wife in 1875. She was formerly Miss Mollie Airs, and lived about four years after marriage. In 1881 Mr. Ellis married Mrs. Mary Robinson (nee Mitchell). Mr. and Mrs. Ellis are members ofthe Seven Day Baptist Church, his first and second wives having belonged to the Missionary Baptist Church. He is a member of the County Wheel and is a strong Democrat, taking an active interest in the politics of the day.
ELLIS WILLIAM T. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Second North Carolina Infantry-Wounded at Battle of Petersburg, Va.-Civil War
William T. Ellis, another enterprising farmer of St. Francis County, was born in North Carolina in 1858, as the son of James G. and Christiana Ellis, both also natives of the same State. The father enlisted in the Second North Carolina Infantry during the late war, but being wounded in the battle of Petersburg, Va., received his discharge and returned home. In 1871 William T. removed to Cross County, Ark., with his parents, with whom he remained until twenty-six years of age. However he had been married during this time to Miss Martha C. Hall, who lived only a short time after her marriage. In 1883 he was married to Melinda O. Hall, and by this union four children have been born: Mattie S., Mollie A., Thomas J. and James L. Mr. Ellis owns a farm of 123 acres, with thirty-two acres under cultivation, being engaged principally in stock raising. He is a stanch Democrat and a member of the County Wheel, and he and his wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Ellis is justice of the peace of his township, which office he has held for the past twelve years. He is well known throughout this part of the county, and is generally liked and respected, lending his aid and influence to all public movements for the good of the order.
ERWIN JAMES E. CROSS CO.
James E. Erwin, merchant, Vanndale, Ark. In this bried outline of the life of this representative citizen of Cross County appear facts which are greatly to his credit, given as plainly as it is possible to put them, and without the intention of anything savoring of flattery. Mr. Erwin is a member of the general mercantile firm of Killough, Erwin & Co., of Vanndale,Ark., which business was established in 1889, and they carry a full stock of general merchandise, dry goods, groceries, clothing and plantation supplies.Mr. Erwin owes his nativity to Tennessee, and his birth occurred in 1849,and is the sixth of ten children born to W. F. and Lucinda (Tucker) Erwin,natives of Tennessee, where the father followed farming until 1856. He then came to Arkansas, settled in Hempstead County, where he remained until 1868,when he camed to Poinsett County, and located near Harrisburg. He purchased a farm of over 200 acres, cleared much of it, made many improvements and here died in 1872. The mother died many years previous, about 1855. James E. Erwin divided his time in youth between assisting on the farm and in attending the common schools where he received a good practical education.At the age of nineteen years he engaged as clerk after which he kept the books of a firm in Harrisburg. In the spring of 1873 he went to Wittsburg and became a bookkeeper for the firm of D. Block & Co. until 1877, after which he bought an interest in the business and continued as a member of the same until the firm closed out in 1879. On February 1 of the same year Mr.Erwin, with J. W. Killough, formed the firm of Killough & Erwin, and began business at Wittsburg, continuing there until February, 1884, when they moved to Vanndale. In February, 1884, Mr. Killough sold his interest to R. Block, and for two years after this the firm continued as Block & Erwin.In 1889 Mr. Erwin sold out to his partner and soon started a new store as the present firm of Killough, Erwin & Co. This firm carries a full stock of general merchandise, dry goods, groceries, clothing and plantation supplies. Mr. Erwin was married in 1872 to Miss R. M. Wade, a native of Virginia, and the daughter of W. H. Wade, who came to Poinsett County in1860. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Erwin were born three children: William F.(attending school at Searcy College), Henry Gordon, and Hugh Maitland. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Erwin is an enterprising business man and for years identified with the commercial interests of Cross County, and is always found at the head of all improvements of a public nature. He takes a deep interest in school matters and is at present director of Vanndale School.
ERWIN WADE HAMPTON CSA-Army-Served With Seven Sons-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1200
NEWPORT
EVANS J.J. ST.FRANCIS
J. J. Evans, of the prominent and substantial firm of H. Evans & Co., druggists of Forrest City, was born in this county in 1864, being the son of H. and Eliza (Ragsdale) Evans, also natives of Arkansas. Mr. Evans is now one the wealthiest planters of St. Francis County, and has the satisfaction of knowing that his fortune has all been acquired by his own personal industry and integrity. He received limited advantages for obtaining an education in youth, but determined that his children should receive a good, practical literary instruction, and is giving them every chance to become scholars and students in whatever right direction their ambition may lie. To himself and wife a family of eleven children have been born, eight of whom are now living, our subject, the youngest. Mr. Evans is still living, and, though having reached an advanced age, is quite active in business, managing the affairs of his large plantation with a sagacity that would put to shame many men of younger years who take pride in their superior and advanced ideas. J. J. Evans finished his literary education in Louisville, Ky., graduating from Bryant & Stratton's College in the scholastic year of 1883 and 1884. He had been occupied in laboring on the farm before going to college, earning enough money to defray his expenses, and although his father was generosity itself, he preferred to pay his own way, and at the end of his career, still had some $4,000 with which to commence business. Having a great admiration for, but no experience in the drug business, Mr. Evans engaged the services of an expert pharmacist and established a store at this place, and has made his business house as good as can be found in an average city of 40,000 inhabitants. The store is 23x180, and the stock contained therein is worth about $12,000, an annual business of between $10,000 and $12,000 being accorded this firm; this necessitates the services of three clerks. Mr. Evans is not a benedict, but a sincere admirer of the fair sex. He is a member of the K. of P. and A. F. & A. M., and is a Democrat in politics.
FAULKNER W.A. CROSS CO. CSA-Army-Civil War
W. A. Faulkner is a son of William and Permelia (Mullins) Faulkner.William Faulkner, Sr., was born and reared near London, England, and emigrated to this country come time in the 40's, locating in MIssissippi,and followed his trade, that of brick-mason and plasterer, until 1869 when he removed to Arkansas, settling in this county, where he entered land under the pre-emption laws. During the Rebellion, he served in the Confederate army for two years. Mrs. Faulkner died in 1859, leaving two children, W. A. (our subject) and James T. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Faulkner was married the second time,in 1861, to Mary Jackson, who died in 1871, leaving one child, now deceased, and in 1872, he married his third wife, Mrs. Lou Smith (neeEllis), who is still living. To this union were given four children, three of whom still live: Robert, Lillie and Edward. He and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church. W.A. was born in Mississippi,in 1855, where he spend his younger days, coming to this county with his father when he was fourteen years of age. At the age of twenty-one he rented a farm which he worked for three years. He then bought his present farm of 240 acres, which he works, besides one of 160 acres belonging to his wife. His farm is considered among the finest in the county, having good buildings upon it, a large orchard of some seven or eight acres and good stock. He was married in 1879, to Mrs. Sarah Bowers (nee Auldrigh). They are the parents of two children: I.H.and N.B. His wife has been married three times, her first husband being James Stephenson, her second husband Jacob Bowen, who lived only one month after their marriage, and the third, Mr. Faulkner. Mr. Faulkner is an enterprising and industrious farmer and highly respected by all who know him.
FEATHERSTON L. B. ST.FRANCIS
Hon. L. B. Featherston deserves prominent mention in the present volume not only as the efficient ex-president of the County Wheel at Forrest City, but on account of his worth as a citizen. A native of Mississippi, he was reared in Tennessee, and received a thorough, common-school education, and then attending the Law School at Lebanon, Tenn., which he was obliged to leave and give up the study of law on account of his eyesight, having lost one eye by hard study. He was then engaged in farming in Tennessee until 1881, when he removed to Arkansas and settled in St. Francis County, buying a farm, and now he owns 16,000 acres of land, with between 300 and 400 acres under cultivation. In 1886 he was elected to the State legislature from this county and served for two years. He entered politics to defeat the influence of the 'American Oil Trust', and introduced into the legislature the first anti-trust bill ever presented before any legislative body in the United States. The bill passed the house by a vote of seventy-two to five, but was defeated in the senate, and not allowed to come to a vote. Mr. Featherston was the recent nominee for the United States Congress, of a convention which met at Jonesboro, having for its platform, 'Fair ballot and free count for every citizen of the United States.' He is a man of influence and thought and willingly assists the promotion of what he considers the best interests of his adopted section. Mr. Featherston was born in 1851, being a son of Lewis and Elizabeth (Porter) Featherston, natives of Alabama and Virginia, respectively. The former is of Scotch descent, and removed to Georgia with his father and brother at an early day, then going to Alabama and later to Mississippi; he is now a respected resident of Shelby County, Tenn. The subject of this sketch was married in 1874 to Miss White, a daughter of E. A. White, of Memphis. They are the parents of five sons: Elbert, Lewis, John D., Paul and Douglass.
FENDLEY JOHN H. USARMY-Third Arkansas Cavalry-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1257
MARSHALL, ARK.
FERGUSON ALEXANDER H. CRITTENDEN CO. CSA-Army-Wounded at Battle of Corinth-Civil War
Alexander H. Ferguson, the present efficient and popular treasurer of Crittenden County and also a merchant at Marion, was born at Greenock,on the Mississippi River, in this county, March 17, 1839, and is the son of Horatio N. and Jane G. (Proctor) Ferguson, natives of Tennessee and Arkansas. The Grandfather Ferguson went from Greenock, Scotland, to Virginia, while a young man, moving from there to Tennessee, where he lived until his death. He was the father of three children: William D.,Allen McL. and Horatio N. (all now deceased). The boys came to Arkansas in 1820 and settled at Greenock, a Scottish town named after the town in which their father was born. William D. was the first sheriff of Crittenden County, holding the office from 1825 to 1835, and died at Memphis, Tenn., in 1866. He fought in the battle of New Orleans, January 8, 1815; was a member of the L. O. O. F. fraternity and belonged to thePresbyterian Church. He took active part in the development of this county and filled the office of deputy surveyor for several years. Allen McL. served as postmaster of Oldman, now Greenock, and was justice of the peace for several years. He died in Sharp County, Ark., in 1872. Horatio N. the father of our subject, came to this State when a young man, married upon attaining his maturity, and settled at what was afterward called Greenock, remaining here until 1835. Then he moved to a[p.414] place lower down the river. He was an extensive farmer and owned large tracts of land which he acquired after coming to Arkansas. He diedin 1841 at Frankfort, Ky., where he had gone for his health. Jane G.Proctor, his wife, was also an Arkansan by birth, her parents having emigrated here about the beginning of the nineteenth century, settling below Memphis on the river. Mrs. Ferguson was a member of the Presbyterian Church and remained a widow till her death, which occurred in 1871. She was the mother of six children, two sons and four daughters, of whom three are now living: Mrs. Kate A. Brown (who lives at Marion), Mrs. Nancy E. Lyon (in this county) and Alexander H. (the youngest). The latter was reared in this county where he has always lived. As school advantages were not very good hereabouts in his youth he attended school at Memphis until the death of his brother, when he had to return home and assume charge of affairs. In that position heremained up to the death of his mother, when he was married to Miss Kate Ritche, of Memphis. In 1884 he located at Marion and has since been engaged in merchandising. In 1880 Mr. Ferguson was elected county clerk,and discharged the duties of that office until elected treasurer in1884, in which position he is now serving his third term. He has alwaystaken a great interest in the advancement of education and is also ahard worker in the Democratic party. He was married January 19, 1882,and after the brief space of eight months was left a widower. His wifewas a true Christian lady and devoted wife, and was a member of theBaptist Church. Alexander Ferguson entered the Confederate army in August, 1862, and had served but a short time when he was wounded at the battle of Corinth, being several times hit in the body by grape-shot from a cannon. He was taken from the battlefield to a hospital at Iuka,where he had his leg amputated between the knee and ankle. He started home as soon as able to travel, coming to Memphis in a buggy, his sister, Sarah J., and Thomas Baldwin, having gone after him to the field of action. Mr. Ferguson is a competent officer for the place which he fills and is in every way worthy of the trust reposed in him.
FERGUSON WILLIAM C. ST.FRANCIS
William C. Ferguson, the son of Joseph L. and Bettie E. Ferguson, was born in Shelby County, Tenn., in 1848, being denied in youth even such advantages for an education that were to be obtained at that period. When eighteen years of age he began life on his own responsibility, choosing for his vocation the most independent of all callings, farming. In 1874 he came to St. Francis County, Ark., locating on his present farm, which consists of 539 acres, with 340 cleared and carefully improved. He has also a gin (steam) with self-acting press, and a capacity of twenty bales per day, ginning on an average 700 bales each year. He is also extensively engaged in stock raising, in which he has been quite successful. In 1887 Mr. Ferguson opened a store on his place, carrying a stock valued at $3,500, from which he is realizing very satisfactory returns. He was married in 1870 to Miss Bettie E. Ligon, a daughter of J. A. and Bettie A. Ligon, natives of Dixon County, Tenn. The result of this union is nine children: Emma D., William R., Annie V., Joe, Elton T., Cleveland, Blanche, Lulu M. and Cora E. (deceased). Mr. Ferguson is a Democrat in his political views, and in religious belief, a Presbyterian. Mrs. Ferguson is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. In secret societies he is identified with the Knights of Honor. His maternal grandfather was a soldier in the War of 1812, and died at the advanced age of eighty-six years. The paternal grandfather, a native of South Carolina, reached four-score years and six. OBIT:Death of Mr.Will C.Ferguson=Mr.W.C.Ferguson, a well known and highly esteemed citizen of St.Francis county died at his residence, corner of Dillard and Rosser Streets, yesterday morning, May 24,1906, of cancer of his kidneys, and was buried this forenoon in the McDaniel cemetery. Elder J.A.McCord in charge of the funeral. Deceased was 58 years of age, a native of Tennessee, he came to Arkansas in 1874, locating at Fergusonville, where he raised a large family and seven children by his first wife, namely Miss Emma Logan, W.R.Ferguson, Mrs.Anna Brittain, and Joe, E?, Blanche, and Lula Ferguson. He was married to Miss Kate Rogers, and she together with two daughters, Mrs.Peyton T.Scott, and Nonie Rogers are also left to mourn the loss of a good and kind indulgent father. Mr.Ferguson had not been well for some time, but had not taken to his bed on last Sunday night. Four brothers, namely: James N.Ferguson, Huntington, Ark.;L.D.Ferguson and wife of Memphis; W.D.Ferguson of Pine Bluff; and C.H.Ferguson and wife of Memphis, attended the funeral. The writer has known the gentleman for twenty years, he was a good man, above the average. He was not the member of any church, but he was honest and conscientious in his dealings with the world. SEE BIO. 5-25-1906 McDANIEL CEMETERY
FERGUSON WILLIAM D. CRITTENDEN CO. USARMY-War of 1812-New Orleans
SEE ALEXANDER FERGUSON
FITZPATRICK EDMUND ST.FRANCIS USARMY-War of 1812
SEE THOMAS O.FITZPATRICK BURIED LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY, ST.FRANCIS CO.,ARK.
FITZPATRICK THOMAS O. ST.FRANCIS
Thomas O. Fitzpatrick, a successful resident of St. Francis County, is of Scotch-Irish descent, his great-grandfather having been obliged to come to this country from Ireland for political causes. He struck for the liberty of his countrymen. Upon arriving in the United States in the forepart of the eighteenth century, he served in the Revolutionary War. His son, Edmund Fitzpatrick, (grandfather of our subject) took part in the War of 1812, in which he held the position of captain. He had a family of nine children. David Fitzpatrick, the father of Thomas O., was born in Charlotte County, Va., on February 19, 1813. He was twice married; first to Miss Clementine Walker, a native of Virginia, and next to Permelia Hargrove who was the mother of three children: Marietta (the wife of Rev. C. H. Ford), Isabella (wife of E. H. Sanders, of Little Rock) and Thomas O. David Fitzpatrick was engaged in speculating in real estate until the panic of 1837, when he was financially ruined, after which he followed farming in Arkansas. Thomas O. was born in Lauderdale County, Tenn., in April, 1849. He spent his younger days on the farm, and attended the common and high schools of his county, and also had the advantages of a private tutor. On his return from school he was appointed county surveyor of Cross County, which position he held, also giving his attention to teaching, until 1871. He then started the Wittsburg Gazette, the first paper published in that county, which he continued to operate until he was elected clerk of the circuit court, and in this capacity remained until the adoption of the new constitution in 1874, when he was again a candidate on the Republican ticket, but was beaten by seventy votes. Coming to St. Francis County he embarked in farming, and also erected a steam-gin, which has proven a very profitable enterprise. In April, 1872, Mr. Fitzpatrick was united in marriage to Miss Sallie E. Eldridge, and they have five children: Eola, Garnett, Ernest D., Kate and Garfield. In 1883 Mr. Fitzpatrick was appointed postmaster of Forrest City, holding that office until Cleveland's administration. In September, 1886, he was elected county clerk, and still discharges the duties of that position with satisfaction to the community, and with credit to himself. He has also been a candidate on the Republican ticket for State senator. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., K. of L., K. of H. and of the County Wheel. LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY
FLEMING WILLIAM P.-DR. LEE CO.-page 587
William P. Fleming, M. D. Among the names which give standing to Marianna and conduce to the welfare of society, is that of Dr. Fleming, [p.587] for he not only dispenses drugs, but also deals in hardware and furniture. He was born in Haywood County, Tenn., in 1856, but was reared in Crockett County, and received his literary education in Dyersburg Institute, of Tennessee, and the University of Louisville, Ky., graduating from the latter institution in March, 1877. He practiced medicine at Bell's Depot, Tenn., for three years, being also engaged in the drug business, but sold out in 1883 and came to Marianna, Ark., where he has since confined himself solely to the sale of drugs, his partner, Mr. Plummer, having charge of the hardware and furniture department. His store-room is 120x25 feet, and his stock of drugs is valued at about $10,000, and nets him a fair annual income. His stock of goods is quite complete, and it is safe to say that a call for any article will be promptly and accurately filled, for Dr. Fleming has few equals as a pharmacist. He was married in Memphis, Tenn., to Miss May Townsend, a daughter of D. H. Townsend, a farmer of that State, and by her has the following little family: Patrick, Guy and Walter. The Doctor is a son of Jacob and Mariah (Turpin) Fleming, the former a native of Illinois, reared in Tennessee. He is now a retired merchant and land owner near Bell's Depot, Tenn., and is sixty-five years of age. His wife was born in Tennessee, and died in 1888, aged fifty years. Anderson Turpin, the maternal grandfather, was a Tennesseean by birth.
FLETCHER WILLIAM CSA-Gen.Frost's Brigade-Col.Mitchell's Reg- War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1215
CALLOWAY CO.,MO.
FOLBRE THOMAS C. SR.-LT. ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.A-FIFTEENTH ARKANSAS-Civil War
The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 81:This sketch is about Judge Thomas C. Folbre, now judge of the County and Probate Courts of St.Francis County, and one of the most popular and efficient officers the county has ever had. He is a son of Charles L. and Mary J. (Baldwin) Folbre, and was born on June 15, 1841, at Aurora, Indiana. He was educated in private schools in Indiana and Kentucky, and in 1850 became a citizen of Arkansas. At the age of sixteen years he began business for himself at Linden. in this county. He came to Forrest City from near that place in 1869, to accept a situation as salesman for the Altheimer Brothers, who were then doing a general merchandise business on the corner of Washington and North Front Streets, now occupied by the Rollwage building in which J.S. Shields & Co. are doing general drug business. Forrest City was incorporated the following year, 1870, and he was elected the first Mayor, and G. Altheimer and Capt.Frank M. Prewett were also members of the Board of Aldermen. During his residence he has frequently been elected to the Town Council, Board of Health, and other official bodies, and in 1894 was elected Circuit and County Clerk, which he held two years. He was elected in 1902 to the office of County and Probate Judge of St.Francis County, and was re-elected in 1904. Judge Folbre was a gallant Confederate soldier. He enlisted in Confederate service in August 1861, and served through the entire period, surrendering May 25,1865, at which time he held the rank of Lieutenant of Co.A., Fifteenth Arkansas Infantry. He was the father of ten children. His wife was Mary M.Folbre and died earlier in 1886. OBIT:AGED CITIZEN PASSES AWAY=Judge T.C.Folbre, stricken by icy hand of death Saturday afternoon, Aug.10,1912. Again are the people of Forrest City and St.Francis county called upon to mourn the death on one of their most prominent and poplular fellow citizens, a good man, honest and true, in the person of Thomas C.Folbre, Sr., who departed this life last Saturday evening, after having suffered for several months with a malady that had held him prisoner in his home, and mostly confined to his bed. Judge Folbre had been in extremely bad health since early in the spring, and though all that medical skill and the skillful attentive care was done for him, all to no avail. Thomas C.Folbre, Sr., was born in Aurora, Indiana in 1841. He received his education in the public schools of that state and Kentucky, and came to Arkansas in 1850, settling in this county. At the age of sixteen he began business for himself at Linden in the southern edge of this county, and in 1869 came to Forrest City as a salesman for Altheimer Bros., a general mechandise on the corner of Washington and Front Streets, where the Rollwage building now stands. In 1870, when Forrest City was incorporated, he was on the first city council. He was tax assessor of the county for four years, as well as a salesman for L.Rollwage & Co. In 1894, he was elected circuit and county court clerk, which he held for two years. Next he was selected to be the office of county and probate judge for three terms, retiring in 1908. He was a continous resident, except two years spent in San Antonio for his health. Judge Folbre was a gallant Confederate soldier, having enlisted in August, 1861, and served throughout the entire war, surrendering on May 1865, at which time he held the rank of lieutenant in Company A, Fifteenth Arkansas Infantry. Just before the the last resting place of the body was begun, taps were sounded by Bugler Joe Reltano of Wynne and Forrest City, and this remembrance of what he had been as a soldier, and citizen, and his now departing, brought fresh tears to the eyes of not only his devoted family, but of the onlooking friends. He was a member of the Episcopal church, the Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows, and Knights of Honor, Knight and Ladies of Honor, and Red Men. Judge Folbre was married, first in 1870 to Miss Henry Adams, the wedding taking place on the Walker place, near Haynes. One child, a little girl who died in infancy, was born to this union, and its mother only lived two years after the marriage. In 1874 he was married to Miss Dora McCrary, of this county, and the couple lived together for about eight years, before they separated. To this union four boys, Thomas, Jr., Claude, Herbert, and Homer, all except Claude survive him. In 1889, he was married to Mrs.L.J.Andrews, the marriage taking place when she visited her sister, Mrs.J.M.Brown. To this union were born four children, three of whom survive, Frank, Gene and Gerald. He also leaves three cousins, Misses Clara, Elizabeth, and Mary Folbre, of Aurora, Indiana; a nephew, Mallon Folbre, a step daughter, Mrs.W.R.Ferguson, and grandchildren:Reullura and Lillian Ferguson. Hubert's two children, Charles Hubert, Jr. and Thomas Walthall; and Homer's daughter, Dora Belle. Funeral services were held at the home, and interment was in the Forrest City cemetery, Rev.E.T.Mabley officiating. The services were under the auspices of the Geo.P.Taylor Lodge No.196, I.O.O.F., and the pall bearers from that lodge: W.A.Pearson, George Swartz, Robert Brittain, Max Yoffie, J.R.Carder, and P.W.Lewis. 8-16-1912 CITY CEMETERY
FORD M. H. LEE CO.-page 587
M. H. Ford, planter and land-holder of Independence Township, is one of four children, reared by Charles F. and Betty (Hewett) Ford, his birth occurring in 1859. Charles Ford, a native of Virginia, was born in 1824, of parents who were among the F. F. V's. He passed his younger days in Virginia, where he became engaged in the mercantile business and was recognized as a man of unusual business aptitude. He was married in 1854 to Betty, daughter of John M. Hewett, of Kentucky, and to their union the following children were born: Minnie (now Mrs. Frank Govan of Marianna, and the mother of four children), Charlie (married to Miss Jessie Jackson, and resides at Marianna and they have three children), M. H. (the subject of this sketch) and William (unmarried, the deputy clerk of Lee County). Mr. Ford immigrated to Arkansas and later on came to Lee County, where he purchased a large amount of property and became very popular, being considered as a public-spirited and progressive man, always ready to lend his substantial support to anything for the growth and eventual good of the county. He died in 1867 in Lee County, and his wife followed him about five years later. They were members of the Christian Church and highly respected by all who knew them. M. H. Ford passed his boyhood days in Arkansas, Kentucky and Quincy, Ill., his education being completed at the Gem City Business College of the latter place. Soon after he came to Arkansas and in 1881 was appointed marshal of Marianna, which position he held with creditable distinction for seven years. After retiring from office he engaged in farming and now has about 320 acres of good land on which his residence is situated, and in addition to that has over 1,000 acres, with a total of 600 acres well improved and under cultivation. Mr. Ford was married in 1885 to Miss Carrie Foreman, of Independence Township, Lee County, Ark., and to their union three children have been born: Twins (deceased) and Carrie Louise. Mr. Ford is a Democrat in his political views, and in secret societies is a member of the Knights of Pythias (charter member) and the Knights of Honor. He is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and his wife a communicant of the Episcopal Church.
FOREMAN JOHN I.-COLONEL CSA-Second Arkansas, Govan's regiment-Civil War LEE CO.-page 588
Col. John I. Foreman, who was born in North Carolina, in 1829, was one of two children resulting from the union of William S. and Elizabeth E. (Williams) Foreman. The father's birth occurred in 1806, in North Carolina, where he became identified with the most prominent and wealthy planters of Pitt County, also belonging to one of the first families of that State. He was married in 1828, to Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. Williams, an eminent physician of North Carolina, who served as surgeon in the Revolutionary War. Mr. Foreman died in 1836, leaving to a young widow the management of his large fortune, which was willed without condition to her. She again married, her [p.588] second husband being E. B. Freeman, clerk of the supreme court of North Carolina for many years. Mrs. Freeman having received a large fortune from her former husband, turned her attention to the education of her two sons, both of them being sent to Princeton, N. ., and graduating from the prominent college of that place. She closed her eyes to the scenes of this world in 1848. In 1851 John I. was elected to the legislature, from Pitt County, N. C., in which he served two years, and had he chose to remain, could have occupied a most enviable position in the political field. This, however, he did not care to do. Having previonsly paid a visit to Eastern Arkansas, he concluded that that was the place for his future home, and in 1853 he came to what is now Lee (then Phillips) County, to join his brother, who had immigrated to the State a year previous, bringing with him into the primeval forest a vast number of slaves and other property. He had purchased a large tract of land, and by the help of the slaves soon brought it from its embryo state, to that of cultivation. This property was equally enjoyed and shared by the two brothers, where they lived in great contentment until the breaking out of the war between the States. During that time they added much to their wealth, and became widely recognized as the most prosperous and popular planters in the State. They were known far and near for their generosity and support to all educational enterprises, and in fact to all movements that betokened the good and growth of the county. When the war was declared, John Foreman believing the South to be right, as a leader of the people with whom he lived, raised a company of soldiers for the Confederate army, and was attached to the Second Arkansas, Govan's regiment. Being transferred east of the Mississippi, he fought in the battle of Perryville (Ky.), and then returned to the Trans-Mississippi Department, where he was attached to Gen. Marsh Walker's staff. He was with this command at the date of Gen. Walker's death, in a duel with a wellknown general. After this Mr. Foreman was not in active service, and at the closing of hostilities he returned home to find that his plantation and all his valuable property had been destroyed by the ravages of war. Let it not for a moment be supposed that his great loss overpowered him, for he set to work with redoubled courage and a determination to succeed, and a few years witnessed the recovery of his fortunes, and an addition to his property lost. Here in this vicinity he lived for many years, occupying a warm place in the hearts of the entire community, by whom he was honored and revered, as a leading and popular citizen of this county. A mean action or an unkind word was something perfectly foreign to his loyal and generous nature. His death, which occurred in 1879, was sincerely mourned by all who knew him, and his work, which was of a lifetime in doing good to man, well deserved its reward in the commendation, "Well done thou good and faithful servant." Col. Foreman was married in 1855 to Miss Arabella Armstrong, of New York City, a daughter of William and Martha Armstrong, early settlers of that city, where her father died in 1834. Her mother then immigrated to Tennessee, and then to Arkansas. Mr. and Mrs. Foreman had eight children: William H., Robert L. (M. D.), J. I., Jr., E. W., Jane, Arabells, M. K. and Bessie.
FOREMAN R. R. LEE CO.-page 589
R. R. Foreman, residing in Independence Township, was born in North Carolina in 1831, being the son of William S. and Elizabeth E. (Williams) Foreman. The father was also a native of North Carolina, his birth occurring in 1806. He followed farming and merchandising with success, and was married in 1828 to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. Robert Williams, of North Carolina, a very prominent man and surgeon in the Revolutionary War, who was residing in the old North State at the date of his death. There were only two children born to the union of Mr. and Mrs. Foreman: R. R. (the subject of this sketch) and John. Mr. Foreman died in Pitt County, North Carolina, in 1836, respected and esteemed by all who knew him. Mrs. Foreman was again married, her second choice being E. B. Freeman, who was for many years previous to his death, and at that data, a clerk of the supreme court of North Carolina. Mrs. Freeman died in 1848 in her native State. R. R. Foreman received his [p.589] education in the schools of North Carolina, afterward attending school at Princeton, N. J. In 1852 he came to Lee (then Phillips) County, and located on a farm about three miles from Marianna, this farm consisting of 360 acres, besides a large amount of property in another portion. He was married in 1853 to Frances C. Williams, a daughter of Dr. R. F. Williams, of North Carolina, a prominent physician who died in that State in 1852. To Mr. and Mrs. Foreman two children have been born: Elizabeth L. (born in 1861) and Mary C. (born in 1866, now the wife of M. H. Ford, of Lee County). Mr. Foreman is a member of Lodge No. 171 of the Masonic order at Marianna, of Chapter No. 54, and also a K. of H. For some years he was Worshipful Master and a charter member of the Blue Lodge, and also High Priest of the order. Mr. Foreman and family are members of the Episcopal Church. He is a man who takes a great interest in the growth of the county, and is lending his substantial support toward gaining this end, and especially is he interested in educational and religious matters, to which he contributes liberally.
FOSTER G. F. -DR. LEE CO.-page 589
G. F. Foster, M. D. Noah Foster, a native of Tennessee, was born in 1809 and passed his younger days in the schools of that State. In 1833 he moved to Panola County, Miss., where he met and married Miss Lodiska Spaulding, daughter of a prominent planter, Gideon Spaulding. Mr. Foster settled in Mississippi, where he and his wife are now residing. He has been very successful as a farmer, and is now enjoying the fruits of his industry, from which he accumulated a large property. He is a Democrat and has always taken an active interest in public enterprises. To himself and wife a family of ten children were born: Delila (now Mrs. Parker, residing in Lonoke County), Nancy (Mrs. Ruby, of Lonoke County), Elizabeth (deceased), John (dead), Thomas (living in Panola County, Mississippi, married and has a family of six children), Davis (unmarried and lives in Lee County, engaged in the mercantile business with his brother G. F., the subject of this sketch), and two children unnamed. G. F. Foster was born in Mississippi in 1847, and received a good common-school education in the schools of his native State, afterward entering the Eclectic Medical College of Mississippi, from which he graduated in 1884. He then moved to St. Francis County, Ark., where he practiced his profession with manifest success. In 1887 he embarked in the mercantile business, and by his courteous and obliging manners has won a liberal patronage from the surrounding community. His practice is among the best and wealthy class of people, by whom he is recognized as an efficient physician, and a credit to the profession. He also owns 200 acres of valuable land under a thrifty state of cultivation. Dr. Foster was married in 1884 to Miss Bradford Watson, a daughter of John and Betty Watson. Her parents were natives of Mississippi, but moved to Arkansas at an early date, about the year 1847 or 1850. To Dr. and Mrs. Foster two children have been born. The Doctor is a Democrat, and in secret societies is identified with the Masonic order, being a member of La Grange Lodge No. 108. He is a member of and an earnest worker in the Methodist Episcopal Church and lends valuable aid to all enterprises for the good of the county.
FOSTER THOMAS LEE CO.-page 590
Thomas Foster was born within one mile of La Grange, the place where he now lives, on August 19, 1849, and was a son of Golden and Elizabeth Foster, natives of Mississippi. Mr. Golden Foster moved to Arkansas from Mississippi, and from there to Texas, but came back to Arkansas in 1841, where he died twenty years later. He was a large planter and acquired some property. He and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and were the parents of twelve children, two of whom are still living: Malissa (wife of Rev. Thomas Craig, now stationed at Desha, Independence County), and Thomas (the principal of this sketch, and the youngest in the family). There is living also a half-sister to these children, Miss Mattie Foster, the issue of their father's second marriage. Thomas Foster had three brothers in the Confederate army, one of whom was killed at Shiloh, one died from the wounds received at Gettysburg, and one while serving in the Indian Territory. Soon after the war he commenced working to support his mother and sisters, and was employed [p.590] by a Mr. Lownsbery at a small salary. In 1873 he began farming for himself, and with the push and energy, which are his principal characteristics, has been very successful as a cotton planter. In 1876 he was married to Miss Vionna Hickey, a daughter of C. W. and Elizabeth Hickey, of La Grange. They are the parents of these children: Frank U., Bettie Lou, Cleols, Thomas, Mattie May, Gustavus W., and one deceased. Mr. Foster, while not a member of any church, is the son of Methodist parents, and his leaning is toward that denomination. He is a member of the following secret orders: Masons, K. of H. and A. O. U. W. Mrs. Foster is a member of the Baptist Church.
FOUNTAIN WILLIAM CROSS CO.
William Fountain, one of the oldest and most respected farmers in Cross County, was born in 1829 to the union of Cary and Sarah (Powers)Fountain, natives of North Carolina and of English descent, the paternal grandfather of our subject coming to this country from England. Cary Fountain was a farmer by occupation, and a slave owner. The paternal grandfather served in the Revolutionary War after emigrating to this country, and the maternal grandfather served in the American Navy. Cary Fountain was the father of six children, two of whom only are living: Maria (wife of Wyatt Earp of North Carolina) and William (oursubjet). The latter was reared on a farm in North Carolina, his nativeState, and at the age of fourteen engaged in teaming, hauling turpentine, in which occupation he was engaged for two or three years. He was afterward occupied in clerking in a dry-goods store for some years, and then learned the carpenter's trade, at which he worked about twenty years. Mr. Fountain has been married three times; first to Martha A.Cutchins, who died in 1855, leaving four children, one surviving, George A., who resides in this county. His second wife was Clara A.Parker, a native of Tennessee; she was a member of the Methodist Church and died in 1880, leaving one child now deceased. In 1880, Mr. Fountain was married to his third and present wife, Mrs. Charlotte T. Martin (neeShaver). They are the parents of two children: Cary E. and Ernest H. In 1849 he left North Carolina for Tennessee, and remained there until 1860, when he came to Cross County, Ark., locating on the place on which he now resides. This then consisted of 140 acres, upon it there being a log-cabin, with ten or twelve acres of land under cultivation. He now owns 827 acres, 100 under cultivation, and raises a large amount of stock,which costs but little to keep through the winter. Mr. Fountain is a member of the Masonic lodge, and holds the office of Junior Warden. He was formerly a notary public of Cross County, and has held the office of constable for about six years, serving as school director for some twenty years. He is also president of the County Wheel, and is one of the prominent Democrats of the county.
FRIAR J.T. CSA-Capt. Dunn's company-Civil War LEE CO.-page 590
J. T. Friar is a member of the Haynes' Mercantile Association, and was born within three miles of where he now lives, in 1844, being the fifth of six children born to J. T. and Perlyxie (Burk) Friar, natives of Tennessee, from near Knoxville. The father removed to Arkansas at an early day (about 1830), and in addition to farming also dealt in land. After his wife's death, in 1848, he married Miss Lucretia Seaborn, by her becoming the father of two children. His death occurred in 1856. His children by his first wife now only number two: Narcissus (wife of J. W. Byers) and our subject. The two half-brothers are also deceased. J. T. Friar was reared and educated in what is now Lee County, and at the early age of seventeen years entered the Confederate army, being in Capt. Dunn's company, known as the "Dead-shot" Company from St. Francis County. He served east of the Mississippi River for four years, and was in the following engagements: Shiloh, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, and from Dalton to Atlants, Ga. He was also at Jonesboro, Springfield, Franklin, Nashville, and in numerous skirmishes. He surrendered at Greenville, N. C., and returned home. He was wounded by a minie ball in the thigh at the battle of Shiloh, and is still troubled by his wound. He first began working as a farm hand at $20 per month, continuing until 1867, when he was married to Mrs. Frances (McDaniel) Hughes, a daughter of Arch. McDaniel, but Mr. Friar was called upon to mourn her death about one year later, she having borne him a child, who is also deceased. In 1868 Mr. Friar purchased eighty acres of slightly improved land, and has since added 200 acres, making him one of the best farms in the county, and in addition to this he owns some valuable town property, all of which he has made by industry and good management since the war. In 1888 he became associated with the Haynes' Mercantile Association, which is composed of farmers, and does a business of some $30,000. Mr. Friar has been careful and painstaking in the management of his farm and, indeed, is thorough in regard to everything connected with its advancement, as he is in every business to which he gives his attention. In 1869 he was married to Miss Martha Tipton, of Tennessee, a daughter of Benjamin and Mary Tipton, of that State, and by her has had eight children, four of whom are now living: Aggie, Nannie, Custer and J. T. Mr. and Mrs. Friar are members of the Baptist Church, and Mr. Friar belongs to Bethel Lodge No. 2168, K. of H.
FRIEND E.F. CSA-ARMY-Civil war LEE CO.-page 591
E. F. Friend, miller and ginner, Marianna, Ark. This wide-awake and enterprising resident was originally from Alabama, where his birth occurred in 1838, and in that State hereached years of maturity, and received his education. He learned the carriage-maker's trade, but when the war broke out he cast aside his implements of peace and took up the weapons of warfare, enlisting in the Confederate service. He participated in the following prominent battles: Corinth, Shiloh, all the battles of Gens. Bragg and Johnston, and during his service never received a wound. After the war he returned to his home, and in 1871 moved to Arkansas. Previous to this he was married in Alabama to Miss Mary E. Gilbert, a native of that State, and after this union he moved to Marianna, where he worked at his trade for fifteen years, being the owner of a regular carriage and wagon shop for that length of time. He had a full plant of steam machinery for his business, and after the fire had but four left. The loss was at least $8,000. After this he embarked in the ginning and milling business, and will introduce a full line of rollers for grinding by the first of the year 1890. He still owns his farm of 320 acres, and is a prosperous [p.591] and progressive citizen. To his marriage were born six children: Anns, Ola, Brent, Julia, Matie and Samuel. Mr. Friend is a member of the K. of H. and K. & L. of H., and Royal Arcanum. He is the son of David H. and Amanda (Hendricks) Friend, natives of Virginia and Alabama, respectively, the father born in 1800 and he mother in 1812. The father was one of the pioneers of Alabama, and lived to be about eighty years of age. He was a jeweler, a silversmith and a farmer by occupation. The mother died at the age of forty-five years.
FRIERSON JAMES G. CSA-Mississippi Inf-Capt-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1201
JONESBORO
FULKERSON ANDREW J. ST.FRANCIS
Andrew J. Fulkerson was born in 1855, St. Francis County, Ark., claiming the advent of his birth. He is the son of John J. and Frances E. Fulkerson, natives of Arkansas and Indiana, respectively. Mr. Fulkerson died in 1880 and his wife in 1858. Andrew J. received but limited advantages for an education, and when only nineteen years of age commenced farming on his personal responsibility. He was married in 1877 to Becky J., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Casteel, and to their marriage five children have been given: Frances E., John H., James Arthur, William A. and Charles. Mr. Fulkerson owns 563 acres of excellent land, with over ninety under cultivation, and everything on his plantation gives evidence of thrift and prosperity. He is a Democrat in his political views, and in his religious faith a Baptist. He is a member of the Wheel and the K. of L. Mrs. Fulkerson belongs to the Methodist Church.
FUTRALL THOMAS A. CSA-Officer of Gen. John R. Cooke's North Carolina Brigade of the Army of Northern Virginia-Civil War LEE CO.-page 591
Thomas A. Futrall, A. M., principal of the Marianna Male and Female Institute, located at Marianna, Ark., is one of the most prominent educators in the South. He was born in the "Old North State," in 1842, and was educated in the best schools of the East, having been at one time a pupil of the famous William J. Bingham. About the time he finished his academic course, in 1860, a war cloud appeared above the horizon, and very soon thereafter he joined the Southern army as a volunteer, and served with distinction as an officer of Gen. John R. Cooke's North Carolina Brigade of the Army of Northern Virginia during the late war between the States. He took part in all the great battles in Virginia, Maryland and Pennsylvania, and was paroled with the remnant of Gen. Lee's army at Appomattox Court House. At the close of the war he immigrated to West Tennessee, and established a classical and scientific school, which soon took rank with the best institutions of learning in the country, and gained for him a widespread reputation as a scholar and an educator, so much so, that in 1884 he was tendered his present position in the flourishing town of Marianna, Prof. Futrall has made this institution one of the most thorough and practical schools in the State, from which young men and women go out well prepared for the active duties of life. Beginning the work when comparatively young, Prof, Futrall has made teaching the business of his life, and has taught successfully for twenty-five consecutive years. In 1887, at the Chicago meeting of the National Educational Association of the United States, he was elected vice-president of the association, and was re-elected to the same position in Nashville, Tenn., in 1889, and is now, 1890, manager for the association in the State of Arkansas. He is a quiet, courteous, thoroughly posted gentleman, a ripe scholar, and is familiar with the best methods of instruction. In 1867 he was married to Miss Emma R. Headen, of Chatham County, N. C. A young family of seven interesting children, four girls and three boys, gather around the hearthstone.
FUTRELL ALEXANDER CROSS CO. CSA-CO.A-Fifth Arkansas Regiment Infantry-Civil War
Alexander Futrell, farmer and stock raiser of Vanndale, Ark. Among the influential and respected citizens of Cross County, Ark., there is no one more justly entitled to representation in this work than Alexander Futrell. He was born in Northampton County, N. C., in 1830; was taught the duties of farm life when quite young and received his education in the common schools. At the age of twenty-one he came to Arkansas, settled in Poinsett County, where he engaged as overseer until the outbreak of the war. He then enlisted in Company A, Fifth Arkansas Regiment Infantry, was in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Nashville and Franklin, and was in ten other of the principal engagements, besides many skirmishes. He was in the battle of Raleigh, N. C., and two days later surrendered at Greensboro, N. C. He then made a visit to his old home, where he spent three months, then returned to Cross County, Ark.,settling on a tract of 160 acres of wild land, one mile west of the present city of Vanndale. In 1868 he marries Miss Isabella F. Lewellen, daughter of James A. and Nancy E. Lewellen, after which he removed to his new home,erected buildings and made many improvements. At the end of four years he had eight acres under cultivation and has a pleasant and comfortable home. He raises a variety of crops and can make three-fourths of a bale of cotton to the acre and forty bushels of corn. By his marriage Mr. Futrell became the father of these children: Eddie E. (died at the age of seven years), John Lewellen, James A., Blanchard W., Mary B., Gordon C., Emma M., Ernest H., Pearl. Gordon C died at the age of six years; Ernest H. at the age of six months. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Futrell is one of the most progressive and enterprising farmers of the county; is honest, industrious and a man who has the respect of all. He is the youngest son born to John and Charity Futrell, and was left fatherless when a child. The father was also a farmer and was born, reared and passed his last days in the same county.
GANLEY WILLIAM CROSS CO.
William Ganley was a son of James Ganley, who was born in Ireland and emigrated to this country soon after his marriage, locating in New Jersey,about five miles below Trenton, on the Delaware River; afterward he moved to Philadelphia, where he died about 1833. His wife, formerly Bridet Doane,died in St. Louis from the cholera, as did several of the children. They reared a family of eleven children, of whom William, our subject, was the seventh. The latter was born in New Jersey, March 17, 1827, and was reared in that State until about eighteen years of age, when he left home and came west, engaging in rafting lumber down the Mississippi from Minnesota to St. Louis.In this occupation he continued for eleven years, being the first man to take a raft of pine lumber from Minnesota to that city between the points mentioned, an industry that has now grown to one of considerable proportions.He then started for California, but passing through Cross County, Ark., became interested in the beauty of the country and stopped here, and has since made it his home. When first coming to this county Mr. Ganley embarked in thelumber business and afterward went to farming, in which he is still interested.He was married about 1852, to Martha Miles, a native of Alabama, who died in1862, leaving five children, one of whom only is living, Bridget, still at home. Mr. Ganley now owns 600 acres of land, with 100 acres under cultivation,located near the Tyronza River; he has good buildings and a large orchard. He is a Catholic in religion and a Democrat in politics.
GIBSON J.H. -DR CSA-Twenty-second Arkansas-Surgeon-Civil War LEE CO.-page 591
Dr. J. H. Gibson, physician and surgeon. The subject of this sketch was born in Iredell County, N. C., in the year 1830. He attended the common schools of the neighborhood, and was graduated from Davidson College, a literary institution in Mecklenburg County, N. C., in the year 1853, after which he spent several years in teaching in the State of Florida. He then commenced reading medicine, and was graduated from the Medical University of Georgia, receiving the degree of M. D. in the year 1858. Subsequently entering upon the practice of his profession in his native State, he remained there until shortly before the breaking out of the late Civil War, when he came to the State of Arkansas, and located in Independence County, but the following year he enlisted in the Twenty-second Arkansas as surgeon. At the close of the war he came to Lee County, and resumed the practice of his adopted calling at La Grange, where he has since resided, and built up a large practice. In 1868 the Doctor was married to Miss Eliza Burke, a daughter of Elisha and Eliza Burke, natives of North Carolina, and who came to Arkansas in 1840. Her father represented Phillips County for a number of years in the State legislature. Dr. Gibson and wife are the parents of five children: Belo, Estelle, Burke, Minnie and Willie. Dr. Gibson is a member of the Presbyterian Church. He also belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and is Worshipful Master of the lodge at La Grange. His wife is a member of the Baptist Church. He is also justice of the peace of Richland Township, and one of the leading men of the township.
GILL ROBERTO. LEE CO.-page 593
Robert O. Gill is one of the prominent residents of Haynes, Ark., is a money lender and a large real estate owner, having become by his own industry the owner of 960 acres of land, with about 260 acres under cultivation. His property is improved with good buildings and fences, and besides his own comfortable and pleasant home in Haynes, he owns another house and lot. He was born in Tennessee, in 1847, and is the second of seven children born to Nathaniel Y. and Susan A. (Bowles) Gill, also native-born citizens of Tennessee. They removed to Phillips County, Ark., in 1851, and settled twelve miles west of Helena, near what is known as Lexa, and there the father was manager of a plantation belonging to his uncle, Isaac Smith, and afterward worked in the same capacity for William Pillow. In 1856 he bought a farm west of Helena, known as Hude Park plantation, but sold out at the end of one year and became general manager of the plantation belonging to Mr. Pillow, remaining with him until the opening of the war, during which time he farmed on what is known as the Grant place. After the war was over he bought what is now known as the H. P. Rogers' place, and here made his home until 1867, when he became the owner of a farm three miles west of Haynes for one year, selling it then to Dr. Wood, moving in the spring of 1869 to La Grange, where he was engaged in the mercantile business until his death, December 16, 1873; his death was caused by pneumonia. His wife died December 3, 1873, and both had been members of the Baptist Church for a number of years. Six of their seven children are now living: W. F. (who is a merchant [p.593] at La Grange), Robert O., Maria M., John Y. (of Texas), I. S. (of Texas), and Mary P. (wife of W. L. Howard, of La Grange). Robert O. Gill was reared and educated in Phillips and Lee Counties. He received only the advantages of a common-school education in his early youth, the turmoils of war placing it beyond the power of his parents to send him to higher institutions of learning, but by self-application and much reading he is one of the best posted and most intelligent men of the county. At the age of twenty-one years, or in 1868, he began life for himself as a farmer, but after farming on rented land for one year he began merchandising in La Grange, his capital stock amounting to $600, which he had earned the previous year. Since 1883 he has been a resident of Haynes, and until the spring of 1889 followed merchandising, but then sold out and has been following his present occupation. He is a man who favors all laudable public enterprises and in his political views is a Democrat. Socially he is a member of the K. of H., La Grange Lodge No. 2166, and has held nearly all the chairs in the local lodge. In the spring of 1875 he was married to Miss Cornelia L. Smith, a daughter of G. B. and Susan S. Smith, natives of Northern Alabama, who removed to Arkansas a few years prior to the late Civil War. Mrs. Smith died in 1888. Of the seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. Gill, two are now living: Alma L. and Robbie.
GILL WILLIAM FRANKLIN CSA-Dobbins' regiment of Confederate Cavalry-Civil War LEE CO.-page 592
William Franklin Gill is a son of Nathaniel Y. Gill, a native of Tennessee, who made that State [p.592] his home until 1849, when he removed to Mississippi, locating near Holly Springs. He was married in Tennessee to Miss Susan Bowles, also of that State. In 1854 they came to Arkansas, and engaged in farming on the plantation now owned by Mr. N. L. Graves, near Lexa. He was a hard working man, and a good manager, and in 1861 raised the largest crop of cotton per acre of any ever grown in Eastern Arkansas. Mr. Gill died in December, 1873, at the age of nearly fifty years. His wife was called to her long home in the same month, when forty-five years old. The paternal grandfather of the principal of this sketch, was a native of North Carolina, and of Irish descent, and moved to Tennessee when a young man, where he lived the remainder of his life, following the occupation of a farmer. William Franklin Gill was born near Columbia, Tenn., on January 8, 1846, being the eldest in a family of seven children, six of whom are living: William F., R. O. (also a farmer of this county), Morris (a farmer of Phillips County), John Y. (a merchant of Texas), Isaac S. (a teacher, also in Texas) and Mary P. (the wife of L. G. Howard [see sketch of William T. Howard in this work], the partner of our subject in the mercantile business in La Grange). In 1862 William F. Gill enlisted in Dobbins' regiment of Confederate Cavalry, in which he served until the close of the war, participating in all of the principal battles in Price's raid through Missouri, Kansas and the Indian Territory. After the close of the war, he went on the farm with his father, remaining with him until his marriage, on November 18, 1869. Mr. Gill labored for himself on the farm for one year, and then moved to La Grange, entering into the mercantile business with his father and brother, R. O. Gill. This was continued until his father died, when he and his brother conducted the trade until 1881, and then dissolved. Mr. Gill then went into business with Mr. L. G. Howard, his brother-in-law. They started with a very small capital, but their present large business demonstrates what can be done by true energy, combined with a large stock of common sense, good business management and honest dealings. He was married, on November 18, 1869, to Miss Bettie Underwood, a native of Tennessee, who died in March, 1874, leaving three children, two still living: Mollie and William Y. Mr. Gill married his second and present wife, Rebecca Holland, February 4, 1875. She was born in the State of South Carolina, in 1857, and is the mother of one daughter, Beulah. In addition to his store at La Grange, Mr. Gill owns800 acres of fine land, of which 450 acres are under cultivation. All this he has made since the war. He is a member of the Royal Arcanum, of the Knights of Honor and is a prominent Democrat of Richland Township.
GOAR F. M.- CAPTAIN CSA-Second Mississippi Reg-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1288
DREW CO.
GOODE THOMAS ST.FRANCIS USARMY-REVOLUTIONARY WAR-COLONEL
SEE WILLIAM THOMAS CLIFTON
GOODLOE GRANVILLE- DR ST.FRANCIS CSA-3RD LT.35TH ALABAMA REGIMENT-Civil War
Granville Goodloe, M. A., was born at Tulip, Ark., January 23, 1857. He was the eldest of twelve children of the Rev. Dr. A. Theodore Goodloe and Sallie Louise, daughter of Granville La Force Cockrill and Louise M. Turner. Dr. Goodboe was a native of Maury County, Tenn.; was educated at the University of Virginia, took the degree of M.D. at Hampden Sidney College, Virginia, and practiced two years in Bellevue Hospital. Just before the war he settled with his brother in St. Francis County, Ark., and engaged in farming. He entered the Confederate service in April, 1862, as third lieutenant in the Thirty-fifth Alabama Regiment; the same year he was promoted to first lieutenant, for gallantry; he served through the war, and in 1868 entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, as an itinerant preacher, in which he is still engaged. His wife is a native of Tuscumbia, Ala., and a relative of the Cockrills and Hardings, of Nashville; her great-grandfather, John Cockrill, was the first white man married in Middle Tennessee. His wife was a sister of Gen. James Robertson. The subject of this sketch, Mr. Granville Goodloe, was a pupil of the Culleoka Institute (Webb. School) for three and one-half years. In 1873-75 he was a student of Emory and Henry College, Virginia, and from 1875 to 1879 of the Vanderbilt University, where he was the first to take the degree of M. A., May 30, 1879. In 1879-80 he was principal of the Black River High School in Smithville, Ark. In the summer of 1880 he became associated with his classmate, the Rev. E. R. Chappell, as joint principal of McKenzie College, as McTyeire Institute was then called. He still presides over this institution. He is a member of the Methodist Church. Birth: Jan. 23, 1857 Death: Mar. 24, 1911 Inscription: "Eldest son of Sarah L. Cockrill and A. T. Goodloe, born near Forrest City, Ark." Burial::Rose Hill Cemetery ArkadelphiaClark CountyArkansas, USAPlot: Block 3 ROSE HILL CEMETERY
GOVAN DANIEL CHEVILETTE -GENERAL CSA-Second Arkansas Regiment, under Gen. Hindman-Civil War LEE CO.-page 595
Gen. D. C. Govan was born in Northampton County, N. C., July 4, 1829, and is a son of A. R. and M. P. (Jones) Govan, the former of whom was born in Orangeburg, N. C., and was educated in South Carolina College at Columbia, some of his schoolmates being William C. Preston, George McDuff, Langdon C. Chevies, Hugh S. Lagree and other men of the South, who afterward became noted. After graduating from the above-named college he began his career as a planter in Orangeburg District, and was elected to Congress from there about the year 1825. About 1830 he emigrated with his family westward to Tennessee, and there made his home until the removal of the Chickasaw Indians from the State of Mississippi, when he made that State his permanent abode, his death occurring there in 1841, at the age of forty-seven years. His wife was born in North Carolina in 1801, and by Mr. Govan became the mother of a large family of children, her death occurring at the age of eighty-seven years. Gen. D. C. Govan grew to manhood in Northern Mississippi, and was prepared for college by Rev. Francis L. Hawks, and graduated from the Columbia (S. C.) College, in 1848. There was a military company kept in drill at this institution, then the best in the State, and of this company Mr. Govan was a member. Immediately upon graduating he joined his fellow-kinsman, Gen. Ben McCullough, on an expedition to California, their company consisting of twenty-one men, all of whom, with the exception of two or three, were experienced Texan and old Indian fighters. They left Mississippi on October 1 and traveled through Texas and Mexico north to Monterey, thence to the seacoast, where they took passage on board a vessel bound for the Golden Gate, and reached San Francisco late in December. They engaged in hunting and trapping until the next spring, and then found that they had accumulated sufficient money to engage in mining, which they did (with the understanding between our subject and Mr. McCullough that they were to share equally in the results of their western expedition) and fitted out a party to go to the mountains and commence operations. Just at this juncture the Territurial legislature of California passed a law imposing a tax on all foreigners mining in the Territory. California was then divided into two districts and Mr. McCullough received the appointment of collector for the Southern District, a position which he and Mr. Govan supposed would prove fabulously remunerative, and Mr. Govan took charge of the mining expedition and went up the San Joaquin River. He met with fair success in mining, and said that had they not been trying to make a competence in a few days, might have amassed a fortune. He mined on various rivers until he reached the North Fork of the American River, when he received a letter from Gen. McCullough saying that the foreign tax could not be collected, and the law was a failure, and requested him to meet him in Sacramento, where they would [p.595] prepare for another mining expedition. When they reached that place the sheriff of the county had been killed and a special election was being held, whereupon Mr. McCullough became a candidate and was elected. Mr. Govan then sold out his mining outfit and became deputy sheriff, the former gentleman officiating in that capacity from October, 1850, to July, 1855, and did the first legal execution in the State of California after it had been admitted into the Union, hanging three men for highway robbery. He returned to his home in Mississippi immediately after retiring from the sheriff's office, Mr. Govan returning at the same time. The latter was married in Mississippi, in December, 1853, to Miss Mary F. Otey, a daughter of the Rt. Rev. James Otey, of Mississippi, and the following December he came to Arkansas, locating in that part of Phillips County, which subsequently became Lee County. He was a successful planter until the opening of the war, then began raising a company for the Confederate army, which afterward became a part of the Second Arkansas Regiment, under Gen. Hindman. They operated Confederate general Daniel C. Govan; circa 1864. GOVAN, DANIEL CHEVILETTE General, Army of Tenn, CSA 4Jul1829-12Mar1911 Holly Springs, MS FIELD OFFICERS AND STAFF 2D ARKANSAS INFANTRY REGIMENT CONFEDERATE STATES OF AMERICA Birth: Jul. 4, 1829 Death: Mar. 12, 1911 Civil War Confederate Brigadier General. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he entered the Confederate Army and was appointed Colonel in command of the 2nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment. He led the 2nd Arkansas in the Battles of Shiloh and was given command of the brigade at the Battle of Chickamauga in 1862. Promoted Brigadier General in 1863, his command consisted of the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th Arkansas Infantry Regiments, which participated in the Atlanta Campaign. In 1864, he was captured at the Battle of Jonesboro, was prisoner exchanged by Union forces and served the remainder of the war with the Army of Tennessee. After the war, he was a farmer and served as the Indian agent at the Tulalip Agency in Washington State. Civil War Confederate Brigadier General. At the outbreak of the Civil War, he entered the Confederate Army and was appointed Colonel in command of the 2nd Arkansas Infantry Regiment. He led the 2nd Arkansas in the Battles of Shiloh and was given command of the brigade at the Battle of Chickamauga in 1862. Promoted Brigadier General in 1863, his command consisted of the 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th Arkansas Infantry Regiments, which participated in the Atlanta Campaign. In 1864, he was captured at the Battle of Jonesboro, was prisoner exchanged by Union forces and served the remainder of the war with the Army of Tennessee. After the war, he was a farmer and served as the Indian agent at the Tulalip Agency in Washington State. (bio by: John "J-Cat" Griffith) Burial: Hillcrest Cemetery Holly Springs (Marshall County) Marshall County, Mississippi, USA Maintained by: Find A GraveRecord added: Jul 12 2000 Find A Grave Memorial# 10879 Hillcrest Cemetery Holly Springs-Marshall County, Mississippi,
GOVAN FRANCIS HAWKS CSA-ARMY-Northern Virginia Division-Civil War LEE CO.-page 595
Francis H. Govan, intimately associated with the affairs of Lee County, as deputy clerk of the circuit court, was a member of Morgan's terrible band in his raid through Ohio. He was in the Confederate army from the beginning of the war until its close, first in the Northern Virginia division, in which he served until the seven-days' fight around Richmond, when he was transferred to the Western division, remaining in Morgan's cavalry until after his Ohio raid. He was subsequently appointed aid-de-camp on the staff of his uncle, Gen. D. C. Govan, holding that position until the cessation of hostilities, but spending the latter days of the war in the hospital on account of a would received at the battle of Franklin. After his return from the army Mr. Govan attended the University of Mississippi, and in 1867 came to Arkansas, and located in this county, where he engaged in merchandising when not holding office. He was elected county clerk in 1874, and again in [p.596] 1876, and in 1885 was appointed deputy clerk of the circuit court, which office he still occupies. He was married in this county in 1875 to Miss Minnie Ford, who was born in Kentucky in 1855. They are the parents of four children: Bettie H., Laura P., Francis H. and Eaton P. Mr. Govan's birth occurred in Mississippi in 1846, and he was reared at Holly Springs, that State,there receiving a common-school education. He is a son of E. P. Govan, a native of North Carolina, and of Scotch descent, his great-grandfather having been born in that country, though he emigrated to the United States. His grandfather, of South Carolina origin, was a member of Congress from that State. The father of our subject died in 1882, at the age of fifty-five years. His wife was a native of Connecticut, and a daughter of Rev. Francis L. Hawks, a distinguished Episcopal minister. Mr. Govan is a member of the A. F. & A. M., in which order he has risen to the rank of Knight Templar. He also belongs to the Knights of Honor and the Royal Arcanum. He is a man who enjoys the continued esteem of his acquaintances, and as a county official has discharged the duties connected-with his office with entire satisfaction to all concerned, and the credit of himself. The records in his charge are a model of neatness and accuracy. Francis Hawks Govan Birth: Jan. 7, 1846-Holly Springs (Marshall County)Marshall CountyMississippi, USA Death: Aug. 6, 1913-MariannaLee CountyArkansas, USA Confederate Veteran Burial::Cedar Heights Cemetery Marianna, Lee County, Arkansas CEDAR HEIGHTS CEMETERY
GRAHAM JOHN CROSS CO. CSA-CO.A-McGee's Regiment Cavalry-Civil War
He always lived a correct life and was one of the leading members of the Second Presbyterian Church in Memphis. John Graham was reared to farm labor and attended the common schools at [p.352] home until 1858, when he attended school at Greensboro, N. C. Subsequently he was under the instruction of a teacher at a private school and remained there until the breaking out of the late war. In 1863, when only sixteen years ofage, he enlisted in Company A, McGee's regiment cavalry, and for a year operated in Eastern Arkansas. In 1864 he joined Gen. Price in his Missouri raid, was in the battle of Pilot Knob and in all the battles until West Port, when, holding the field until Price could escape with the wagon train, our subject was captured, taken to Kansas City and later to Fort Leavenworth, where he was held in captivity, and after some time was removed to Camp Morton, Ind., and here retained until the close of the war, being released about June 1. He immediately started for home and made the journey from Memphis on foot. He at once took charge of his father's farm. In 1866 he went to Mebaneville school, remained there one year and then came home, residing with his parents for one year, From there he removed to the bottoms, engaged in agricultural pursuits for himself and there remained three years. Following this he took charge of the old homestead, while his father went to Memphis, and tilled the soil for five years, after which his father gave him an interest in the place, on which he erected a dwelling and there resided. At the time of the father's death he bought out the heirs and moved back to the old homestead. Since then he has cleared about sixty acres and now has 500 in a fine state of cultivation, and on another tract near by he has sixty acres under cultivation. He moved his gin to the home place, has a good dwelling, orchard and is considered one of the best farmers in the county. He is quite extensively engaged in stock raising, principally mules, and has been very successful at this, raising some of the largest and finest mules ever seen in the State, and as good as any from Kentucky or in fact, any State. He seeds down a large part of his farm to improve and fertilize the soil. He raises large crops of cotton and corn and is a practical, as well as a scientific farmer. His farm embraces about 600 acres under cultivation,lying on the west slope of Crowley's Ridge, and presents a magnificent view, for, from his residence, nearly every acre is spread out like a picture before the eye. He was married in December, 1870, to Miss Jennie Allen, a daughter of Abijah Allen, one of the early settlers and prominent farmers of St. Francis County. Eight children were the result of this union: Mary C., Charles C. (died at the age of three years),John M., Abijah Allen (died at the age of three weeks), Jennie Clay,Willie Vernon (died at the age of three years), Carey Osceola and James Franklin. Mrs. Graham is a member of the Presbyterian Church. In 1888 Mr. Graham joined with his partners in the large mercantile firm at Wynne. He is the leading spirit in all movements pertaining to the good of the country, and is not only a leading farmer, but is a member of the leading commercial firm in Cross County.
GRAY JOSEPH O. CSA-Dobbin's regiment of Cavalry-Civil War LEE CO.-page 593
Joseph O. Gray. Payton R. Gray, a prominent and wealthy planter of Bear Creek Township, was born in Livingston County, Ky., in 1818, being a son of Presley Gray, also a Kentuckian by birth and a tiller of the soil, as was his father, originally from Virginia. Presley Gray was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and lived until his seventy-second year. His wife, Maria (Hodge) Gray, was connected with the Baptist Church. She was the mother of seven children, all of whom are yet living, five residents of Kentucky, one of Iowa and our immediate subject, who has been a citizen of this State since 1847. He took charge of the old homestead at the age of twenty years, and two years later was married to Mrs. Eliza (Dunn) Thrailkill, who died a year after, leaving one child, which only lived nine months. He then married Miss Maria Woods. She died shortly after his removal to Mississippi, in 1844, leaving three children, all deceased. He was next married to Mrs. Margaret S. Bohanan (nee Dickson), a native of Paris, Ky., who died in 1883. They were the parents of two children: Blanche (widow of John E. Burke, living with her father) and Joseph O. (who was born in Coahoma County, Miss., in 1848.) His father having been drafted for the Confederate service in 1863, our subject went as a substitute, and served in Dobbin's regiment of Confederate cavalry until the close of the war, operating in Eastern Arkansas and Missouri, and receiving his discharge in January, 1865. He was then employed in farming and clerking until 1872, when he entered into the mercantile business at Philips Bayou, in which he has since been engaged, with the exception of the years 1877-78. At that time farming occupied his attention. Mr. Gray married in March, 1875, Miss Mary C. Wilkins, a native of Lee County, Ark., and a daughter of Maj. Wilkins, an officer in the Confederate army, now deceased. They have had one son who is now deceased. Mr. Gray carries a stock of about $5,000, and his annual sales amount to over $40,000. He is also extensively occupied in farming, owning a half interest in 320 acres of fine land, besides some city property, and has the control of over 1,500 acres of land. Mr. Gray is also the postmaster of Philips Bayou, which position he has filled for the past eight years. In connection with his other interests he is engaged in cotton-ginning, operating two steam gins and one horse-power cottongin. He is a member of the A. F. & A. M. His wife is a member of the Baptist Church. POSSIBLE:Joseph O Gray Birth: 1848 Death: May 17, 1914 Served 1863-1865 J.R.Swan's Co Dobbin's Ark Cav Burial::Cedar Heights Cemetery Marianna, Lee County, Arkansas
GREER J.W. CSA-CO.B,-Twenty-third Arkansas-Civil War LEE CO.-page 594
J. W. Greer's farm, comprising 160 acres, is one of the best for successful agricultural purposes to be found in this part of the county, and the manner in which it is conducted is in full keeping with the personal characteristics of its owner, a man of great energy and determination and of much perseverance. He was born in Union County, S. C., in 1836, and is a son of J. M. and Sarah A. (Sanders) Greer, the former a native of South Carolina and of English-Irish descent. The paternal [p.594] grandfather, Robert Greer, and his brother, Orpha, served in the American Revolution, and the former was exiled from Ireland on account of his religious views, and after coming to the United States he settled in South Carolina, and there left a large number of descendants, several of whom served in the War of 1812. J. W. Greer spent his youth in his native State, but in 1858 came west and settled near Helena, Ark., on a farm where he remained industriously at work until the Rebellion came up. In 1861 he enlisted in the Confederate army, Company B, Twenty-third Arkansas, of which he was captain, and participated in the following battles: Corinth and the siege of Port Hudson, in which engagement he lost his left arm, it being shot off by a cannon ball. He was captured on July 9, 1868, and was retained a prisoner until the close of the war at ewOrleans, Fort La Fayette, Bedloe's Island, Fort McHenry, Fort Delaware, then to Morris Island. After remaining at his old home for a number of years he came to Lee County, Ark., in 1878, and here has become well known and highly esteemed by all. He has been justice of the peace for eight years; is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and has always tried to follow the teachings of the Golden Rule. He was married in 1885 to Mrs. Fannie R. Allen Harris, and by her has one child, Sarah F. He was first married to Elizabeth H. Patterson, who died leaving one child, Jason H. POSSIBLE:John W Greer Birth: unknown Death: unknown Inscription:Company B, 23rd Arkansas Infantry, CSA Burial::Cedar Heights Cemetery Marianna, Lee County, Arkansas,
GREER JAMES W. CSA-Trans Mississppi Dept-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1211
WASHINGTON COUNTY
GREER ORPHA USARMY-REVOLUTIONARY WAR LEE CO.-page 594
SEE J.W.GREER
GREER ROBERT USARMY-REVOLUTIONARY WAR LEE CO.-page 594
SEE J.W.GREER
GREER WILLIAM T. CSA-1st Tennessee Cavalry-Civil War LEE CO.
SAME CEMETERY AS J.W.GREER
GREGSON FRANK A. CSA-Army-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1189
GREGSON WILLIAM CSA-Army-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1189
GUSTAVUS FERDINAND LOUIS CSA-Cavalry-escorted Jefferson Davis and his cabinet south on their flight from Richmond-Civil War LEE CO.-page 595
Ferdinand Louis Gustavus is one of the men who escorted Jefferson Davis and his cabinet south on their flight from Richmond. He enlisted in 1862, in a company of cavalry, which was made up and mustered in service at Memphis, Tenn., although composed mostly of men from Phillips and St. Francis County. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Corinth, Iuks, Atlanta, and most of the battles of his division, and was in the command of Gen. J. E. Johnston, at the time of his surrender in May, 1865. Mr. Gustavus was born in Winnebago County, Wis., April 29, 1832, and was the oldest son of John G. and Charlotte A. (Koepner) Gustavus, natives of Prussia. Mr. Gustavus was born in 1806, and was reared within fifteen miles of Berlin, being married in 1830. In 1831 they emigrated to this country, and settled in Wisconsin, where they lived until their respective deaths, in 1862 and 1864. Both were members of the Lutheran Church, and were the parents of seven children, six of whom are living: Ferdinand L., Robert, Bertie, Theodore, Maria and Henry. The paternal grandfather of our subject was a soldier under Napoleon, and held the position of lieutenant in the Prussian army. Mr. Gustavus commenced farming at the age of twenty-two in the State of Wisconsin, but moved to Arkansas in 1856, where he was engaged as an overseer in Phillips County, until his enlistment in the army. After his return from the battlefield, he purchased the farm on which he still resides. The land is well adapted to the growing of cotton, corn, clover, and small grain. He was married April 14, 1867, to Luey A. Rives, of Phillips County, where she was born January 28, 1848, being a daughter of John H. and Jane C. (Bonner) Rives, both deceased. They had a family of eight children, seven of whom survive: Mary F. (wife of C. J. McQuien, a farmer of Lee County), Jane A. (wife of Guss Roesher, also of Lee County), John H., Augusta E., Carrie L., Hattie C. and Frederick L. Mr. Gustavus is a leading Democrat, and has served his party and the people of his township as justice of the peace for the past eight years. He has been a member of the school board of this district since 1868. He and wife and four children are members of the Missionary Baptist Church. He also belongs to the Masonic fraternity, and of the Knights of Honor. Mr. Gustavus, having farmed in the Northern States as well as the Southern States, is capable of forming a correct opinion of both localities in regard to climate, soil, and general advantages and disadvantages for those who follow farming for an occupation, and in his judgment Arkansas can not be excelled.
HALE ROBERT E. USARMY-Company B of the Second Illinois Infantry-MEXICAN WAR LEE CO.-page 597
Robert E. Hale is a direct descendant of the celebrated Chief Justice Matthew Hale of England. His parents, Richard C. and Driscilla (Mathews) Hale, were natives of Bedford County, Va. The former was born in 1798 and when a young man moved to Alabama, and afterward to Hardin County, Tenn., where he remained about ten years, then going to Pulaski County, Ill. This was the home [p.597] of himself and wife until their death, Mr. Hale dying in 1848 and Mrs. Hale in 1884, at the age of ninety years. He started in life as a brick mason, but during the latter years of his career became a prominent contractor and builder, and was an influential man in Pulaski County, Ill., taking an active part in local politics. During the last four years of his life he held the office of probate judge. He was a son of Richard Hale, whose birth occurred in Virginia shortly before the Revolutionary War. Mrs. Hale was a daughter of Joseph Cromwell Mathews, formerly from South Carolina, who was a soldier in the Revolutionary War when a young man. He was married in South Carolina to Miss Penina Crisp, afterward removing to Alabama, then to the States of Tennessee, Kentucky and finally back to Texas in 1835, where they remained until their deaths, which occurred in the year 1858 at the ages of ninety-two and ninety-fouryears, respectively. Both were members of the Christian Church, in which they took an active part. The Mathews family trace their lineage back to Oliver Cromwell, who was one of the early ancestors of the family. The principal of this sketch was born in Lauderdale County, Ala., in 1824, being the third of three sons and three daughters. He was married in Pulaski County, Ill., in 1848, to Miss Susan J. Hawpe, a daughter of Judge George Hawpe. She was born in Hall County, Ga., in 1830. Mr. and Mrs. Hale became the parents of twelve children, four of whom are still living: James G., Lillian C., Joseph O. and William M. Mr. Hale made Illinois his home until 1855, when he came to Arkansas and located in that portion ofPhillips County, which is now included in Lee County. For some years after his advent he carried on the mercantile and lumber business at Jeffersonville. The Mexican War breaking out a few years before his marriage, he enlisted in Company B of the Second Illinois Infantry, in which he served as sergeant, having command of his company at the battle of Buena Vista. Upon the commencement of the Civil War he was commissioned captain, but did not enter the service. At the time of his removal from Pulaski County, Mr. Hale held the position of county trassurer, collector and assessor, and had been postmaster of Haleside for a number of years. Since locating here he has served as justice of the peace for a number of years. He is now the owner of over 1,000 acres of land, and has about 250 acres under cultivation, all made since his arrival in this county, when he had but $2.50, Mr. Hale is a member of the A. F. & A. M., but has not affiliated with the order for a number of years. He also belongs to the L O. Q. F., and he and wife are connected with the Christian Church, taking an active part in religious movements.
HALL ORVILLE JESSE ST.FRANCIS
Orville J. Hall, enlisted during the Civil War, in the Confederate service, at the age of twenty-four, serving in the Sixth Kentucky Infantry, under Col.Lewis, who is now judge of the supreme bench of Kentucky. He entered as a Private, but was appointed a Corporal, later made Third Sergeant, and at the close of the war was virtually Captain of a Company, although he had not received his Commission papers. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Vicksburg, Baton Rouge (in which he was wounded), Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Atlanta, Peach Tree Creek, Jonesboro and a number of minor engagements; was captured at the battle of Jonesboro and taken to Nashville, where he was held for twenty days. After his exchange he returned to his regiment, and during the service was on detached duty, being attached to the provost-marshal's division. Following the war period, Mr.Hall returned to his home in West Point, Ky., and commenced farming on his father's old place, his mother living with him. He was born in West Point, Ky., on Sept.3,1837, being a son of John Hall, also a Kentuckian by birth, born in 1802, who removed to West Point, Ky., a short time after his marriage, and engaged in the hotel business; he was the proprietor of the well-known West Point Hotel, and also owned considerable property at the time of his death, which occurred in 1852. His wife came upon the stage of life's action at West Point, Ky., in 1805, and is still living at that place. In their family were seven children, three of whom are living. In 1867 Orville H. Hall removed to Crittenden County, and the following year came to St.Francis County, carrying on the timber business for a year and the next year rented a farm. He was married to Miss Margaret E.Davis, daughter of Jasper N.Davis, an old settler of this county. They are the parents of ten children, eight living: Margaret, John William, Orville Jesse, Robert Young, Samuel Davis, Henry Russell, Edwin Winchester and Hugh. Following his marriage, he bought a farm of 200 acres, with fifty seven under cultivation, lying in the fertile valley of the St.Francis river. He is a good Democrat. Mrs.Hall is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. WIDENER CEMETERY
HAMMOND D. LEE CO.-page 598
D. Hammond, proprietor of the Phonix Hotel of Marianna, Ark., was born in Rochester, N. Y., November 3, 1840, and, like the majority of the natives of the "Empire State," he is enterprising in his views, is industrious and the soul of honor. After remaining in his native State and attending the common schools until he attained his twentieth year, he went to Missouri and worked as an engineer on the North Missouri Railroad for four years. When the war broke out he was running a Government train, and was captured by Price just west of Mexico, Mo., and was taken to Northeastern Arkansas, where he was paroled upon taking the oath not to aid the North during the remainder of the war. From Arkansas Mr. Hammond went to Nashville, Tenn., thence to Jackson, Mich., where he began working on the Michigan Central Railroad as an engineer between Detroit and Jackson, continuing two years. He was married to Miss Lucretia Blodgett, in Eaton Rapids, Mich., she being a native of that place, and afterward went on the road selling steam fire-engines for Clapp & Jones, of Hudson, N. Y. He followed this business some five years, and in October, 1871, during the great Chicago fire, he was on his way to St. Paul, Minn., to exhibit an engine, and was at Michigan City when the news of the fire reached him. He immediately went with his engine to the scene of the fire, and for four nights and three days never left his post, but did all in his power to assist in subduing the flames. He afterward took his engine to St. Paul, where he sold it, also two others, notwithstanding the fact that he had to encounter much competition. He [p.598] finally left the road and began working with an engine in the fire department of Greenville, Mich., the city paying him $150 per month and furnishing him with a house, fuel and gas. At the end of one year he went to Fort Scott, Kan., and made his home for five years at that point. Here he put up a 100-battery steam-boiler, and ran it until it was moved to Marianna, Ark., on February 17, 1889. He put up the present engine in Marianna and managed it until a short time since, when he turned it over to his son, and became the proprietor of the Phonix Hotel, in which he has made many needed changes and improvements. He and wife have two children: Luther and Mand. He is a Democrat, and belongs to the Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers. His parents, S. and Clarinda (Howe) Hammond, were born in Clarendon, Vt., in 1799 and New York, in 1811, respectively. The father was a farmer, and immigrated to Missouri, locating at St. Charles, where he died in 1881, his wife dying one year later. Of their family of two sons and three daughters, all are living.
HARPER WILLIAM L.-DR LEE CO.-page 598
William L. Harper, physician and surgeon, Clifton, Ark. Dr. Harper is recognized throughout the county as a friend and laborer in the cause and advancement of the medical fraternity. He is a native of Georgia, his birth occurring in Gilmer County in 1864, and received his primary education in that State. At the age of nineteen years he entered the Medical College at Atlanta, graduating from that institution in his twenty-first year. He first commenced his practice in his native county, removing from there to Arkansas in 1886, and settled where he now lives. He enjoys a large and lucrative practice, which is gradually increasing, and a bright future is opening before him. He is a genial and generous gentleman, liberal in his ideas, a proteotor of the rights of, a strong promoter of the welfare of, and in deep sympathy with, humanity. He is a member of the Knights of Pythias at Marianna, Ark. The Doctor is the third of ten children, the result of the union of Lindsey and Margaret (Osborn) Harper, natives of Georgia. Lindsey Harper was a prominent farmer of his county and was a soldier in the late war. Returning home after his service he found himself financially ruined, but since then, by close attention to business, and by economy, he has succeeded in accumulating a comfortable competency. He and wife still reside in Georgia, and both are members of the Baptist Church. Of the ten children born to their union, eight are yet living and all reside in Georgia with the exception of Dr. William L. The maternal grandparents are both yet living, the grandfather at the age of eighty-four years and the grandmother at the age of eighty years. The former has been a minister in the Baptist Church for a number of years and has followed agricultural pursuits all his life. The paternal grandparents died during the war. The grandfather was taken from his house and shot by bushrangers, as were several other old and venerable men in the neighborhood, for the simple reason that they did not wish to part with all their property.
HARRINGTON V.M. CSA-Quartermaster Sergeant-Civil War LEE CO.-page 599
V. M. Harrington enjoys enviable prominence as the faithful sheriff of Lee County. A native of Delaware, he lived there until eighteen years of age, attending the common schools of the county of his birth, but having from his childhood imbibed a love of the South and Southern people, at an early age he moved to Mississippi, locating at Jackson, where he was employed as a clerk in a store until the breaking out of the war. Then he was given a position in the Confederate service at Brookhaven, Miss., and afterward was made quartermaster-sergeant in a Confederate camp. Though devoted to the South, he was at heart a Union man, and was unwilling to fight voluntarily against his country, so, after a long tramp and when nearly exhausted by hunger and fatigue, he reached the Federal lines. The Union officers tried to induce him to give them information in regard to their enemy's forces, location, etc., but having been employed by the Southern people and having lived among them, he refused to act the part of a spy. After the war he was again engaged as clerk. A Mr. Miller becoming intimately acquainted with him and interested in his welfare, furnished him with the necessary capital to enter into the mercantile business for himself. A wholesale house also offered to supply him with goods for carrying [p.599] on a business of many thousand dollars, both of which offers he accepted, devoting his attention to commercial pursuits in Tennessee until 1871, at which time he sold out and removed Arkansas, locating at Palestine, St. Francis County. There he resumed the mercantile business, but soon moved to Marianna, where he went into the same occupation, carrying it on until 1886, the time of his election as sheriff of the county. He was re-elected in 1888. Mr. Harrington's wife was formerly Miss Georgia A. Wood, and she is now the mother of three children: Samuel, V. M. and James W. Mr. Harrington wasborn in Kent County, Del., in 1842, and was a son of Samuel and Sallie A. (Moore) Harrington. The collections of the county revenues made by Mr. Harrington as sheriff and collector of the county of the current year will aggregate 99 per cent. The lowest he has ever reached is 97« per cent. Note:Vincent Moore Harrington III, from Marianna, is buried in Forrest Park Cemetery-could be descendant
HAYES JESSE J. CSA-Forrest's Cavalry-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1197
HAYES JOHN W. -DR CSA-CO.F,-Thirteenth North Carolina Battalion-Civil War LEE CO.-page 599
John W. Hayes, M. D., was born in Pittsboro, N. C., June 4, 1848, at which place he received his early education. He was afterward a student of the Hillsboro Military Academy, and then attended Davidson College, North Carolina, being in the Classical Department. In the third year of the Civil War he enlisted in the Confederate army, where he remained until the close, serving in the cavalry department, Company F, Thirteenth North Carolina Battalion. After peace had been declared Mr. Hayes went to Jackson, Tenn., and studied medicine under his uncle, Dr. J. G. Womack, one year, following which he attended a course of lectures at the University of Louisville, Ky., and the following year at the Washington University, graduating the next spring. Subsequently he commenced practicing medicine at Denmark, Tenn., was located there seven years, and in 1877 came to Arkansas, settling at Marianna, where he has been since engaged in attending to the calls of his adopted profession. Dr. Hayes is a son of Dr. W. A. Hayes and Jennette Womack Hayes. He was married to Miss Lou Moore, of Brownsville, Tenn., October 9, 1872. Dr. Hayes was one of the organizers of the Lee County Medical Association, which is one of the best in the State. He was elected State Medical Examiner of the K. of H., in October, 1884, and re-elected to fill the same consecutively for several years. He took a full course at the New York Polyolinic, in 1886; is a member of the Arkansas State Society and the American Medical Association. He has a brother also a physician, W. G. Hayes, M. D., of Bowie, Texas. Dr. Hayes and wife are the parents of two children living: Jeannette (a student at Batesville, Ark., College), and John W., Jr.
HENLEY ENNES M. CSA-CO.C.-Capt. John Foreman's-Later Gen.Govan's Command- Second Arkansas Infantry Volunteers-Civil War LEE CO.-page 600
Ennes M. Henley first saw the light of day in Massac County, Ill., on January 28, 1832, and is the son of William and Malinda (Smith) Henley, natives of Tennessee and Kentucky, respectively. They were married in Illinois in 1828, and were the parents of twelve children, seven now living: Ennes M., Matilda (widow of Kennard Steward, of Lee County), John (a farmer of Illinois), Elijah (a lawyer, of Marianna and also postmaster of that city), Rebecca (the widow of Nieholas Phelps), Isaac (a farmer residing in Missouri), Mary (widow of Henry Lynn), Louisa (the wife of Simon Pierce). Mr. Henley died in Illinois, in the seventy-fifth year of his life, his wife having died one year previous. Ennes M. was reared in Illinois and received such advantages for an education as the primitive schools of the period would admit, accepting, when twenty years of age, the position of watchman on the steamer St. Francis, running on the St. Francis River. Later he worked on the Mississippi River on various boats. He settled in Monroe County, Ark., in 1859, and engaged in farming, and this has been his occupation ever since. He now owns an excellent farm in the western portion of Lee County, consisting of 240 acres, 100 of it being in a high state of cultivation. The principal products are corn and cotton, and clover and the grasses to someextent, and he is quite successful also in raising all kinds of stock. He owns a steam cotton-gin and grist-mill, valued at $1,000, a comfortable residence with modern improvements and conveniences being among his late additions. Mr. Henley was married in Monroe County December 23, 1858, to Miss Louisa F. Settles, of Giles County, Tenn. She was born in 1831, being the daughter of S. P. and Mary J. (Cunningham) Settles. Mr. Settles, a native of [p.600] Virginia, and of Irish descent, died in Arkansas in 1854, Mrs. Settles closed her eyes to the scenes of this world in 1872. To Mr. and Mrs. Henley's marriage eight children have been born: William F., James L., Andy S., Charley W. (residing in Brinkley), Mary M., Josephus B., Jason L. and Ennes W. William F. died in 1880. Mr. Henley served in the Civil War, enlisting in 1862 in Company C, Capt. John Foreman's Second Arkansas Infantry Volunteers, which was afterward Gen. Govan's command. He participated in the battles of Perryville, Missionary Ridge, Franklin, Nashville and many others of minor importance. He was mustered out of service at the surrender in 1865.
HEWITT JOHN MARSHALL USARMY-Second Kentucky Cavalry-Civil War LEE CO.-page 601
Hon. John Marshall Hewitt (deceased), of Marianna, Ark., was born in Frankfort, Ky., July 22, 1841, and was a son of John Marshall Hewitt, of that city, an eminent lawyer and for many years judge of the circuit court at Frankfort. Our subject received a classical education in the schools of his native city in his youth, but before he had attained his majority the Civil War broke out, and the following lines in regard to it are given in his own words: "The war was a bitter experience for me, for my father had two sons in the Union army and two sons in the Confederate, also one son-in-law on each side. All my old schoolmates and associates, as well as relatives in Kentucky, were about equally divided in sympathy, and one of my brothers was killed at Fort Donelson, on the Confederate side." Mr. Hewitt was a member of the Kentucky State militia when the war broke out, and in 1861 he joined the Federal army as adjutant of the Second Kentucky Cavalry, and was attached to the staff of Gen. Rousseau as assistant acting adjutant-general. He participated in the battle of Shiloh, and was captured by Gen. John Morgan, while the latter was on his first raid in Kentucky, but in the night he succeeded in effecting his escape, and returned to his command. After the war he returned to his home in Kentucky, and was admitted to the bar by the court of appeals, in 1865, and the following year he immigrated to St. Francis County, Ark., and engaged in cotton. planting. In 1873, when Lee County was formed, he moved to Marianna and resumed the practice of his profession, continuing this in connection with planting until his death. Although a Federal soldier, he was all his life an active Democrat, and although he came to Arkansas at a time when he could have had any office, or could have grown rich by affiliating with the Republican party, he would not do so, but stuck to his principles and party, unscathed by the political cyclone that swept Arkansas. He labored zealously for the advancement of the material interests of the State, and his fellow-citizens honored him for his efforts. He has been an active leader of his party, and was elected by the Democratic State Convention to the National Dermocratic Convention, which met at St. Louis, Mo., in 1876. In 1880 he was chosen to represent Lee County in the State legislature, and was elected speaker pro tem. In 1882 he was re-elected, and was chairman of the judiciary committee. In 1884 he was again sent to the legislature, and during the session of 1885 he was chairman of the committee of circuit and justice courts. In 1886 he was elected to his fourth term in the legislature, and was elected speaker of the house, and the Democratic State Convention, which met at the State capital in 1886, elected him president of the same. In January, 1886, he became president of the State Bar Association, but just as he had surmounted all primary obstacles, and could have grasped the highest honors of the State, his career was cut short by the hand of death February 29, 1887, his demise resulting from cancer of the tongue. Being a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, his brother Masons kept his body in their hall for three days, that all might have an opportunity of paying due honor to his remains. His remains were taken to Memphis, Tenn., by the Commandery of Marianna, and at that city were met by the Commandery of Little Rock, and he was buried with the highest honors of his order, in Elmwood Cemetery. Determination was a marked trait of his character, and so was Christian fortitude and charity. Cut down in the meridian of manhood, at a time when it seemed possible for him to accomplish so much, his death was deeply lamented by all. Kentucky has given to Lee County many estimable citizens, but she has contributed [p.601] none more highly respected or more worthy of respect, love and veneration than was Mr. Hewitt. He was married to Miss Sallie Howard, of Memphis, Tenn., and leaves her with one son to care for: John M., Jr. Mrs. Hewitt is a daughter of Wardlaw and Mary (Polk) Howard, the father a Virgi
HIGGINS WILLIAM H. ST.FRANCIS
William H. Higgins was born in St.Francis County, Arkansas, in 1844, a son of Jeremiah and Martha Higgins, natives of Indiana and Arkansas, respectively. He passed his boyhood days in much the same manner as other farmer lads, receiving such advantages for an education as could be obtained from the meager facilities of the district. His father moved to Texas in 1853, but returned after a residence there of two years. Young William began fighting life's battle at the age of twenty-three, choosing the occupation of farming, which he has since continued. He was married in 1867 to Miss Mary E.Saratt, who died in 1879, leaving seven children: Martha A., Mary J., Melissa E., Josephine, Melinda C., Auazablin, and Rosie L. Mr.Higgins was married in 1883 to Martha A. Ellis, who was also called from earth three years later, having borne one child: Elsie J. For his third, and present wife, Mr.Higgins married Martha J. Elliott, an estimable lady of culture and refinement. Mr.Higgins enlisted in the Confederate army in 1861, in Company H, Fortieth Tennessee Regiment, participating in the battles of Island No.10, Dalton, (Ga.), Altoona and Resaca. At the first named engagement he was captured and removed to Springfield (Camp Butler, Illinois), and at the battle of Altoona, again taken prisoner and sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, remaining in prison for seven and a half months. He was exchanged at Richmond, Va. and released on parole, but before this term expired the final surrender took place.. After the war Mr.Higgins returned home, where he resumed his occupation of farming, and now owns 424 acres, with 110 cleared and improved. He is also successfully engaged in stock raising. He is a member of the Wheel, and Alliance. His views politically are Democratic, and in religious faith he is a Methodist. He is a leader, not a follower, in all public enterprises, to which he contributes liberally, and under his able and efficient management the success of any movement is largely assured. Mrs.Higgins is a member of the Baptist Church. BARNISHAW CEMETERY
HINTON CEPHAS F. ST.FRANCIS
Cephas F. Hinton, a prominent druggist of Forrest City, has been a resident of this county all his life. His father, A. G. Hinton, a native of North Carolina, came to what was then considered the wilds of St. Francis County, in 1850, where he died in 1874, at the age of forty-seven years. He had a family of twelve children, six of whom are still living: M. D. (now Mrs. Gwynne, a resident of this State), Frank M. (of this city), Lucretia M., Annie G., R. E. and C. F. The latter remained on the farm until his eighteenth year, when he came to Forrest City and embarked in general merchandising with T. E. Hastings, with whom he was connected as a partner until 1874. Then selling out to his associate he commenced in the drug business, but was unfortunate in having all of his stock destroyed by fire, on which there was no insurance, and later he entered the employ of Fussell, Pollack & Co. Three years afterward he went into the grocery business, and continued it about two years, when he was seized with a desire to alleviate the sufferings of humanity, and the study of medicine occupied his attention the following two years, after which he again entered into the drug business. The high water at that time stopped traffic on the railroad, and the goods which he had ordered with which to commence business, were laid over at Mariana. Mr. Hinton obtained help and loaded his stock on a handcar, which was pushed by hand to Forrest City, and thus was made his second start in the drug trade. He has by strict attention to business and honest dealing, built up a large and lucrative patronage, and now carries a stock of goods valued at $4,000. He was married in 1874 to Miss Mary A. Brown, a daughter of John Brown, and a native of Mississippi. They are the parents of four children: Robert Emmet, Arthur Gordon, William W. and Mary Bertha. Mr. Hinton also owns several hundred acres of land, and is one of the most prominent citizens of the county seat of St. Francis County, having held the position of mayor for seven years in succession. He is a decided Democrat, and a member of the K. of H.
HINTON LOVETT T. CSA-Sevententh Arkansas-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1218
HEMPSTEAD CO.,ARK.
HODGES JESSE B. ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.G-Thirteenth Arkansas Regiment-Civil War
Jesse B. Hodges, one of the prominent tillers of the soil in this section, was born in Beaufort County, N.Carolina, in 1837, being the son of John L. and Cynthia (Rodgers) Hodges, natives of N.Carolina. Jesse B. came to Arkansas with his parents on 1859, settling on a farm not far from his present residence. His educational advantages were limited, his help needed on his father's farm, but notwithstanding this fact, he is a well informed man, having given considerable attention to reading, which added to keen observation, has enable him to be conversant on all the important topics of the past and present. When twenty-two years of age he accepted a position as manager of a farm, so continuing until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in 1861, in the Confederate service, in Company G, Thirteenth Arkansas Regiment, participating in the battles of Shiloh, Richmond, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Liberty Gap, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, New Hope, Resaca, also Peach Tree Creek, Decatur, Jonesboro, Spring Hill, Franklin and Bentonville. Subsequently, or at the close of the war, his regiment surrendered to Sherman at Greensboro, N.Carolina, on April 26, 1865. As this sketch will show, Mr.Hodges participated in all of the principal engagements of the war, in which the Tennessee Army took part. After peace was declared he returned home, resuming the occupation of farming, and in 1868 was united in marriage to Miss Mary F, Matthews, a daughter of Lawrence and Lydia A. (Crawford) Matthews No children have been given them. Mr.Hodges owns 400 acres of excellent land, with 275 under cultivation. He has a pleasant, comfortable place, and all the improvements and conveniences that add so much to the happiness of home. He also is quite extensively occupied in stock raising. His political views are Democratic. Himself and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. 2-10-1911 DEATH=The Forrest City Times, Feb, 10, 1911. Another Pioneer Dead. "Uncle" Jesse B. Hodges Goes to His Reward Last Sunday Night as Result of Paralytle Stroke. A brother of St. Francis County's loved citizens answered the final summons on Sunday night at 10:12 o'clock when MR. Jesse B. Hodges, or "Uncle Jesse," as he was familiarly called by those who knew and loved him as well, passed to his eternal reward, after a long and useful life, as an upright, conscientious Christian gentleman. Mr. Hodges had been in feeble health for a number of years, but had not until recently been confined to his room and bed. On Sunday he had been up and about as usual until about the middle of the afternoon he was stricken with the fatal stroke, from which he never recovered, and to which his gallant spirit finally succumbed, in spite of all that scientific skill and kindly loving care could do to alleviate his suffering and prolong his life. Mr. Hodges was in his 74th year, and had long been a resident of this county, where he lived and worked, and had all of his interests. He was a life long member of the Missionary Baptist church, and was one of the founders of the church of that denomination at Popular Grove. The following brief sketch of his life taken from "Memories of Eastern Arkansas," a volume published in 1890, bells in better language than we could hope to express, his life story up to that time: "Jesse B. Hodges, one of the prominent tillers of the soil in this section, was born in Beaufort county, N. C. in 1837, being the son of John L. and Cynthia (Rodgers) Hodges, natives of North Carolina. Jesse B. came to Arkansas with his parents in YOCONA CEMETERY
HOGGATT JOHN USARMY-REVOLUTIONARY WAR PHILLIPS CO.
SEE HOGGATT CLOPTON
HOLBERT A. CSA-CO.G.-Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry, under Col. Tappin-Civil War LEE CO.-page 601
A. Holbert is one of the leading farmers and stock raisers of Lee County, Ark., and here his birth occurred in 1843, he being the second child born to James M. and Antoinette (McDaniel) Holbert, who were born in Kentucky and Arkansas, respectively, the former's birth occurring in 1809, and the latter's in 1825. The father removed to this State in 1815, and after making his home here until 1849, he went to Mississippi and died opposite to where Helena, Ark. is. Our subject and his brother, A. J., who lives in Arizona, and is the sheriff of Maricopa County, are the only children born to their parents, and the mother died on November 29, 1843. James M. Holbert was married a second time in 1845, his wife being Mary McDaniel, a daughter of Archibald McDaniel, and one child, Antoinette, blessed this union, she being now the wife of N. B. Purnell, and resides in Pike County, Ark. After the death of Mr. Holbert his widow married a Mr. Hughes, and died during the war. J. A. Holbert received his education and rearing in St. Francis County, Ark., but at the age of seventeen years he dropped farm work and books to enter the Confederate army, enlisting in Company G, Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry, under Col. Tappin, and served east of the Mississippi River for four years, being a participant in the following engagements: Belmont, Shiloh, Corinth, Knoxville, Richmond (Ky.), Bardstown, Perryville, Atlanta and Jonesboro, where he waswounded and captured. He succeeded in effecting his escape after being retained only about twenty-four hours, and he afterward came west and joined Capt. Coats' company, under Gen. Marmaduke, and operated in Arkansas. After surrendering he was given his freedom, and returned home and began farming on his grandfather's plantation. Prior to the war he had owned quite a large area of land, and a number of slaves, and his father owned nearly 100 slaves. The former carried the mail from Wittsburg to Helena, a distance of over seventy miles (there being only four postoffices on the route), through a heavy cane brake all the way. Although the country was very wild and unsettled at that time, Mr. Holbert says he never carried a pistol or a gun, and was never molested, either by the wild animals or Indians. He now has one of the finest farms in the county, comprising 200 acres of land, and has about 100 ares under cultivation, on which is a splendid frame residence and outbuildings. He was married in 1869 to Miss O. L. Hannah, of this county, a daughter of John and Penelpia (Lynch) Hannah, natives of Ireland and Arkansas, respectively, and by her became the father of eight children, four of whom are living: Lee, J. J., Bell and Blanche. One child died at the age of five years and three in infancy.
HOPKINS JOSEPH K. LEE CO.-page 602
Joseph K. Hopkins is a native of Lee County, whither his parents had come two years before his birth. He attended the common schools of this locality until the death of his father (when he was sixteen years of age), when he commenced farming for himself. Mr. Hopkins was born in 1851, being [p.602] the son of Archibald and Martha (O'Neal) Hopkins, natives of North Carolina and Alabama, respectively. Archibald Hopkins removed from the State of his birth to Greens County, Ala., when twenty years of age, and in 1849 to Arkansas, locating in this county, where he was engaged in farming until called from earth, in 1867, at the age of fifty-one. His wife died when the principal of this sketch was a child. Both were members of the Baptist Church. After her death Mr. Hopkins married Miss Lou Purcell, of Woodruff County, who is now deceased. He was a successful farmer during life, but lost heavily by the war. He was the father of three children by his first marriage, two of whom are still living: William A. (also a farmer of this county) and Joseph K. (our subject). The latter was married, in 1869, to Mrs. Emma (Burrows) Poole, a daughter of Peter Burrows and widow of William Pools. They have one son, Joseph B., who is at present helping his father in the store. Mr. Hopkins engaged in the mercantile business in 1876, and although starting with a small capital he has, by close economy and good business management, built up a satisfactory trade, and has the largest patronage of any store in this section of the township. He also owns one of the most extensive farms hereabouts, and in addition the control of a number of other fine farms. Although not an active politician, Mr. Hopkins is one of the leading Democrats in all campaign work. Mrs. Hopkins is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church.
HOUSTON HIRAM ST.FRANCIS
Hiram Houston is a native of this county, and as he was reared in a locality but thinly settled, his advantages for a schooling were somewhat limited, but these were enough to lay the foundation for his success in life as a farmer, which occupation he engaged in for himself at the age of twenty-two, and now owns 223 acres of fine bottom land on the St. Francis River, seventy-five acres of which are under a fair state of cultivation. He also owns a steam grist-mill and cotton-gin. He was married November 2, 1884, to Miss Annie L. Clark, a daughter of Thomas A. and Susan A. Clark, originally of Kentucky and Ohio, respectively. They are the parents of three children, only one of whom is living: Nannie E. (at home). Mr. and Mrs. Houston belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Alfred K. Houston, the father of our subject, was born in North Carolina in 1814 and died in St. Francis County in 1879, and was a most successful farmer. He married Sarah E. Evans, a South Carolinian by birth, and who was the mother of seven children, four of whom are still living: Margaret E. (widow of Robert Anderson, of this county), William C. (a farmer of this county), Francis M. (also a farmer of St. Francis County) and Hiram (the principal of this sketch).
HOUSTON J.P. LEE CO.-page 602
J. P. Houston is a farmer and stock raiser of Richland Township, Lee County, Ark., and was born in what is now Lee County (then Phillips) in 1851, being the second child born to James M. and Mary J. (Simpson) Houston. The parents settled in Arkansas in 1846, and in Richland Township the same year, and here he purchased land to the extent of 160 acres, all of which was heavily timbered. He was a public-spirited citizen, a Democrat in his political views, and at the time of his death, in 1857, he was in full communion with the Methodist Episcopal Church. He was a son of Ross Houston, a Virginian, and was a second cousin of Gen. Sam Houston, of Texas. He and wife, who was born in the "Blue Grass State," were married in Alabama in 1845, and became the parents of three children: Mary A. (now Mrs. Coffey, of St. Francis County, Ark.), J. P. and Thomas R. (who died in the State of Arkansas in 1884). Mrs. Houston is still living, and makes her home with her son, J. P. She is a member of the Methodist Church, and is a true Christian in every respect. J. P. Houston's early life was spent at farm labor and while thus engaged he learned lessons of industry and economy, which have stood him in good stead in later years. A portion of his early education was acquired in the schools of Middle Tennessee, and after attaining his twentieth year he started out in life for himself, and has since given his attention to farming, and is now residing on the old homestead, which comprises 320 acres, of which 230 are under cultivation. In 1886 he was united in marriage to Miss Tennie Hickman, a daughter of Nelson and Alabama (Moore) Hickman, who were Kentuckians, both of whom died in Alabama, the former's death occurring in 1862, and the latter's in 1867. Mr. Houston has always been a Democrat in his political views, and is interested in all matters relating to the welfare of the county in which he has so long made his home. He is a liberal patron of schools and churches, and is always found ready to assist the poor and afflicted. He and his wife have two children: Thomas Ross (born in 1886), and Anna May (born in 1888).
HOWARD WILLIAM L. LEE CO.-page 603
Hon. William L. Howard is a native of Lee County, and has always made this locality his home. Consequently he is well known and the respect accorded him is as wide as his acquaintance. His father, desiring to give his children a thorough education, William was sent to neighborhood common schools until the war, after which a private tutor was employed, who prepared him for college. He then entered Burrett College in Van Buren County, Tenn., where he took a full course. In 1874, the year of his father's death, he took charge of the old homestead, near La Grange, on which he was born on December 23, 1849, as a son of Robert W. and Malinda (Harris) Howard, natives of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. Robert W. Howard was born in 1814, being a son [p.603] of Christopher Howard, also a Virginian by birth, who died in Kentucky. He was a small boy when his father moved to the Blue Grass State, in which he was reared on afarm, remaining there until 1840, when he came to Arkansas and located in what was then Phillips County, on the St. Francis River. After giving his attention to rafting timber to New Orleans for the following two years, he purchased the plantation on which he spent the remainder of his life, dying on March 11, 1874. Mrs. Howard was born in 1824, and is still living on the old homestead. Both were members of the Baptist Church, and the parents of nine children, six of whom survive, all residents of Richland Township, this county: Virginia F. (at home with her mother), William L. (the principal of this sketch), L. G. (a merchant of La Grange, and a partner of William F. Gill, whose biography appears in this work), Addie (wife of N. D. Ramey), E. J. (now justice of the peace of this township) and Robert W. (at home). William L. Howard was married on January 16, 1875, to Miss Emma L. Crook, who was born in White County, Tenn., in 1850, and died in February, 1884, leaving four children, three now living: Ida B., Robert E. and Sallie H. He married his second and present wife, Miss Maggie Broyles, a relative of his first wife, and a native of the same county, January 14, 1886. They have a family of two children, Ethel Lee and William C. Mr. Howard has always taken a leading part in the politics of this county, and is one of its prominent Democrats. He was elected coroner in 1878, and served two years; was afterward elected justice of the peace, and filled that office the same length of time. He was then a candidate before the Democratic Nominating Convention in 1886 for sheriff, but was defeated. In 1888 he was elected to represent Lee County in the State legislature, which office he still acceptably holds. Mr. Howard, while not in public life, has followed agricultural pursuits for a livelihood, and owns a farm of 320 acres of as fine land as can be found in Lee County, besides an interest in the old homestead, consisting of 480 acres. He is a member of the Baptist Church, and Mrs. Howard belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, as did his first wife. Mr. Howard is also a member of the Royal Arcanum.
HUGHES ELIJAH C. ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.B-McNEIL'S REGIMENT-Civil War
Elijah C. Hughes, of St. Francis County, Ark., is too well known in this vicinity to render a formal introduction necessary, but in compiling a volume of biographical sketches of prominent men hereabouts, the omission of his biography would leave the work incomplete. His farm, which is one of the finest in the county, consists of 2,000 acres of valuable land, with 900 under a successful state of cultivation. He grows from 350 to 450 bales of cotton yearly, 4,000 bushels of corn, and is extensively engaged in stock raising. Mr. Hughes was united in marriage, in 1857, to Miss Martha M. Reddill, and by her became the father of five children, all deceased. He enlisted in the Confederate service during the war, as a member of Company B, McNeil's regiment, and participated in the battle of Cotton. He afterward employed a substitute and remained at home, running his steammill for the Confederate army. Mr. Hughes is a stanch Democrat, and though not a member of any church is an adherent to the Methodist doctrine, as is also his wife. His birth occurred in Marengo County, Ala., in 1837, he being the son of John and Susan Hughes. When only one year old his parents moved to Arkansas, which has been our subject's residence ever since, with the exception of eight years spent in Shelby County, Tenn. He has served as magistrate in this county for some time, discharging the duties of the office in a highly commendable manner. He is a member of no secret organization. Mr. Hughes lends his support to all movements of a worthy character, and is considered one of the most responsible and influential men of the county, winning by his courteous manner and honesty in all business details, the respect of those who know him. E.C.Hughes died at his home in Haynes, Lee county, Sunday night, Sep.12,1897. This death removes one of the oldest landmarks of Eastern Arkansas. He had resided in St.Francis and Lee counties for many years and had always been prominently connected with the interests of his locality. He leaves a large estate, a wife and many friends.-9-17-1897 OBIT:9-17-1897 - Hughes - E. - C. - E.C.Hughes died at his home in Haynes, Lee county, Sunday night, Sep.12,1897. This death removes one of the oldest landmarks of Eastern Arkansas. He had resided in St.Francis and Lee counties for many years and had always been prominently connected with the interests of his locality. He leaves a large estate, a wife and many friends. PROB.BURIED IN CASTEEL CEMETERY, ST.FRANCIS CO.,ARK.
HUGHES JOHN J. ST.FRANCIS
John J. Hughes is the son of John J. and Mary S. (Patrick) Hughes, natives of Georgia and Alabama, respectively, who were residing in the latter State when John J. was born, his birth occurring in the year 1828. Twelve years after they moved to Arkansas and located in St. Francis County, where Mr. Hughes died four years later, his wife surviving him only one year. The subject of this sketch was married in 1855 to Miss Margaret Ross, daughter of James F. Ross, and their union has been blessed by seven children: William S., John J., James L., Robert Lee, Leona, Bertha R. and Cora E. The boys are engaged in the mercantile business at Haynes Station, Lee County, Ark. Leona and Cora are deceased, Mrs. Hughes died in 1873, and two years later Mr. Hughes was married to Miss Fannie J. Ballout, by whom he became the father of three children; Thomas S., Walter E. and Samuel T. Thomas S. is the only child surviving. The estimable wife and mother departed this life in 1885. Mr. Hughes owns 1,000 acres of land, with 550 acres under cultivation, and the numerous late improvements placed upon it indicate the owner's spirit of progress. A comfortable and pleasant home, furnished in a quiet, refined way, show that culture and good taste have not been lacking in his busy career. Mr. Hughes has a gin with a capacity of fourteen bales per day, and he is also engaged in raising stock. In his politics he is a Democrat, and in religious faith a Baptist, though not a member of any church.
HUTTON H.N. CSA-Gen. D. C. Govan's staff-Adjutant General-Civil War LEE CO.-page 604
Hon. H. N. Hutton, representative from Lee County, and who has been engaged in the practice of law in Arkansas for over twenty-nine years, is a graduate of the Lebanon Law School, and a very able attorney. Born in Franklin County, Tenn., in 1835, he is a son of John and Margaret (Davidson) Hutton, of Virginia and North Carolina origin, respectively. He received his literary education at Union University, Murfreesboro, Tenn., in which he took a full classical course, being a thorough scholar in Latin, Greek, and French, and from this institution was graduated on June 18, 1853. He then entered the Lebanon Law School, graduating in June, 1855, with the highest honors of his class. Mr. Hutton commenced practice at Shelbyville, Tenn., and in 1860 came to Arkansas, locating in this county, and practicing at Helena. In 1862 he enlisted in the Confederate army, serving one year as adjutant-general on Gen. D. C. Govan's staff. He then resigned his commission on account of poor health, and returned home. When the first court was organized at Helens, after the war, he was made prosecuting attorney, and at the expiration of his term of office, resumed regular law practice, in which he was engaged until 1874, when he was appointed to fill the vacancy of judge of the circuit court, caused by the death of the former incumbent, Judge Fox. The office not being in his own district, he declined to accept the position until having first communicated with the members of that circuit to see if his service would prove acceptable. Having received a favorable reply, he was installed in the office, and served until the expiration of the unexpired term. Judge Hutton removed to Arkansas before Lee County was formed, and when the question of the organization of a new county was sufficiently agitated, he was elected to draft the bill for the formation of the same to be presented to the legislature. He first drew up a bill for that purpose, calling the proposed county Coolidge, but it was defeated. He next drew up another, taking for a name Woodford, which was also defeated by the senate. He then revised the bill, substituting the name Lee, which [p.604] was presented during the latter part of the session, and it passed the lower house in a few moments with great enthusiasm, and being sent to the senate also passed that body. On January 8, 1857, Mr. Hutton was married to Miss Cillie M. Mottley, a native of Tennessee, and a graduate of the Abbie Institute. They are the parents of four children: H. N., Jr., Walter S., J. T. and Herbert. Mr. Hutton, or Judge Hutton, as he is familiarly called, has devoted his time to hard study during life, and has developed a wonderful memory. In his extensive practice he never takes notes of the evidence, relying wholly on that faculty,, which never fails him. He is justly considered one of Lee's substantial and worthy citizens.
HUTTON WILLIAM A. CSA-Capt.Collier's Co.-Col.Boddy's Alabama Reg,-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1177
INGRAM JOSEPH L. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Army-Civil War
Joseph L. Ingram owes his nativity to North Carolina, and is a son of Thomas and Ellen (Covington) Ingram, who also came originally from that State. Thomas Ingram in 1849 removed to Northern Mississippi, where he resided until his death, reaching the age of seventy-five years. His grandfather, whose name he bears, was a Virginian by birth and a wealthy planter of the old Dominion, subsequently removing to North Carolina where he lived until his final summons in 1825, when about eighty-five years old. Joseph L. Ingram was born in North Carolina in 1830. At the age of twenty-seven he commenced business for himself, and the following year was married to Martha Young, daughter of Tandy K. Young. They were the parents of four children: W. C., Martha Y., Eben J. and Lady. Mr. Ingram was engaged in farming in Mississippi from 1848 to 1885. He then removed to Arkansas and located in St. Francis County, where he purchased a farm and is still employed in planting. He joined the Confederate army in 1862 and served two years, then returning to his plantation, which he found in a bad state of delapidation, the crops and stock having been confiscated by both armies. He was justice of the peace for several years while in Mississippi, and also served on the board of county supervisors for a term of years. Mrs. Ingram died in 1888 at the age of fifty. Mr. Ingram is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and of the A. F. & A. M. and also the Knights of Honor. .
IVY CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS CSA-Forrest's Cavalry-POW-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1194
IZARD MARK WILSON ST.FRANCIS
M. W. Izard & Co. are the owners and operators of the largest saw and grist mills and cottongin in St. Francis County, located near Colt Station. The firm is composed of M. W. Izard and John N. Cotton, both representative, active young business men, and thoroughly worthy of the position to which they have attained. Mr. Izard was born in Fayette County, Tenn., on March 3, 1855, being a son of F. J. and Sarah E. (Whittaker) Izard. Reared in this county, he attended public and private schools and received a good education, and at the age of seventeen was employed as a clerk, which occupation received his attention for about ten years. Subsequently he went into business for himself as a butcher, and two years afterward entered in the saw-mill business, later forming a partnership with his father-in-law, John N. Cotton, in the grist-mill and cotton-gin business. He also owns a large farm of 190 acres of land, with sixty-five acres under cultivation, having good improvements, a small orchard, etc. Mr. Izard was married June 12, 1879, to Miss Emma Cotton, daughter of J. N. Cotton, his partner in business. They are the parents of two boys: John and Mark W. Mr. Izard is an outspoken Democrat, and he and wife are members of the K. & L. of H. John N. Cotton owes his nativity to Western Tennessee, where his birth occurred March 2, 1834. His parents, John and Easter (Nelson) Cotton, were natives of Virginia and of English descent, their ancestors coming to this country in colonial days and taking part in the great struggle for liberty. Mr. and Mrs. Cotton moved from Virginia to Kentucky, and in 1834 to Arkansas, settling on a farm in this county, where they both died within two years after their arrival. John N. worked on a farm, and attended school three months during the first seventeen years of his life, improving his spare moments and finding opportunity to prosecute his studies for a few terms after reaching that age. Thus he acquired a good common-school education. He was then engaged in clerking in a grocery at Taylor's Creek, now Colt, until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in the Twenty-third Arkansas Infantry and served as first lieutenant until the close of hostilities. After peace was restored he embarked in the general mercantile business in Forrest City, followed it for ten or twelve years, and then entered into the tie and timber business in company with his son-in-law, M. W. Izard. Mr. Cotton was married on June 20, 1861, to Miss Taylor, who died in 1865, leaving one daughter, Emma, the wife of Mr. Izard. He was married the second time, September 2, 1867, to Mrs. Gullett. They are the parents of three children: Edna, Guy and Willie. Mr. Cotton has held several important offices since living in Forrest City, among them chief magistrate of the city, and deputy sheriff of the county. His family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member of the Masonic and I. O. O. F. fraternities and of the County Wheel, belonging, too, to the K. & L. of H. He is also a thorough Knight of Labor. Per Mrs.Julia Izard Hemenway's book on Izard Family in 1935:M.W.IZARD CELEBRATES HIS 80TH BIRTHDAY-MAY 3,1935Mark Wilson (Linnie) celebrated his 80th birthday on May 3,1935. As it came on Sunday, following his usual custom, he attended the Landmark Baptist Sunday School and church of which he has been a member for many years. Rev. Bogard spoke of his long and faithful membership. When he returned home, a special dinner awaited him. At the table with him were his wife, Mrs.Emma Cotten Izard; his son in law, C.L.Hendrix, and daughter Mrs.Letha Hendrix; his two sisters, Mrs.Julia Izard Hemenway, and Mrs.Linnie Izard Beauchamp. Also a friend, Mrs. Vesta Petree. She had brought a birthday cake and large bowl of boiled custard. Altogether it was a very happy occasion.
IZARD NICHOLAS ST.FRANCIS USARMY-War of 1812
SEE VAN BUREN IZARD-NICHOLAS HOFFMAN8 IZARD (NICHOLAS7, GABRIELLE6, MICHAEL III5 ISARD, JR. IZARD4 MICHAEL, SR. IZARD3,HENRY2 IZZARD, HENRY1 IZARD) was born August 04, 1776 in Cape May, NJ, and died August 09, 1836 in St.Francis, AK. He married REBECCA WHITAKER January 12, 1800 in Lexington, KY, daughter of MARKWHITAKER and CATHERINE BOONE. She was born June 19, 1780 in KY, and died December 03, 1860 inSchulenburg, TX.Children of NICHOLAS IZARD and REBECCA WHITAKER are:9. i. MARK WHITAKER9 IZARD, b. November 12, 1800, Ashland Co., KY; d. August 08, 1866.ii. CATHERINE IZARD, b. May 23, 1802, KY.iii. JOHN G. IZARD, b. March 20, 1805, KY.iv. NICHOLAS HOFFMAN IZARD, b. November 30, 1807, KY.v. MARY ANN IZARD, b. August 16, 1809, KY.vi. NANCY IZARD, b. June 05, 1811, KY.vii. GABRIELLE JONES IZARD, b. 1813, KY; m. 1832, St. Francis Co., AK.viii. THOMAS ARGYLE IZARD, b. 1819. MT.VERNON CEMETERY
IZARD RICHARD J. ST.FRANCIS
R. J. Izard, one of Forrest City's most prominent attorneys at law, was born in St. Francis County in 1865, being the son of Col. V. B. and Mary T. (Fondren) Izard. [See sketch of Col. Izard.] R. J. was educated at Jackson, Tenn., and after being prepared at that school for the study of law (which had been the ambition of his youth) he entered the office of R. J. Williams, of Forrest City. Subsequently he attended the Law Department of the University at Lebanon, Tenn., and was graduated with honors from that institution in June, 1887, at once returning to the office of Mr. Williams, where his career has been a creditable one. He is now city attorney, having been elected to that position in April, 1889. In August, 1889, Mr. Izard was united in matrimony to Miss Effie Howell, a daughter of Capt. J. L. Howell, in whose honor the town of Howell, Ark., was named. Although young in years, Mr. Izard has attained a prominence that would compare favorably with others of maturer years and wider experience. He is loyal to his profession and clients, and numerous personal characteristics of worth have endeared him in the hearts of many friends and acquaintances, a confidence and respect which he will not do aught to misplace. CITY CEMETERY
IZARD VAN BUREN-COLONEL ST.FRANCIS
Col. V. B. Izard, whose name is identified with only that which is good and noble, and who has attained an enviable position in the hearts of the citizens of Eastern Arkansas, owes his nativity to St. Francis County, Ark., where he was born in 1837, being the son of Mark W. and Permelia (Shackelford) Izard. The genealogy of the Izard family is traced to Scotland, whence at an early day the great-grandfather of our subject emigrated to the New England States. Three of his sons afterward settled in South Carolina, and some time subsequent the grandfather of Col. V. B. Izard separated from his two brothers, and located permanently in Lexington, Ky. His occupation was that of a farmer, and he was a gallant soldier in the War of 1812. His son, Gov. Mark W., was born in Lexington, Ky., in 1800, removing from his native State to St. Francis County, Ark., in 1824. Here he was successfully engaged in mercantile pursuits for some years, and also opened one of the first farms or plantations in the county. Mark N. Izard was not a man who attained high intellectuality as the result of a collegiate education, for he had scarcely more than ordinary literary attainments. Something besides scholarly accomplishments drew around him hosts of friends in the pioneer days of Eastern Arkansas, it may have been his inborn worth, and intuitive genius. He entered the political field with no other qualifications to recommend, or guide him, than his own broad sense, untiring energy and clear judgment. First elected to the Territorial legislature, he sarved as a member of the Constitutional Convention, distinguishing himself in both cases, and to the credit of his county. He afterward served in both branches of the Arkansas State legislature (two or more times each), assisting first as speaker of the house, and later as president of the senate. While still actively engaged in the affairs of his own State, a candidate for another term in the State senate, an incident occurred which changed the field of his political labors from the State of Arkansas to the then Territory of Nebraska. This was his appointment as United States marshal of the Territory mentioned, by President Franklin Pierce, the first to hold that office. The demise of Gov. Burt, the incumbent of that position when Gov. Izard was serving as marshal, made it necessary that another Governor should be appointed. There were, of course, many aspirants for the place, but Gov. Izard with his usual characteristic originality of method, carried the official news of Gov. Burt's death to the President, and solicited the influence of the then two senators of Arkansas, W. K. Sebastan and R. M. Johnson, to have him made Governor, but they thought action on their part useless. This rebuff, however, did not daunt him. Going in person to President Pierce, after a clear statement of his ideas, he received the appointment to the coveted office. The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 114:Probably the best-known man in St. Francis County is Mr.Van Buren Izard. He was born February 27,1837, and enjoys the distinction of being the first born white-child in the territory of what is now Forrest City. His parents, Mark W. and Permelia (Shackleford) Izard, were among the early pioneers, having located here in 1824. Mr. Izard saw the first light on the site of the old Baptist church on the hill near the cemetery. His father was a noted man. He was twice speaker of the house in the Arkansas legislature and twice the president of the senate, which is an unusual record. By appointment of President Pierce he was made governor of the then territory of Nebraska, and his incumbency was continued under President Buchanan. He was appointed the purchasing agent and made superintendent of construction of the first capitol building of Nebraska at Omaha. Mr. Izard was a large slave holder, and with his help did much to develop this section. He was educated in the private schools of St.Francis county, public schools at that time being an unknown quantity. When the war came he enlisted and was a participant in the battles of Prairie Grove and Helena, besides numerous minor engagements. He was a member of Co.E, McRae's regiment, of the Confederate Army. Col. Izard was appointed by Governor Berry to be Colonel of the militia of the eastern district of Arkansas, and that commission was never revoked. When the troubleness times of 1889 came he was appointed Sheriff by Governor Eagle, and he was a very strong factor in conserving peace of our town and county. He has been a member of the city council at various times from the establishment of municipal government here, and his work on the school board, of which he was a member for several years, was of a most valuable and conscientious sort. On January 29,1859, Colonel Izard was married to Miss Mary Fondren, of Oxford, Mississippi, and five children were born to them. Lena, the eldest, is the wife of Mr.J.W.Williams, the successful merchant of Wynne; Richard J. Izard is a thriving lawyer and insurance man of Forrest City; Kate is now Mrs. E.A.Long, and also resides in this city; Van B. Jr., is in a large mercantile establishment at DeVall's Bluff; Pearl died at the age of four years. CITY CEMETERY
JASTRAWER A. LEE CO.-page 604
A. Jastrawer, dealer in dry goods, groceries and drugs at White Hall, is a native of Prussia, being a son of Mark and Rose (Cohn) Jastrawer, also natives of that country. The former died when the principal of this sketch was a small boy, and his wife in 1875. Our subject was born in 1832 and was married in Prussia about 1863, to Miss Ester Cohn, also of that country, and who became the mother of two children, both now deceased. Mr. Jastrawer learned the shoemaker's trade while in his native country, at which he worked for a number of years. Emigrating to America about 1869 he landed at New York City, where he remained, working at his chosen calling for about one year. He then went to Memphis, Tenn., and three years later came to Forrest City, where he was engaged in the same business for several years, ubsequently removing to Lee County. He first started in the mercantile business in different parts of this county, and in 1883 located at White Hall, where he has since been occupied in general merchandising, with excellent success, having acquired considerable properly. He is the owner of 1,000 acres of land, of which half is under cultivation, and is enjoying a patronage of about $25,000 annually. Mr. Jastrawer is a member of the K. of H. and of two Jewish and German Lodges.
JENKINS J.L. LEE CO.-page 605
J. L. Jenkins, farmer, Haynes, Ark. On September 15, 1851, in Johnson County, Tenn., there was born to William and Sarah M. (Russel) Jenkins a son, who is taken as the subject of this sketch. William Jenkins was born in South Carolina in 1805, thence removing, in 1833, to Johnson County, Tenn. Leaving that State in 1857 he went to Dent County, Mo., where he remained the balance of his life, his death occurring July 27, 1871. He was too old to participate in the late war, but this did not prevent him from being barrassed by bushrangers. By his marriage to Miss Russel he became the father of ten children, only two now living: Sophronia J. (wife of J. D. Crabtree, resides in Golden City, Mo.,) and J. L. (who was the youngest of the family. The mother was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and died February 28, 1860. The paternal grandfather was an early settler of Tennessee, and was in one of the early wars. J. L. Jenkins passed his boyhood days in Dent County. Mo., received the benefit of a common-school education, and at the age of eighteen years commenced for himself in Dent County, where he farmed for some time on rented land. In 1872 he moved to St. Francis County, Ark., and worked for wages on a farm for two years, after which (in 1878) he purchased a portion of his present place, forty acres. To this he has since added 160 acres, and has fifty-five acres under improvement. Besides this his wife has sixty acres of an undivided farm of 120 acres, on which Mr. Jenkins now resides. He was married in 1878 to Miss Annie E. Stanfield, a native of Lee County and the daughter of Clark and Jane (Myrick) Stanfield, natives, respectively, of Alabama and Arkansas. The Myrick family were among the early settlers of Arkansas, having made their appearance here as early as 1820 or 1825, and were prominently identified with the early settlement of the country. Mr. and Mrs. Stanfield were the parents of four children, two now living: Mrs. Jenkins (the eldest) and J. M. (who resides with Mr. Jenkins). Mr. Stanfield died in 1883 and Mrs. Stanfield in 1876, the former a member of the A. F. & A. M. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins were born five children; P. J. (deceased), Willie A., Nora L., Hattie M. (deceased) and Joseph B. Mr. and Mrs. Jenkins are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and are liberal contributors and supporters of all laudable [p.605] enterprises, particularly those pertaining to religious and educational matters. Mr. Jenkins is a member of the Masonic fraternity, Cannon Lodge No. 254, and is also a member of the Knights of Honor, Lodge No. 2168. )
JOHNSON JACOB CSA-ARMY-DIED OF SMALL POX-Civil War LEE CO.-page 605
SEE JOHN M. JOHNSON
JOHNSON JOHN M. LEE CO.-page 605
John M. Johnson. The estate which Mr. Johnson now cultivates and owns, comprises 500 acres, of which 300 are under cultivation, and it is well adapted to the purposes of general farming. In his operation he displays those sterling principles so characteristic of those of Virginian nativity, of which industry and wise and judicious management are among the chief. He was born in Russell County, October 23, 1857, and is a son of Jacob Johnson, who was born in Carroll County, Va., in 1830, his wife, Malinda Foster, being also a native of that State, born in 1832. Their marriage took place in 1847, and to their union a family of seven children were born, of whom John M. is the fourth. Only three of this family are now living, and all reside in Lee County: Benjamin F. (who married Ida L. Riner), Nannie (who married H. E. Sapp) and Jacob. The father was a man of public spirit and took an interest in all worthy public enterprises wherever he lived. He served in the Confederate army during 1861-62, but in the latter year returned home and died of small-pox. He was a farmer by occupation, and at the time of his death owned a good farm of 200 acres. His widow survives him, and resides in Lee County, Ark., with her daughter. John M. Johnson received his education in the schools of Sulphur Springs, Va., but in 1877 concluded to seek his fortune in the West, and immigrated with his mother to Arkansas, locating in Lee County, where, in 1881, he began business for himself. He has a well-improved and well-stocked farm, and his management shows a thorough knowledge of the business.
JOHNSON SAMUEL L. LEE CO.-page 605
Samuel L. Johnson has worked at farm labor since a young boy, his father having died when he was but two years of age, and the mother when the son was eighteen years old. At the age of fifteen he was employed as a farm hand in Monroe County, but shortly after started to learn the trade of blacksmithing, soon returning to farm labor, at which he was employed until he bought a farm of his own. He now owns 280 acres of fine farming land in Lee County, with half of it under cultivation. Mr. Johnson was born in Monroe County January 4, 1850, his parents, Hardin and Elizabeth (Davis) Johnson, being natives of Mississippi and South Carolina, respectively. They removed from Mississippi to Arkansas in 1842, and located in Monroe County on a farm, on which Mr. Johnson lived until his death in 1852. Two years later Mrs. Johnson married James Ganberry, and survived until 1868. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson had a family of four children, three of whom are still living: Julia (wife of William Moy, a farmer of Monroe County), Thomas B. (a resident of Illinois), and Samuel L. (the principal of this sketch). The latter was married March 20, 1880, to Miss Nannie Ruscoe, of Alabama birth, who lived only two years after her marriage, leaving two children, one of whom, Laura E., still survives. He was married to his second and present wife, Mary A. Jeffcoat, a native of this State, April 4, 1883. She was a daughter of William K. and Nancy J. (Fisher) Jeffcoat, both now deceased. By this marriage there was born one child, Bessie V. Mr. Johnson is a Democrat, and takes an active interest in the success of his party, He and wife are leading members of the Presbyterian Church, and live upright Christian lives.
JOHNSTON S.D. LEE CO.-page 606
S. D. Johnston is a member of that well-known general mercantile firm of Johnston & Grove, of Marianna, Ark., which has existed under the present title since 1881, having previously been Jarratt, Rodgers & Co., and Johnston, Foreman & Co. These two firms were really one and the business of both houses was kept in one set of books and as one firm. Later, the firm name was changed to Johnston, Rodgers & Co., and Johnston, Foreman & Co., and finally to Johnston & Grove. Their establishment is among the leading ones in Eastern Arkansas, and they occupy one of the main business houses in Marianna, having regularly in their employ seven men, besides assisting in the work themselves. The main room is 27x125 feet, the large stock of goods occupying parte of two other floors, and ranging from $15,000 to $20,000. Their highest annual sale, made in 1879, amounted [p.606] to $140,000, but of late years have aggregated from $75,000 to $85,000. They also own two farms. Mr. Johnston is a Kentuckian by birth, born in 1849. He was reared to manhood in his native State and after acquiring a fair education in the common schools supplemented this by a course in college at Columbia, Ky., and in 1872 took a complete course in Leddin's Business College, Memphis, Tenn., graduating therefrom in October, 1872. Immediately after he came to Marianna and for some time acted as book-keeper for the mercantile firm of Jarratt & Rodgers, serving them in this capacity until 1877. Also during this time from 1884 he had a half interest in the mercantile firm of Johnston & Foreman, in Marianna, keeping the books and attending to the financial part of the business. When the two firms consolidated, the styles being then changed to Jarratt, Rodgers & Co. and Johnston, Foreman & Co., he was an equal partner in both houses. Unlike the majority of the young men of the present day he judiciously saved his money and in the investment of the same he has shown excellent judgment, and in every respect deserves the reputation he has acquired as a successful business man. He not only owns a one-half interest in the mercantile firm, but also some of the most valuable property in the city, consisting of a two-story brick store building, a valuable residence and other real estate in the business portion. He is an active worker for the upbuilding of the town and county, and has done much to assist in eliminating the whisky traffic from Marianna. He is the fire insurance agent of Marianna, representing eight of the best fire insurance companies; is an active member and official of the Methodist Church and the Royal Arcanum, a K. of H., a K. & L. of H., a commissioner of accounts for Lee County, and also belongs to the I. O. G. T. He was married in 1875 at Austin, Miss., to Miss Mollie F. Grove, and by her has two children living: Mary E. and Sarah A. He was married the econd time at Brownsville, Tenn., to Miss Nita Mann, his present wife, and by her has one child; Willie Webster. J. B. Grove, the junior member of the above-named firm, was born in West Tennessee in 1849, and made his home in that State several years as salesman in a dry-goods store until about twenty years ago, when he came to Marianna, Ark., and acted as book-keeper and salesman for J. E. Wood in a general mercantile business until 1876. Wood failing in business he accepted a position as salesman for Jarratt & Rodgers, and in 1877 became a partner in the firms of Jarratt, Rodgers & Co. and Johnston, Foreman & Co., now Johnston & Grove. He is an excellent man of business, shrewd, honest and capable, and, like Mr. Johnston, has made all his money in Lee County. He is unmarried.
JOLLY WILLIAM ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.A-McNeil's Regiment-Civil War
William Jolly was born in Beaufort County, N.Carolina, in 1844, being the son of Isaiah and Senia (Williams) Jolly, natives of the same state. He came to Arkansas with his parents in 1852, locating in the eastern part of St.Francis county. His schooling was limited to a few months in the district school, as he was obliged to assist his father on the farm, and when he was twenty-two years old he purchased a farm near the home place in 1867, being married to Miss Mattie Cummings, a daughter of Sam and Martha Cummings, of Tennessee. Mr.Cummings was among the the early settlers of the county. To Mr.Jolly's marriage five children were born: Samuel E., Katie Sliza, Lee A., Georgia Beulah and Julius H. He enlisted in 1862 in Company A, McNeil's Regiment, of the Confederate Army, participating in the engagements of Jenkin's Ferry, Helena, Little Rock, Mansfield and Prairie Grove. At the battle of Helena he received a wound, but which did not prove serious. He surrendered at Marshall, Texas, and returned to his home, resuming his occupation of farming, and accepting the results of the war, as a final adjustment of the difficulties between North and South, Mr.Jolly cheerfully turned his attention to the recovery of his lost fortune, though his entire stock in trade consisted of $1.25, which he obtained from a Yankee in exchange for Confederate money. His success was swift and sure, and in 1868 he located on his present farm, numbering 125 acres, cleared and in a fine state of cultivation. A beautiful residence with all the modern improvements, gives evidence of his spirit of progress and prosperity. He is a member of the Masonic order, and a Knight of Honor, a Democrat in his political views, and with his wife is a member of the Baptist Church. Mr.Jolly contributes most generously to all public movements, and is one of the representative men of the county, commanding respect of the entire community. ENLISTED JUN.19,1862 AT MADISON
JONES H.M. LEE CO.-page 606
H. M. Jones, recognized as one of the well-to-do and enterprising farmers and stock raisers of Independence Township, was born in Limestone County, Ala. His father, Kimbrough Jones, was also a native of Alabama, and was married in 1846, to Evaline Weatherford, who bore him eight children: Sally (Mrs. J. P. Farrel, of Marianna), Betty (Mrs. Beauchamp, now dead), Margaret (the wife of J. D. Brown, of Marianna), Fannie (now the wife of Mr. Beauchamp, of Marianna), Emma (deceased), S. W., Dixie (Mrs. Harden) and H. M. (the subject of this sketch). Mr. Jones was a successful farmer, and in 1868 moved to Arkansas, settling in Lee County, where his death occurred two years later. Mrs. Jones is now living with her children in Marianna, and is a member of many years' standing of the Methodist Church. Mr. Jones settled the land owned by his father and which is now operated by him. After the father's death he assumed charge of his mother's family and the management of her estate, where his intuitive sense and excellent business qualifications were given a wide scope. His farm consists of 100 acres of valuable land, with eighty acres under cultivation, and bears evidence of careful and unceasing attention. In his political belief he is a Democrat.
JONES JOHN M.- DR CSA-Forrest's Cavalry-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1193
JONES NATHANIELM. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Army-Civil War
Nathaniel M. Jones came to St. Francis County with his father in 1832, when nine years of age, the country at that time being a comparative wilderness. He remained with his father until his death, which occurred in 1851, and in 1856 was married to Martha A. Agerton, who has borne five children: Mary C., Nancy, James P., Cleopatra and Senoth. Mr. Jones was born in Lawrence County, Ala., in 1823, to the union of Branch and and Nancy Jones, natives of Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. Mr. N. M. Jones owns a farm of 146 acres, with sixty acres under cultivation, and is extensively engaged in stock raising. He is a Democrat in politics, and was a firm adherent to the Southern cause during the late war, serving in the Confederate army throughout that conflict. He is a member of the Baptist Church (as are also all of his family, with the exception of one of the children), in which he has been an active worker. Few men have led a more honorable life or contributed more liberally to the support of religious and educational enterprises than Mr. Jones.
JONES WILLIAM ABRASON CROSS CO
William Jones was a member of the House,27th General Assembly, 1847-49;representing Fayette, Hardeman, and Shelby counties in Tennessee. Party affiliation not known. He was a farmer and merchant in the 10th Civil District of Fayette County.William was born in Surry Co., NC but moved with his family to Danville, VA early in his life. He went to Tennessee in his youth,clerked for a few years, and then bought an interest in the same store. He continued at this business until perhaps thirty-six years of age, when he moved to a farm near Memphis, and tilled the soil for a few years, then, with the proceeds of the sale of this farm, he bought the old William Strong Place in Witsburg, AR. The farm consisted of 1200 acres. At the time of William's purchase, Mr.Strong had about completed a large house,which William immediately proceeded to finish. It stood as one of the best houses in the county. William purchased this place in1848. At the time of his death, he was the owner of about 400 acres under cultivation, over 300 of which he cleared himself. He was a member of the legislature from St.Francis County, and a member of the State Senate from this district. He was a self made man, and although his educational advantages were limited, he carved his way to social and political eminence, and left a name and memory that was revered by all. Born 1809 Virginia, died December, 1860, in Cross County, Arkansas, and buried on the Jones Family Farm near Wittsburg. His first wife bore him three children: Lewis F. Jones b.1837; William T.Jones b.1841-d.before April 26, 1875 at Wittsburg, Ark.; and Sarah F.Jones b.1839 Brownsville, Tenn. d.1861 Laurenceburg, Tenn. Second wife whom he married March 2,1848 at Somerville, Fayette Co.,Tenn., was Mary Jane Granberry b.abt 1826 N.Carolina d.1887 Wittsburg, Ark., buried Jones Family Farm, Wittsburg, Cross Co.,Ark. They had three children: Lucy J.Jones b.1849 Tenn.; Mary C. (Mollie) Jones b.1853 Wittsburg, Ark. d.1883 Wynne, Arkansas; third unknown. Mary C.Jones married Judge Leonidas N. Rhodes, Feb.10,1876, and they had one child:Mary Lee Rhodes b.1879 d.Dec.15,1953 Forrest City, Arkansas, who married Unk Mann, who had preceded her in death. Jones Family Farm, Wittsburg, Ark.
KELLAM HIRAM C. LEE CO.-page 607
Hiram C. Kellam, not unknown throughout this region, commenced life for himself at the age of thirteen, being employed as a farm hand, but on the death of his father, two years later, he served an apprenticeship with a leading blacksmith of his native county (Davis County, Ky.), and became [p.607] a finished workman. After working at his trade in Illinois, he came to Arkansas and located at Moro, Lee County (then Monroe County), where he followed his adopted calling for some time. Afterward he purchased a farm, and has since followed that occupation. He was born September 4, 1851, being a son of Elisha J. and Lucinda (Kelley) Kellam, also Kentuckians by birth. E. J. Kellam was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and also carried on farming. During the war he was taken by the Federals and carried to Indiana, on account of his Southern principles and sympathy with the Confederate cause and died in that State in March, 1866. His wife died in 1862 at the age of fifty-two years. They were the parents of eight children, two of whom only are now living, the principal of this sketch, and Albert J., a farmer residing in the State of Texas. Mr. Kellam was married on February 27, 1876, to Miss Julia I. Boykin, of Johnson, County, N. C., and a daughter of Elmore and Jane E. (Jones) Boykin, originally from Virginia and North Carolina, respectively, both of whom are deceased, the former dying in 1867 and the latter in 1882. Mr. and Mrs. Kellam have a family of five children; Albert B., Hiram C., Lucinda, David H., and William L. and one deceased. Mr. Kellam owns a farm of 120 acres, with about sixty acres under cultivation, which he devotes principally to the raising of stock, having a large number of cattle, horses and hogs. He also owns and operates a large steam grist-mill and cotton-gin, erected at a cost of about $1,500. He is a strong Democrat and takes an active interest in polities, and has held the office of deputy sheriff of the county for the past twelve years. He is a member of the K. of P. and of the Masonic order, and belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of which his wife is also a member.
KUPER HENRY SR. CSA-CO.A-Third Arkansas Reg-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1247
FT.SMITH
LEE JOHN USARMY-CO.C-One Hundred and Forty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry-Civil WaR LEE CO.-page 608
John Lee, farmer and blacksmith, of Hardy Township, is a native of Indiana, and a son of Jonathan and Deborah (Britian) Lee. Jonathan Lee was born in Mercer County, Ky., in 1793, in which State he lived until after his marriage, learning the trade of blacksmithing. Soon after his marriage he removed to Washington County, Ind., and when the principal of this sketch was about one year old, went to Jackson County, where he died on July 16, 1862. He was a son of William Lee, of Irish descent, and a cooper and farmer by occupation. He was a native of Mercer County, Ky., and died in Washington County, Ind. Mrs. Lee came originally from West Virginia and died in Jackson County, Ind., in 1867, at the age of seventy-four. She was a member of the Baptist Church, as was also her husband, being a daughter of Samuel Britain, a native of Virginia, who died in Washington County, Ind., at the age of ninety-seven. John Lee was the youngest son in a family of eight children, four of whom are still living, the eldest son, Samuel, two daughters, and our subject. The latter was born in Washington County, Ind., in 1832. He was married in 1851, to Ludia Chilcott, who was born in Jackson County, Ind., in 1825. Her parents were John and Rachel (Robertson) Chilcott, the former a native of Virginia, removed to Jackson County, Ind., where he was married and made his home the rest of his life, dying in 1848. He was a son of Eli Chilcott, of Pennsylvania, who removed to Virginia after his marriage, and died in Hardy County, that State. Mrs. Chilcott was also of Virginia birth, and died in 1835. She was a daughter of Blaze and Hannah (Hutchinson) Robertson. Mr. Robertson wasborn in England, the son of an English nobleman. He left home at the age of seventeen and came to America against his parents' wishes, and, having no money, though possessed of a good education, he contracted the wages which he would receive for his duties as a teacher, his chosen calling, for seven years, to pay his passage to the United States; after four years' service he was released from his contract. He then settled in Virginia, where he made his home the balance of his life. His wife, after the death of her husband, moved to Indiana, where she died. They were the parents of a large family of children, who were among the pioneer families of Jackson County, Ind. One of the daughters married a Mr. Hamilton, the first representative from that county, in the State legislature. Mr. and Mrs. Lee had five children, two sons and three daughters, all of whom survive: [p.608] Jonathan R. (a resident of Phillips County), Hannah E. (wife of S. B. Eaks), Lydia A. (wife of W. B. Jones), Sarah M. (wife of C. T. Payne) and William Samuel. Mr. Lee enlisted in January, 1865, in Company C of the One Hundred and Forty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in which he served until the close of the war. He lived in Jackson County, Ind., until 1870, when he came to Arkansas and settled in what is now Lee County. Two years later he settled on his present farm, consisting of half a section of land, of which sixty-five acres are under a high state of cultivation, and all made since coming to this State. He is a prominent Democrat and takes an interest in the political affairs of the day. He and his wife are members of the Christian Church.
LESSER JULIUS LEE CO.-page 608
Julius Lesser, treasurer of Lee County, was born in Prussia in 1853, and emigrated to America in 1867, locating first inMemphis, Tenn., where he was employed as a clerk. In 1870 he came to Arkansas, and was employed in that occupation at Forrest City until 1875, then entering into business for himself at Marianna. In 1884 he sold out his store, and became engaged in the banking business, which he still continues. Shortly after disposing of his mercantile interest he bought it back, and associated with his brother as partner, the latter now having the management of the store. Mr. Lesser gives his attention to his banking business and official duties. He has held, with great satisfaction, the office of county treasurer for five consecutive years, having served first by appointment to fill an unexpired term, and afterward being elected. He and his brother enjoy a large patronage in their store, handling sixty per cent of all the cotton grown in the neighborhood, which they ship direct to the spinners, and not to commission men, as is the general custom. Mr. Lesser is a stockholder and director in the First National Bank of Helena, also a stockholder in another bank of that city, and one in Memphis, Tenn., and, in addition, is a stockholder in a large lumber company. He was married to Miss Lenora Raphaels, by which marriage two children were born: Harry and Blanche. Mr. Lesser is also largely interested in real estate in the city, owning several business blocks, including the one in which his bank is situated, and pays taxes on $35,000 to $40,000 worth of real estate. He participates actively in promoting all public enterprises; is a member of the Masonic order, in which he has taken the degree of Royal Arch Mason, and is also a member of the Knights of Honor.
LEVESQUE J.M.-CAPTAIN CROSS CO. CSA-CO.C-Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry-Captain-Civil War
Capt.J.M. Levesque, the worthy and esteemed county clerk of Cross County,enlisted at the outbreak of the Civil War, in Company C of the Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry, the first regiment organized in that part of the State, Cross County, and was immediately elected orderly-sergeant of his company.The regiment was sent to Fort Pillow, and thence to Kentucky, and was also in the battle of Belmont, Mo., November 7,1861, evacuating at Columbus,Ky., in March, 1862. At the battle of Shiloh, April 6, 1862, Lt. Joe Hall was wounded, and Mr. Levesque was chosen to fill his place as Second Lt. Shortly after this the first lt. was wounded and discharged, and our subject was elected to his position, and at the reorganization of the regiment at Corinth, in April, 1862, he was elected captain, and served through the Alabama and Kentucky campaign, also participating in the battles of Richmond, Ky., under Kirby Smith, at Perryville, Ky., and Murphreesboro, Tenn. At the reorganization of the army, he was sent to the Trans-Mississippi Department, and there engaged in recruiting a company of cavalry, mostly from Cross County; was in a number of skirmishes, but not in any important battles, his company going on the MIssouri raid under Gen. Price. At the close of the war, he took up farming as an occupation, buying a farm of 336 acres, near Vanndale, but in1866 he was elected circuit and county clerk of Cross County, which he held until the reconstruction of the county, when he was disfranchised for having held office at the beginning of the war, and in participating in the Rebellion. He then again engaged in farming, in which he continued until 1874,during which time he improved his farm, and adding to it, till in 1878, he was the owner of 2,000 acres of land. In 1874 he was elected sheriff of Cross County, and was re-elected in 1876, and again in 1878.In1880 he was elected circuit and county clerk, and was also re-elected to that office in 1882, 1884, 1886 and 1888, and is the present incumbent of this office, and that he has given satisfaction is shown by the fact of his having been elected to the same office for four terms in succession. In 1868 he was selected as one of the three men on a locating committee, to choose a site for the county seat,which was then changed to Wittsburg, and in 1885 was appointed one of the committee which located the seat of justice in Vanndale.Mr. Levesque was born in Fayette County,Tenn.,in1834,and was the son of James and Elizabeth (Arnett) Levesque, natives of Tenn. and Mississippi, respectively. His father was a farmer by occupation, and died when our subject was five years old. His mother dying when he was the age of thirteen, he then went to live with an uncle, the Rev. William Levesque, of Alabama, remaining with him until he was sixteen years of age, when he then returned to Fayette County, and was employed as a farm overseer until 1854. In this year he was married to Miss Nannie Willis, of Tennessee origin, and in the fall of that year he removed toArkansas, settling in Cross County, in what was then a part of PoinsettCounty.Here he was again employed as a farm overseer, until 1860, when he waselected constable of Mitchell Township, and which office he held until the breaking out of the Rebellion, and the call for men for the Confederate service, to which he responded so readily. He has been a delegate to the Democratic State Convention every year since 1876, and has the unbounded confidence of his party, which he has never betrayed, and is so whollydepended upon that he goes uninstructed and uses his own judgement in the convention. The results of this marriage are five children, three of whom are still living: Elizabeth (wife of Thomas B. Smith, of Cold Water Township), Fannie (wife of Isaac Block, of Wynne), Willie T. (married and resides in Cold Water Township), James Cheatham (deceased) and John Phillip(deceased).Capt. Levesque owns considerable property in different places throughout the county, and owns some 2,000 acres of land, of which there are 800 undercultivation.
LITTELL PHILANDER ST.FRANCIS CSA-FIRST ARKANSAS REGIMENT-Civil War
Philander Littell, attorney at law of Forrest City, first saw the light of day in Chicot County, Ark., being the son of Philander and Martha Littell. He received his literary education in the schools of Arkansas, and in the Lebanon University of Tennessee, and commenced the study of law at Helena, Ark., under the prominent and able Supreme Judge Hanty. At the breaking out of the war he joined the First Arkansas Regiment, serving until the final surrender. He was aid-de-camp to Gen. Walker after the battle of Shiloh, in which battle he was badly wounded, and at the time of his duel with Marmaduke was sent by Gen. Starling Price around the Federal army to carry the news of the wounding of Gen. Walker to his family, also to bring his wife to see him. This he did, but Walker had died of his wounds before her arrival. Mr. Littell being financially embarrassed by the war, read privately and taught school for several years, and began the practice of his profession in this city, receiving the license to practice law in any State in the year 1869. He followed farming here from the time of his admission till entering upon the prosecution of his chosen profession in Forrest City, owning several considerable plantations, and is now opening a large stock farm. His father was a native of Kentucky, and an attorney for many years, afterward practicing medicine. He died in this county in 1864. The name Littell, as would be imagined, is decidedly French. Philander Littell is a Democrat in his political views, and a man noted for his thorough knowledge of law, and is perhaps better versed in land matters and titles than any other man in this part of the State. While he has a vast amount of land devoted to the growing of cotton, he takes decided interest in stock raising, in which he has been quite successful. Mr. Littell is conservative on all questions, and a man whose judgment is seldom biased. He believes that the race question could be solved without difficulty if it were not for local politicians, whose zeal for county offices rushes them into the perpetration of many blunders, irrespective of party. Mr. Littell was united in marriage with Miss Annie Seaborn, of this county, their marriage being solemnized in 1883. . Mr.Philander Littell shot by J.W.Hines, who he quarreled over a settlement. It was ruled a justifiable homicide by the Cornoner's Jury. On the afternoon of last Wednesday, April 15, about 8 o'clock, on Littel's place, on Linden Island, Philander Littell, a member of the bar, met his death at the hands of J.W. (Pony)Hines, a tenant farmer living on the place. A pistol was found in the deceased's pockets during the inquiry, and this gave reason for Mr.Hines having to defend himself with his shotgun which he had out in the quarrel.-4-17-1896
LITTLEFIELD GEORGE W. ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.C-Twenty-Third Arkansas Regiment-Civil War
George W. Littlefield is the son of Andrew J. and Betsy Littlefield, his birth occurring in Gibson County, Tenn., in 1844. His boyhood years were passed in Panola County, Miss., and in 1861 he came to St. Francis County, and purchased a farm of 120 acres, fifty acres of which are in a good state of cultivation. He is also engaged in raising stock, and at this occupation has been quite successful. Mr. Littlefield enlisted in 1861, in Company C, Twenty-third Arkansas Regiment, participating in the battles of Corinth, Iuka, Ripley and Port Hudson, La., and served until the final surrender. He was married in 1866, to Miss Druecillar Halbert, and by her is the father of three children: John, Maggie and George. In his political views he is a Democrat, and socially is identified with the Knights of Honor. Mr. and Mrs. Littlefield are members of the Baptist Church, and while not wealthy in the possession of this world's goods, they have that which is more to be desired-an unsullied name, and the love of a host of friends. Enl l2Feb1862 in St Francis Co, AR. by John A. Higgs. Slightly wounded and missing at Corinth, MS Oct1862. Captured 9Ju11863 and paroled 10Jul1863 at Port Hudson, LA. Paroled 25May1865 at Wittsburg, AR. Age 20, eyes black, hair black, complx fair, ht 5'7"born MS
LITTLEFIELD PHILIP B. CROSS CO.
Philip B. Littlefield, a farmer of no mean ability, and one highly respected, is originally from Mississippi, but attained his manhood in St. Francis County, where he lived until 1879; then going into Cross County occupied himself with farming. In 1872 his marriage to Miss Ann McDonnell (also of this State), was solemnized, and who died in 1876, the mother of two children, now deceased. He was again married to Miss Ollie Rose (see Johnson) of Tennessee nativity, and a daughter of Thomas Johnson, who came to Arkansas in 1864 from Missouri. By his second wife, he became the father of one child, deceased. Philip B.Littlefield (our subject) was born in Panola County, Miss., in 1852, and is a son of Andrew J. and Elizabeth (Beliew) Littlefield, of Alabama and Tennesee origin, respectively. Andrew J. Littlefield came to Panola County, Miss., where he remained until 1858, then coming to Arkansas he settles in St. Francis County and entered a tract of land which he has converted into a good farm, and on which he made his home until his death in 1880. He and wife were members of the Baptist Church. Mrs.Littlefield is still living, and is the mother of ten children, four of whom are deceased; Flemming M. (a soldier during the Rebellion was killed at Cumberland Gap), Shelton (who served in the Confederate army and died in 1877), John S. (also in the late war, died in 1877), and an infant now deceased. Those living are: Zachariah, George W., Mattie C., Sarah E.,Jennie and Philip B. Philip B. Littlefield is numbered among the Knights of Honor and is a strong Democrat politically. He owns valuable property and has about 125 acres under cultivation. Mrs. Littlefield is a memberof the Methodist Episcopal Church.
LITTLEFIELD CROSS CO.
SEE PHILIP LITTLEFIELD
LITTLEFIELD CROSS CO.
SEE PHILIP LITTLEFIELD
LITTLEFIELD CROSS CO.
SEE PHILIP LITTLEFIELD
LOGAN J.R.-JR CROSS CO. USARMY-Mexican War
SEE J. W. LOGAN
LOGAN J.R.-SR CROSS CO. USARMY-Revolutionary War
SEE J. W. LOGAN
LOGAN J.W. CROSS CO.
J. W. Logan, one of the early and prominent settlers of this county,is a Kentuckian by birth and a son of J. R. and Emeline (Wright) Logan,also natives of the Blue Grass State. The paternal grandfather, J. R.Logan, Sr., was a soldier in the Revoutionary War, during which he was captured by the Indians, and for two weeks had his thumbs tied together with sinews of deet, at night being suspended to a branch of a tree. At the end of three weeks, while under the care of one Indian, he managed to escape. J. R. Logan, Jr., the father of the subject of this sketch, served a short time in the Mexican War. He and his wife were members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and were the parents of seven children, three of whom are still living: J. W., Mattie C. (wife of J. Pryor, of Henry County, Ky.), and Mary F. (the widow of J. A. Patterson, and resides in Louisville, Ky.). J. W. Logan was born in Henry County, Ky., in 1840, and at the age of twenty-one commenced farming for himself on rented land in Kentucky, continuing until 1860, going thence to Canada, remained for some five or six years and during that time traveled over a large part of British America, including Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Eastern and Western Canada. he returned in 1865 to Kentucky, but a year later, started out again, and traveled over the Eastern and Northern States, and back to Canada. In 1874, Mr. Logan was married to Miss Florence M. Garr, of Jefferson County, Ky., after which he settled down to farming near Louisville, also carrying on the dairy business until January, 1880; removing to Arkansas he settled within two miles of his present farm, bought 260 acres of land and in 1887 purchased his present farm on which he lives, now owning altogether 1,531 acres,with 300 acres under cultivation. Mr. Logan has considerable stock and raises har, corn, etc., being considered one of the most prosperous farmers in the county. Himself and wife were the parents of six children (two of whom are deceased, the others are at home): James E., Mamie, Virgie, George, Willie (deceased) and Jessie (also deceased). Mr. and Mrs. Logan are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.
LYNCH JOHN CARROL LEE CO.-page 608
John Carrol Lynch was born on a farm which was then in St. Francis County, now a part of Lee County, in 1848, being a son Byant Lynch, who was born in this State in 1818, and Eliza (Davis) Lynch, of Kentucky origin, born in 1825. The principal of this sketch has spent his whole life in this county, but as his help was needed on his father's farm, his educational advantages in youth were very limited. He was married, in 1873, to Miss Lou A. Rogers, who was the mother of two daughters, one, Annie L., still living. Mr. Lynch owns 1,400 acres of land, 700 acres of which are cleared and a large part of it under cultivation. He raises very little cotton, but devotes most of his time and labor to the raising of stock, which he finds more profitable. He is a life-long Democrat and uses all means in his power to advance the interests of his party. He is a member of the Masonic order. His wife belongs to the Baptist Church. Mr. Lynch is one of the prominent and well-known men of Lee County. He has never had a sick day in ten years, nor taken a dose of medicine in that time, and during the last ten years he has increased in weight from 156 to 254 pounds. Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Eastern Arkansas
LYNCH JOHN F. ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.B-McNEIL'S REGIMENT-Civil War
John F. Lynch first saw the light of day in St. Francis County, Ark., August 7, 1828, being the son of John and Pollie (Barnes) Lynch, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The father moved to Arkansas in 1817, some time before it was made a State, and saw it rise from an insignificant territory to a community of wealth and affluence in the sisterhood of the Union. His father, a native of North Carolina, was a resident here for many years, dying in his sixty-eighth year; he was the first man buried in the county. John F. (the subject of this sketch) began farming for himself at the age of eighteen, but at the breaking out of the war, laid aside the inoffensive implements of the farm, to take up those that robbed the country of so many of her sons. He enlisted in Company B, Capt. McNeil's regiment, and received his discharge just before the final surrender. Upon his return home he found he had suffered serious losses, in fact everything being gone but his land. Mr. Lynch was married in 1853 to Miss Lizzie Davis, a daughter of Cornelius and Eliza Davis, who came to Arkansas from their native State (Kentucky) in 1828. To his marriage with Miss Davis three children were born: Albert Sidney, Kate and Bessie. Albert is residing with his father; Kate was married in 1882 to Perry Minor, living at Phoenix, Ariz., engaged in the manufacture of ice, and Bessie, the youngest, is attending school at Lebanon, Tenn. Mr. Lynch owns 220 acres, with 150 carefully cultivated, and is also engaged in stock raising. He has amassed quite a large fortune, and is considered one of the representative men of the county, his success not having made him penurious, as is so often the case. He is always ready to assist in worthy enterprises, aiding in many movements having for their aim the growth of the country. The needy ever find in him a sympathetic listener, and many of his acts of charity never reach the ears of the outside world. He has passed his sixty-second year, and his whole life has been one of upright and honorable principles. The respect and esteem accorded him is as wide as his acquaintance. . Death of John C.Lynch=The news of the death of Mr.John C.Lynch, which reached this city yesterday, was most shocking to his large number of friends. He was in town Monday, and seemed as well as usual, though he has almost been an invalid for several years from rheumatism. He was taken sick Tuesday morning with dropsy, and died Wednesday night, May 12,1906. He was fifty nine years of age, a native of Lee county, and died on his father's old homestead. He leaves a wife, and two children, namely Mrs.Custer Fryer and Miss Annie Lynch besides numerous relatives and a host of friends to mourn his loss. John C.Lynch was of sturdy stock, a man of honor, and the highest sense of right. He was a Mason, and lived as near to Masonic teachings as was possible for him to do. He was a friend in need, and always had a kind word for all with whom he came in contact. The remains were interred in the family cemetery yesterday afternoon, Elder W.H.Paslay conducting the funeral services. Peace to his ashes. 5-11-1906 LYNCH CEMETERY
LYON J.L. CROSS CO. USARMY-Mexican War
J. L. Lyon is the son of W. D. and Lydia (Arnold) Lyon, and was one of a family of thirteen children, eight of whom are still living: Elizabeth(wife of J. L. Robinson), P. L. (a resident of St. Francis County), Mattie(wife of G. W. Dallas), Nannie (wife of G. W. Timuel), Catharine, J. F.,J. L., and B. A. J. L. Lyon was born in Mississippi in 1863, and at the age of twenty came to Arkansas with his father. For three years previous to this he had been clerking in a store in Memphis, Tenn. Subsequently he took charge of his father's business for eight years, and in June, 1889, bought the livery stable of J. B. Hamilton, which he has until recently owned and conducted. Mr. Lyon has enjoyed a large and lucrative business,and is one of the representative men of Wynne. W. D. Lyon was a native of Alabama, and upon moving to Mississippi settled in Chickasaw County, where he engaged in farming, there remaining until 1864. During this time he served as sheriff of the county for several years, and later was appointed county clerk to fill an unexpired term. In 1864 Mr. Lyon moved to Shelby County, Tenn., where he was occupied in farming for nineteen years, and in1883 came to Arkansas, locating in St. Francis County. In 1886 he became a resident of Cross County and rented a farm in Searcy Township, where he died in June of the same year, at the age of seventy-five years. Mr. Lyon belonged to the Methodist Episcopal Church. He served in the war with Mexico, and was a member of the A. F. & A. M., and of the I. O. O. F.During the last eight years of his life he was afflicted with blindness.Mrs. Lyon is connected with Old School Presbyterian Church.
MALLORY GEORGE B. CSA-Fifth Arkansas Reg-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1260
FORREST CITY
MALLORY JOHN W. ST.FRANCIS
John W. Mallory was born in Petersburg, Va., in the vicinity of which he resided with his mother until the year 1842, when she moved to Fayette County, Tenn.Leaving home in 1843, when fifteen years old, John went to Memphis, Tenn., and became engaged in clerking in a dry-goods store, continuing at that business until 1849. During his stay in Memphis he enlisted in a company fitting out for service in Mexico, but as their services were not needed it was soon disbanded. In the winter of 1848 he returned to Fayette County and in the January following was married. In 1852, moving to St. Francis County, Ark., he engaged in the mercantile business at Mount Vernon, at that time the county seat. To Mr. Mallory's marriage nine children were born: Etta, Cora, Emmett, Bessie, Eddie, John, Roger, Robert and Neeley. He now resides on his farm where he has made his home for thirty-seven years. He is a Mason, having passed the Blue Lodge to the Chapter, and thence to the Knight Templar degree. He is also a member of the L O. O. F. and K. of H. Mr. Mallory's father was a native of Louisa County, Va. He was of Scotch descent and his mother of French, descended from the Huguenots who fled to America on account of religious persecution. At an early age he moved to Petersburg, Va., and engaged in business, subsequently enlisting in the War of 1812 as a member of the Petersburg Blues, and served in Canada under Gen. William Henry Harrison. He was present at the principal engagements of that war, among others the battle of the Thames, in which the celebrated chief, Tecumseh, was slain, and he was only a short distance from him when he fell. He secured his tomahawk, which is still in the possession of the family. It is a piece of wonderfully unique and grotesquely finished workmanship. After the close of the war he was elected high sheriff of Petersburg, which office he held until his death in 1830. In commemoration of his untiring energy and devotion to his office the city council presented him with a silver cup, bearing the date of his birth, March 10, 1790. It is now in the possession of his son, the subject of this sketch. OBIT:6-24-1910 JOHN W.MALLORY-Veteran Citizen and Knight Templar Passes Away at an Advanced Age-John W.Mallory was born near Petersburg, Va. on March 25,1828. At the age of fourteen years he came west with his father's family, and settled in North Mississippi. There in 1846, he was married to Miss Martha Parham, and to that union nine children were born, six of whom survive him, namely:Mrs.F.Laughinghouse, Mrs.Cora Crews, Mrs.Nelle Buford,Mr.J.E.Mallory, and Mr.Ned Mallory. Two sons, Roger and Robert, and one daughter, Mrs.Lowry Mallory preceded him to the grave. In 1852 he came to Arkansas where he made his home and lived here until his death, which occurred last Saturday, June 18,1910. He united with the Methodist church in early boyhood, and was the Senior Mason in this county, having taken the Knight Templar degree. At his death he was 82 years, 2 months and 24 days. The funeral sermon was delivered by Rev.B.L.Wilford and the remains were followed by a large number of friends and acquaintances of the family to beautiful MT.VERNON,which has been the family burying grounds for half a century or more, and were their interred, the services at the grave being conducted with the beautifully Masonic ceremonies. Dr.H.R.Clark, Worshipful Master of the local lodge officiating, and Rev.Geo.H.Kirker offering the prayer. The following gentlemen were the active pallbearers:Mr.V.B.Izard, Mr.J.F.Stockard, Mr.J.M.Davis, Capt.Jas.Fussell, Mr.Ellis Turley, Mr.M.Isaacs. Honorary pallbearers:Mr.Eugene Williams, Mr.E.A.Rolfe, Mr.R.J.Williams, Mr.H.T.Mallory, Mr.John Eldridge, and Mr.John Gatling. MT.VERNON CEMETERY
MALLORY LOWRY ST.FRANCIS
Lowry Mallory is a native of Alabama, and grew to manhood in his native State, supplementing his primary education by an attendance at Oxford College. Upon leaving school he came to Arkansas, locating on White River, in Jackson County, where he opened up a farm and remained for twelve years, improving his land; but overwork impaired his health, and he was obliged to travel for a few years. Thus were spent all the savings which he had made during that time in seeking restoration to his former condition, and he had only about $50 remaining. He then went to West Point, and was engaged in the real-estate business until 1884, when he entered the employ of the Little Rock Oil Company, and for four years was occupied as general purchasing agent of the company, employed in buying cotton seed. Mr. Mallory's marriage was to Miss Bessie Mallay, who was born in St. Francis County. She died in 1886, leaving three children: Walter E., J. W. and Bessie. William Mallory, the father of our subject, is a Virginian by birth, and moved to Alabama at an early date, being one of the pioneers of that part of the State. He was there married to Miss E. J. Blackwood. He was a son of a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and was of Irish descent.
MANNING WILLIAM ST.FRANCIS USARMY-Thirty-Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry-Civil War
William Manning was born near the city of Cork, Ireland, on August 12, 1835. In 1844 his father and mother emigrated to the United States, and located in Dutchess County, N. Y., the subject of this sketch, with the other children, following in 1845. The family remained in New York, engaged in the nursery business and farming, until 1856, when all moved to Will County, Ill., and settled on a farm. There our subject continued till 1866, the time of his removal to Jasper County, Iowa, where he was engaged in the nursery business until 1874. Selling his nursery, he returned to Illinois, and remained on the homestead until 1876, when he moved to his present location in St. Francis County, Ark. He was married on April 8, 1863, to Miss A. D. Harrah, a native of Pennsylvania. In September, 1861, Mr. Manning enlisted in the band of the Thirty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged in June, 1862, when the band was mustered out of service. While in Illinois he served one term as commissioner of highways, and one year as collector of taxes. In 1888 he was elected representative from St. Francis County on the Fusion ticket. He is a Democrat in politics, but not of the ballot-box stuffing variety. In the legislature he upheld every measure that was in the interest of progress and development, and supported every local temperance measure, and was largely instrumental in securing the passage of the native wine bill. His family consists of seven boys and one girl, ranging in age from four to twenty-five years. Since coming to Arkansas Mr. Manning has been engaged in farming and stock raising, and has been fairly successful.
MARCHBANKS GEORGE-CAPTAIN CSA-CO.K-Twenty-fifth Tennessee-Civil War LEE CO.-page 609
Capt. George Marchbanks, planter, Marianna, Ark. Of that sturdy and independent class, the farmers of Arkansas, none are possessed of more genuine merit and a stronger character than he whose name stands at the head of this sketch. He has risen to a more than ordinary degree of success in his calling, and wherever known, he is conceded to be an energetic and progressive tiller of the soil, imbued with all those qualities of go-ahead-ativeness which have characterized his ancestors. He owes his nativity to Middle Tennessee, where his birth occurred on May 25, 1839, and is the son of Judge A. J. Marchbanks, of Warren County, Tenn. The father was a well-educated gentleman, had read law and was a legal practitioner all his life. [p.609] His father educated him and then disinherited him, and sent him forth to fight his own way in life. He was circuit judge of his district for more than thirty years, and was occupying that position at the breaking out of the war. He was kept a prisoner at Camp Chase, Ohio, during this eventful period, and when peace was declared he was offered the position of judge again. He died in the fall or winter of 1866. The mother was born in McMinnville, Tenn., and was a daughter of George and Elizabeth (Kenion) Savage. She died at the age of twenty-nine years, leaving five children. Capt. George Marchbanks attained his growth in Tennessee, and was sent as a cadet to West Point, to the Federal Military School. He was appointed by old Col. Savage, while the latter was in Congress, and remained at the school until the breaking out of the war. On April 1, 1861, he went South, and entered the Sixteenth Tennessee Regiment as adjutant. He was in the regular Confederate service, commanded a company, and served with the Sixteenth one year as first lieutenant. He was on Gen. Bragg's staff until late in 1862, and commanded Company K, in the Twenty-fifth Tennessee. After the campaign he was on Gen. Johnston's staff for some time, and was also on Gen. Bragg's staff for a year. He was with Maj.-Gen. B. Johnston in Virginia, was at Drury's Bluff and at the siege of Petersburg. After that campaign he was sent with his command up around Richmond, and subsequently to Wheeler's command. Later he came to Tennessee on a furlough, and was captured there, and remained in prison until the close of the war. After this he engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1870, when he came to what was then Phillips (now Lee) County, and there has tilled the soil ever since. He was a member of the legislature in 1881 and 1882. In 1883 he married Mrs. Freeman, whose maiden name was Julia Sterdivant. Mr. Marchbanks is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is the owner of 1,500 acres of land, and is also the owner of considerable town property.
MATHEWS GEORGE J. LEE CO.-page 609
George J. Mathews. Among the enterprising and prospering farmers and stock raisers of Lee County, none are more worthy of mention than George J. Mathews. He is a son of Burel and Piney (Whittaker) Mathews, and was born in Pitt County, N .C., December 24, 1820. Burel Mathews was a native of North Carolina, and followed the occupation of farming all his life. He was married in that State in 1818, to Miss Whittaker, and to their union sir children were born, two now living: George J. and Roderick. Those deceased are: Richard F., William Miza A., Henry and one unnamed. Both Mr. Mathews and wife are dead. George J. Mathews first began to "paddle his own canoe" at the age of eighteen, accepting a position as overseer on a large plantation. He was married in 1841 to Miss Mary Crawford, of Martin County, N. C., who bore him four children, one living: George R. Mary A., P. A., and Elisha are deceased. Mrs. Mathews died in 1858, a member of many years standing in the Methodist Church. Mr. Mathews was married in 1862 to Mrs. Lydia Brooks, the widow of Amsley Brooks. She is a daughter of Franklin and Lydia Maye, of Tennessee, and was born in 1827. To the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Mathews four children have been given: Marietta (the wife of Allen Wall), Kelson O., Epson J. and William F. (deceased). Mr. Mathews immigrated to Arkansas from North Carolina in 1852, settling in St. Francis County. He now owns 160 acres of good land, with 115 improved, the principal crop being corn and cotton. He has actedas marshal of St. Francis County for the past twelve years and has served as justice of the peace for six years. He is a member of the Methodist Church, having joined that denomination over twenty years ago. Politically he is a Democrat. Mrs. Mathews is a Baptist in her religious belief, and belongs to that church.
MATTHEWS W. J. -DR. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Army of Tennesee-Surgeon-Civil War
W. J. Matthews, M. D., a popular physician of Forrest City and a credit to the medical fraternity, was born in Maury County, Tenn., May 28, 1831, being one of eight children born to James W. and S. K. (Dooley) Matthews, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. James W. Matthews was a pioneer of Tennessee, a farmer by occupation, and surveyor of Maury County for many years. He died in his eighty-third year, his wife having gone before in her sixty-fourth year. The paternal grandfather was born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee when James W. was a small boy, dying in Tennessee at a very old age. The maternal grandfather also owed his nativity to Tennessee, and served in some of the Indian wars, and was given the euphonious title of 'Old Capt. Dooley.' The great-grandmother was killed by Indians while holding the grandmother (a baby at the time), and engaged in spinning flax. W. J. Matthews passed his early life in the schools of Maury County, Tenn., afterward becoming enrolled as a pupil of Erskine College, South Carolina, remaining away from home for three years. On the completion of his literary education he returned home and began the study of medicine under A. T. Boyd and J. M. Buldridge of Maury County, Tenn., and after having graduated from the Medical Department of the College at Nashville, Tenn., 1860, went immediately to Taylor's Creek, St. Francis County, Ark. In June, 1861, he entered the Confederate army as a private, this company being commanded by Hon. Poindexter Dunn. After three months Dr. Matthews was promoted to the position of surgeon of the Third Confederate Regiment, and served in that company in the same capacity till the close of the war. Of a company of 100 men from this neighborhood, all [p.485] were unmarried, with the exception of the captain. They were in the Army of the Tennessee, and participated in the hard-fought battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga, Kenesaw Mountain, Ringgold Gap, Golgotha Church, Jonesboro, Franklin and Perryville. Pat. Cleburne was the major-general, and Dr. Matthews was on the field when he met his death. Twenty-one men of the original number (100) returned home, and nine of them are now living. At the close of the war Dr. Matthews resumed his former practice, which he had established a year previous to the war at Taylor's Creek, and though he voted against secession, he went with his State when it seceded. Coming to Forrest City, in 1871, he has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession, and has attained an enviable position, both in social circles and as a competent physician. Dr. Matthews was married in 1866 to Miss Ella Eastham, of Summerville, Tenn., but death claimed her in 1871, she having borne two children, now deceased. His second wife was Mrs. Carrie Prewitt, of Saulsbury, Tenn., and to them one child was born, Lets B. Mrs. Matthews died, and his third and present wife was Miss C. M. Gray. Dr. Matthews is a member of the State Medical Association, secretary of St. Francis County Medical Society, and a member of the A. F. & A. M., I. O. O. F., K. of H., and K. & L. of H. He is also an earnest worker in the Presbyterian Church. -He was married to Mary Ella Eastham on 9 Jan 1866 in Maury County, Tennessee. Mary Ella Eastham was born in 1844 in Tennessee. She died in 1871.He was married to Carrie Prewitt about 1875. Carrie Prewitt was born in 1841 in North Carolina. William J. Matthews and Carrie Prewitt had the following children: 365 i. Leta B. Matthews was born in 1877 in St. Francis County, Arkansas.He was married to C. M. Gray on 23 Dec 1884 in St. Francis County, Arkansas. 1880-FORREST CITY 134 Wm J. MATHEWS Self M M W 49 TN Occ: Doctor Of Medicine Fa: NC Mo: TN- OBIT:FORREST CITY TIMES-SEP.18,1896: TO THE GOOD PEOPLE OF ST.FRANCIS COUNTY-ON LAST FRIDAY EVENING, SEPT.10,1896, THE REMAINS OF ONE OF THE TRUEST AND KINDLIEST OF MEN WAS LAID AWAY IN THE CEMETERY AT FORREST CITY AND WHILE THE LAST SAD RITES WERE PRONOUNCED, WHILE EIGHT OF HIS FELLOW BROTHER TEMPLARS KNELT AROUND THE NEW MADE GRAVE AND WITH CLASPED HANDS REPEATED THE GRAND APPLICATION, "OUR FATHER, WHO ART IN HEAVEN." , IT SEEMED TO ME I HAD NEVER REALIZED THE AWFUL MAJESTY, THE GREAT SOLEMNITY OF DEATH. DR.MATTHEWS WAS INDEED THE GOOD SAMARITAN TO HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE OF ST.FRANCIS COUNTY. AFTER AN ACQUAINTANCE OF THIRTEEN OR FOURTEEN YEARS WITH HIM, I CAN TRULY SAY THAT HE MUST HAVE KNOWN THAT FOR MUCH OF THE SERVICE, NO REWARD WOULD EVER BE RECEIVED BY HIM ON THIS EARTH. MISS NONIE PREWITT AND BROTHER, P.H.PREWITT, ATTENDED THE FUNERAL LAST WEEK OF DR.W.J.MATTHEWS, AND SPENT SEVERAL DAYS WITH FRIENDS. CITY CEMETERY
MAY ARCHIBALD S. ST.FRANCIS
Archibald S. May, a well-known farmer of St. Francis County and numbered among its younger citizens, was born in that county in 1854, being the son of R. A. and L. C. May, natives of North Carolina and Georgia, respectively. With the exception of a few months spent in Texas he has passed his entire life in Arkansas. Mr. May was not fortunate in receiving a liberal education, the advantages at the period of his boyhood being far from satisfactory, but by constant and close application to study of late years he is conversant with many topics of importance of the past and present. He was married in December, 1888, to Miss Mollie Taylor, a daughter of James H. and Lucinda C. Taylor of Arkansas. Mr. May is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and also of the Wheel. His principal business is that of stock raising, and he is a man who stands high in his community-possessing true worth and integrity and being a liberal supporter of all public enterprises. HUGHES CEMETERY
McDANIEL WILLIAM HOWISON ST.FRANCIS CSA-Thirteenth Arkansas Volunteer Infantry-Civil War
The father of this respected citizen, John McDaniel, of Scotch origin, was born near Lexington, Ky., January 25, 1799, but grew to manhood in Virginia, where he married Miss Nancy Calvert, of Welsh descent. Soon after that event they decided to move, the tales related of the rich valley beyond the 'Father of Waters,' inspiring them to seek a home in the then new territory of Arkansas, coming of ancestors who were used to conflicts with the Indians, and the hardships of pioneer life, they did not hesitate to start for this new land of promise. Their trip was made by boat to a point several miles above the mouth of L'Anguille River, where they landed in 1824, and set ashore their worldly goods, consisting of one pony, two cows, and what household goods the pony could haul on a sled, and 12« cents in money. With his family, which then consisted of his wife and two children, and with no guide but the compass, Mr. DcDaniel struck out through the forest and staked off the farm now owned and occupied by the principal of this sketch. At that time there were not more than twelve families within the limits of the present St. Francis County. Upon the breaking out of the war, Mr. McDaniel was worth over $75,000 in lands, negroes and stock, all accumulated in a little over thirty years, in a wild and unsettled country, and upon a start of only one shilling; such a record is marvelous, and shows the latent force and energy, which was lying dormant in the character of John McDaniel when coming to this locality. Mr. McDaniel lived to a ripe old age, and died October 31, 1869, his wife surviving him only four years. She died September 15, 1873, aged seventy-four years and six months. Ten years after their arrival here, January 17, 1834, was born William H. McDaniel, who, together with his brother, John L., are the only survivors of this pioneer family. The early life of William H. was spent on the farm, helping his father clear up the land which he had settled when coming to Arkansas; the outbreak of the war found him still on the old homestead, but with the enthusiasm of a patriot, and the love of his native State burning in his breast, he enlisted in the Thirteenth Arkansas Volunteer Infantry. Entering as a private, his bravery and good conduct were soon rewarded by his being promoted, first to the position of orderly-sergeant, then first lieutenant, and after the battle of Shiloh to the rank of captain. He participated in the battles of Belmont, Shiloh, Richmond and Murfreesboro (where he was wounded and disabled for a short time, also being wounded at Chickamauga) then at Missionary Ridge, and a number of other hard-fought battles, among which was the battle of Atlanta, July 22, 1864. In August, 1864, the Captain was sent west of the Mississippi, to gather up recruits for the service, and while on duty, in October of that year, was captured and taken to Chicago, and then to Johnson's Island, where he was held until the close of the war. Then returning home, he has since been engaged in farming in this county,. with substantial success, and now owns 1,480 acres in one tract, having 900 under cultivation. His principal crop is cotton, and he owns his own cotton-gin and saw-mill, and a supply store to furnish goods for his tenants. On January 24, 1867, Mr. McDaniel married Miss Mollie E. Fondren, of Tennessee. They are the parents of three daughters: Willie, Nannie and Ads. Several years ago Mr. McDaniel moved his family to Forrest City, where he has since lived, and has been a member of the city council for a number of years; also a member of the school board, and at one time was coroner of the county. OBIT:Death of Capt.W.H.McDaniel-The dealings of providence with the beings created by omnipotent power are wonderful, mysterious, and oft-times perplexing. When on last Friday, it became known that the spirit of Capt.W.H.McDaniel had left its frail, enfeebled body, friends remarked on the vitality and strength of constitution which enabled him to battle so many years against the inroads of time. William Howerson McDaniel was born in St.Francis County Jan.17,1834, and died Oct.21, 1904. His love for his native state and county, was shown by his continued residence here during his entire life. When the Civil war began and volunteers were first called he was one of the first to enlist, joining the 13th? Arkansas as a First Lieutenant. At the battle of Shiloh, he replaced his captain lost in battle. He survived the war, being wounded several times at Murfressboro. At Chickamauga, when the smoke had cleared of that great battle, he and his friend, Jesse Hodges stood among the thousands of dead and dying, and being the sole survivors of their company. He chose to return home to enlist more to the cause, when he was captured on this trip, and sent to Johnson's Island where he remained until the end of the war as a prisoner. At the close of the war, he returned home and married Miss Mollie Elender Fondren, of Tennessee, on Jan.24,1867. They were the parents of three children:Mrs.John W.Naylor, Mrs.Sydenham R.Trapp, Jr., and Mrs.Percy H.Barker, all of whom were with him, and ministered to his wants. He was a successful businessman, an interested citizen. The services at the church were simple, Rev.W.H.Paslay officiating, and then the body was laid to rest in the Forrest City cemetery by his Confederate Veteran comrades with the battleflag entwined with crepe over all that was mortal of W.H.McDaniel. 10-28-1904 CITY CEMETERY
McDONALD JAMES P. ST.FRANCIS USARMY-Army-Civil War
James P. McDonald was born in Kingston, Canada, in the year 1830, and is of Scotch-Irish descent. When quite a young man he left the parental roof, engaging in the lumber business, some little distance from home, and afterward worked on the Erie Canal, in 1854 going to sea. He next went to New Orleans, and having commenced boating on the Mississippi, followed that occupation until 1857, only discontinuing to accompany Albert S. Johnston to Salt Lake City.After sojourning in the land of the 'Mormons' for a while the spring of 1859 found him in California. Later he went to Leavenworth, Kas., and from there to Hagerstown, Md., where he accepted the position of wagon master in the Federal service, gaining the approbation of his superior officers for his faithful attention to every detail of his business. In 1864 Mr. McDonald moved to Memphis, Tenn., and remained until 1866, leaving to take up his permanent abode in St. Francis County, Ark. In 1870 he was united in marriage with Mrs. Williams, who died two years later. In 1874 Miss Lucy Halbert became his wife, and by her he had two children, who have since died: Rosie A. and Sallie Baker. Mrs. McDonald closed her eyes to the scenes of this world in 1876, and in 1881 Mr. McDonald was united in matrimony with Mrs. Lane, his present wife. Mrs. McDonald is a very estimable lady, and enjoys the respect of a wide circle of acquaintances and friends. In secret organizations Mr. McDonald is identified with the Masonic order, and is also a member of the Wheel. In politics he votes the union labor ticket, and with his wife attends the Baptist Church, in which they have been members of many years standing. OBIT:3-25-1910 - McDONALD - J. - P. - - - unk - 3 9 1910 - UNKNOWN - Resolutions of Respect=To the Worshipful Master Warden and brethren of Rising Star Lodge No.211, F. A. and M. We, your committee appointed to draft suitable resolution to the memory of our deceased brother, J.P.McDonald, who died the 9th day of March, 1910.Robt.Brown,David Duncan,Henry Hughes, Committee. CEMETERY UNKNOWN
McELROY A.J. CROSS CO. CSA-CO.B-McRae's Regiment-Civil War
A. J. McElroy, served four years in the Confederate service during the late war as a member of Company B, McRae's Regiment, and participated in the battles of Helena, Red River, Prairie Grove and a number of other battles and skirmishes, remaining in the field of duty until the surrender in 1865. Leaving home at age twenty-six he engaged in farming on 160 acres of land which he had bought in this county, and where he still resides. He now has upward of 100 acres under cultivation, with good buildings and good stock. Mr. McElroy was born in Georgia in 1833, as the son of John and Mary (Stephenson) McElroy, natives of South Carolina. Soon after the latter's marriage, he came to Georgia, remaining until 1848, when he moved to Arkansas,settling in this county, where he entered 480 acres of land. Here he lived until his death in 1866, at the age of sixty-eight years. He was four times married. His first wife, Miss Shy, became the mother of one child, now deceased. By his second wife (Miss Belk) he had five children, only one of whom survives: J. C. (of this county). After her death, Mr. McElroy was married to Mary Stephenson, who died in 1859 (continues on page 370)
McELROY J.C. CROSS CO.
J. C. McElroy, the subject of this sketch and prominent in the affairs of his county and known to all as a law-abiding citizen, was born in the State of Georgia in 1827, as the son of John and M. S. (Belk) McElroy). Mr. McElroy was reared on a farm, and removed with his father, John McElroy, to Arkansas in the year of 1848, and the following year married Miss Sara C. Lantroupe.Then settling and adjoining farm to his father, he has since lived there. Mr.McElroy was put on detached duty by the Confederate Government during the war,and had charge of the Government tanyards; also served in the postal service during that conflict. He was justice of the peace for several years, and also acted as a county judge from 1868 till 1874, since which time he has taken no active part in politics. Mr. and Mrs. McElroy are the parents of nine children, three of whom are still living: John W., Sallie (wife of James A. Sadler) and Emmett L. (all residents of this county). Mr. and Mrs. McElroy are strict members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. The former is also a member of the A. F. & A. M. He is one of the prominent farmers of Bedford Township and a highly respected citizen. John W. McElroy, the oldest son, has been county surveyor of Cross County for six years.
McGEHEE THOMAS -CAPTAIN CSA-Sixteenth Alabama Reg-Capt-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1252
NORTHERN ALABAMA
McGOWEN JOSEPH ST.FRANCIS
Joseph McGowen, a native of North Carolina, was left an orphan at the age of seven years, his mother having died in 1836 and his father four years later. He was then bound out to a Mr. Turnage, with whom he remained until his seventeenth year, when he commenced working for himself at common farm labor in Shelby County, Tenn., and in 1852 purchased a farm in Tipton County. He was married November 19, 1854, to Cordelia A. Joyce, a native of Tennessee. They were the parents of thirteen children, seven of whom are still living: William Oliver (born January 15, 1856), Eugenia H. (born September 6, 1857) and Thomas Martin (born April 26, 1862), who are married; Edward G. (born October 1, 1860), Annie Eliza (born January 10, 1867), Mary Frances (born December 25, 1868) and James Taylor (born June 28, 1872). Eugenia H. was married to William Williams March 4, 1875; William Oliver was married to M. J. English December 28, 1881; Thomas Martin was married to Gertrude Tennant December 21, 1887. Mr. McGowen remained in Tipton County until 1878 when he removed to Lee County, Ark., but after one year there, came to St. Francis County, where he still resides. He owns a quarter section of land with all but twenty acres under cultivation. Mr. McGowen has always been an active Democrat, and is a strong advocate of the public school system.
McMURRAY JAMES-CAPTAIN CSA-Army-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1252
LAKE VILLAGE
McPHERSON JOHN A. USARMY-Missouri State Militia-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1308
PERRY CO. MO.
MERIWETHER WILLIAM WINSTON CSA-Army of Tennessee-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1303
TIPTONVILLE, TENN.
MERWIN T. C.- CAPTAIN CSA-Maj. Corley's cavalry-CAPTAIN-Civil War LEE CO.-page 610
T. C. Merwin is a successful general merchant of Marianna, Ark., and is an example of the success attending hard work and honest dealing. He was born in Louisville, Ky., December 25, 1845, and is a son of A. W. and Anna L. (Chartres) Merwin, the former of whom died when our subject was small. He was a carriage dealer in Louisville, and died there in 1852, followed by his wife in 1864, her death occurring in the State of Mississippi. Of six children born to them, four lived to be [p.610] grown, but T. C. Merwin is the only one now living. He and his mother moved to Mississippi in 1860, and were residing near Austin at the time of the latter's death. Mr. Merwin was educated at South Hanover College, Kentucky, and when the war broke out he joined the Confederate forces and was a member of Maj. Corley's cavalry. Shortly after he was discharged on account of physical disability, but about six weeks later he joined another command, the company being raised by Capt. Nall, of Missouri, and with this he remained until the close of the war, serving in the capacity of lieutenant, and operating in Missouri and Arkansas. On October 19, 1864, he and his men were captured by a force of Federals under McNeal, and the following morning one of his men was hanged by McNeal, at Lexington, Mo. They remained captives of war until June 18, 1865. After the war he began farming in Arkansas, and for eleven years continued to till the soil along the Mississippi River. After moving to Marianna he served as collector of taxes for two years, and was then elected circuit court clerk, and ex officio clerk of all other courts, serving by re-election until 1884. In the fall of 1885 he was appointed clerk of the State land office at Little Rock, and was installed in January, 1886, and held the position until November 1, 1889. He then resigned, and returned to Marianna, and opened his present establishment, which is proving a paying investment. He is a Democrat, a Royal Arch Mason, a K. of L., a member of the K. & L. of H., and also belongs to the R. A. He was married December 20, 1874, to Miss Laura Campbell, who was born in Woodford County, Ky., in 1852, and died June 18, 1877, leaving one child, Olie. His second wife was a Miss Emmie Govan, a niece of Gen. D. C. Govan, and a daughter of E. P. Govan, the latter a prominent planter before the war. Mr. Merwin and his present wife have had three children: Mary, Govan (who died in 1844, aged two years) and Willie. The family worship in the Episcopal Church.
MILLER JONAS LEE CO.-page 610
Jonas Miller owns a fine farm of 240 acres in Hampton County, also a steam grist-mill and cotton-gin at Moro, Lee County. He is a native of North Carolina and a son of Moses and Rolly (Cross) Miller, also originally of that State. Mr. and Mrs. Miller made North Carolina their home until 1853, when they removed to Mississippi, and two years later came to Arkansas, locating in Monroe County. The father was a very successful farmer, always having something to sell, and not owing any man, and was well known and highly respected throughout the community until his death, in 1880, twenty-three years after the death of his wife. They were members of the Missionary Baptist Church and had a family of eight children, three still living: Carrie (wife of I. W. Burrows, of Woodruff County), Polly (wife of John Boyer, also of Woodruff County) and Jonas. The subject of this sketch was born in Cape Barrow County on July 15, 1845, and began life for himself as a farmer and miller at the age of twenty. He was married in March, 1873, to Miss Martha E. Breeding, daughter of Wesley and Mary (Brooks) Breeding. They are the parents of eight children, five still living: William, John, Elizabeth, Kate and Cricket. Mr. Miller has about 100 acres under cultivation, in cotton and corn principally, but is now turning his attention to stock raising, and consequently raising more grasses and grain. He has held the office of deputy sheriff and constable, both of which he filled with credit to himself and with per. fect satisfaction to the citizens of the community.
MOORE J.H. CSA-CO.H-Eleventh Mississippi Infantry-Killed At Battle of Gettysburg, Pa.-Civil War LEE CO.-page 611
SEE WILLIAM T.MOORE
MOORE WILLIAM T. CSA-Forty-first Mississippi Infantry-Civil WaR LEE CO.-page 611
William T. Moore, who is well known among the citizens of Richland Township, came originally from Alabama and is a son of Lewis and Willie (Riel) Moore, natives of Georgia and Alabama, respectively. Mr. Moore was of English descent, and moved to Alabama when a young man, where he was married, making that his home until 1838, Removing to Mississippi, he purchased a large plantation in Chickasaw County, and at the time of his death, in 1866, at the age of sixty-two years, was the wealthiest man, but one, in the county. His wife died in 1862, at the age of fifty-two years. She was the mother of eleven children, the following of whom now survive: Elizabeth (wife of B. F. Fitzpatrick, of Mobile, Ala.), John P. (a prominent merchant and real estate dealer, of Helena), Mary Ann (deceased, wife of Dr. J. P. Rockatt, of Mississippi), S. C. (a farmer of Chickasaw [p.611] County, Miss.), C. C. (a farmer and merchant of Houston, Miss.), James B. (a farmer of Pickens County, Ala.), Cora F. (wife of S. C. Pippen, of Helena), Dora (now Mrs. Bass, also of Helena), J. H. (who was killed at the battle of Gettysburg and was captain of Company H of the Eleventh Mississippi Infantry), and William T. (our subject). The latter, the third child of this family, was born in Greene County, Ala., on September 23, 1835; and remained home with his father until a short time before the war, when he commenced farming for himself. In 1862 he enlisted in the Confederate army, in the Forty-first Mississippi Infantry, in which he served until the close of the war, being present at the surrender at Appomattox Court House. After the war he returned to his home in Mississippi and engaged in farming, and in 1878 came to Arkansas, locating in Phillips County, where he was occupied in agricultural pursuits for a short time; subsequently he moved to La Grange. He was married in 1855 to Miss Lucy J. Buckingham, who was born near Okolona, Miss., in 1841. They were the parents of six children, four still living: John T. (who is in the mercantile business with his father), Mary (wife of J. B. Foster, agent and operator at Harper, Mo., for the Iron Mountain Railroad), Lulu B. (wife of Thomas M. Jack, surveyor and civil engineer at Helena), and George C. (at home). Mr. and Mrs. Moore are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, in which they take an active part.
NAIL IRVING R. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry-Johnston's Co.-Civil War
Irving R. Nail owns one of the carefully cultivated farms of St. Francis County, Ark., it consisting of 120 acres, a greater portion of it being under the plow, and the general impression of the observer, is that thrift and prosperity prevail. He owes his success to no one, being thrown on his own resources at the age of thirteen, and though the prospect was not one to encourage one, he never grew despondent, but kept bravely on, with what success is already known. He was born in Tennessee in the year 1825, being the son of Andrew and Lucy, natives of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. Mr. Nail came to St. Francis County in 1838 where he breathed his last a few years later. Irving R. Nail enlisted in the Confederate [p.486] army in 1861 in Johnston's Company, Thirteenth Arkansas Regiment, participating in the battle of Belmont. He was shortly after discharged on account of illness, this ending his war career. He was married in 1863 to Amanda Raney, a daughter of Thomas and Jane Raney. The result of this union was four children: Martha J., William R., Dorinda and John C. Mrs. Nail died in August, 1877, and Mr. Nail remained a widower until January, 1881, when he took for his second wife Miss Nancy Cobb, whose father, W. M. Cobb, immigrated from South Carolina to Arkansas in 1855, having been born in 1825. Mr. and Mrs. Nail are members in high standing of the Baptist Church, to which the former lends his hearty support and influence. He is a Democrat politically. Horton-Obituary-Died on May 18,1899, at his home in this vicinity, after a long and tedious illness, Mr.Earl Nail, aged 73 years. Was born in Tennessee. Came to this county when very young and has resided here most of his life. Was laid to rest in the Barney Shaw (probably Barnishaw). He leaves to mourn him two sons, who found him a loving father and numerous friends who regret the loss of a Christian gentleman and true friend. For the past thirty three years he had been a consistent member of Bible Union church. While we tender our sincere sympathy to the bereaved family, we will say, grieve not, for Christ will claim his own at the appointed time. We can only find consolation by putting our trust in the Lord, Who giveth and Who taketh, but doeth all things well. A Friend. Shown as Alexander Irvin Nail on FindAGrave site and birthdate as Sep.20,1825.5-26-1899 BARNISHAW CEMETERY
NEW JAMES H. USARMY-First Mississippi Mounted Riflemen-NCO-Civil War LEE CO.-page 611
James H. New traces his ancestry back to Revolutionary times, his grandfather, William New, having been a soldier in that war, in which he served as a member of Marion's famous legion. The great-grandsire, William New, came to this country in 1763, settling on the Chickasaw River, in Virginia. He had two sons, John and William. William and his two sons were also in the Revolutionary War, the former being colonel of Lee's dragoons. He was wounded on Roanoke River, while pursuing Lord Cornwallis, and died from the effects of that injury. William, pare, was in the War of 1812, and his two sons, John and William, were in the battle near Baltimore, Md. James H is also a descendant, on his mother's side, of Jesse Lee. His parents were James and Mary M. (Blankenship) New, Virginians by birth. James New, Sr., was born in Halifax County, on July 4, 1805, and was of English and Irish extraction, He was married in November, 1833, shortly after which he removed to Georgia, and remained one year, then going to Lauderdale County, Miss., where he lived until his death, on September 7, 1864. They were the parents of four children: Saleta A. (wife of John H. Anderson, of Illinois), Mary M. (widow of Irvin McRovy), John R. (a farmer of Lee County) and James H. (our subject). The latter, the next to the eldest, was born in Landerdale County, Miss., on August 14, 1839. He commenced farming for himself at the age of twenty-two, and in 1869 came to Arkansas, and located on his present farm, which was then in Phillips County (now in Lee), composed of 160 acres of land, seventy acres being under a good state of cultivation. Mr. New was married in August, 1865, to Emily Clayton, also a native of Mississippi, who died in December, 1884, after having borne tan children, air still living: William U., Pattie L. (wife of J. A. Smith, a farmer of this county), James J., John R., Rebecca C. and Walter T. Mr. New enlistedin the secret service of the United States, in November, 1862, and was a member and non-commissioned officer of the First Mississippi Mounted Riflemen. He served until the close of the war, participating in the battles of Chickasaw Bluff, Harrisburg, and a number of others. He is a conservative Democrat, and a member of the Agricultural Wheel and Farmer's Secret Alliance. He is also ruling elder in the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, of which he has been a member eighteen years.
NEW WILLIAM USARMY-REVOLUTIONARY WAR LEE CO.-page 611
SEE JAMES H.NEW
OBENCHAIN L.K. -REV LEE CO.-page 612
Rev. L. K. Obenchain, pastor of the Baptist Church of Haynes, was born in Botetourt County, Va., on January 23, 1841, being a son of Peter M. Obenchain, also of that county, and of German descent. He was reared on a farm in his native county, and received a good education in the common schools, later attending Roanoke College, and also Alleghany College, in Greenbrier County, Va. He was first located, after entering the ministry, in [p.612] the mountains of Rock Bridge County, having been ordained at Mill Creek Church, where he remained three years. Coming to Arkansas in 1869, he was occupied in preaching at Phillips Bayou, and also taught school for three years, the following three years serving at Forrest Chapel. He next had charge of the Salem Church, of Phillips County, and of the churches at Marvel, Barton and Trenton for seven years. Mr. Obenchain later moved to La Grange, and had charge of that church, and also of the one at Phillips Bayou, where he had before been located. He came to Haynes, in January, 1888, and has since resided here, being the pastor of the Baptist Church at this place, and also at Oak Grove. He was married on the second Sunday of June, 1862, to Miss Sarah A. Baker, a daughter of Henry Baker, of Botetourt County, Va. They became the parents of five children, three of whom are still living: Bettie (wife of W. H. Ward, of Marvel), Edward B. and Ella D. Mr. Obenchain is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of the Masonic order, and of the Knights of Honor. His life has been devoted to the service of his Master, and no man in the county is more highly respected or honored, and by the purity of his life, and the example he sets, he is well worthy the confidence and respect which are placed in him.
OTEY C.A. CSA-Fourth Alabama Infantry-Johnston's Division -Bee'S Brigade-Civil War LEE CO.-page 613
C. A. Otey, attorney-at-law of Marianna, is a native of Madison County, Ala., and spent his early boyhood days in the southern part of the State, but the death of his father necessitated his return to his native county, where he remained for some time, while preparing himself for entering the military school at La Grange. He attended that institution only a short time, as the Civil War broke out shortly after his entering college, when he immediately joined the Confederate army, enlisting in the Fourth Alabama Infantry, which was attached to Johnston's division of Confederate States troops and Bee's brigade. The Fourth Alabama distinguished themselves at the first general engagement, but it is to be regretted that they lost their gallant commander, Col. Jones, who sacraficed his own life as well as many of his command to save the day. Gen. Bee, after Jones had fallen, [p.613] came up, and saying, "Fourth Alabama! I have seen your gallant fighting from yonder hill, and your ranks mowed thin while you held your position against fourfold odds! Follow me; Jackson has arrived, and he stands like. a `stone wall.' Let us go to his relief." So Jackson received the immortal soubriquet of Stonewall, while Bee was leading the Fourth Alabama in that charge, and he who knighted him, the immortal Bee, fell shot through the heart a few moments afterward. The Fourth Alabama erected a monument on the spot. The false accusation that Gen. Bee was intoxicated, which was the cause of his reckless bravery, is explained by our subject by the fact that he was seen to drink repeatedly from a flask during the engagement, but which he knows contained water, as he himself filled it for him at a spring. Mr. Otey was wounded at the battle of Gaines' Mill by a bullet, breaking his arm, which laid him up for about three months; rejoining his regiment at the battle of Antietam, he was captured at the battle of Lookout Mountain, and was a prisoner for one year, before being exchanged. At the close of the war he came to Arkansas and located at Helena, wherehe commenced the study of law, and was admitted to the bar in 1871, and later admitted to practice law efore the Supreme Court. He then commenced the practice of law at Helena, and was shortly after elected prosecuting attorney, having filled the office of city attorney two terms. He was editor of a daily and weekly newspaper during two campaigns, from 1874 to 1879, and was in the legislature in 1887. Having become largely interested in real estate in this county, he moved to Marianna in 1883, where he has since lived. He now owns 4,000 acres of land, including a large plantation, on which is situated a general, supply store, a saw-mill and steam cotton-gin, all under his general supervision. Mr. Otey was a son of Christopher and Emily (Smith) Otey, natives of Virginia and North Carolina, respectively. He was arried in the State of Arkansas to Miss Kate McAnulty, a native of this county. Mr. Otey is well known and highly spoken of by all who are acquainted with him.
OWEN R.B. CSA-CO.C-Sixth Mississippi Infantry-NCO-Civil War LEE CO.-page 612
R. B. Owen, a prosperous farmer of Richland Township, Lee County, is a native of Alabama, and was born in 1833, being the fifth in a family of nine children given to Richardson and Tobitha (Allin) Owen. Their names are as follows: Tobitha, Henry R., Edward T., Sarah H., R. B., Mary F., Susan E., Anna E. and Thomas Grant. Richardson Owen was born in North Carolina in 1790, and in 1820 was married to Tobitha, a daughter of Grant Alien, of Tennessee. Mr. Owen afterward settled in Alabama, where he engaged in farming, and was also a minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church and a doctor, having practiced medicine for some years previous to his death. Coming to Arkansas in 1851, he settled in Lee County, Richland Township, where he purchased 500 acres of valuable land. He was a public-spirited and progressive man, lending his support and influence to all public enterprises. In polities he was an old line Whig. R. B. Owen moved to Arkansas with his parents, and in 1862 enlisted in Capt, Anderson's company of Johnson regiment. He was soon after exchanged to Company C, Sixth Mississippi Infantry, and was a non-commissioned officer, serving as an ordnance-sergeant. He participated in the battles of Prairie Grove, Helena, Jenkins' Ferry and many others of minor importance. After the war Mr. Owen returned to Arkansas, settling in Lee County and resuming his occupation of farming, where he has since remained. He owns 310 acres of land, with 200 under cultivation. He was married in 1860 to Martha E. Sellers, a daughter of William B. and Mahala J. (Estes) Sellers, natives of Tennessee, but who immigrated to Mississippi, and then to Arkansas in 1847, settling in Lee County. Mr. Sellers died in 1858, and his wife in 1868. They were the parents of five children: William, Martha, Mary, Vianna and one deceased in infancy. To Mr. Owen's marriage five children have been born: Virginia D. (died in 1861), Helena (now Mrs. Walter Rainey, residing in Mississippi), Leila A., Mattie M. and an infant. In secret organizations Mr. Owen is identified with the Knights of Honor. He takes a great interest in all public improvements, and is especially interested in schools, in which he can see vast advancement and progress.
PAINE FRANCIS M.- REV/DR. CSA-Army-Surgeon-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1222
CLARKSVILLE
PARNELL DANIEL CSA-Jeff Davis Artillery-Died on way home from prison-Civil War LEE CO.-page 614
SEE J.H.PARNELL
PARNELL ELIJAH CSA-Hood"s Infantry-Killed at Chickamauga-Civil War LEE CO.-page 614
SEE J.H.PARNELL
PARNELL HENRY CSA-Nathan Bedford Forrest's Army-Died from Measles on fulough-Civil War LEE CO.-page 614
SEE J.H.PARNELL
PARNELL J.H. LEE CO.-page 614
J. H. Parnell, of Marianna, Ark., was born in Southern Alabama, July 4, 1837, and is a son of John and Temperance Jane (Avery) Parnell, the former having been born in Putnam County, Ga., in 1806, and died in February, 1889, a farmer by occupation. He was a Whig in politics, was strongly opposed to secession, and served for some time in the capacity of magistrate. At the time of his death he weighed 225 pounds. His wife was born in South Carolina, and when young was taken to Alabama, where she grew to womanhood and met and married Mr. Parnell. She died about 1850, having borne a family of sixteen children, only the four oldest and the four youngest being now alive. Five sons were in the Confederate army, M. W. Parnell being a lieutenant under Gen. Price; Thomas J. was in the cavalry under Hood, Elijah being under Hood in the infantry, and was killed at Chickamauga; Daniel was in Jeff Davis's artillery and fired the last cannon at the battle of Bull Run, was taken prisoner to Elmira, N. Y., and after being paroled, died on his way home, his death being caused by exposure. Henry was in Forrest's army, and after procuring a furlough, came home, where he died of measles. All the brothers-in-law returned safe from the war. J. H. Parnell grew to manhood near Selma, Ala., and in his youth acquired a good English education. He farmed until the close of the war, then engaged in merchandising at Jacksonville, where he remained until 1869, when he immigrated to Osceola, Miss., and followed the same occupation there until 1882, at which time he came to Marianna, and until recently was a merchant there also. For the last six months he has been occupied in the hotel business, which is proving fairly remunerative. He owns some good property in thecity and sixty acres of farming land, which is said to be quite valuable. Mr. Parnell is a Democrat, a Mason and a member of the A. O. U. W. His wife, who was Miss Mollie Rigney, was born in Marianna, Ark., in 1868, and is a daughter of Hy. and Cynthia (Webb) Rigney, who were former residents of Huntsville, Ala., the father a Confederate soldier during the Civil War. The paternal great-grandfather of Mr. Parnell was born in England, and came to America many years prior to the American Revolution, his son, the [p.614] grandfather of our subject participating in that struggle.
PARNELL M.W. CSA-Gen.Price-Lt.-Civil War LEE CO.-page 614
SEE J.H.PARNELL
PARNELL THOMAS J. CSA-Hood"s Cavalry--Civil War LEE CO.-page 614
SEE J.H.PARNELL
PARROTT JOHN ST.FRANCIS USARMY-War of 1812
SEE JOHN M.PARROTT
PARROTT JOHN M. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Army-Civil War
John M. Parrott, a retired lawyer of Forrest City, is native of Tennessee. His father, John Parrott, moved to that State at a very early day in its history, where he engaged in the saddlery business, serving as a soldier in the War of 1812. He died in 1845, his wife surviving him twenty years. They were the parents of a large family, of whom John M., our subject, who was born in Jefferson County, Tenn., in October, 1814, is the only survivor. He lived at his native town, Dandridge, attending the academy at that place, until seventeen years of age, when his father moved upon a farm in the vicinity. In 1836 he commenced life for himself at Blountsville, Ala., going into the mercantile business, and three years later came to St. Francis County, continuing the same business at Madison. In 1840 he was appointed deputy clerk by Isaac Mitchel, then clerk of the St. Francis circuit court, and in 1842 was elected circuit clerk, which office he filled with such satisfaction to the citizens that he was made his own successor for fourteen years in succession; during this time he applied himself closely to the study of law, and in 1856 he was admitted to the bar and commenced practicing, which he followed until within a few years, when be retired from active professional life. In 1864 Mr. Parrott was elected to the legislature, but did not serve the term, owing to the fact of there being no session that year. In 1874 he was delegate to the constitutional convention. He was a candidate for nomination for the office of auditor of State in 1876, but was beaten by John Crawford. During the war he entered the Confederate service and acted as assistant adjutant, though being in no engagements. Mr. Parrott has been twice married; first, in 1841, to Rhoda Johnson, who died in 1858. His second union, in 1859, was to Mrs. Johnson (nee Witter). They are the parents of six children, three of whom are still living: Kate C. (now Mrs. Martin), Ida Lee (now Mrs. Miller) and Mattie A., all residing in this county. Mr. Parrott has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for the past forty-five years. He is also connected with the Masonic order. OBIT: It is with the feeling of great sorrow that the Times chronicles the death of Judge John P.Parrott. which sad event occurred at his home, five miles north of the city, on Monday, March 23rd, 1896, in the eighty second year of his age. He was buried in the family cemetery, near Andrew's Landing, on the following day, under the auspices of the F.& A. Masons. Judge Parrott settled in this county in 1835, having moved from Knoxville, Tenn. He represented the county in the only two constitutional conventions held by our state, and held the office of circuit court clerk for fourteen years., and served as County and Probate Judge for one term. There never lived a purer or more honored citizen in this county, and to his last day on earth wore his crown of labor, love, and forebearance meekly, submitting to his long suffering with resignation and courage to the last. May the rising generation imitate his noble life, and that in death they too may be prepared to go in peace. Judge Parrott was a member of the Bar of Eastern Arkansas, and highly esteemed by all the courts. The service was officiated by Dr.H.P.Dooley and Gen.Geo.P.Taylor, in a sweetly impressive manner. He was a charter member of the W.M.W. and brethren of the Rising Star Lodge, and was the first Secretary of the lodge.-3-27-1896 CITY CEMETERY
PARTEE A.Y. CSA-Army Artillery Battalion-Battle of Vicksburg-Commander-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1240
MEMPHIS
PARTEE ARK YOUNG CSA-Army-With Seven Sons-Civil War-SON HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1240
LITTLE ROCK
PARTEE CHARLES WATKINS CSA-Army-With Seven Sons-Civil War-SON HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1240
LITTLE ROCK
PARTEE HIRAM CSA-Army-With Seven Sons-Civil War-SON HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1240
LITTLE ROCK
PARTEE POLK CSA-Army-With Seven Sons-Civil War-SON HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1240
LITTLE ROCK
PARTEE REUBEN DOUGLAS- CAPTAIN CSA-Army-With Seven Sons-Civil War (FATHER) HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1240
LITTLE ROCK
PARTEE REUBEN DOUGLAS JR. CSA-Army-With Seven Sons-Civil War-SON HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1240
LITTLE ROCK
PARTEE S.BOONE-CAPTAIN CSA-Army-With Seven Sons-Civil War-SON HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1240
LITTLE ROCK
PARTEE WILLIAM ABNER CSA-Army-With Seven Sons-Civil War-SON HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1240
LITTLE ROCK
PASLAY W.H. -REV. ST.FRANCIS
Rev. W. H. Paslay, prominently associated with the Baptist Church of Forrest City, first saw the light of day in South Carolina, December 18, 1831, being the son of H. W. and Mary (Wright) Paslay, born in South Carolina, in 1803 and 1802, respectively. H. W. Paslay was a graduate from the Medical Institute of Charleston, and also a minister of the Baptist Church. He was recognized as a gentleman of unusual attainments, both in his practice of medicine, and as a minister of the Gospel. He immigrated to Arkansas in 1857, where his death occurred in 1872. To himself and wife a family of eight children were born. The mother of Mr. Paslay closed her eyes to the scenes of this world in 1873. W. H. Paslay received his education in the schools of his native State, afterward taking a full course in the well-known Furman University of South Carolina, graduating therefrom in the year 1855. He then taught school for several years, and was ordained in Alabama, where for fifteen years he was engaged in preaching and teaching. Coming to Arkansas in the fall of 1872, he located in Monroe County, and has endeared himself to many friends and acquaintances by his conscientious and faithful work in the church, as well as by his efficient discharge of the manifold duties of teacher in the schools. He has been occupied in preaching (as at present) in St. Francis, Lee, Monroe and Phillips Counties, his work covering a period of over thirty-one years. During the Civil War he was prevailed upon by many soldiers, who went into active service, to remain at home to look [p.487] after their families, they feeling that his watchful care would keep them from all harm, so his work in the war covered only a short time. Mr. Paslay was first married to Miss Geraldine Rupum, of Alabama, who left four daughters, viz.: Mary Tula, Ora Lana, Alna Mona and Etta Leta. He was next married to Miss Julia Prince of Alabama, who died leaving one child, Estelle. His third and present wife was formerly Miss Ann Dozier of Jasper County, Ga., and by her he became the father of three sons; W. H., Woode D. and Rob E. Mr. Paslay in connection with his many other duties, carefully cultivates a farm of 320 acres of valuable land. He is a Mason in the Blue Lodge and Chapter, and also a Knight of Honor. OBIT: 2-10-1911 DEATH=REV.W.H.PASLAY=The Forrest City Times, Feb. 10, 1911. DEATH OF ELDER PASLAY. Venerable Reverend Passes Away Sunday Afternoon After Long Illiness. The death last Sunday afternoon at his home in this city of Elder. W. H. Paslay marks not only the passing of an able, earnest disciple of the Creator, but the one of the old landmarks of St. Francis county and of Forrest City. Another beloved citizen has gone to his reward, The voice of an able churchman is stilled, and in the hearts of countless congregations of those who in years gone by have listened to him as he expounded the gospel, as it was given to him to preach, a feeling of an expressible sadness comes, and in all of our city there was not a heart but quickened with pain and many eyes, but held a tear, when the sad tidings flew, as sad tidings always do, on Sunday afternoon, of the death of that venerable partriarch, who for so many years had faithfully served this people, and though his death was not unexpected, yet none the less were the tidings sad, and . . . less the tears that flowed. Elder W. H. Paslay was born in Laurens county, South Carolina, on December 18, 1831. His father was a Baptist minister and a physician of note. After receiving an academic course in the different branches of studies, he entered Furman University, in Greenville, S. C., and graduated with first honors from that unstitution. After this he moved to Dallas county, Alabama, where he taught school. In 1858 he entered the ministry, in which he has since been actively engaged. Mr. Paslay came to Arkansas in 1872, and located on a farm near Wheatley. He has been married three times, and has now living three sons and three daughters, as follows: Mr. H. W. Paslay, of this city; Messrs. R. E. and Willie Paslay, of Oregon; Mrs. J. T. Johnson and Mrs. Murray Hambleton, of ;this city, and Mrs. C. H. Paslay, of Memphis. Elder Paslay was greatly honored by his denomination, being elected Treasurer and Moderator of Mt. Vernon Association consecutively for the last thirty years. He held the position of County Examiner for several years, and was closely identified with the educational interests of this state and county. He was also a member of the Masonic fraternity, having taken the degrees of the Commandery, and was ever ready to put into practice the honorable tenants of this illustrious fraternity, dispensing light in darkness, joy in sorrow, and sustenance to the needy. Elder Paslay had been in feeble health for a number of years, but only recently would he consent to give up the work he had so long and faithfully performed. He had been confined to his room and bed for over twelve months, and though all that medical skill, and the loving care and attention of a devoted family could do, was done to prolong his life, all efforts wre unavailing, and the gentle spirit passed to the Maker, whose disciple he had been through all the years of his maturity, and ". nls" was written in the story of a life well spent - a life that was not lived in vain. In his daily CITY CEMETERY
PEARSON EVERETT ST.FRANCIS CSA-Sixth Mississippi Regiment-Died in Service-Civil War
SEE GEORGE W.PEARSON
PEARSON GEORGE W. ST.FRANCIS
G. W. Pearson, deputy circuit and county clerk of St. Francis County, was born in Mississippi December 25, 1830, being the third in a family of nine children born to John A. and Nancy (Nichols) Pearson. They were natives of North Carolina (near Fair Bluff), and married there, moving to Southern Mississippi in 1829. At the date of their deaths they lived near Brandon, Miss. John A. Pearson was a Methodist Episcopal minister, and had preached from the earliest recollections of his son until his death, in 1842. Of their large family of children, G. W. is the only one now living. Everett died at Nashville, Tenn., in the Confederate army, in the Sixth Mississippi Regiment; John was waylaid and shot by a negro; the sisters married and all died after the war. G. W. has in his possession a cane which was made by his grandfather (a native of North Carolina) when a young man. He was a carpenter and natural mechanic, and died in his seventy-third year. G. W. Pearson received his education in the schools of Mississippi, and selected farming as his occupation, in which he was actively engaged until coming to Arkansas, in 1872. He was married in Mississippi to M. A. Taylor, and their union was blessed by two children: William Atkins and Annie Everett. Mr. Pearson owns a residence in town. He was agent for the Memphis & Little Rock Railroad for nine years, subsequently being appointed magistrate, and has been filling the position of deputy county clerk since May, 1889, discharging the duties of his office in a highly creditable manner. The grandfather of Mr. Pearson and two brothers were taken captives by Indians and carried far back into the interior of the country, after which the savages held a council to determine the best way to dispose of their captives. The brothers were lashed to the ground to await their terrible death, but an Indian maiden became enamored of one of them-a very handsome man-and went to his relief, cutting the lashes that bound him, and telling him at the same time to flee for his life, which injunction he was not slow to follow. He released his brothers, and after running nearly all night, they crawled into a large log, whose capacity was sufficient to hold them all. The Indians followed in hot pursuit, and were close upon them when a herd of deer crossed their path, thereby destroying the trail. The redskins gave up the chase, and actually seated themselves on the log in which the brothers were secreted, and in which they remained until night. They had been without food for three days, and when an opossum crossed their path they killed and devoured it without waiting to have it broiled, their intense hunger making them forget that it was raw. They made their way to a white settlement, and then on to their old home, where they were welcomed by their relatives and friends, who had despaired of ever seeing them again. Mr. Pearson has not been particularly fortunate in amassing property, but he and his honored wife enjoy that which is of far more consequence-an unsullied name and the sincere love of a host of friends. He is a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, his wife also being connected with the same church. OBIT:DEATH OF GEO.W.PEARSON=Passes away peacefully after long illness, at advanced age. Was Efficient Recorder. "Mr.George W.Pearson, died on Tuesday, Dec.5,1905," The funeral was on the following day, Elder J.A.McCord presiding over the religious ceremonies. The hand of disease was laid on Mr.Pearson almost a year ago, and although a sufferer for so long, he continued to take an active interest in the affairs of this life, discharging his business duties until the last day. On Friday previous, he worked on the books as Recorder, trying to leave them in order. The disease, although not painful, was very wasting in its effects, and in spite of a strong constitution and a determined will, the brave man was compelled to take to his bed, but not until a day or two before the end. The services at the church were edifying and comforting, and the Masonic ritual at the cemetery impressive. Mr.Pearson had lived in Forrest City for many years, and ever in his business relations was found just and robust, and in social and religious activities, kind, true, reliable and faithful. To his wife and children, a tower of strength, to his fatherless sister-in-law, a father and friend. CITY CEMETERY
PEEVEY ROBERT W. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Colonel Robinson's Regiment-Major-Civil War
Hon. R. W. Peevey, farmer, stock raiser, and one of the prominent old settlers of St. Francis County, owes his nativity to Alabama, being a son of W. H. and J. A. (Childers) Peevey, originally from Georgia and Tennessee, respectively, and of Irish descent. The parental grandparents of our subject came to this country shortly after the Revolutionary War. R. W. Peevey was born January 8, 1827, and was the fourth son in a family of seven children. He spent his boyhood [p.488] days on his father's farm, and before his twentieth birthday was married to Miss Nellie A. Collier, who died in 1850, leaving three children, two still living: James J. and Emma J. (wife of W. H. Fogg), both in this county. In 1862 Mr. Peevey enlisted in the Confederate army and served in Col. Robinson's regiment, being elected captain of his company at starting out, and in May, 1863, he was promoted to major. He participated in the battles of Vicksburg, Baton Rouge, Corinth and a number of others. After the war he engaged in farming in Madison County, Ala., until 1873, when he came to Arkansas and located in St. Francis County, where he bought his present farm. In October, 1859, he married Miss Louisa Curry. She died in August, 1878, having borne seven children, and of these four survive: Thomas Elbert, Robert H., William H. and Luther B. Mr. Peevey married his third wife, Mary J. Dew, in January, 1880. He is a prominent Democrat, and has ably served his county in the State legislature, to which he was elected in 1876. He also held the office of justice of the peace for several terms, and is still filling that position. A member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, he is also connected with the Masonic fraternity. OBIT: Capt.R.W.Peevey died at his home near Newcastle, in Johnson township, Wednesday night, Aug.22,1906, of old age and general debility. He was in his 80th year, and had lived in this county since 1871, coming from Alabama. He represented the county in the legislature for one term, and for many years was one of the staunchest and hardest working democrats in the State. He was a good man and honest, and besides his family, consisting of a wife and four sons, viz.:Jim, Hall, Luther, and Will, and a sister, Mrs.Baxter, formerly of this city, leaves many sorrowing friends. He was a Mason, Knight of Honor, member of Camp 923 United Confederate Veterans, and a member of the Methodist church, being a leader in the Sunday school work of his neighborhood for many years. His remains were interred in the Loughridge cemetery yesterday afternoon, under auspices of Rising Star Lodge. Peace to his soul. LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY
PHILLIPS ANDERSON CROSS CO. USARMY-Civil War
Anderson Phillips, one of the prominent colored farmers in Searcy Township, was born a slave of David H. Walker, of Carroll County, Mo., in1843. His father, Carter Phillips, died in 1889. His mother at last accounts was in Nebraska. Mr. Walker had crossed the plains with his slaves, and left the mother of our subject in the West, and she never returned. After the Emancipation Proclamation, Anderson Phillips came north and joined the Federal army, and served until October, 1865, when he received his discharge, then coming to Phillips County, Ark., where he remained seven years. In 1874 he bought his present property, consisting of 240 acres in Cross County. He first purchased 660 acres, but has given a portion to his children, and now has 180 acres under cultivation. Mr. Phillips was married first in 1866 to Charlotte Smith, who died in 1874, leaving three children: G. A., James H. and Glenn A. (wife of Jeff Ham, a resident of this county). His second marriage was to Alice Ham (who was killed in a railroad accident in 1879). They became the parents of four children, all of whom are deceased. Mr. Phillips' present wife was formerly Martha E. Davis, whom he married in 1880. They have one boy,Anderson. Mr. and Mrs. Phillips are members of the Independent Order of the Immaculate, and are connected with the Baptist Church. The former is a strong Republican, and takes an active part in politics, having held the office of coroner of the county two times.
PHILLIPS THOMAS G. CSA-CO.G-Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry-Civil War LEE CO.-page 614
Thomas G. Phillips, mayor of Haynes, came to Arkansas in 1855, and located in Lee County, where he was engaged in farming until the war. He enlisted in August, 1861, in the Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry, being appointed orderly sergeant of Company G, and participated in the battles of Belmont, Shiloh (where he was slightly wounded), Murfreesboro, Liberty Gap, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, and all of the principal battles of the Georgia campaign. He was severely wounded at Atlanta, was afterward elected second lieutenant, and rejoined his regiment just before the surrender. After the war Mr. Phillips returned to his farm, which he had purchased previous to entering the army, consisting of 327 acres of land. In 1879 he entered into the mercantile business. He carries a stock of goods invoicing about $2,500, and his annual sales will amount to $8,000 per year. He also owns the farm purchased before the war and, too, other property, in all 767 acres, with nearly 100 acres under cultivation. He has been twice married; first, to Miss Antonette Hustus, who died in 1879, leaving two children: Mollie (deceased) and Emma M. (still living). His second marriage was in 1885 to Mrs. Thompson, who died in 1887. Mr. Phillips was born in Indiana, May 21, 1832, as a son of Joseph and Sallie Phillips, natives of North Carolina and Ohio, respectively. They were the parents of eight children, all of whom survive and five of them are residents of Arkansas. Mr. Thomas Phillips is a strong Democrat. He has held the office of justice of the peace of his township, and on the incorporation of Haynes, was elected mayor, which office he still holds. He is a member of the Masonic order, and of the Knights of Honor, and belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South.
PITTMAN GEORGE W. LEE CO.-page 614
George W. Pittman. Of that sturdy and independent class, the farmers of Arkansas, none are possessed of more sterling principles than he whose name heads this sketch, and as a merchant he has not his superior in the county as far as intelligent management, honesty of purpose and energy are concerned. He is a Georgian, born February 16, 1849, and is a son of James R. Pittman, also of that State, who was born, reared and married there, the last event being to Miss Bettie A. Nash. Of a family of ten children given to them, five are now living: John C., James G., Jesse W., Mary J. (wife of Thomas J. Pinkston and the mother of seven children) and Mattie B. (who is the wife of A. S. Sears and is the mother of four children). Mr. Pittman was a farmer by occupation, and in this calling became quite wealthy, being the owner of 1,700 acres of valuable and productive land at the time of his death, which occurred in 1868. He was always interested in the local politics of the community in which he resided, and also furthered the building of churches and schools with his purse as well as by his influence, and was ever considered one of the leading and public-spirited men of the county. His wife's death followed his, January 12, 1887, she having been an earnest Christian lady and a member of the Baptist Church. George W. Pittman, our immediate biographical subject, inherits English blood from his mother, and his early education was received in the schools near Georgetown, Ga. In 1874 he immigrated to Mississippi, and at the end of two years went to Louisiana, a year later returning to Mississippi. Since May, 1882, he has been a resident of Arkansas, and has successfully followed the occupations of farming and merchandising, and where he was then worth $800, he is now worth ten times as much.
PORTER JOSEPH C.- BRIG.GEN. CSA-Gen.Armaduke-Wounded and Died at Battle of Hartsville,MO.Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1270
STUTTGART
PREWETT FRANK E. ST.FRANCIS
George C. and Frank E. Prewitt are now prominent young farmers of this county, though natives of Missouri. They removed to St. Francis County, Ark., in 1886, and settled on the St. Francis River, a section noted for its fertility and productiveness. Their father, Joseph E. Prewitt, was a native of Scott County, Ky., where he was reared and married, Miss Naomi M. Nash, a native of Covington, Ky., becoming his wife. She was a daughter of William and Elizabeth Nash, and died in 1879, leaving six children: Robert C. (M. D.), William L. (a teacher in Missouri), Bettie A. (wife of George W. Watts), George C. and Frank E., and Mattie C. (now Mrs. Clifford, of Missouri). Mr. Prewitt died in 1874 at the age of sixty-five. George C. Prewitt was born on May 20, 1850, and received a good education, being instructed in the rudiments of farm work by his father, who was an agriculturist of advanced ideas. At the age of twenty he commenced farming for himself. Frank E. was born in Pike County, Mo., June 18, 1859, and started out in life as a tiller of the soil at the age of nineteen, in 1886 becoming associated with his brother George. They are industrious and enterprising young farmers, and are turning their attention to that most lucrative branch of agricultural pursuits, as well as that most beneficial to the community, the breeding of fine stock, in which they will undoubtedly make a decided success. They are Democrats in politics and liberal donators to all charitable and worthy enterprises. MT.VERNON CEMETERY
PREWETT FRANK M. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Capt.Mallory's Company-Captain-Civil War/USARMY-MEXICAN WAR
Frank M. Prewett, one of the oldest and most respected merchants of Forrest City, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., November 4, 1827, and at the age of sixteen went to Texas and volunteered in the Mexican War, under Capt. James Arnold and Col. Albert Sidney Johnston. He participated in the battles of Monterey and Buena Vista, receiving an honorable discharge at the end of two years. On his way home he stopped at Mount Vernon, and then and there became ensnared in cupid's toils, yielding up his affections to the charms of Miss N. E. Izard. Ten days after they met she wore his engagement ring, and eight months later they were married. Mr. Prewett located at Mount Vernon and engaged in the grocery business, and, notwithstanding that he started with very little capital, he possessed at the breaking out of the war, a large plantation and twenty-nine slaves. He enlisted in Capt. Mallory's company as first lieutenant during the civil strife, and was promoted while at Cotton Plant to the office of captain. His health giving way necessitated his resignation, which took place in the northern part of Arkansas, inflammatory rheumatism, caused by exposure, rapidly making inroads upon his usual health. At the close of the war he found his fortune all gone, and many debts previously contracted staring him in the face. His slaves remained with him, but the expense of keeping them was much more than they could possibly liquidate. One morning Uncle Frank (as he is familiarly called) was viewing his gloomy situation, naturally becoming more and more despondent, when he was accosted by Mr. J. H. Cole, an acquaintance of many years, who proposed that they go to Madison and enter into business, Mr. Prewett not to furnish any capital. The result was the establishing of a mercantile establishment under the name of Cole & Prewett. After a few months Mr. Prewett discovered something which he considered more profitable, and desired a dissolution of partnership, his share of the profits being $1,900. Mr. Cole presented him with a fine horse and saddle, which he traded for a small box house, the first house erected on the present site of Forrest City, and since converted into a saloon. Here, in connection with Col. Izard, he amassed a fortune in the grocery business, while the Little Rock & Memphis was being built. They afterward failed for $45,000, and were obliged to dispose of a large amount of real estate in order to cancel their indebtedness. Mr. Prewett went out of the business and resumed farming for ten years, at the expiration of that time coming back into the same business, where he is to be found at present. Mrs. Prewett, who died in her fifty-fourth year, was a faithful worker and member of the Baptist Church, and a most exemplary lady, being thoroughly beloved by all who knew her. By her marriage with Mr. Prewett she became the mother of eleven children, seven now living: John M. (attorney at law of Forrest City), Mark W. (mail clerk from Helena to Knobel), Thomas E. (city marshal of Forrest City), Blanche (wife of T. L. Briscoe, of Helena), Oscar (a railroad man), Mary E. and George Emma (at home). Mr. Prewett is a son of P. H. and Judy (Whittaker) [p.489] Prewett. His father was born in Bedford County, Tenn., and in 1854 immigrated to Texas, breathing his last in the latter State, in 1866, at the age of seventy-two. Mr. Prewett is a Royal Arch Mason, an Odd Fellow and a member of the Baptist Church. UNMARKED GRAVE CITY CEMETERY
PREWETT GEORGE C. ST.FRANCIS
George C. and Frank E. Prewitt are now prominent young farmers of this county, though natives of Missouri. They removed to St. Francis County, Ark., in 1886, and settled on the St. Francis River, a section noted for its fertility and productiveness. Their father, Joseph E. Prewitt, was a native of Scott County, Ky., where he was reared and married, Miss Naomi M. Nash, a native of Covington, Ky., becoming his wife. She was a daughter of William and Elizabeth Nash, and died in 1879, leaving six children: Robert C. (M. D.), William L. (a teacher in Missouri), Bettie A. (wife of George W. Watts), George C. and Frank E., and Mattie C. (now Mrs. Clifford, of Missouri). Mr. Prewitt died in 1874 at the age of sixty-five. George C. Prewitt was born on May 20, 1850, and received a good education, being instructed in the rudiments of farm work by his father, who was an agriculturist of advanced ideas. At the age of twenty he commenced farming for himself. Frank E. was born in Pike County, Mo., June 18, 1859, and started out in life as a tiller of the soil at the age of nineteen, in 1886 becoming associated with his brother George. They are industrious and enterprising young farmers, and are turning their attention to that most lucrative branch of agricultural pursuits, as well as that most beneficial to the community, the breeding of fine stock, in which they will undoubtedly make a decided success. They are Democrats in politics and liberal donators to all charitable and worthy enterprises. COULD BE MT.VERNON
RAGLAND E.D.-MAJOR CSA-Seventh Tennessee Cavalry-Memphis Light Dragoons-Civil War LEE CO.-page 615
Maj. E. D. Ragland is the son of Dr. Nathaniel and Elizabeth (Love) Ragland, his birth occurring in Shelby County, Tenn., in 1834. Dr. Ragland, a native of Virginia, was born in 1793, and served in the War of 1812. He attended the Philadelphia Medical College, and upon commencing the practice of his chosen profession, in 1818, selected Louisville, Ky., as the field of his labors. He was married in 1816 to Elizabeth, daughter of Mathew Love. To their union seven children were born, E. D., the subject of this sketch, being the sixth in order of birth. Their names were: James B., Louisa M. (now Mrs. Dr. B. D. Anderson of Texas), Dr. Nathaniel (who died in 1870 in De Vall's Bluff, [p.615] and was a sergeant in Price's regiment), Mary E. (now Mrs. Rembert, residing in Memphis, Tenn.), Sarah V. (Mrs. Dunlap of Memphis, Tenn.), and Samuel W. (died in 1861 leaving a family.) His wife is the daughter of Avan Huntsman, a former Congressman of Tennessee. Dr. Nathaniel Ragland (father of our subject) died in 1859, and his wife in 1873. They were members of the Presbyterian Church, to which the former lent his hearty support and valuable influence. He was a man of great public spirit, and many improvements of early days in his city stand as monuments to his memory and liberality. He had the name of being the proprietor of the first drug store ever established in Memphis, and died very wealthy, his estate alone being valued at $294,000. Maj. E. D. Ragland passed his boyhood days in Shelby County and graduated from the University at Lebanon, Tenn. He was married in 1857 to Cornelia Mottley, daughter of B. F. and Martha (Doak) Mottley. Mr. Mottley was State representative of Tennessee for years, and died in 1847, his wife only surviving him three years. Mr. Ragland entered the army in 1862 as major in the Memphis Light Dragoons, attached to the Seventh Tennessee Cavalry and served three years. In 1864 he was taken prisoner of war and held eleven months, making his escape April 19, 1865. He participated in most of the principal engagements, and by his kindness and thoughtfulness to his men won from them their life-long respect and esteem. Maj. Ragland is indeed a generous man, never being behind in contributing to any worthy purpose, but his liberality does not end there, for many benevolent acts never reach the ears of the outside world, though his generous deeds are recognized by the happy recipient of his bounteous gifts. Major Ragland settled in Phillips County, Ark., in 1865 being occupied in the independent profession of farming in that locality until 1869, at which time he moved to his present home in Richland Township. He owns 160 acres of land, all cultivated and stocked with the various superior grades necessary to successfully operate a farm of that size. He is a Mason, being a member of La Grange Lodge, No. 108, and also belongs to the Chapter at Marianna. The city council recognize in him an efficient and influential member. The Major and Mrs. Ragland are members of the Methodist Church at Marianna, Ark. He is interested in all enterprises for the development or promotion of the county, and has witnessed the growth of Marianna from a place that could only boast of one store to its present prosperous proportions.
RAITH JULIUS- COLONEL USARMY-Forty Third Illinois Volunteer Inf-Killed at Battle of Pittsburg Landing-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1302
ST.LOUIS, MO.
RIEFF AMERICUS V.- COLONEL USARMY-MEXICAN WAR/CSA-Army-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1220
FAYETTEVILLE
RIEFF J. FEN USARMY-MEXICAN WAR/CSA-Killed at Pine Bluff, Ark.-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1220
FAYETTEVILLE
ROBINSON T. J. -DR. CSA-Army-PVT-Civil War LEE CO.-page 615
T. J. Robinson, M. D., received a good common-school education in Tennessee, his native State, and spent two years in the study of medicine at home, after which he took a course of lectures at Nashville. He was attending Medical College at the breaking out of the war, but, with the true spirit of patriotism, enlisted in the Confederate army, serving part of the time in the hospital, though mostly engaged in active duty as a private. After the close of the war he gave his attention to farming for four years. He then entered the medical college at Louisville, Ky., and was graduated from that institution in the winter of1868-69, after which, returning to Hardeman County, he practiced for fifteen years. Dr. Robinson later went to Texas, but within three months following he came to Arkansas and located at Marianna, Lee County, in 1883. Since that time he has built up a large practice. Dr. Robinson was born in Hardeman County, Tenn., in 1841, as a son of Jonas and Elizabeth (Chisum) Robinson, natives of the same State. Jonas Robinson was born in 1800, and died at the age of fifty-three. His wife is still living in Hardeman County, at the age of seventy-six years. The subject of this sketch was married in Tennessee to Miss Nannie Chisum, by which union were born three children: John C. (a student of the University of Louisville, Medical Department), Mary Wood and Pearl (his only daughters, aged, respectively, fifteen and fouryears, are his pets). The Doctor is a member of the Lee County Medical Society, of the Knights of Honor, and belongs to the Christian Church.
RODGERS ALBERT S. CSA-Army-Wouned in four battles-Civil War LEE CO.-page 618
Albert S. Rodgers took part in many of the important and hard fought battles of the Civil War, prominent among which were the engagements at Perryville, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Murfreesboro, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Dalton, Chickamauga, Franklin and a number of others. He was wounded in the former and last three battles, and was taken prisoner at the last named, being confined in a Federal hospital for three months. Upon his recovery he was taken to Camp Chase, Ohio, where he was held until shortly after the surrender of Lee, when he was released on parole and returned home. There he engaged in farming until 1868. Coming to Arkansas he located in Lee County, and opened up a farm at Walnut Bend. Mr. Rodgers was born in Lawrence County, S. C., in 1844, and is a son of James S. and Emily B. Rodgers, both natives of that State. He was reared in Marshall County, Miss., where his father moved when he was three years of age, and which he made his home until his enlistment, when only seventeen years of age, in Company E, of the Thirty-fourth Mississippi Infantry. He was married in 1880 to Miss Scott M. Davidson, a daughter of A. W. and Susan E. (Camthes) Davidson. They are the parents of two children: Alma M. and Emma S. In connection with farming and stock raising Mr. Rodgers is engaged in the general mercantile business, and carries a stock of some $2,000, enjoying a large patronage. He is a prominent Democrat, and has held the position of deputy clerk of Lee County, and was justice of the peace for six years, but at the present time is not occupied in an official capacity. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of the Knights of Honor, and is a liberal patron to all public enterprises. Mrs. Rodgers is a member of the Presbyterian Church. James S. Rodgers, the father of our subject, was born in South Carolina in 1791, and lived to the ripe old age of seventy-five years. He was a soldier [p.618] in the War of 1812, and was a prominent man of his county, holding the office of sheriff for several years. He owned a large plantation and at the breaking out of the war was the possessor of sixty slaves. In his family were twelve children, five sons and seven daughters. Saxon Rodgers, his father, was of South Carolina nativity, and a farmer of considerable means and influence. Mrs. Rodgers, the mother of Albert S., was a daughter of Edmund Ware, a Virginian by birth, and a general in the Revolutionary War.
RODGERS HENRY PRESTON LEE CO.-page 617
Henry Preston Rodgers. In chronicling the names of the prominent citizens of Lee County, that of Henry Preston Rodgers is accorded an enviable position. He is the son of Ebenezer and Parmelia (Jackson) Rodgers, his birth occurring in Madison County, Ill., in March, 1844. Ebenezer Rodgers was a native of Wales, born in 1790, and in 1820 he came to America, locating in Howard County, Mo., where two years later he was united in marriage with Miss Jackson. During their residence in that State three children were given them, but in 1839 they moved to Illinois, where seven children were reared, making a family of ten born to their union. Mrs. Parmelia Rodgers, of English descent, first saw the light of day in Kentucky, in 1805, and after a long and consistent Christian life as a devoted wife and mother, she passed to her eternal rest, on Wednesday, March 28, 1882, at the age of seventy-seven years. Mr. Rodgers, Sr., though of Welsh parentage, was of English birth, and in 1818, being prompted by missionary zeal, came to America, locating in Kentucky, which presented a wide field for his labors. His was a grand and noble work, and his efforts for the advancement of Christianity and education have left imprints for good that will remain through time and eternity. In 1823, five years after his arrival in the United States, he organized a Baptist Church, in Capt. John Jackson's neighborhood, and subsequently became its pastor. Capt. Jackson, [p.617] the father of Mrs. Rodgers, was by occupation a farmer, but entered the War of 1812, commanding a company of volunteers (Kentucky). In 1834 Rev. Mr. Rodgers moved with his family to Madison County, Ill., where he presided for a period of two years as pastor of the Baptist Church. At the expiration of that time he left the pastorate and devoted his time to missionary and association efforts throughout the State. After a long and well-spent life, he passed away, at his home in Upper Alton, Ill., at the age of sixty-four years. Henry Preston Rodgers, the subject of this sketch, received the rudiments of his education in the subscription schools of Madison County, Ill., and matriculated in the Shurtliff College in 1861, completing the junior year in 1863. In September, 1863, he entered the cientific department of the University of Michigan (Ann Arbor), and completed his education one year later. After leaving Ann Arbor Mr. Rodgers went to Memphis, but soon located in Bolivar, Tenn., where he engaged in merchandising. Finding that venture to be unsuccessful, however, he closed out his business, and accepted a position as salesman with a large and prominent firm, which he filled with credit and satisfaction. In 1870 he came to Arkansas, selecting Marianna as his place of abode, and again embarked in the mercantile business, his efforts being liberally rewarded. For ten years he was recognized as one of the most enterprising and progressive of Marianna's citizens, only retiring from business at that time to devote his attention to planting. He now owns 6,000 acres of as fine farm land as can be found in Arkansas, and 1,200 of this are in a high state of cultivation, the principal crops being corn and cotton. The soil in favorable seasons yields about one bale of cotton to the acre. The year 1877 witnessed Mr. Rodgers' marriage to Miss Mary Virginia Upshaw, a native of Arkansas, and a daughter of James R. and Bettie W. (Epps) Upshaw. To their union two children were born: Henry Preston, Jr. (born June 10, 1878), and Mary Lucile (born December 24, 1879). Mrs. Rodgers died in 1887, a lady of great culture and refinement, and a favorite among her wide circle of friends and acquaintances. In politics Mr. Rodgers is a Damocrat, and in 1883 he received the election to the State legislature, being re-elected in 1884. He holds a membership in the Episcopal Church, as did also his estimable wife. That he is popular is proven beyond a doubt, by the respect and confidence reposed in him by the entire people.
RODGERS JAMES S. USARMY-WAR OF 1812 LEE CO.-page 618
SEE ALBERT S.RODGERS
RODGERS JAMES W. -CAPTAIN CSA-CO.D-Ninth Mississippi Infantry-Civil War LEE CO.-page 616
Capt. James W. Rodgers received a high school education in his native State of South Carolina, preparatory to entering the military academy at [p.616] West Point, to which his father wished to send him, but having chosen a mercantile life rather than that of a military nature he engaged in merchandising at Byhalia, Miss., where he opened a stock of general merchandise, and was also proprietor of a blacksmith and wagon shop. At the breaking out of the war he joined the first troops organized in his county, Company D, of the Ninth Mississippi Infantry, and the first year served at Warrington, near Pensacola, Fla He received his discharge within the year on account of sickness, and returned home, but as soon as able organized Company E, Thirty-fourth Mississippi Infantry, which he commanded until the close of the war. He participated in the battles of Perryville, Murfreesboro, Dalton, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and on to Atlanta, and then went back with Hood, but was taken sick and sent to the hospital at Columbus, Miss. After his recovery he was placed in command of 600 men, and started to join Gen. Johnston's army in North Carolina, but receiving word of the surrender he paroled his men at Meridian, returned home, and again resumed his business. Upon remaining two years he came to Arkansas, and located in what is now Walnut Bend Township, Lee County, where he has since lived. Capt. Rodgers was born in Lawrence District, S. C., in 1834, being a son of Hon. James S. and Emily N. (Ware) Rodgers, also natives of that State. James S. Rodgers was a well-to-do farmer and a prominent citizen of his locality, and held the office of sheriff of Lawrence District for several years, and later for several terms was representative from that district to the State legislature. He served under Gen. Jackson in one of the early wars, and was a son of John Rodgers, a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and of Scotch-Irish descent. Mr. Rodgers was a member of the A. F. & A. M., and his death, which occurred in 1866, was much regretted by all who knew him. He was at that time a resident of Marshall County, Miss., to which he had removed in 1849. Mrs. Rodgers was a daughter of Gen. Edwin Ware, a merchant of Abbeville District, S. C., and a soldier in the Revolutionary War. She was a member of the Baptist Church, and died in 1862, leaving twelve children, five sons and seven daughters, four of whom are still living: James W. (the principal of this sketch), Amanda (now Mrs. Du Puy), Albert S. and Flora (now Mrs. Myers). Mr. Rodgers was married in 1872 to Miss Ella Newman, daughter of Augustus and Sallie Newman, who removed from Bolivar County, Miss., to this county in 1868, and both of whom are now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Rodgers are the parents of eight children, five surviving, all sons. Mr. Rodgers has lived on his present farm since 1886, and has it well improved. It consisted of 640 acres, with over 400 acres under cultivation. Mrs. Rodgers is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to which her husband is a liberal contributor, strongly advocating Sunday-school work.
RODGERS JOHN USARMY-REVOLUTIONARY WAR LEE CO.-page 616
SEE JAMES W.RODGERS
ROLLWAGE OTTO B. ST.FRANCIS
Hon. Otto B. Rollwage, mayor of Forrest City, and a member of the firm of Rollwage & Co., one of the leading mercantile houses in Forrest City, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1854, being reared and educated in that city. At the age of twenty years he came to Forrest City, and engaged as salesman in a store in this city for three months, after which he entered into the mercantile business with his brother Louis. They commenced on a small scale, but by close attention to business and strict economy, enjoy a very extensive trade, employing eight salesmen in their store. They own five business houses besides the one they occupy. Mr. Rollwage was a member of the board of aldermen for some time, and so efficient were his services in that capacity, and so diligently did he attend to the duties devolving on him that he was complimented with a nomination for mayor of Forrest City, while away from home, and without his knowledge. His administration has been very beneficial to the city, he having enforced the many ordinances that were before a dead letter on the status, and especially has he been vigorous in the prosecution of all parties violating the whisky laws; as a result there is now no better regulated city in the State. In his domestic relations Mr. Rollwage is not less happily situated than in business circles. He married Miss Jennie Anderson, of Monroe County, a graduate of a female college in Tennessee, and a highly educated and refined lady. She is a leader in the society of Forrest City, and is one of the prominent members of the W. C. T. U. in Arkansas, having been a State delegate to the National Convention held at Nashville in 1887. This worthy couple are the parents of five children: Norma, Otto, Tolise, De Velling and Madeleine. Mr. R. is a son of Frederick and Mina (Kuker) Rollwage, both natives of Germany. Frederick Rollwage is still living and resides in Cincinnati, but spends about half of his time with his son, our subject. -The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 94:Hon.Otto B.Rollwage is a lawyer by profession, and is a native of Cincinnatti, Ohio, where he was born On Sept.23,1853. He is a son of F. and Mena (Kuker) Rollwage, who emigrated from Germany in 1838. His father was a tailor by trade, who continued at his chosen calling until sixty-five years of age, when he retired. Our subject was reared in Cincinnatti and educated in the common schools of that city. In 1874, at the age of twenty years, he came to Forrest City and was engaged as a salesman for the firm of Sparks & Rollwage, said firm being composed of William Sparks, and L.Rollwage, brother of our subject. They then formed L.Rollwage & Co. and operated until December 31,1902, Otto Rollwage retired from the firm and soon thereafter, admitted to the bar, and since has been practicing law with marked success. In 1877 he was happily married to Miss Jennie E. Anderson, of Monroe County, who was born and reared in Arkansas, and is a highly educated and refined lady whose friends are legion. Ten children have blessed this match, namely, Talbert, Norma, Otto, Tolise, DeVeiling, Madeline, Ardale, Herman, Virginia and Ralph, all of whom, their first born, Talbert, who died when four years of age, are now living in this city. He was a member of the board of aldermen for three years, and Mayor for two terms, having been nominated for the latter the first time while away from home and without his knowledge. He was chosen President of the Arkansas State Merchant's Association in 1900 at it's organization in Little Rock. CITY CEMETERY
ROWLAND CHARLES ST.FRANCIS CSA-Army-Civil War
SEE GEORGE M.ROWLAND
ROWLAND GEORGE M. ST.FRANCIS
George M.Rowland, a prominent farmer of Utica Township, is a native of Mississippi, and a son of Charles and Mary (Lewis) Rowland. who were Virginians by birth. In 1830 they left the Old Dominion for Marshall County, Mississippi, then a new part of the state, from which the Indians had just been moved. Here the father lived on a farm which he entered until 1840, then going to Benton County, where he made his home until called by death, in 1863. His wife survived him to 1876. They were the parents of six boys, three of whom are still living: W.L. (on the old place), J.E. (a resident of St.Francis County), and George M. The latter was born in Marshall County, Miss., Feb.22,1850. His father, like a number of other Southerners, was a Union man, when he announced his allegiance to his native state, and gave three sons to the Southern cause. After the battle of Shiloh the brothers returned home on furlough, and were surprised by the Federals, but would not have been captured for the treachery of a companion. The three boys and the father were taken prisoners, and carried to Cairo, Illinois, afterward being exchanged, but the father died within eight days of his return, from exposure coming down the river. George M.Rowland remained at home during the war, being too young to enter the service, though he heard the bullets whistle on more than one occasion. In 1868, he went to Gibson County,Tennessee, was engaged in teaming for a man named Davis, and the following year took charge of a large farm, In Hardeman County, belonging to the same party, where he remained until 1876. Going home on a visit, the month of January, 1876, found him enroute for Arkansas, in charge of stock for J.D.Beans of Forrest City, for whom he clerked the rest of the year. The next year he rented a farm, and has since been occupied in that occupation, now owning two farms, one of 214 acres, and one 185 acres in extent, with over seventy-five acres under cultivation. Mr.Rowlans has been twice married, first in 1879 to Miss Mollie V,Jeth, who died in 1881. His second wife was Mrs.Allie S.Johnson (nee Hill). They are the parents of one child, Charlie Pike, born in 1887. Mr.Rowland is an influential Democrat, and has served as justice of the peace two years. He is a member of the Knights of Honor, and at one time belonged to the County Wheel. OBIT:2-5-1904 - ROWLAND - GEORGE - M. - - - 1852 - 2 4 1904 - UNKNOWN - Death of George M.Rowland=George M.Rowland, Assessor of St.Francis County, died last night, Feb.4,1904, at his home in Colt; after an illness of about three hours. While working in his barnyard about 6 pm, he was taken with a pain in his jaw, and the pain increased down his neck and into his left side. He suffered terribly, and Dr.L.H.Merritt was sent for and arrived about 8 pm. Everything was done that could be thought of, and a few minutes before he died, he seemed to be resting much easier. Death had put its quieting hand upon him, and he passed away around 9:15 pm. George Rowland was widely known, loved, and respected throughout the county, and his death is regretted by hundreds of friends and acquaintances. He was about 52 years of age, and leaves a wife and one child, a boy of 14 years. The remains will be interred in the Hughes or Roy cemetery today. HUGHES OR ROY CEMETERY
ROWLAND JOHN L. CSA-CO.B-Holmes' regiment-Civil War LEE CO.-page 618
John L. Rowland, who stands high in the agricultural ranks of Lee County, came originally from Tennessee, being a son of John B. and Elizabeth (Thomas) Rowland. The father was a son of Birch and Mary Rowland, natives of North Carolina, both of whom lived to be over sixty years of age. They were the parents of four sons: William (a mechanic and a master of his trade), George, David (both successful farmers and well-to-do) and John B. The latter moved to St. Francis County in 1834, where he was engaged in farming, but a few years later came to Lee County. He was married before entering this State (then a Territory), to Miss Elizabeth Thomas, daughter of Lewis and Margaret Thomas, of South Carolina and Tennessee origin, respectively. Lewis Thomas was a soldier in the War of 1812, and gained distinction by his bravery, living to the age of sixty-five. John L. Rowland was born in Montgomery County, Tenn., in 1829, and was therefore five years of age when his parents moved to Arkansas. He was reared on his father's farm, and as the territory was at that time very thinly settled, and schoolhouses were few and far between, his educational advantages were very limited. He commenced farming for himself when twenty years old in this county, and in 1857 was married to Susan E. Reed, daughter of Noah and Mary (Hurley) Reed, natives of Massachusetts and Kentucky, respectively. Noah Reed was born in 1797; his wife died at the age of forty. Mr. and Mrs. Rowland have four children: Josephine (deceased), Ardella (deceased), Jessie L. and Mary. Mr. Rowland enlisted in the Confederate army in 1862, in Company B, of Holmes' regiment, in which he served throughout the war, participating in the battles of Cotton Plant, Helena and some others, but was principally engaged in skirmishing. After the war he returned home and resumed farming, and although be lost nearly all he had during that unhappy period, by hard work and close economy, together with good business management, he has accumulated considerable property, and now owns a fine farm of 540 acres, with 250 acres under cultivation. He has also a large amount of stock, to which industry he turns his attention, in preference to the more general occupation of cotton raising. Mr. Rowland is a Democrat in politics, is a member of the Masonic order, and of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, to which his wife also belongs, they taking an active part in religious enterprises. He is a liberal contributor to all enterprises for the good of the community
ROY JOHN LEWIS ST.FRANCIS
John L. Roy, active in the agricultural affairs of Utica Township, is a native of Tennessee, and a son of James and Mary Roy, originally from Virginia and Tennesee, respectively. John L. came to St.Francis County, Arkansas, with his father in 1828, being at that time only one year old. Though not having been consulted as to this change in residence, he has never regretted being a citizen of the state of Arkansas, as he is entirely satisfied with the country and people. He grew up to farm life, and while living in the country for a day when it was but thinly settled, received a good education, attending school regularly until he grew to manhood. At the age of twenty-one he commenced life for himself as book-keeper at a store in Helena, but resigned that position in a short time to take charge of a trading boat on the Mississippi River. Two years later he went to New Orleans, and resumed clerking in a dry goods and grocery house for two years, after which he returned home, and since has been occupied in farming. Mr.Roy was married in 1853, to Miss Lucy E.Dallor, daughter of James and Mary Dallor, natives of N.Carolina. They are the parents of nine children: Mary E., Thomas J., Mark G., Martha J., Sarah F., William E., Nettie A., Richard L., and John A., the last two being twins. He owns a farm of 160 acres, with sixty-five under cultivation, and is engaged in raising stock and farming, principally. He is a member of the Masonic order, and of the Knights of Honor, and also of the County Wheel, and he and his family are members of the Baptist Church. In the early days when the parents of our subject first came to this country, and for a number of years after, game was plentiful, and John L. had many exciting bear hunts. At one time, while his father and William Stags were out hunting, their dog was in danger of being killed by a bear, whereupon the former caught the wild animal by the ears, and held him until Mr.Stags shot him; this exploit gained him quite a reputation as a bear hunter. OBIT:UNCLE" JOHN LEWIS ROY, A NATIVE OF ST.FRANCIS COUNTY, AND THE OLDEST RESIDENT OF THE COUNTY, DIED AT HIS HOME SEVEN MILES NORTH OF THE CITY, MONDAY AFTERNOON, OCT.11,1896. HE WAS 69 YEARS OF AGE, A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC FRATERNITY, THE KNIGHTS OF HONOR, AND A DEVOUT MEMBER OF THE BAPTIST CHURCH. HE HELD THE ESTEEM OF ALL WHO KNEW HIM, AND IN HIS DEATH THE COMMUNITY LOSES ONE OF IT'S MOST WORTHY CITIZENS. 10-16-1896 PROB.ROY CEMETERY
RUSSELL DAVID BELL USARMY-Gen.Steele-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1235
CONWAY CO.,ARK.
RUSSELL JOHN W. CSA-Malone's Battalion-Johnston's Army-Civil War LEE CO.-page 619
John W. Russell, who stands foremost among the farmers of Lee County, Ark., is a native of Alabama and a son of Alexander Russell, also of that State, and who was born about 1809. He was of Scotch descent, and was a farmer, tanner and shoemaker. In 1828 Miss Rebecca Ann Cart-wright became his wife, a daughter of John and Polly Cartwright, both originally from Alabama, and of Irish descent. She was born in Madison County, that State, in 1815, and died in 1882, three years after the death of her husband. They were the parents of nine children, five sons and four daughters; three of these are known to be living: Joseph, Eveline (now Mrs. Holly of Alsbama), and John W. The subject of this sketch was born in Limestone County, Ala., December 10, 1831, and remained in that county until his marriage, having charge of his father's farm. He has been married four times; first, in 1855, to Miss Louisa Breeding, a native of Morgan County, who died in 1877, leaving seven children, three still surviving: Samuel R., Otis P. and William W., all engaged in farming in this county. Mr. Russell was next married May 10, 1879, to Miss Susan Bickerstaff, also of Alabama, who died in 1883. His third marriage was in 1884 to Miss Dora Smith, also of the same State. She lived a year after her marriage, leaving one child, which died [p.619] a short time after its mother. His fourth and present wife was Mrs. Mary A. Archy, widow of Rufus Archy, of Tennessee, to whom he was married in October, 1886. Mr. Russell enlisted in the Confederate service, in 1864, in Malone's battalion, in Johnston's army, and served until the close of the war. Comng to Arkansas in 1873, he located in this county and purchased the farm on which he still resides, now one of the finest in Lee County, consisting of 216 acres, with 150 acres under cultivation. He is also engaged in the milling business and cotton ginning. Mr. Russell is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. His wife belongs to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church.
SCRUGGS HARTWELL CSA-Dobbins' Regiment of Arkansas Cavalry-Civil War LEE CO.-page 619
Hartwell Scruggs, holding a prominent place among the enterprising and wealthy farmers of Richland Township, is a native of Tennessee, and was born in 1824, being the second in a family of three children, resulting from the union of Hartwell and Lucy (Howell) Scruggs. Hartwell Scruggs was born in 1800, in the Old Dominion. He moved to Tennessee, and there married about the year 1820, making it his home for many years, and giving his children such advantages for an education as could be obtained at that time. His son, Louis H., died in 1859, leaving a wife and two children; John, died in 1860, a wife and one child surviving to mourn his loss. Mr. Hartwell, Sr., moved from Tennessee to Lee County, Ark., in 1844, and settled on the St. Francis River, where he resided at the date of his death in 1845. Mrs. Scruggs died in the same year. Mr. Scruggs was a Democrat in his political views, and in religious faith, a Baptist. Hart. well, the subject of this sketch, passed his younger days in Tennessee, and came with his father to Arkansas in 1844. Two years later he embarked in rafting on the Mississippi River, following this occupation for eight years, after which he went to farming on the St. Francis River. In 1863 he enlisted in Dobbins' Regiment of Arkansas Cavalry, soon being taken prisoner of war, and was not released until 1865. In 1868 he settled in Richland Township, purchasing a farm of 200 acres, 100 acres now under cultivation. With the improvements that he made this farm is second to none in the county, and the impression to the casual observer, or passer-by, is that thrift and prosperity predominate. Mr. Scruggs was united in marriage with Miss Amanda Morgan in the year 1847, and by her became the father of sir children: Martha A., Hartwell, Cortez, Howell, Helen and Louis. Mrs. Scruggs died in 1861, and for his second wife Mr. Scruggs chose Rebecca Moore, of Virginia, who died in 1870, leaving two children: Clara and Anna. Mr. Scruggs was married in 1871 to Miss Harriet E. Haydon, a daughter of Waller and Sarah F. (Nelson) Haydon, originally from Virginia and Kentucky. respectively. By this marriage they have had eight children: Libourn R., Lucian (deceased), Horace B. (deceased), Carrie L. and Cora L. (twins-Cora is dead), Blackstone F., Edna E. and Rhuney R. Mr. Scruggs is a man who has traveled a great deal, and who has seen life in all its different phases. He is a member of Lodge No. 108, of the Masonic order at La Grange, Lee County, and has been school director in his district for years. He takes an active interest in those movements tending to the good of the county, lending by his valuable support and influence especially to the advancement of education. He comments with pardonable pride on the development and growth of the county since he has resided here, and many of its enterprises will stand as monuments of his generous support, and interest manifested therein
SEABORN G.W. ST.FRANCIS
G. W. Seaborn, deputy sheriff of St. Francis County, is well known to the residents of that section of Arkansas, and enjoys the esteem of all, except from those whose disregard of law compels him to discharge the duties of his office in an impartial manner; at such a time he would scarcely be recognized as a jovial companion or the perpetrator of many amusing jokes. Mr. Seaborn was born in St. Francis County in 1853, being the son of G. W. and Frankie (Casteel) Seaborn. The former, of Tennessee nativity, came to Arkansas when about nineteen years of age, locating in St. Francis County, and being the first man to bring a flat-boat load of merchandise up the St. Francis River. He purchased the goods in New Orleans, and established an extensive business near Mount Vernon, when that was the county seat. He was the first sheriff of the county, holding that office for twelve years, and subsequently served in the State legislature, and was a member of that body at the breaking out of the late war. In 1863 he moved to Tennessee, and upon the close of hostilities opened a mercantile establishment at Jefferson, Texas. In 1872 he returned to St. Francis County, and died in 1875 at the age of sixty-three years. Mrs. Seaborn accompanied her parents from Tennessee to Arkansas when quite small, and has resided in this county ever since. She was married in St. Francis County and became the mother of two children, G. W. being the youngest. Annie, his sister, is now the wife of B. F. Elington of Atlanta, Ga. Mrs. Seaborn owns a large farm, but resides with her children. G. W. Seaborn grew to manhood in St. Francis County, receiving his education in Texas, where the facilities afforded him were unusually liberal. After finishing his schooling, he came back to his old home and engaged in farming for four years, and with the exception of four years spent in the livery business at Forrest City, has made agricultural pursuits his principal avocation. He now owns about 600 acres in this and adjoining counties. Mr.Seaborn was married in 1876 to Miss Mattie Cabbs, a daughter of Dr. J. H. Cabbs, brother of the present land commissioner. Dr. Cabbs' mother is living in this county at the advanced age of ninety-three years. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Seaborn three children were born. Mrs. Seaborn died in 1883, leaving many friends to mourn her death. In his political views he sides with the Democratic party.
SHACKELFORD JOHN L. USARMY-WAR OF 1812 LEE CO.-page 620
SEE RICHARD D.SHACKELFORD
SHACKELFORD JOHN L. USARMY-WAR OF 1812 PHILLIPS CO.
SEE R.S.BONNER
SHACKELFORD RICHARD D. CSA-CO.G-Dobbins' regiment-Civil War LEE CO.-page 620
Richard D. Shackelford. One among the many prosperous and prominent farmers of Lee County is Richard D. Shackelford, who was born of honorable parentage at Murfreesboro, Tenn., on February 10, 1826. He is a son of John L. and Sarah A. (Chisenhall) Shackelford. John L. Shackelford came upon the scene of action in Virginia, on August 12, 1796; he was a mechanic by occupation, an old-time Whig in politics, and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and as a pious and devout man, was much loved and respected by those who knew him. He was a Scotchman by birth, and came to this country when young, during the War of 1812, taking an active part, and doing valiant duty as a soldier. He was successful in life, and at the time of his death, which occurred [p.620] on August 20, 1863, had onsiderable property. His wife, to whom he was married May 26, 1816, was also born in the Old Dominion, and was the mother of ten children, two sons and eight daughters, four of whom are still living: Katharine (widow of Rev. John Roberts), Tabitha (widow of William Williford), Rebecca (widow of John Walthall), and Richard D., the principal of this sketch. The latter was reared in Marengo County, Ala., where his father had removed when the son was two years of age. As that portion of the State at that time was comparatively an unsettled country, his education was of a very limited character. He began farming for himself at the age of twenty-one, and in 1847 removed to Arkansas, settling in Phillips County, about thirty miles northwest of Helens, which was at that time an uninhabited wilderness. After remaining there seven years, he removed to Woodruff County, continuing until 1862, at which time he joined the Confederate army, in Company G, of Dobbins' regiment, and served up to the close of the war. He then returned to his family in Woodruff County, but soon removed to his present location, where he has since been engaged as a farmer and mechanic. Mr. Shackelford has been twice married; first, toMiss Belvida Tully, in 1850, who died fifteen years later, having been the mother of seven children, six still living: Alice (now Mrs. Brown, of this county), Thomas E. (a farmer of Pulaski County), Mary (now Mrs. Marshall, of Ft. Smith), William R. (also a farmer of Pulaski County), Lucy (now Mrs. Ferguson, of Lee County) and Louis L. (a farmer of Pulaski County). He was then married in December of that year to Mrs. Mary E. Wilks (nee Brown), a daughter of John and Mary Brown, and a native of Mississippi. They had seven children, two of whom survive: Zula (now Mrs. McAlexander, a mechanic of Brinkley, Ark.), and Nannie, at home. Mr. Shackelford is a Democrat in polities, and a member of the Christian Church, as is also his wife, in which they take an active part, always being ready to give their time and means to worthy church and religious enterprises.
SIKES J.WADE CSA-CO.D-Second Arkansas Mounted Rifles-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1282
BENTON CO.
SIMS JAMES A. CSA-Arkansas Home Guards-Civil War LEE CO.-page 620
James A. Sims is a native of Mississippi, and a son of John and Isabella (Johnson) Sims, natives of Virginia and North Carolina, respectively. John Sims was a blacksmith by trade, and was also engaged in farming. He died in 1831, preceded by his wife (who was a daughter of Gilbert Johnson, a native of South Carolina) some five years. They were the parents of nine children, eight sons and one daughter: Samuel A., John P., William B., James A. (the principal of this sketch), Gilbert G., Benjamin M., Ernest W., David D. and Mary A. (wife of John W. Walker, of Warren County, Miss.). The places of residence of the brothers are not known. James A. Sims was born in Warren County, Miss., near Vicksburg, on February 5, 1817. On account of the country being then but thinly settled, his early advantages for an education were very limited. He commenced farming for himself at the age of seventeen, and in 1849 came to Arkansas, purchasing a farm in Lee County, which was at that time a part of Monroe County. Two years later he sold his farm, and removed to Clark County, where he remained thirteen years, soon returning and purchasing his present farm, then within the lines of St. Francis County. Mr. Sims was married, in 1851, to Miss Augusta C. Davis, a native of Phillips County, and a daughter of Thomas J. and Elvira (Mullen) Davis, both of whom are deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Sims are the parents of ten children, five sons and five daughters; seven of these are still living: John H., Louisa J., Florence I., William A., Robert E. Lee, Edward M. and Donnie D. Mr. Sims enlisted in the Confederate service in the summer of 1864, in the Arkansas Home Guards, in which he served until the close of the war. He and his wife are members of the Missionary Baptist Church, to which they have belonged for over thirty years. Mr. Sims is a strong, uncompromising Democrat.
SKINNER JAMES W. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Army-Civil War
James W. Skinner was born in Fleming County, Ky., in 1842, as the son of Benjamin F. and Lucinda SkinnerHis early life was passed in the schools of his native State, from which he received a superior education, and at the age of nineteen he began in business on his own responsibility in New Orleans, making many friends both in social and business circles during his stay in that city. In 1861, going to Memphis, Tenn., he enlisted in the Confederate service, where he remained for one year and then commenced steamboating on the Mississippi River, following this business until the Federals gained control of the river. In 1868 he came to St. Francis County, Ark., and embarked in the manufacture of staves. Two years later he settled his present farm, which is well improved and gives evidence of thrift and prosperity. Mr. Skinner is a believer in the Christian Church, and in his political views is a Democrat. He is liberal in his support to all worthy enterprises, and a man generally esteemed by the entire community. His ancestors came from Ireland, having emigrated to America previous to the Revolution, in which conflict his grandfather was a gallant soldier. OBIT:Justifiable Homicide=An unfortunate killing occurred in Johnson township, near Fulwood, on Wednesday afternoon, July 15,1903, between 6 and 7 p.m., when J.W.Skinner, a well known and familiar figure in this city was intstantly killed. The circumstance which led up to the shooting were as follows: T.J.Wall and J.W.Skinner were planting a crop together on Skinner's farm, and Wall and wife occupied the residence. Skinner had his faults, and Wednesday afternoon a quarrel arose between the two men relative to the crop and Skinner picked up a club and approached Wall threatening him. Wall backed to the hosue and reached for a shot gun, at the same time trying to pacify Skinner by saying "let us talk the matter over." "Damn you, I'll show you how to talk," replied Skinner, raising the club to strike, whereupon the gun was discharged, tearing away part of Skinner's head, killing him almost instantly. Wall said he did not intend to shoot, and regrets the killing very much. An inquest was held by Squire McLaren, and a verdict of justifiable homicide was determined, and he was released. Later-Wall was arrested yesterday by Deputies Murphree and Swan, lodged in jail. He will have a preliminary hearing tomorrow.7-24-1903 Another story has come forward about the killing, it is said Skinner was sitting in a chair in his room when a shot from behind was fired, as evidenced by the blood, and afterwards the body was taken out into the yard. Skinner was 60 years of age, and a respected member of the community. Could be James W.Skinner, bio online born in 1842. Judge Folbre is hearing the case, and the body was exhumed to study the wounds. Hon.R.J.Williams represents the defendant, and the state is represented by W.J.Lanier. 8-3-1903 Witnesses that were part of the inquest were questioned about their part in the story of Wall, as it appears Skinner was shot, probably asleep, while sitting on his porch, and pulled out into the yard afterwards. Afterwards the County Court in granted bail of $2000 for Wall in habeus corpus proceedings. 7-17-1903 CEMETERY UNKNOWN
SLAUGHTER LOUISA A.-MRS LEE CO.-page 621
Mrs. Louisa F. (Noles) Slaughter, the widow of Dr. Stanton Slaughter, was born in Maury County, Tenn., November 27, 1837. Dr. Stanton Slaughter, a native of South Carolina, was born in 1820, being a son of Arthur and Jane Slaughter, of Virginia. He received a liberal education, graduating from the New Orleans (La.) Medical College in 1846, and afterward settled in Mississippi, choosing this as the field of his labors, but [p.621] subsequently immigrated to Arkansas, and located in Phillips County in 1851. He was immediately recognized as an efficient and conscientious physician, and rapidly gained an enviable position, both as a son of ’sculapius and a citizen. He was married in 1851 to Miss Mary Pollard, of Mississippi, who only lived one year. He was again married, his second wife being Miss Louisa F. Noles, a daughter of Allen J. and Eliza Noles. Mr. Noles was a native of Maury County, Tenn., and was born in 1807. He was a farmer and contractor and served as sheriff of Lewis County, Tenn., for many years. In 1829 he was married to Elizabeth Batmon, of Maury County, her birth occurring in 1809. They were the parents of eleven children, six sons and five daughters, four now living: Louisa F., Sarah E. (widow of B. M. Marbeau), James B. and Rosena (wife of Bruce Kirk, now residing in Texas). Mr. Noles died in 1887, and his wife in 1863. To Dr. and Mrs. Slaughter a family of ten children were given, seven sons and three daughters, five now living. Dr. Slaughter died in Brinkley, this State, January 26, 1885. He was a courteous and highly-cultured gentleman, well worthy the respect and esteem shown him by his wide circle of friends and acquaintances. Mrs. Slaughter owns 160 acres of excellent farm land, with over 100 acres under a successful state of oultivation. She is a bright, intelligent lady, and though by no means a masculine woman, manages her estate and business in a highly commendable manner, that might well be copied by many of the sterner sex.
SLOCUM W.H. CROSS CO. CSA-Army-POW-Civil War
W.H. Slocum. One of the leading farmers and old settlers of Cross County is W.H. Slocum, who is a native of North Carolina, and the eldest son of G.C. and Sarah (Griphith) Slocum, also of North Carolina birth.Mr. G.C. Slocum was a blacksmith by trade, and moved to Tennessee in 1844,where he died in 1849, and his wife in 1879, leaving nine children, three of whom are now living: Mary (the wife of E. Robins, of this county),Joseph D. and W.H., all residing in this township. The subject of this sketch dates his existence from January 6, 1828. He received only five months education in youth, his father needing his help in the blacksmith shop, in which he worked from the time he was able to swing a sledge until twenty-three years of age. In 1844 he accompanied his father to Tennessee, and in 1851 was married to Elizabeth Roberts, after which hemoved to Arkansas and setled in this county (then Poinsett), where he rented a farm for two years. In 1853 he made entry of a quarter section,on which he now resides, and afterward bought 960 acres, about 500 ofwhich he has given to his children. When Mr. Slocum first moved to Brushy Lake Township, in February 1861, there were but three families for a distance of ten miles north or south. When he entered his land there were no clearings on it, and he erected a shanty in which he lived by himself until a log house was built. In 1874 he constructed the first steam mill and gin in the township, at that time the woods abounding the game,including bear, deer, and wild turkey. Mr. and Mrs. Slocum are the parents of nine children, eight living; Benjamin, Preston, Rebecca (nowMrs. Ott), Lovenia (wife of B. Burns), Samuel, Charles and Virg. Mr.Slocum joined the Confederate army in 1863, and served until the close of the war. He was taken prisoner south of Little Rock, from which he was paroled, and afterward rejoined the army, serving throughout the war.Upon the close of hostilities he returned home and engaged in farming and stock raising, in which he has been very successful. Mr. and Mrs. Slocum are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and take an active partin its affairs.
SMITH G.F. LEE CO.-page 621
G. F. Smith has been a resident of Arkansas since 1860, when he located in what was then a part of St. Francis County, but which now forms a portion of Lee County, and was one of the first men to advocate this county's formation. Born in Rutherford County, Tenn., on December 15, 1819, he was a son of William and Rebecca. (Webb) Smith, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. William Smith moved to Tennessee when a young man, where he worked at his trade, as a gunsmith, and also engaged in farming. He was a soldier in the War of 1813, and was present at the battle of New Orleans. To himself and wife ten children were born, five sons and five daughters, two of whom only are living: G. F. and Jasper N. (a farmer of Hardeman County, Tenn.). G. F. Smith commenced farming for himself at the age of nineteen, and four years later removed to Hardeman County, where he was engaged in the same occupation until his removal to Arkansas. He first purchased 1,000 acres of land for $4,800; now he owns 3,600 acres in the western part of Lee County, and has some 700 acres under cultivation, which he devotes principally to cotton and corn. He also owns a steam grist-mill, saw-mill and cotton-gin, with a capacity of eight bales per day, which were erected at a cost of $3,000. Mr. Smith was married in Tennessee, in 1838, to Miss Elizabeth Bell, a daughter of Samuel Bell, of that county; she died in about 1840, leaving two children, both of whom are now deceased. Mr. Smith was married on January 17, 1843, to Miss A. J.Smith, also of Tennessee origin, who passed away in 1878, having been the mother of one son; the latter died in 1853. His third and present wife, Miss V. M. Granger, was a daughter of A. H. and Mary Granger, and a native of Phillips County, Ark. They are the parents of four children: George F., Melvine, Philip J. and Stephen C. They are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Mr. Smith belongs to the Masonic order.
SMITH R.M. CROSS CO.
R. M. Smith, senior member of the firm of Smith, Graham & Jones,merchants at Wynne, owes his nativity to Batesville, Independence County, Ark., where his birth occurred in 1849. His parents, William and Mary (Miller) Smith, were also natives of Arkansas, and the father died when his son, R. M., was quite young. The paternal grandfather, Robert Smith,was a native of Maryland and came to Arkansas in about 1835, settling at Batesville where he followed farming for many years. He owned a fine tract of land on the opposite side of the river from the town. He moved to Springfield, Mo., in 1878, and there he died a few years later at the age of seventy-eight years. The maternal grandfather, John Miller, moved to Independence County, Ark., in 1817, bought a large tract of land near the site of the present city of Batesville and was a very successful farmer, accumulating a very large fortune. He died in 1886 at the advanced age of ninety-seven years. R. M. Smith passed his youth in Batesville and in 1866 went to Little Rock where he entered St. John's College, and there remained for four years. After this he engaged in the retail grocery business in Little Rock, remaining there until 1871, when he sold his business and went back to Batesville. Going to Wittsburg in1875 he started a drug store, which he carried on until 1881 when the firm title was changed to Hamilton, Smith & Co., continuing thus until January,1888. That partnership was then dissolved and the firm of Smith, Graham& Jones was formed, which in February 1888, opened business in the brick block known as the Commercial Hotel, at Wynne. Here they carry an average stock of $20,000 and are going a good business. Mr. Smith was married in February, 1881 to Miss Mary Mebane (a native of Cross County and daughterof W. T. Mebane). To the union of Mr. & Mrs. Smith have been born two children: Bertie and Willie. Mrs. Smith is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Mr. Smith owns two farms comprising 475 acres, with fifty under cultivation and another tract three miles southeast of Wynne with 125 acres under cultivation. He is at present building an elegant new cottage with the hall and ceilings finished in natural wood and the rooms planned and designed by Mrs. Smith.
SMITH T.B. CROSS CO.
T. B. Smith, of the firm of Smith, Cole & Davis, of Cross County, is a native of Northern Alabama, a son of W. H. and Minerva (Levesque) Smith,who also came originally from that State. The father moved to Arkansas in 1854 and located in Poinsett (now Cross) County, where he bought and entered a farm of 640 acres. He served in the Indian War of 1836 for a short time, and was married in 1842-43, being the father of ten children, five of whom are still living: W. A., T. B. (our subject), Ophelia (wifeof J. W. Perkins, of Jonesboro), Ala (wife of R. P. Fulenwider, of Jackson,Mo.), and Laura (wife of J. M. Puryear, of Jonesboro). Mrs. Smith was a member of the Methodist Church, and died in 1879, her husband surviving until 1884. He was a very popular man and served in several local offices.T. B. Smith was reared on a farm and educated in the subscribtion schools of this county, also attending the school of Covington, Tenn. He afterward engaged in farming on his father's land and also on a rented farm until 1876, when he bought a place containing 240 acres. This original amount has been increased until he now owns some 2,000 acres, having about 400 acres under cultivation. Mr. Smith was married in 1874 to Miss Bettie Levesque, daughter of Capt. J. M. Levesque [whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work]. They are parents of three children (two living): Nannie B., Rufus (deceased) and Morris. Mr. Smith is the largest farmer in the county,cultivating over 1,000 acres, and is also extremely engaged in the sawmill business, having an interest in two mills with Messrs. Cole and Davis.Their output will be some 2,000,000 feet yearly from each of the two mills. He is also interested in a steam-gin, in connection with one of his saw-mills. His brother-in-law, Mr. W. T. Levesque, is associated with him in the gin. Mr. Smith has served as a member of the county court, and is at present county commissioner, and it was under his management that the present court house was built. For this attractive and useful public structure he deserves great praise. Mr. Smith is a member of the A. F. &A. M. His connection with the affairs of Cross County has caused him to become widely known, and the faithful manner in which he has deported himself in the discharge of public duties has redounded greatly to his own credit and the benefit of the community.
SMITH W.H. CROSS CO. USARMY-Indian War
SEE T.B.SMITH
SMITH WILLIAM USARMY-WAR OF 1813 LEE CO.-page 621
SEE G.F.SMITH
SNOWDEN STEPHEN F. ST.FRANCIS
Stephen F. Snowden was born in Gibson County, Tenn., in 1844. His father and mother immigrated from North Carolina at an early day and when he was about two years old the father died. At the age of ten years his mother moved to Memphis, Tenn., where she still resides. Stephen's first work in Memphis was in a butcher shop, where he remained about three years. He then went on the Mississippi River as cabin boy, continuing for some time in this and other capacities, or, till about 1863, when he entered the employ of the Memphis & Charleston Railroad as brakesman. He remained at this business about one year. In 1864 Mr. Snowden farmed and cut cord wood on Island Forty in the Mississippi River eighteen miles above Memphis. In 1865-66-67 he was employed on a tug plying the Mississippi River above and below Memphis. His last work on the water was acting as mate on a steamer running up and down White and Black Rivers in 1868. On the second day of March, 1869, he landed in St. Francis County, Ark., where he still resides. He has been occupied in farming since his arrival and now owns 250 acres of land, seventy acres of which are in a high state of cultivation. W. Snowden's father dying when he was quite young and leaving his mother in indigent circumstances caused him to be raised without any education. Consequently he had to depend on mother wit alone, but to his credit be it said he is in better circumstances than many who have had the advantage of a good schooling. Mr. Snowden was married in 1871 to Miss Temperance M. Claiborn, daughter of Thomas and Laura A. Claiborn. To Mr. and Mrs. Snowden have been born four children: Johnie (born May 18, 1873, and died October 6, 1875), Vital (born January 1, 1876), Delia (born August 14, 1878) and Mildred (born November 2, 1882). Mr. Snowden is a Democrat of the first water, and with his wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He is a member in high standing of the Knights of Honor and enjoys the respect of all who know him. He is a liberal supporter of all worthy objects that indicate the growth and prosperity of the country.
SPAIN R.M. CROSS CO. CSA-McNeil's Regiment-POW/Wounded-Civil War
R. M. Spain was born in 1834, and was reared to agricultural pursuits in Maury County, Tenn., from the ages of eighteen to twenty-three being employed as a farm laborer. In I856 he was married to Miss Margaret E. Benderman, and for two years after lived with his father-in-law. He then rented for a short time, and in 1859 came to this county. buying his present farm, consisting of 297 acres to which he has added some eighty-six acres, and has now 125 acres under cultivation. Mr. and Mrs.Spain are the parents of ten children, four largest of whom survive: Emma E. (wife of J. W. Moore), Ozni, Lenora E., and John A. In 1862 Mr. Spain joined the Confederate army in McNeil's regiment and served until July 4, 1868, when he was wounded at the battle of Helena, and was taken prisoner, being removed to the Memphis hospital, where he was kept until October of that year; then he was confined at Alton, Ill., and he was removed to Camp Douglas, from which he was paroled in 1865. When he returned home his family were in much better circumstances than he expected to find them. His negroes were still on the farm, and had it in good order and crops growing. In 1874 Mr. Spain was elected assessor, acceptably discharging the duties of that position for two years. Mrs. Spain is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He belongs to the A. F. & A. M., and is a public spirited and enterprising man, enjoying the respect of all who know him.
SPARKMAN R.H. -DR ST.FRANCIS CSA-McNeil's Regiment-Civil War
R. H. Sparkman, M. D., one of Forrest City's enterprising citizens, was born in North Carolina, May 10, 1828, being the son of John and Nancy (Wooten) Sparkman. John Sparkman owed his nativity to North Carolina, but moved to Tennessee when the subject of this sketch was quite small, locating in Shelby County, Tenn., where his death occurred in his fifty-ninth year. Mrs. Sparkman was also of North Carolina origin and by her union with Mr. Sparkman became the mother of five children, R. H. being the only one now living. The name Sparkman, as might be supposed, is Irish, the ancestors of the family coming at an early day from the Emerald Isle. The grandfather was a soldier in the War of the Revolution, and the maternal grandfather served in the War of 1812. Dr. Sparkman received a good common education in the schools of Shelby County, and afterward attended his first course of medical lectures in Cincinnati, his early ambition having been to be a physician, and by his determination and diligent application to his studies he became a credit to that most noble of all professions. He graduated with honors from the Medical School at Memphis in 1857, and immediately began practice in Shelby County, but a year afterward, in 1858, making a trip to Arkansas became convinced that that State promised a better opening, so located on the Helena road, five miles from Forrest City. At the breaking out of the war he had built up an enviable practice. He joined the Confederate army, McGee's company, McNeil's regiment, afterward becoming surgeon of that regiment. The company was soon made independent and reported to Col. Dobbins, Dr. Sparkman remaining in the service about two years. He returned to Arkansas and practiced until 1875, but succeeded in collecting only about half of his bills, some of them of long standing. He has since retired from active practice, and is now engaged in farming, owning 450 acres of valuable land. Dr. Sparkman was united in marriage on December 23, 1859, to Mrs. Liza (Purvis) Daniel, of North Carolina. Dr. and Mrs. Sparkman are members of the Baptist Church, and the former is a member of A. F. & A. M. . OBIT:Dr.R.H.Sparkman died Wednesday night, and was buried yesterday in the Forrest City Cemetery. Fuller notice next week.1-2-1903-1-9-1903 DEATH OF DR.R.H.SPARKMAN-One of St.Francis County's pioneers, died at his home in Forrest City Dec.31,1902, just as the old year was passing away into the past to be forgotten by many and revered as a memory by others. The remains were interred in the Forrest City Cemetery on New Year's day, and were followed to their last resting place by relatives and many old time friends. The funeral tookplace from the family residence and was conducted by Eld.W.H.Paslay. Dr.Sparkman was a mason, a good citizen and a christian gentleman. He was quiet and unostentatious, and was loved, honored and respected by all who knew him well. At the time of his death he was in his 75th year, and his demise was probably due as much to his years as to any other cause. He leaves the partner of his life's joys and sorrows in her declining years to mourn her loss alone. In her deep affiction and loneliness our hearts go out to her in tender and sincere sympathy. May she be comforted with the thought that all things are ordered by an all-wise Creator for the best, and that the parting will but make the meeting a greater joy. CITY CEMETERY
SPARKS G.N. CROSS CO.
G. N. Sparks, of the firm of Daltroff, Sparks & Oliver, merchants at Wynne, is one of the most enterprising business men of the place. He owes his nativity to McMinnville, Tenn., where his birth occurred in 1853, and is the youngest of ten children born to the union of Thomas and Mary L. (Boothe) Sparks, both natives of the Old Dominion. The father was a tiller of the soil and followed this occupation in Tennessee until 1859, when he moved to Arkansas, and settled at Jonesboro, Craighead County, where he purchased 320 acres of land, only slightly improved. Mr. Sparks immediately began erecting good buildings, clearing land, and soon bought other tracts in the the vicinity. He gave all of his children homes at the time of their majority and was a man whose of shrewd business tact is remembered by old settlers. He became one of the best-known men in several counties, and died in 1878. The mother's death occurred two years later, and both were seventy four years of age. G. N. Sparks early in life became familiar with the duties of the farm and attended the schools of Craighead County until fifteen years of age. Later he took a commercial course at Leddin's College at Memphis, and when seventeen years of age he left the parental roof, went to Forrest City, where he engaged as clerk in the firm of Sparks & Rollwage, and continued with this firm until 1874, when he was united in marriage to Miss Jennie Cobbs, a native of Arkansas, and the daughter of C.H. Cobbs, a pioneer of St. Francis County. After his marriage Mr. Sparks removed to the old homestead, where his father had settled on his arrival in Arkansas, and which was given to G.N. Sparks at that time. Here he was engaged in farming and teaching school for four years, and in 1880 he engaged as bookkeeper for for Killough & Erwin at Wittsburg. After five years he changed to a similar position with Block & Co., who had opened a branch store at Wynne. In January, 1886, that firm was bought out by Daltroff, Sparks & Oliver, who opened a fine store in Wynne. Mr.Sparks owns a fine residence in that city, and is the owner of real estate in Forrest City and 160 acres of good land in Craighead County. He is a member of the K. & P, Levesque Lodge No.52, at Wynne, and is also a member of the Knights and Ladies of Honor, Pearl Lodge. Mrs.Sparks is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church. To the union of Mr.& Mrs.Sparks, were born two children: Lena May and Annie Blanche. Mr.Sparks is a man of cordial and generous dispostion, is a member of a large firm and is well thought of by all. He remembers distinctly that at their first settlement in Craighead County, there was but one shanty where the city of Jonesboro now stands, and this was used as a saloon and kept by the man named Pollard.
SPENCE PHILIP BRENT-COLONEL CSA-Gen.Leonidas Polk-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1295
NASHVILLE, TN
SPIVEY JOHN H. CSA-Blythe's Battalion-Wounded at Battle of Beaver Dam Bayou-Civil War LEE CO.-page 622
John H. Spivey first saw the light of day in Alabama, and after spending nine or ten years of his life in that State, he moved to Tennessee, remaining there about four years; the balance of his boyhood days were passed in Mississippi. He was reared on his father's farm, but received a good education in the common schools of the community in which he lived, and when grown served an apprenticeship as a mechanic, but has followed farming nearly all of his life. He was born on April 8, 1821, to the union of Tample and Charity (Hicks) Spivey. The former's birth occurred in Moore County, N. C., on September 22, 1794. He emigrated to Alabama in 1818 and was married in June, 1820, remaining in that State some ten years, when he went to Hardeman County, Tenn. Four years later he removed to the Chickasaw Nation in Mississippi, which was then occupied by [p.622] the Indians, and now forms a part of Tippah County. In 1849 he went with his wife to Texas, in which State they spent the balance of their lives. Mr. Spivey was a millwright and farmer by occupation, and at the time of his death, in 1877, was possessed of considerable property. Mrs. Spivey was born on October 17, 1802, in North Carolina, and died in 1873. They were members of the Baptist Church, and had a family of sixteen children, nine sons and seven daughters, eight of whom are still living. John H., the principal of this sketch, removed to Monroe (now Lee) County, Ark., in November, 1863, and was engaged in farming until 1872, when he entered the ranks of the merchants of this county, though he still carries on farming. In 1862 he enlisted in the Confederate army as a member of Blythe's battalion, and participated in a number of battles and skirmishes, being wounded at the battle of Beaver Dam Bayou, by a shot through the right arm. This disabled him so that he was disqualified from active duty. He was at that time a lieutenant of his company. Mr. Spivey was married in November, 1845, in Hardeman County, Tenn., to Miss Martha A. Howard, of Madison County, Ala., and daughter of George and Penelope (Moore) Howard, of North Carolina nativity. She was born on November 17, 1824, and is the mother of nine children, six sons and three daughters, five of whom survive: Mary E. (wife of John Ward, of Lee County), William A. (also a farmer of Lee County), Andrew T. (a farmer of Lincoln County, Tenn.), Luada (now Mrs. Bickeroff) and Thaddeus F. (also of this county. Mr. Spivey is a stanch Democrat, and was elected justice of the peace in 1874, which position he held six years; he has also been a notary public for eight years. He was appointed postmaster of Moro in 1882, and discharged the duties of that position until November of the past year. He is an unaffiliated member of the Masonic order, in which he has taken the Royal Arch degree, and is a member of the County Grange; he also belongs to the Missionary Baptist Church, as does his wife.
STACY G.W. CROSS CO.
Mr. Stacy known throughout the county as an upright and thorough going citizen, was thrown upon his own resources when very young. At the age of sixteen he took charge of his mother's farm and bought out interested in this farm. The old homestead consisted of 200 acres, located in this county, with forty-five cultivated. He sold this place a few years, and bought the eighty acres of land on which he now lives, this lying near to the corporation of what now is Cherry Valley, yet was not surveyed at the time he purchased this tract. He has since sold thirty acres of this land for building purposes. Mr.Stacy engaged in the mercantile business in 1877, at this place, carrying a stock of general merchandise worth between $4,000 and $5,000 and built up a large trade, doing a business which averages about $20,000 per year. Mr.Stacy was born in this county in 1853, and was the son of Miles and Rebecca (Duke) Stacy, natives of Arkansas and Tennessee, respectively. The senior Stacy was a farmer and machinist by trade, living in this State until his thirteenth year, when he went to New Orleans, remaining there until twenty-seven years of age, when he returned to this State. He was married in Mississippi in 1834. In 1844, he came to Cross county, where he purchased some 400 acres of land. He held the office of county judge for five years, holding this up to the time of his death, which occurred April 18,1853. He was the father of fourteen children, five of whom are living: Amelia, Louisa, C.M., R.M., and G.W (our subject). Mrs. Stacy is still living in her seventy third year, and resides with G.W. The latter was married in June, 1875, to Miss Eva (McCall) Beadle, a daughter of B.G. and Evaline (Wilson) Beadle, originally of Indiana and North Carolina, respectively. Mr.Beadle was first cousin of Abraham Lincoln, and served during the late conflict in the United States frigate "Annie." Mr.Beadle was engaged in the manufacture of cotton gins, and died in 1876. Mr.& Mrs.Stacy are the parents of six chidlren: C.M., Lena and Ester (who are away at school), and Miles, Henry and Glenn (at home). Mr.Stacy is a staunch Democrat in politics, and has officiated as postmaster of Cherry Valley for a number of years.
STAYTON D.H. -DR ST.FRANCIS CSA-Army-Asst.Surgeon-Civil War
D. H. Stayton, M. D., was born and reared in Phillips County, Ark. His father, Thomas N. Stayton, made his advent into the world in Delaware, in 1809, and landed in Arkansas on February 14, 1829, settling in Helens, which was at that time only a village numbering but seven families. Mr. Stayton painted the first house in that present city. His father, Hill D. Stayton, was employed as State surveyor at the time, and helped to lay out the section lines of those counties. Pioneers of such early days depended largely on their rifles for subsistence, as the farms were small and not cleared, but their children are the large land owners and prosperous farmers of the present. Mr. Stayton was married after coming to Arkansas to Miss Easter Harris, a daughter of William R. Harris, who moved to this State in 1833. They were the parents of five children, three of whom are still living: John W. (a lawyer of Jackson County and at one time judge of the court), Ruth (now the wife of Dr. Hearing, of Brinkley, Ark.) and D. H. (the subject of this sketch). The latter was born on September 13, 1837, being reared on the farm in Phillips County. His first absence from home was to attend the University of Louisville (Ky.) Medical Department. After taking his first course he served four years as assistant surgeon in the Confederate army. At the close of the war he practiced in Lee County until 1870, when he returned to the University and completed his course, which hostilities had interfered with, and graduated in the spring of 1871, afterward resuming his practice at his old home. In 1887 he came to and located in St. Francis County, at Palestine, where he has since been engaged in attending to the prosecution of his chosen profession, his practice being large and steadily increasing. Dr. Stayton was married May 9, 1862, to Mrs. Caroline Bowden (nee Lockart), a daughter of Thomas Lockart, of North Carolina. They have a family of three children: David H. (who is married and lives near Palestine), Thomas L. and Lelia C. Dr. Stayton was once president of the board of medical examiners of Lee County, and is medical examiner of the Royal Arcanum; he is also a member of the United States board of pension examining surgeons for this locality, and examiner of the K. of H. and of the K. & L. of H. Besides being a member of the three lodges named he belongs to the Masonic order, in which he has occupied all of the positions of honor. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is now lord mayor of the incorporated town of Palestine, Ark. OBIT:Dr.D.H.Stayton, formerly of this county, more recently, of Searcy, died at his home Monday. He is the brother of Judge J.W.Stayton of Newport.8-23-1895
STEDMAN LEONIDAS CSA-CO.G-First Arkansas Reg-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1305
GAINESVILLE
STERN J.G.-CAPTAIN ST.FRANCIS USARMY-Eighty-Fourth Pennsylvania Infantry-Civil War
Capt. J. G. Stern's first trip south was an unwelcome one, but he remained for some time, boarding at Libby Prison and Belle-Isle. After his exchange he was again taken prisoner at the siege of Petersburg. Preferring death to that of prison life, he took the desperate chances and left his captors on the field of battle; this being done in daylight on the run. He was given a parting salute by a volley of musketry. The patriotic enthusiasm with which it was given was shown by a bullet hole through his equipage and one through his coat. Although given such a hearty farewell he stopped not until he reached his regiment, the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry. He participated in a number of battles, among the principal ones were Fredericksburg. Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Appomattox Court House, through the siege of Petersburg, and was present at the surrender of Gen. Lee. He was born April 17, 1844, in the State of Pennsylvania. At the close of the war he followed his parents to the State of Illinois, where he completed his education, which was very limited up to that time. During the latter years of his residence in that State he was employed in teaching school. In 1872 he went south a second time and located in Arkansaw, Phillips County, at the mouth of St. Francis River, where he worked as a laborer in a saw-mill. He soon engaged in business on his own account, getting out logs and staves. A few years later he accepted a position as agent for the Helena Lumber Company, and purchased a half interest in a boat running on the St. Francis and Mississippi Rivers, of which he was captain and pilot. Selling out his interest in the boat about seven years ago, he came to Madison, where he is now engaged in the timber and shingle business. He leased a shingle-mill about five years ago with a capacity of from 8,000,000 to 10,000,000 shingles per year. He owns a number of thousand of acres of timber land, located near his mill and to which he is connected by a tramway, operated by steam-power and leading into the woods for several miles. His parents are both living in the State of Illinois, his father at the age of seventy-one, and his mother one year younger. They were the parents of nine children, six of whom are living.
STEWART JAMES M. ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.A-Fifth Arkansas Infantry-Hart's Regiment-Civil War
James M. Stewart, of the representative firm of Stewart & Taylor, abstract, loan and general insurance agents of Forrest Citywas born at Collierville, in Shelby County, Tenn., in 1842. In 1859 he came to Arkansas, locating at the old county seat of Madison, in St. Francis County, where for two years he was engaged as clerk and book-keeper by an establishment at that point. When the war between the States was declared he went to Kentucky to join the cavalry service, but the delicate condition of his health caused him to be rejected, much to his chagrin. Giving his supplies to a companion who had been more fortunate in being accepted, he returned to Arkansas and joined the Fifth Arkansas (Hart's) Regiment as a private of Company A; he was afterward adjutant of his regiment, and at the close of the war was commanding Company A, in the Trans-Mississippi Department. He served for four years, and participated in all the principal engagements of the State. When peace had been declared Mr. Stewart accepted a position of trust with a firm at Memphis, Tenn., where he remained until 1868, leaving at that time to return to St. Francis County to fill a position as clerk and book-keeper. In 1879 he was elected clerk of the circuit court, in which capacity he served for four consecutive terms, in a manner eliciting the satisfaction and admiration of all concerned. Mr. Stewart then ceased to be an aspirant for office, and at that time was more popular with the people of the county than he had ever been before. By this prudent and all-wise step he still remains one of the most esteemed and influential men in the community. Soon after leaving the clerk's office he, in company with Mr. Taylor, formed the present real-estate firm, which is one of the most widely known and substantial establishments of this branch of business in this section of the State, they owning over 10,000 acres of valuable land. In societies Mr. Stewart is identified with the F. & A. M., K. T., K. of H. and K. & L. of H. Washington G. and Sarah W. (Griggs) Stewart, his parents, were natives of South Carolina and Tennessee, respectively, he being the fourth of a family of nine children born to their union. Washington Stewart was a millwright by trade, and enjoyed an extensive business in Tennessee and Mississippi. He executed a greater part of the work on the plank road out of Memphis, Tenn., through Mississippi, on Big Creek Plank Road, and many other public highways. He was a man of prominence and influence, and was one of the first mayors of Madison, the old county seat of St. Francis County. He died in 1868. J. M. Stewart was married, in 1866, to Miss Ollie E. Colson, of Paducah, Ky., and by her became the father of three children: James H., Elbert and Mary E. Mr. Stewart, besides his other interests, is a stockholder in and one of the incorporators of the Forrest City Hotel Company. He was elected secretary of that company at its organization, serving as such until forced by ill health to vacate in the winter of 1888. He is also a stockholder in and one of the original incorporators of the Bank of Eastern Arkansas, located at Forrest City. A member of the city council of the town of Forrest City and chairman of the finance committee, he was also twice elected a member of the school board of the special school district of Forrest City, and as such took an active interest in educational affairs. He served as Master of the Masonic Lodge here several terms and was Grand Marshal of the Grand Lodge of this State, also Dictator of the Lodge of K. of H. at same place, several consecutive terms. CITY CEMETERY
STONE J.E.--DR. ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.B-First Arkansas Mounted Rifles-Civil War
J. E. Stone, M. D., has reached an eminence in his profession which renders his name almost a household word throughout Forrest City, and the surrounding locality. He received his literary education in Tennessee, and commenced the study of medicine under a tutor in Arkansas, afterward entering the Missouri Medical College (known then as the old McDowell College, and situated in St. Louis), where he was graduated with honors. Entering the Confederate army in May, 1861, in Company B, First Arkansas Mounted Rifles, he served over four years, participating in the battles of Oak Hill (where he was severely wounded) and Pea Ridge, and was then transferred across to the Army of Tennessee, just after the battle of Corinth. He also took an active part at Jackson (Miss.), Chickamauga, Duggers' Gap, New Hope Church, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Franklin, and several other engagements of minor importance. After the war Dr. Stone located in Van Buren County, Ark., where he actively followed the practice of his chosen profession for five years, then going to Memphis, and thence to Walnut Bend, Ark. In 1883 he came to Forrest City, and still enjoys an extensive patronage, besides a large livery business, also owning considerable land, both here and in Lee County. He is one of Forrest City's most enterprising and influential citizens, and has done much in his own peculiar way toward the present advancement and prosperity of the place. The Doctor has been twice married, his first union occurring in Tennessee, and the second in Arkansas. He was born in Virginia in 1839, and is the son of M. G. and Martha (Stovall) Stone, also originally from the Old Dominion. Dr. Stone is a member in high standing of the various Masonic lodges of this place. OBIT: 3-15-1912 DR.STONE PASSES AWAY FRIDAY MORNING=After a well spent life of 73 years, the spirit of Dr.J.E.Stone took its flight Friday morning, Mar.15,1912. His death was not unexpected, for he had been in ill health since the the greatest sorrow of his life occurred-the death of his beloved on May 8,1905,-but nevertheless his passing away causes regret and sorrow among his many friends here and elsewhere. Dr.Stone was a native of Virgiinia, having been born in Boyton, Va. on Feb.10,1839. He attended the schools of his native county until early childhood, but received his literary education principally in Tennessee. He began the study of medicine, however in Arkansas, under a tutor, and graduated with honors from the Missouri medical college located at St.Louis. Dr.Stone was a brave and gallant soldier, entering the Confederate army in May 1861, in Company R, First Arkansas Mounted Rifles, and serving over four years. He was an earnest and fearless participant in the battles of Springfield, Missouri and Pea Ridge, Ark., was severely wounded during the former. He was then transferred to the Army of Tennessee, and took an acitve part in the engagements at Jackson, MIssissippi; Chickamauga, Richmond, Kentucky, Duggin's Gap, New Hope church, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Franklin and elsewhere. When hostilities ceased, he located in Van Buren county, Arkansas, where he practiced his profession for five years. He then went to Memphis, and thence to Walnut Bend, Arkansas, and in 1883 came to Forrest City where he has since continuously resided. He had been in the city council at intervals for twenty years, and also was twice elected mayor. He was a member of the Episcopal church and of several Masonic lodges of the city. Funeral Sunday morning, at the Forrest City cemetery, under the auspices of the Masonic lodge, services by Rev.E.T.Mabley of the Episcopal church. Dr. Stone was married to Miss Ora Branch, of Shelby Co., Tennessee, on the 22nd day of October, 1872, who died on the 24th of October 1874. He was again married on May 10,1879, to Miss Mansfield Rodgers Dupuy, to whom he has been entirely devoted until her death May 3,1905. He owns considerable property in this and Lee county. CITY CEMETERY
STONER JOHN -DR. CROSS CO. USARMY-Seventy-Seventh Illinois Infantry-Asst.Surgeon-Civil War
John Stoner, M. D., a retired physician of Tyronza, has been closely identified with professional affairs during an active and busy life. He graduated from the Jefferson Medical College, of Philadelphia In 1851, after which he commenced the practice of his adopted calling in Pennsylvania, remaining there for three years. While in that state he was married, in 1842, to Louisa Bixler, who died in 1866, leaving five children, two still living: Robley D. Stoner and Mary (the wife of Mr. Simcox ). Dr. Stoner married, in 1867, his second wife, formerly Miss. Kate Huxtable, of New York State. They are the parents of two children:Frank and Ida. Dr. Stoner was born in York County, Penn., October 17, 1822,and was a son of Samuel S. Stoner, originally from Germany, and Mary Brubaker,of Pennsylvania nativity. About 1871 Dr. Stoner moved to Arkansas, and settled in Cross County, where he now lives, having been engaged in farming and stockraising since that time. He has a fine place of 320 acres on the St. Francis River. Dr. Stoner served in the Union Army for three years, as assistant surgeon in the Seventy-Seventh Illinois Infantry. Himself and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He also belongs to the I. O. O. F.,and is recognized as a citizen of influence and worth. .
STOUT J.W.-CAPTAIN ST.FRANCIS CSA-FIRST BATTALION-ARKANSAS CAVALRY-CIVIL WAR
Capt. J. W. Stout enlisted in the Rebel army, in 1862, in the First Battalion, Arkansas Cavalry, Gen. Price commanding. He was captured at the battle of Big Black Bridge, Miss., May 17, 1863, and sent to military prison on Johnson's Island, in Lake Erie, where he was kept till February, 1865. After the collapse of the Confederacy, he returned to his family, and subsequently removed to Cross County. Ark., remaining there till 1871. Coming to St. Francis County, he purchased a home of 200 acres of land, and has since followed farming regularly and successfully, also serving the public as a mill and gin proprietor. Capt. Stout was born in McMinn County. E. Tenn., in 1829, and is of German descent, being a son of Daniel and Elisabeth Stout. His father was born in Virginia, and his mother in Kentucky. Her maiden name was Franklin. The senior Stout was a professional school-teacher in McMinn County, E. Tenn., for a series of years, and taught ten years in succession in the same academy. J. W.'s boyhood was spent in Tennessee, in attending school, and in 1851 he moved with his father to Walker County, Ga., following farming for about one year. Then he was engaged as salesman with Parham & Lee, in the mercantile business, till December, 1854. He was married December 26, to Mrs. Elizabeth B. Brooks, daughter of Benjamin C. Hardin, who had one daughter. They have had nine children born to them, four of whom are dead, three sons and one daughter. Five children are living, two sons and three daughters: Minnie (the wife of Rev. W. W. Hendrix), Hollace W., Flora (wife of Dr. A. A. Berry), Thomas J. and Ophelia. Georgie A., the daughter of Mrs. Stout, is the wife of A. C. Shaver. Capt. Stout and wife, and all the children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He also belongs to the Masonic order and the Knights of Honor. His wife is a member of the K. & L. of H. He is Democratic politically. OBIT:Colt-Capt.J.W.Stout, an old and respected citizen of New Castle, died last Thursday. His remains were buried in the Loughridge graveyard last Friday, where they were followed by a large concourse of friends.8-5-1898-Capt.J.W.Stout, who was favorably known throughout the county, died at his home ten miles north of Forrest City, July.28,1898, ages 69 years. The death of Capt.Stout caused deep gloom in the family circle and the entire community. His presence will be greatly missed by his daily associates; he was a kind husband, a kind an charitable citizen. He was a member of the Methodist church and of the Masonic fraternity and was buried by that fraternity at LOUGHRIDGE. Capt.Stout leaves a wife and four children, and a host of friends to mourn his loss. A Friend.FORREST CITY TIMES 8-5-1898 LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY
SULLIVAN JACOB A. LEE CO.-page 622
Jacob A. Sullivan's boyhood was spent on his father's farm in Tennessee, and the war breaking out during his school days his education was interrupted, and he was obliged to work at farm labor, when he should have been receiving instructions in the common English branches. He began farming at the age of twenty-two, and has followed that occupation all his life. Born in Tipton County, Tenn., in 1847, Mr. Sullivan moved to Lee County in 1876, where he engaged in farming, in 1881 opening up a store. He carries a stock of general merchandise invoicing about $5,000, and enjoys a good trade. He was married in 1869 to Miss Mary F. Wooten, daughter of Cannon S. and Helen Wooten. They are the parents of nine children, six still living: James R., Isaac R., Charles C., Jacob S., Hugh, Mary A. and Fred. Isaac Sullivan, the father of the principal of this sketch, was born in Sumner County, Tenn., in 1814, and yet survives. His twin brother, Jacob Sullivan, so closely resembles him that it is nearly impossible to distinguish them. They are both farmers by occupation. They have an older brother, Nathan, who was a prominent Methodist minister. Jacob A. Sullivan owns a farm of 160 acres of land, with 100 acres under cultivation.
TAYLOR GEORGE PRESSLEY ST.FRANCIS
George P. Taylor enjoys the friendship of, perhaps, a larger number of personal acquaintances than any man in Eastern Arkansas. Of magnificent physical proportions, standing over six feet high and weighing above 195 pounds, he attracts attention in any gathering. He was born in Cooper County, Mo., October 13, 1850, and traces his ancestry back four generations to John Taylor, of Scotch and Irish descant, who was the founder of that branch of the family on this side of the continent. He came to America before the great 'Stamp Act' and 'Boston Tea Party' occurred, and settled among the colonists of South Carolina. He was loyal to the country of his adoption when the great conflict began which announced the birth of the greatest nation on the face of the globe, and gave one of his sons to the cause of freedom. Early in the history of Kentucky John Taylor emigrated to this new territory, and here was born and reared his son, upon whom was conferred the family name of John. He grew to manhood in a locality even then thinly settled, but being lured by the tales of the new region across the Mississippi, followed the train of emigrants westward, and among the prominent names in the early history of Cooper County, Mo., appears that of John Taylor. He was there married to Miss Cochrell. After remaining in that county until the breaking out of the war he moved to St. Louis. George P. Taylor spent his early life in his native State, and attended school at Boonville, conducted by the renowned Dr. Kemper. He was fourteen years of age when his father removed to St. Louis, and in 1867 removed to Arkansas, settling in Lee County, on a plantation, where he remained until 1873. Then he came to Forrest City and died here in 1879 of yellow fever, his wife preceding him about one year. George P. Taylor located as a citizen of St. Francis County in 1870, where he was engaged in farming, being married in February, 1873, to Miss Alice Koonce, a native of this county. She is the mother of six children: Edgar P., Walter R., Alva J., Alice N., Nannie and George P., Jr. In 1874, after the reconstruction act, Mr. Taylor was elected representative from St. Francis County, though at that time only twenty-four years of age; he was re-elected in 1878, and in 1880 was appointed county collector. In 1880 he entered into the real-estate business at Forrest City. In 1885 the 'Forrest City Manufacturing Company' was formed, with Mr. Taylor as president, but a $5,000 fire shortly after caused the dissolution of the company. In 1884-85 he formed a partnership with Hatcher & Mann in the mercantile business, this remaining for two years. December, 1886, he was associated with James M. Stewart, as real-estate agents and brokers, then the only firm of the kind in the county. He is one of the organizers and is secretary of the Forrest City Hotel Company, a corporation with a capital stock of $24,000, and is also a stockholder and director of the Bank of Eastern Arkansas, located at Forrest City, which has a capital stock of $50,000. Both enterprises yield good returns, and their stock is quoted above par. Mr. Taylor also owns several large plantations in this county, and is conceded to be one of its most prominent citizens, especially having the esteem and confidence of the Democracy of this locality, as is shown by the fact that for eight consecutive years he has been chairman of the County Central Committee, and was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention of 1888. He was also a delegate to the National Farmers' Congress, held at Montgomery, Ala., in November, 1889. Mr. Taylor is a member of the Masonic order, in which he holds the office of Master, also belonging to the order of Knights of Pythias. Besides these he is a member of the I. O. O. F., and of the Knights and Ladies of Honor. Mrs. Taylor is a member of the Baptist Church. Their home in Forrest City is one of the finest here, elegantly furnished, and contains one of the largest and best-selected libraries in the county, OBIT: 5-16-1902 JUDGE TAYLOR PASSES AWAY=Buried under the auspices of the Masons. Judge George P.Taylor, who was stricken with apoplexy on May.7, died Tuesday, May 13,1902 at his home. He never spoke again from the attack on the 7th, but lay unconscious until death claimed its victim, and he passed away peacefully and without a struggle. "Death loves a shining mark," in claiming Hon.George P.Taylor as its victim, it has robbed the family of its mainstay and protector; of a loving husband, and a kind and indulgent father. He was perhaps better known and more universally esteemed than any other character in Eastern Arkansas. He has been prominent in social, business, church, political, and fraternal circles for many years, and in the discharge of his duties as a representative of his constituents here and following of his inclinations, has mingled with the great men of the state and nation among whom he has a legion of friends. The writer has known the Judge for sixteen years, and he has always been our friend, and his counsel was always wise and never selfish. The funeral sermon was delivered by Elder W.H.Paslay, who was assisted in the ceremonies by Elder A.N.Couch, at the Baptist church, Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock. The remains were accompanied from the residence by the Blue lodge and a Knights Templar escort, to the Forrest City cemetery under the auspices of Forrest City Lodge No.198, F.A. & M. The Woodmen of the World also attended the funeral in a body, and accompanied the body to its resting place. The funeral procession was lead by Tyler Geo.W.Pearson, and the Citizen's Concert Band, and was one of the largest in the history of the city. The following biographical sketch is taken from the 1892 Souvenir edition of the Forrest City Times: A man of over six feet in height, and 195 pounds, was born in Cooper County, Missouri, Oct.13,1850, and traces his ancestry back to John Taylor of Scotch and Irish descent, who was the founder of that branch of the family on this side of the continent. He came to America before the great "Stamp Act" and "Boston Tea Party" occurred, and settled among the colonies in South Carolina. He was loyal to the country of his adoption when the great conflict began which announced the birth of the greatest nation on the face of the globe, and gave one of his sons to the cause of freedom. Early in the history of Kentucky, John Taylor emigrated to this territory, and here was born and reared his son, upon whom was bestowed the family name of John. He grew to manhood in a locality even then thinly settled, but being lured by the tales of the new region across the Mississippi, followed the train of emigrants westward, and among the prominent names in the early history of Cooper County, Missouri. appears that of John Taylor. He was there married to Miss Cockrell. After remaining there in that county till the breaking out of the war he moved to St.Louis. George P.Taylor spent his life in his native state, and attended school at Boonville, taught by Rev.Dr.Kemper. OBIT-BIO He was fourteen when his father moved to St.Louis, and in 1867 removed to Arkansas; settling in Lee County on a plantation, where he remained until 1873. Then he came to Forrest City, and died here in 1879 of yellow fever, his wife preceding him by about a year. George P.Taylor located as as citizen of St.Francis county in 1870, where he was engaged in farming, being married in Feb.1873 to Miss Alice Koonce, a native of this county. She is the mother of six children-Edgar P.,Walter R.,Alva J., Alice N., Nannie, and George Jr. In 1874 after the reconstruction act, Mr.Taylor was elected representative of St.Francis county, though at that time only twenty four years of age. He was re-elected in 1878 and 1880 was appointed county collector. In 1880 he entered into the real estate business at Forrest City. In 1885, the Forrest City Manufacturing Co. was formed, with Mr.Taylor as President, but a fire after caused the dissolution of the business. In 1881, he formed a partnership with Hatcher & Mann in the mercantile business, remaining two years. December, 1886, he was associated with James M.Stewart as real estate agents and brokers, then the only firm of that kind in the county. He is one of the organizers and is the secretary of the Forrest City Hotel company; a stockholder and director of the Bank of Eastern Arkansas. He also owns several plantations in this county, and is conceded to be one of its most prominent citizens. He is presently a member of the prosperous firm of Taylor & Izard, real estate and insurance agents. He is a member of the Baptist church, and their home is one of the finest here, with a well stocked library. Bringing the sketch on down to now: the firm of Taylor & Izard were succeeded by Geo.P.Taylor & Co., Edgar P.Taylor taking the junior partnership. In 1896, the subject of this sketch was made Brigadier General of the Arkansas State Guard by Governor Fishback. In 1898, he was elected to the office of County and Probate Judge. All of the family aforementioned survive him. CITY CEMETERY
TAYLOR J. H. CROSS CO. CSA-Twenty-Third Arkansas Infantry-POW-Civil War
J. H. Taylor started life as a farmer at the age of twenty, on a farm in this county, which he rented for about five years, when he purchased 40 acres some three miles east of Wynne. In 1878 he traded for this land on which he now lives, consisting of 160 acres with ten acres under cultivation. At this time he has forty acres under cultivation. In 1862, Mr.Taylor embraced the principles which he believed right, enlisting in the Twenty-third Arkansas Infantry in which he served only 18 months, being captured at Ft.Hudson, then he was paroled and never exchanged. He has been married twice: first in October, 1864, to Miss L.C.Pulley, who died in May 1887, having been the mother of nine children, four of whom are still living: Mary I. (wife of A. May, a resident of St.Francis county), A.S., A.M., and George (who are at home.) Mr.Taylor was married the second time in 1888, to Mrs.Ellen Ramsey (nee Griffin). She is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as was also Mr.Taylor's first wife. Mr.Taylor belongs to the A.F. & A.M., and is a popular citizen of Wynne township. His parents, Adolford and Martha A. (Brown) Taylor, were natives of Tennessee, the former of whom moved to this state in 1842 and first settled in Jackson County, where he remained two years, then finding a home in St.Francis County. After two or three years there he came to Cross County and settled at the foot of Crowley's Ridge, where he rented a farm. In 1847 Mr.Taylor entered a quarter section of land, one mile from where the town of Wynne is now located. Afterward selling out, in 1854 he bought the farm on which he resided till his death, in March, 1881, having survived his wife by twenty-two years. They were members of the Methodist Church, and were the parents of nine children, two of whom are living.
TAYLOR JOSEPH CROSS CO.
Joseph Taylor is one of the oldest settlers in Cross County, and was born in Kentucky in January, 1809, being the son of Peter and Elizabeth (Dawson) Taylor, natives of Kentucky and Georgia, respectively. Peter Taylor, whose parents were Chapman Taylor and Rachel Taylor, was married in June,1806, and became the father of twelve children, five still living: Joseph (the second one of the family), Daniel (in Colorado), Peter in (Texas), Elizabeth (now Mrs. Hodges, of Illinois), and Rachel (now Mrs. Williams, of Texas). Mr.Taylor died in 1825. Joseph Taylor has been twice married: first, to Susan Levesque, in 1830, and died in 1866, leaving seven children. five of whom survive: William, James (who resides in Augusta, Ark.), Ellen (the widow of J. J. Fields,an old settler of this county) and Glenn (at home). Mr. Stacy is a Democrat in an old settler of this county), Elizabeth (now Mrs. McKey, of Texas), and Mary. Mr. Taylor was married to his second wife in February, 1872, she being Miss Louisa Stafford. They are the parents of one child, now deceased. Joseph Taylor came to what was then a part of Poinsett (now Cross) County, in 1857, where he purchased 200 acres of land, with about sixty acres cultivation, to this he has since added some forty acres; in 1886 moved to Cherry Valley, where he State he bought a house and lot, and now has one of the finest homes in the village. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as was also his first wife. He belongs to the A F. & A.M. Mr. Taylor is a Democrat, politically, but never took an active part in politics, and never favored slavery.
TAYLOR THOMAS L. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Army-Civil War
Thomas L. Taylor, a prominent planter of St. Francis County, is a native of Missouri, and a son of John and Mary Elizabeth (Cockrell) Taylor, originally from Virginia. John Taylor and wife came to Arkansas in 1866, where he engaged in farming (in this county), during his life. Thomas L. received a good education at the public schools of this township, and later attended college in Clay County, Mo., supplementing this by an attendance at the Kemper School of Boonville. He left this institution in the fall of 1861 to join the Confederate army, in which he served until taken prisoner in 1863, being confined eight months, after which he was paroled. His health having suffered by close confinement he went to California, but returned in 1866 by wagon train, as the cholera which was prevalent along the rivers prevented a passage by boat. Mr. Taylor was married in August, 1874, in Shelby County, Tenn., to Miss Sallie A. Jarman, but she lived only a few months. He owns a fine farm of 120 acres, with a large part of it under cultivation, having good improvements, etc. He is a prominent Democrat of the Jeffersonian type.
TAYLOR WILLIAM CROSS CO. CSA-Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry-Civil War
William Taylor, in his association with the affairs of this county, has come to be recognized as one of the prominent farmers. Born in Alabama, in 1830, he is a son of Joseph and Susan (Levesque) Taylor, and growing up was reared principally in Alabama, receiving a good education, for the times, in the common schools. At the age of twenty he commenced farming for himself of rented land, and in 1852, removed with his father to Western Tennessee, where he remained for only one year, then going to Panola County, Mississippi. He worked at the carpenter trade for a few years in that county, and in 1859, came to Cross County (then Poinsett County), Arkansas, locating in what is now Mitchell Township. At first renting land until 1866, he then bought 80 acres on Crowley's Ridge, but in 1871, he sold this place and bought his present estate, consisting of 160 acres, with twenty five under cultivation. He has also cleared up some seventy-five acres of fine bottom land, and has a spendid frame house close to the village of Cherry Valley. Besides his farming interests he is in the carpentering trade. In 1861, Mr.Taylor enlisted on the side of the Confederacy, in the Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry, serving in the Tennessee Division. He acted as wagon master for some time, and took part in the battles of Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and Dalton, Ga. After the last battle, he came west and joined Gen.Price's command as first lieutenant in a cavalry regiment, remaining with him on his raid through Missouri, in 1864 and 1865. Mr.Taylor has been married twice; first in 1851, to Mary C. Murphy, a native of Alabama, who died in 1871, leaving five children (three now living): Julia O.(wife of P.C.Crumpton), Frederick P.(deceased), W.C. (deceased), John M. (clerk in the Commercial Hotel in St.Louis, Mo.), and James P. (deceased, who was killed in a storm while riding through the woods, and having a tree fall on and killing him). Mr.Taylor was married the second time, in 1872, to Mrs.Emma C.Brinkley (nee Stevens), daughter of James and Rachel (Stovall) Stevens, of Tennessee nativity. By this union are five children, (four living): Robert N., Charles (deceased), Rachel, Maud and Lillie (twins). Mr. & Mrs.Taylor are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, as was also his first wife. He is a Royal Arch Mason, and belongs to Arcada Lodge No. 183, in which he holds the office of Senior Warden. Mr.Taylor is also connected with the I.O.O.F.. and the K. of H. A strong Democrat, he is a liberal donator to all church, educational, and charitable objects.
THOMAS LEWIS USARMY-WAR OF 1812 LEE CO.-page 618
SEE JOHN L.ROWLAND
THOMPSON ANDREW J. CSA- Dobbins' Regiment-2ND LT-Civil War/USARMY-MEXICAN WAR LEE CO.-page 623
Andrew J. Thompson. Foremost among the leading farmers of Lee County, and well known throughout Phillips and Lee Counties, is Andrew J. Thompson, who has been a resident in this State since 1840, and a citizen of Lee County since 1881. Born in Garrard County, Ky., on December 12, 1828, he is a son of Davis and Gabraella (Dunn) Thompson, natives of West Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. Davis Thompson moved to the Blue Grass State with his parents when a child, and remained there until 1836, when he came to Arkansas, having been appointed land agent by President Jackson, for the State of Arkansas. Locating at Helena he moved his family four years later, and held the position referred to until elected to the State legislature in 1840. He was also one of the commissioners appointed to re-establish the line between Arkansas and Missouri. In 1846 he enlisted for the Mexican War, starting out as a private, but was soon promoted to the command of his company, and was commissary of his regiment. After the close of the war he was elected sheriff of [p.623] Phillips County, in which capacity he served four years. Mr. Thompson then retired from active life, and died in 1859. He was a son of Arthur Thompson, of Scotch and Irish descent, who died in Kentucky about 1820. Mrs. Thompson was a daughter of Benjamin Dunn, and was born in Baltimore, Md. Her father was a soldier in the Revolutionary War. Of their large family of children four are still living: Josephine (now Mrs. Hargravis, a resident of Helena), Helen (wife of Judge Hanks, of Helena), one daughter (now Mrs. C. L. Moore, also of that city) and Andrew J. (the subject of this sketch and the eldest of those living). The latter was reared and educated in Helena, remaining there until the war. After Gen. Curtis had taken Helena, Mr. Thompson passed the Federal lines and joined the Confederate army, enlisting in Dobbins' regiment, in which he was afterward promoted to second lieutenant. In December of that year (1862) he was captured by a party of the Fourteenth Illinois Cavalry and taken to Helena and then to Memphis, Tenn., where, through the influence of Senator Sebastin, he was given his freedom for a time, but was soon sent North and confined t Camp Chase, in Ohio, and then to Fort Delaware, and was held a prisoner until exchanged at Johnson's Island in December, 1864. After the war, returning to Helena, he was engaged in farming for twelve years, later ran a steam ferry, and for two years was occupied in operating a large steam cotton-gin at Helena. In 1881 he came to this county and purchased a farm on which he still lives, and has now 1,000 acres of land, with nearly 700 acres under cultivation, all made since the war by hard work and good business management. He at one time also owned a half interest in the Helena Oil Mills. Mr. Thompson was married in July, 1865, to Miss Eliza Jones, a native of Limestone County, Ala., and who died in 1868, leaving one son, Arthur Thompson, now book-keeper and general superintendent in D. H. Crebe's oil mills at Helena. His second wife, to whom he was married in 1870, was formerly Miss Sallie E. Crenshaw, also of Limestone County, Ala., and who died in 1886, leaving one daughter, Jessie F., at home. Mr. Thompson is a Democrat, and a leader in the political movements of his township.
THOMPSON JOHN J. LEE CO.-page 623
John J. Thompson was born in Bedford County, Tenn., January 25, 1823, and is the son of Samuel C. and Rebecca (Doty) Thompson. Samuel Thompson, a native of Virginia, was born in 1801, and married in Tennessee, about the year 1820, Miss Doty, who was born in Tennessee in 1803. They were the parents of ten children, of whom those living are: John J., Rebecca A. and Mary E.; those deceased are: William, Isaac D., Enoch G., Lucy, Henry, Nancy D. and Thomas. Mr. Thompson died in Hardeman County, Tenn., in 1862, and his wife in 1875. John J. received but limited advantages for schooling, the ducational facilities at the period of his boyhood being far from satisfactory. At the age of twenty-one he began life on his own responsibility, selecting farming as his occupation, which, together with the mechanic's trade, has principally occupied him. Coming to Arkansas in 1861, he settled in Phillips County, near where he now resides in Lee County. He owns eighty acres of land with fifty in cultivation, the principal products being corn and cotton; he is also engaged to some extent in the raising of cattle and hogs. Mr. Thompson was married in Hardeman County, Tenn., on March 24, 1846, to Miss Mary R. Clift, a native of that State and county, and a daughter of Barney B. and Helsie, Clift. Mrs. Thompson died in Lee County, October 23, 1886, having borne seven children: John H. (Baptist minister of Springfield, Mo.), William T. (a farmer of Lee County, Ark.) and Franklin P., Martha E., James R., Charles R. and one infant dead. Mr. Thompson served as justice of the peace for one year, and has been a member of the school board fortwo years. In secret organizations he is connected with the Agricultural Wheel.
THOMPSON JOSEPH S. USARMY-WAR OF 1812 LEE CO.-page 624
Joseph S. Thompson came originally from Hardeman County, Tenn., being a son of Thomas Thompson, a native of Orange County, N. C., who died in 1830. The latter was a soldier in the War of 1812, and took part in some of the most important engagements of the war, including the battle of New Orleans. He was a farmer and blacksmith by occupation. Joseph S., the principal [p.624] of this sketch, was reared in his native county until after grown to manhood. He did not have the advantages for obtaining an education which his children now enjoy, as Hardeman County was at that time but thinly settled, and there was no school-house or church in his neighborhood. He began farming for himself at the age of twenty-one, andin 1858 came to Arkansas and purchased a farm near Marianna, not moving his family here until the ollowing year. He was first married, in 1840, to Miss Nancy Allen, of North Carolina, who died in 1861, leaving three children, Ellen (the wife of John Lovejoy, a farmer of Lee County) being the only survivor; Thomas was killed by an accidental fall from a tree, and Sarah (now deceased) was the wife of Leander Johnson. Mr. Thompson was afterward married in Woodruff County, about 1863, to Mrs. Mary McLean (nee Crawford), widow of William J. McLean, and a daughter of William Crawford. She died in 1874, having borne two children: Minnie (wife of Edward Gillen Waters, a farmer of this county) and William J. His third and present wife, Mrs. Susan Green, a native of Mississippi, was the daughter of William and Betsey (Coley) Dougherty. They are the parents of one son, Joseph Ritter. Mr. Thompson now owns a farm of 160 acres, with 100 acres under cultivation. He and wife are members of the Christian Church, in which they take an active part.
TILLMAN NEWTON J. CSA-Gen.Price-Lt.-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1279
FAYETTEVILLE
TOOLE JOHN CROSS CO.
John Toole, roadmaster of the Helena branch of the Iron Mountain Railroad, from Knott to Helena, was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., in 1847, and is the son of John and Mary Toole. The parents moved to St.Louis in 1856, and here John Toole Jr.,received his education. He remained in school until about fifteen years of age, and then commenced railroading on the Iron Mountain road, beginning as brakeman, and after a long time, promoted to conductor. He ran on the road in the latter capacity for about eight years, and was then appointed head roadmaster on the main line between St.Louis and Little Rock. In May 1888, he was put in charge of the Helena branch, and has since made his headquarters at Wynne. Mr.Toole selected his companion for life in the person of Miss Conley, a native of St.Louis, Mo., and the wedding took place in 1869. To this union was born three children, a son and two daughters: John, Kate, and Alice. Mr.Toole is a member of Lodge 52 of the K. & P., and is one of the much respected citizens of the county. He has discharged every duty encumbent upon him in his positions of trust with accuracy and dispatch, and has the confidence of the public.
TYER D.A. CROSS CO. CSA-Price's Regiment-Civil War
D. A. Tyer was born in St.Francis County, Ark., shortly after his parents came to this state. Curtis Tyer, the father, was a blacksmith by trade and a native of Tennessee, who removed here in 1840, settling in St.Francis County, where he was married to Elizabeth Sparks, who was also of Tennessee origin. Mr.& Mrs.Tyer were the parents of eight children, four of whom are living: D.A., Mattie (wife of R.Harrell, of this township), T.C., (also a native of this township) and Sallie (wife of W.H.Newsom, a resident of Wynne). Mr.Tyer died in 1866, and his wife, who was a member of the Baptist Church, in 1873. D.A., the subject of this sketch, was born in 1846, and was reared on a farm, being educated in the subscription schools of the county. At the age of twenty-one, he commenced farming himself, and also ran a blacksmith shop, having learned that trade in his father's shop. In 1864, he joined the army, in defense of the Southern cause, and was in Price's raid through Missouri, in which he served until the close of the war. Mr.Tyer was married in 1866 to Miss Mary F.Lindley. Their union has been blessed by eight children: Ida (wife of T,N.Holt), Cora, Willie, Robert, Allen, Sallie, Stephen, and Grove M. In 1868 Mr.Tyer bought forty acres of land, to which he has since added another eighty, now having about sixty acres under cultivation, with a good dwelling: he also raises some stock. A public spirited man he is a liberal donator to all enterprises for the good of the community in which he lives.
TYER SAMUEL CROSS CO.
Samuel Tyer, Wynne, Ark. This venerable man has been a resident of Arkansas since 1817, and this of itself is sufficient to give him extensive acquaintance, even if his personal characteristics were not such to draw around him many friends. He was born in Tennessee in 1812, and in 1815, the family moved to Cape Giradeau County, Mo., where his father, Wright Tyer, made on crop and then, not liking the country very well, he went down to the present state of Arkansas and made on crop in what was then Smith Township, Cross County. The next year (1817) he brought his family to this section and there lived on vacant land for two years. In 1820, he bought eighty acres of land from William Russell, of St.Louis, who had been buying up most of the valuable land in this section. His father died in 1831. On this farm, Samuel Tyer spent his youth, helping to cultivate the farm. In those early days they exerienced many hardships and endured many privations. At the time of their settlement, in 1817, there were but six families between Ben Crowley's place, in Greene County, and the Jones place, then called Cherokee Village, on the southern border of the county. Here they lived, and as an occasional settler joined them the population increased. In 1838 Mr.Tyer married Miss Nancy Newton, a native of Wayne County, Tenn., whose father came to Arkansas in 1836 and started a blacksmith shop, but subsequently moved to Independence County, where he died at Sulphur Rock. After marriage, Mr.Tyer bought a farm three miles north of the present village of Wynne, cleared about twenty five acres and then sold out and moved to the Lone Star state, making the trip of 1,600 miles oveland in six months. Not liking the country or the people, he soon returned to Arkansas, satisfied that this country was good enough for him. On his return in 1862 he bought the place on which he still resides, a farm of 160 acres , which was almost wild land. This he immediately began to improve and at the present time has about forty acres under cultivation. He and his wife are living all alone in a house which has been their home for many years, and during that time they have witnessed the gradual development of the country. Their family consisted of eleven children, all now deceased but three: Josephus and Monroe, (who are living on the old place) and Melinda Jane (who resides in Poinsett County). Mrs. Tyer spun and wove the goods from which their clothes were made and she had not bought any domestic until a few years ago. Mr.Tyer has lived in what is now Cross County, Ark., longer than any one now living, and in the vicinity of Copper's Creek, where his father first settled, there were over thirty panthers killed in two years. This old and much respected couple have lived for fifty one years a happily married life and have had their share of hardships incident to the early pioneers. They raised all their provisions and made their own clothing. Mr.Tyer still farms and has a good crop of corn this year. This worthy couple have a set of knives and forks, still in a good state of preservation, which they have used all throughout their married life.
UNDERWOOD PHILLIP H. LEE CO.-page 624
Phillip H. Underwood has been a resident of Lee County since four years of age. He commenced farming for himself at the death of his father, on the old homestead, which occupation he has followed since that time. He was married, in 1873, to Miss Sallie Bennett, a daughter of Thomas B. and Betty (McCloudon) Bennett, natives of North Carolina and Georgia, respectively. Mr. and Mrs. Underwood are the parents of six children: Phillip O., Delia, Ola, Robert, Jettie and Honor. Mr. Underwood was born in Maury County, Tenn., in 1848, being a son of Edward and Mary Underwood, originally from North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The father of our subject was born in 1809, and was one of a family of six hildren; he died at the age of fifty-nine, having been a successful farmer in Tennessee, to which State he removed when a young man. There he made his home until 1852, when he came to Arkansas, and located in this county, dying here in 1868. Mr. Underwood owns a farm of 167 acres, of which he has forty-five acres under cultivation. His principal crop is cotton, but he is also engaged in stock raising on a small scale. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a prominent man of Lee County. His wife is of the Primitive Baptist faith.
VADADKIN EDWIN LINCOLN ST.FRANCIS
E. L. Vadakin, the popular editor of the Forrest City Times, owes his nativity to the State of Illinois, having first seen the light of day near the little town of Sullivan in 1864, as the son of H. F. and A. (Clements) Vadakin. H. F. Vadakin was born in Vermont, but when quite young immigrated to Illinois, settling near Sullivan, where he became well known to the citizens for many miles around as an efficient and courteous druggist. His business was of many years' standing, and his death in 1888 was sincerely mourned, both by his personal friends and those who knew him through reputation. Mrs. Vadakin died when E. L. was a little child. At the age of fourteen, the subject of this sketch entered a printing office and there laid the foundation of his future career. After a few months his brother-in-law purchased the paper, which was located at Stewardson, Ill., but soon sold it. Mr. Vadakin remained with the successor, receiving $10 per month for his services. His next move was to Tower Hill, Ill., where, as no other employment presented itself, he worked for three months on a farm. About this time a campaign paper was started in the town, and afforded work for our subject for some time, but unfortunately it was short-lived, and as it sunk into obscurity, the editor also failed to materialize, having neglected to give Mr. Vadakin any compensation for his labor. The latter, as might be supposed, found himself in rather straightened circumstances, but at this juncture, a railroad advertising agent stopped in the village, and taking a fancy to Mr. Vadakin, induced him to accompany him to Cincinnati, Ohio, promising to use his utmost endeavors to secure for him a good position in some one of the printing offices of that city. This he was unable to do, but he did furnish him a home for some time. Eager to become self-reliant, and not dependent on the bounty of his friends, Mr. Vadakin returned to his old home in Illinois, and accepted the position in one of the printing offices for the sum of $2 per week, and board. An uncle, who was a member of the Union Printing Company at Little Rock, then came to his assistance, and secured him work in an office in that city, where he remained for three years. At one time, while serving his apprenticeship, he had charge of the Union Job Office at Little Rock. Though his promotion was gradual, it was none the less sure, and he is to-day one of the expert printers in Arkansas. After working on the Democrat, at Lonoke, Ark., for some time, the proprietor purchased the Times at Forrest City, appointing Mr. Vadakin the manager, he to receive half of the net profits. The paper had almost died out, having become exceedingly unpopular from the effects of a newspaper controversy, but Mr. Vadakin brought it to the front, and it is now one of the best county papers in the State, besides being the leading publication of St. Francis County. In May, 1886, Mr. Vadakin was united in marriage with Miss Lillie B. Landvoigh, and to their union one child has been born, Dora Annette. Mr. Vadakin and his father-in-law bought the Times, and own it in partnership. He is a member of the Episcopal Church, and in politics a Democrat. CITY CEMETERY
VAN PATTEN PHILLIP-DR. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Thirteenth Arkansas Volunteer Infantry-Civil War
'Philip Van Patten, M. D.'' So reads the sign that noisily swings to and fro on its rusty hinges, attracting the passers-by on one of the principal streets of Forrest City. The busy little notice is given only a momentary thought by its many readers, but the reputation of him whom it represents, an efficient and popular physician, will survive him many years. Born in Schenectady County, N. Y., in 1827, Dr. Van Patten's boyhood days were passed in carving his name in wonderful designs on his desk and making pictures, much to the delight of his schoolmates, but aside from all his fun, he was a good scholar, and won the approbation and affection of his teachers. When only thirteen years old he was deprived of his father's love and protection, death claiming him while on business in Michigan. Philip then moved with his mother to Iowa, the mother afterward going to Denver, Colo., where she passed away in 1885, at the age of eighty-six years. His literary education was received in Iowa, he taking a classical course, under the able instruction of Father Pelamargues, a Catholic priest, of Paris, France. His studies extended to a course in Latin, Greek and Hebrew, the former being so thoroughly instilled in his mind, that he read Caesar some four years ago without consulting his Lexicon but six times. He made it a rule to regularly demonstrate a certain number of mathematical problems every morning, and now devotes a half hour daily to the study of classics. Entering the Medical University of Iowa when twenty-one, he graduated with honors in 1853, and first announced himself competent to alleviate the sufferings to which flesh is heir, in DeWitt, Iowa, where he practiced for one year in association with Dr. Asa Morgan. During the year 1861 he choose for the partner of his joys and sorrows the daughter of Col. John Miller, of Batesville, Ark., father of the late Gov. Miller. One child, Hattie L., born to Dr, and Mrs. Van Patten alone survives. She is now a student of art in Memphis, Tenn. During the war between the States, Dr. Van Patten was surgeon of the Thirteenth Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, Col. Tappen in command. He was afterward promoted to brigade-surgeon, and subsequently to the position of division-surgeon. For a short period he served as brigade-surgeon for Old Frank Cheatam, and was for two years in the Trans-Mississippi Department, under Gen. L. Polk, in Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri and Mississippi, also being surgeon of Fort Pillow, in 1861. He was present at the battle of Shiloh, and was made division-surgeon by Gen. Polk on the battlefield, in the presence of Albert Sidney Johnston and Beauregard. He was obliged to resign before the war closed, on account of nervous prostration. Dr. Van Patten's children have inherited his own studious propensities, and have been endowed by nature with unusual capabilities. Eva Lillian graduated in higher mathematics at the age of fourteen years, under Prof. D. L. Thompson, of Wittsburg, the course extending through Calculus. After thus having her reasoning powers developed far beyond the height attained by even some of the most brilliant women of our country, in order to give her that proficiency in language, literature and the fine arts, which she had already attained in mathematics, and understanding that a harmonious development of all the faculties is requisite to attain perfect personal and intellectual culture, Dr. Van Patten wisely sent her to Notre Dame, Ind., to the female school there, made famous the world over by the Sisters of Mercy. After having well improved the opportunities afforded her she again returned to her home an even more devoted student than before. During her leisure hours she was found poring over the works of Tyndall. Huxley and Darwin, drinking in the many good things in their writings and criticising contradictory statements appearing on different pages. In mathematics, literature, language, art and every other branch, her mind searched eagerly for knowledge, and she daily meditated on many of the great questions which have from remote ages vexed and perplexed the minds of our greatest thinkers. She was the constant companion of her father, and with him discussed all questions. Her greatness of heart was unlimited, and she had charity for the faults of all. Such women are priceless gems, but her physical constitution could not stand the draft on her intellect, and paralysis of the brain caused her death. Such an affliction is certainly to be lamented by more than her family, and it is to be hoped her young soul, freed from its incumbrance of clay, can see, without effort into all the mysteries she was continually investigating here. Hattie L., now the wife of Eugene Parrish, of Paragould, Ark., was on the point of graduating from Notre Dame, when the breaking out of diphtheria caused her sudden return home, and prevented her receiving a diploma. Her paintings and her music show the touch of an artist. She paints from nature with absolute perfection, and her portrait gems, which have been examined by many, are pronounced worthy of an artist of national reputation. She is an excellent English scholar, and proficient in Latin, French and German. She was married November 2, 1889. Birth: 1827Schenectady, Schenectady County, New York, USA Death: Jul. 20, 1890 Forrest City, St. Francis County, Arkansas, USA -BURIED COGBILL CEMETERY-CROSS COUNTY
VANN CLAUDE H. ST.FRANCIS
Claude H. Vann, editor and proprietor of the Forrest City Register, was born in Cross County, Ark., April 17, 1871, being the son of J. M. and Ida H. (Hare) Vann, well-known and highly esteemed residents of Cross County.Claude H. received his education in the schools of the county, and served an apprenticeship to the newspaper business in the office of the Cross County Chronicle. Having proved an able assistant in the office, at the expiration of his time he was given an opportunity to remain, but as better inducements were offered him by the Morrill Bros. Printing Company of New York as a traveling salesman, he accepted that position, and demonstrated his ability as a commercial traveler, being considered a valuable acquisition to the force of that house. He subsequently was occupied as solicitor of the Forrest City Times, and in September of 1889 purchased the Register of that city. It had become considerably run down at the time he took it in hand, but though only a few months have intervened since then, he is making rapid strides in its upbuilding, and success is the sure future of his earnest endeavors. Mr. Vann is a young man, eighteen years of age, and only recently located at Forrest City, but the prominence he has attained, the esteem in which he is held, and his position in business and social circles, concede him to be a prominent factor in the county. Birth: Apr. 17, 1872 Death: Mar. 30, 1894 Inscription:Son of J M and Ida VANNDALE CEMETERY-CROSS CO.
VANN JOHN M. CROSS CO.
John M. Vann, merchant and postmaster at Vanndale, Ark. Ever since his connection with the affairs of Cross County, Mr.Vann has displayed those sterling qualities, industry, perseverance and integrity, that have resulted in awarding him a representative place in matters pertaining to this community. He owes his nativity to Fayette County, Tenn., where his birth occurred in 1845, and is the eldest in a family of seven children born to Renselear and Emily M. (Maget) Vann, natives of North Carolina. The father was a farmer and came to Arkansas, in 1850, settling in St.Francis (now Cross County), about three miles south of the present site of Vanndale. In the same year he erected a cotton gin and grist mill, which was the first mill and gin in this section. He bought 640 acres of land on which he made many improvements, clearing about 200 acres, erecting buildings, etc., and made a good home for his family. He was well known as a thrifty and enterprising citizen, and was for a long time postmaster at Mill Ridge, the only postoffice in that section for a long time. He was also justice of the peace for a number of years. His death occurred on April 30,1887, at the age of sixty-nine years. His estimable wife had died two years previous. John M. Vann remained at home until his twentieth year and attended the common schools of the section. He was preparing to go away to school when breaking out of the war caused him to throw aside all thought of books. In 1867 he engaged as clerk for J.Q.Thomas & Co. at Wittsburg, with whom he continued for one year, and after which he began a business for himself at Cleburne, at that time the county seat. He continued in that business until 1879, when he moved to his farm and there erected a store, where he continued in that business until 1882. In October of that year he came to a place on the Iron Mountain Railroad that had just been named for his honor, Vanndale, and here he erected a store and dwelling. He has since been increasing his business and now carries a full stock of goods valued at $5,000. In 1870 he was appointed postmaster at Cleburne and has continued at such at that place and Vanndale ever since, being the only one ever at the latter place. Mr.Vann owns 440 acres of good tillable land, 100 acres of which is under cultivation and the balance mostly covered with good timber. He was married in 1870 to Miss Ida Hare, a native of Tennessee and the daughter of Rev.Thomas P. Hare, a pioneer preacher of this section. Three children were the result of this union: Claude (at present publishing the Register at Forrest City), Thomas and Bessie. The family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr.Vann is a member of the Knights and Ladies of Honor. He has served as school director for ten years and takes a deep interest in educational matters.
WADDELL JESSE CSA-Army-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1295
ALABAMA
WALDRIP WILLIAM BENNETT- DR. LEE CO.-page 625
Dr. William Bennett Waldrip is a native of Mississippi, his birth occurring in De Soto County (near Belmont), March 9, 1846. His father, S. G. Waldrip, of North Carolina, was born in 1818, and at an early age was apprenticed to a brick-mason, in which trade he became very proficient, in connection with farming, the latter being his principal occupation through life. He was married to Miss Martha J. Smart, of Mississippi, and by her became the father of five children, four now living: James M. (a resident farmer and brick-layer of Tate County, Miss.), William B. (our subject), Henry L. (of Tate County, Miss.), Elizabeth J. (widow of Ned Casey, now Mrs. John Gray, residing in Wheetley), Mary F. (Mrs. Henderson Freeman, died in 1885), Mr. Waldrip removed to Arkansas in 1874 and settled in St. Francis County, where he passed away in 1885. He was a member of the Masonic order, and in political views was a Whig until the death of that party, after which he became a Democrat. In his religious belief he was a Baptist, being a member of the Primitive Baptist Church. Mrs. Waldrip died in Wheetley, Ark., in 1883, having passed her sixty-seventh birthday. William B. Waldrip was reared in Mississippi, where he obtained a liberal common school education, and in 1809 began the study of his chosen profession, that of medicine-first, under the able instruction of Dr. J. M. Richro, and afterward attending the Medical Institute at Cincinnati, where he was graduated with high honors in the class of 1870. He first began to alleviate the sufferings of humanity in Marshall County, Miss., but one year later moved to Arkansas, locating in Monroe (now Lee) County in the town of Wheetley. Here he rapidly gained the confidence and respect of his fellow [p.625] citizens; both as an efficient physician and friend. Some years later he moved to his present location, which is situated six miles southeast of Wheetley, and though here but a few years many improvements that owe their existence to his presence show him to be a man of enterprise and progress. In connection with his practice he is engaged in farming and stock raising, in which he has been unusually successful. He owns 1,600 acres of valuable land with 240 under cultivation, and the general appearance of his farm and its appointments is of thrift and prosperity. The Doctor was married in Monroe County, August 31, 1871, to Ada, daughter of Peter W. and Martha W.(Bladen) Hollaran, of Alabama. Mrs. Waldrip died in 1882, having become the mother of four children, one now living, Frederick E. Dr. Waldrip was again married on September 20, 1888, to Miss Katie Henley, of Illinois, and the daughter of Elijah and Emma (Crutchfield) Henley (residents of Marianna). Dr. Waldrip is a Master Mason and in politics a Democrat. He is liberal and charitable, contributing to all worthy enterprises, as far as his limited time and means will permit.
WALL ENOCH W. LEE CO.-page 625
Enoch W. Wall is a native of Alabama, and a son of Enoch G. and Elizabeth J. (Chapman) Wall, originally from Georgia and Alabama, respectively. They were married in the latter State in 1853, and in 1865 removed to Arkanas, settling in Phillips County, where his wife died the following year, leaving three children, two still living: Enoch W. (the principal of this sketch) and William A. (a prominent farmer of this county). Mr. Wall was married a second time, by this union there being six children, three of whom survive: Judge J., Ada G. and Eula G. Mr. Wall was a decided Democrat, a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, in which he took an active part, and also belonged to the Masonic order. He was a farmer by occupation, and was comfortably well off at the time of his death, which occurred in 1880, at the age of forty-seven years. Enoch W. Wall was born in Russell County, Ala., May 29, 1854, and was reared from the age of twelve, in Phillips County, Ark. He began life for himself at the age of twenty two years as a farmer in Lee County, which was a part of Phillips County, where he now owns a fine farm of 340 acres, with over half under cultivation, lying in the heart of the "Arkansas Cotton Belt;" this yields him a large income from year to year. In 1880 and 1881 he was engaged in the mercantile business at Oak Forest, in connection with farming, but preferring agricultural life to that of a merchant, he sold out his store in 1881, and has since that time devoted himself exclusively to tilling the soil, in which, although having his share of losses and disappointments, he has been very successful. His pleasant home in this rich country is a full reward for the labor and care spent in its acquirement. Mr. Wall was married December 19, 1877, to Miss Lizzie D. Coleman, a native of the same State as himself, and a daughter of David and Viola F. Coleman, also of Alabama. They are the parents of three children: Enoch D., Orby G. and Laura V. Mr. Wall is a leading Democrat of the county, and holds the office of justice of the peace of his township, having served in this capacity for a number of years. His official duties he discharges with satisfaction to the citizens and with credit to himself. He is also president of the school board, and here also has won the respect and regard of his fellow men.
WALL WILLIAM A. LEE CO.-page 626
William A. Wall is a son of Enoch G. Wall, one of the pioneers of Lee County, who is now departed from this world, and who will be long remembered by the older citizens of the community. Enoch G. Wall was born in Georgia in 1833, and was married at the age of twenty to Miss Elizabeth J. Chapman, a native of Alabama, to which State he had removed a few years previous. There he made his home until 1865, when he removed to Arkansas, and settled in Phillips County, where his wife died the next year. She was the mother of three children, two of whom still live: Enoch W. (a well-known farmer of this county, whose biography precedes this) and William A. By a subsequent marriage six children were born, and three of these are living: Judge J., Ada G. and Eula G. Mr. Wall was actively interested in the political affairs of this county, being an outspoken Democrat. He was a member of the Cumberland [p.626] Presbyterian Church, and a Master Mason; was well-known throughout the community, and was highly respected, and owned a good farm, which was well improved. He was in comfortable circumstances at the time of his death, in 1880. The subject of this article was born in Barbour County, Ala., on April 9, 1856, but has been a resident of this State since nine years of age, devoting himself to the occupation of farming since old enough to handle a plow. He commenced farming for himself at the age of twenty-one, and has been very successful, now owning 200 acres of land, with half of it under cultivation, and which is well improved and stocked, and devoted principally to the raising of cotton. Mr. Wall was married on November 26, 1882, to Miss Mary Etta Mathews, of St. Francis County, and a daughter of George J. and Lydia (May) Mathews, who now reside in Lee County. Mrs. Wall was born on July 4, 1863. They have had a family of three children, two of whom are still living: Fannie P. and Lydia J. The second child, Green, died in 1886. Mr. Wall is a leading Democrat in Texas Township, and is recognized throughout this part of the county as a hard-working, industrious man.
WALLACE R.N. CRITTENDEN CO. CSA-Crittenden County Rangers-Joe Earl's Company-POW-Civil War
R. N. Wallace, prominently identified with the mercantile affairs of Bartonville, was born in Weakley County, Tenn., in 1840, being the son of James Wallace, originally from Barren County, Ky., who came to Tennessee about 1820 with his parents when eight years of age. He grew to manhood in Weakley County, and engaged in farming there, becoming married to Miss Mary E. Goldsby, a Kentuckian by birth, who went toTennessee with her parents in 1852 when she was a child. After they were married Mr. and Mrs. Waliace moved back to their native State, and lived there till their death. They were both members of the Baptist Church,and the parents of three sons and three daughters, of whom three sons and one daughter lived to be grown. J. G. Wallace, the youngest of the children, was reared by his grandfather, and is now a practicing lawyer in Russellville, Ark. R. N. Wallace, the oldest son, was left on his own resources at the age of sixteen, his father having died at that time,and he came to Arkansas in 1856, and to Crittenden County in 1859, where he has since lived. During his stay here he has spent two years in Tennessee attending school, and after his return he was occupied in teaching. At the breaking out of the late war he enlisted with the Crittenden County Rangers, Joe Earl's company, and later joined the Second and Third Arkansas as a private. He was captured near Dalton,Ga., in 1864, and taken to Camp Chase, Ohio, from which he was paroled after being kept for five months. Returning to his command he was again taken prisoner the day before the surrender of Joseph E. Johnston, and was paroled from Chester Court House, S. C., and came back home on horseback. After his arrival he resumed farming till 1869, when he entered the firm of R. C. Wallace & Co., and opened the first store at Crawfordsville. A. F. Crawford, a member of the above firm, was the first postmaster at Crawfordsville, in 1870, the first post office established west of Marion. Mr. Wallace remained with this company for two years, when they sold to Anderson & Allen. He then carried on farming till the spring of 1887, when he opened and conducted a store for one year at Needmore, and after going out of business at Need more,embarked in merchandising at Bartonville, where he continued till October, 1889. Then he sold to H. F. Avery, and has since given his attention to his farm which consists of 300 acres under cultivation,besides small tracts of wild land. Mr. Wallace was married to Mrs. Sarah A. Chambars, nee Graham, daughter of H. Graham, one of the old settlers in this county. Mrs. Graham is still living, and is seventy-nine years of age. Mrs. Wallace died in January, 1888. She was an active and earnest member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was the mother of one child, John G., who was born August 26, 1874. Mr. Wallace is a Master Mason, and stands high among the prominent citizens of CrittendenCounty.
WALTON WILLIAM A. CSA-CO.F-Capt. D. C. Govan's Second Arkansas Infantry Volunteer Cavalry-Civil War LEE CO.-page 626
William A. Walton. William H. Walton, a native of North Carolina, was born in 1808. He was married in 1836 to Mary A. Wynn, also of North Carolina origin, and by her became the father of nine children: William A. (the subject of this sketch), Susan H. (widow of John H. Moore, residing in Oak Forest, Lee County), Lucy M, (wife of J. Carr), T. (a farmer and residing in Texas), John R., Annie (deceased wife of R. R. Badders), Nancy Z. (Mrs. John B. Grove, deceased), Nicholas J. and Catherine. Mr. Walton died in Lee County, Ark., in 1876, his wife passing away in Phillips County in 1863. William A. Walton was reared in North Carolina until reaching the age of fifteen, at which time he came with his parents to Arkansas. He received as good an education as could be obtained in the common schools and academies about his home, and when twenty-six years old he began life on his own responsibility, choosing farming as his occupation. He now owns one of the best and most picturesque farms in the western part of Lee County, consisting of 200 acres of land, with 115 under cultivation and well adapted to the growing of corn and cotton, which are the principal crops. He raises grasses and clover to some extent, and is quite extensively engaged in the development of stock. He has a steam gin and grist-mill valued at $1,500, and the general impression formed of the many improvements about the farm is that thrift and industry are characteristics predominating with the owner. He enlisted in May, 1861, in Company F, Capt. D. C. Govan's Second Arkansas Infantry Volunteer Cavalry, participating in the battles of Mumfordsville, Shiloh, Perryville, Stone River and Murfreesboro. He received a wound from a minie ball at the battle of Shiloh, and was also wounded at Murfreesboro by grape-shot, this entering his shoulder, which disabled him permanently. He was captured while in the hospital at Murfreesboro and taken to Louisville and then to Camp Butler, afterward being exchanged at City Point, Miss., where he remained until the close of the war. After the close of hostilities Mr. Walton resumed his agricultural pursuits, and a fair degree of success has attended his efforts, and prosperity now rules supreme. He was married in Phillips County, November 2, 1868, to Miss Nancy C. Boykin, a native of North Carolina, born February 12, 1852, and a daughter of Edwin and Jane Boykin. Nine children have blessed their union: Florence B., Charles, Mary E., John R., Edwin, and Frank D., Kismick, Carl and Paul, dead. Mr. Walton is a member of the Methodist Church, and served as justice of the peace of Texas Township for two years. He has also been a member of the school district, and is a man that takes great interest in all enterprises to which he lends his able support and influence.
WARD JOHN C. LEE CO.-page 627
John C. Ward, merchant and farmer, Haynes, Ark. This prominent business man and successful agriculturist is a native of Lee County, Ark., his birth occurring on October 2, 1866, and is the first child born to the union of Lafayette and Fannie (Adams) Ward, the father a native of Kentucky and the mother of Georgia. Lafayette Ward is one of the oldest physicians of this county now [p.627] living, coming here in 1857 and settling in Phillips County (now Lee County) where his practice extended over a vast territory. He accumulated quite a nice fortune, and this he is at present enjoying. He was a soldier in the Mexican War and was also in the late war, being army surgeon of his regiment for a year or so. He tered service in the Mexican War at the age of fifteen years, was under Gen. Taylor in the First Kentucky Infantry and served during the entire time. He has been twice married; first, in 1851 to Miss Roxana Robards, of Louisville, Ky., and by her became the father of three children, all deceased. The wife died in 1862 or 1863, and in 1864 Dr. Ward married Miss Adams, who bore him three children, all deceased except John C. Ward. The mother was a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church and died in 1872. Dr. Ward is a member of the Catholic Church and of Irish parentage. John C. Ward was educated in the free schools of Lee County, and at the age of thirteen years entered the Catholic School on Washington Street, where he remained for one term. He then entered Miss Hattie Eunice's select school on Poplar Street, remained there but one term and then, in 1882, he attended school at Newton for some time. After this he entered the Lexington Commercial School, graduating from the same in 1886, and then returned home, where he began working for R. O. Gill. He continued with him for one year and in 1888 bought an interest in the business, and in 1889 succeeded him. Mr. Ward has been unusually successful in all his enterprises and does an annual business of $25,000. He and his father own about 4,500 acres of land with 550 acres under cultivation, on which are produced about 350 bales of cotton yearly. J. C. Ward selected for his companion in life Miss Ida Neolies, of Collierville. Tenn., and was united in marriage to her on November 4, 1889. Mr. Ward is a member of the Catholic Church, is a member of the K. of H., and is one of the leading young business men of Haynes. He contributes liberally to all worthy enterprises and is one of the promising young men of the county.
WARD LAFAYETTE CSA-ARMY-Civil War/USARMY-Gen. Taylor in the First Kentucky Infantry-MEXICAN WAR LEE CO.-page 627
SEE JOH C.WARD
WARREN ELLA MRS. CROSS CO.
Mrs.Ella Warren. Among the early and most prominent farmers of this county some twenty five years ago, was James W.Warren, who came to this state in 1852. He was the son of Jesse and Rebecca (Boon) Warren, who were the parents of seven children, all of whom are now dead. James Warren was married to Miss Ella Futrell in Tennessee in 1847, both natives of North Carolina. After his marriage Mr.Warren moved to this state, settling in what is now Cross County, but at the time of his settlement was Poinsett County, where he purchased a section of land, part of which is now the village of Vanndale. He also owned a number of negroes, and carried on a large plantation previous to the war. At the time of the rebellious outbreak Mr.Warren was in poor health, and so did not take any part in the Confederate service, and died soon after the war closed, in 1868. He was very active in politics, and was one of the leading men of his community, besides being one of the largest land owners in the county. He left his widow in good circumstances at the time of his death, and she has proven herself thoroughly capable of taking care of the property left her. Mr. & Mrs.Warren were the parents of seven children, two of whom are now living: Jefferson (who is married and carries on the farm for his mother), and James, also at home. Mrs.Warren's parents were very wealthy. They moved from North Carolina to Tennessee when she was but a child. To these parents were born eight children, five of whom still live: Ella (our subject), Sarah, Martha A. (now Mrs.Outland), Mary L., and James G. Mr.Futrell (our subject's father) died in 1883, and his wife in 1888. Mrs.Futrell was a member of the Baptist Church. Mrs.Warren is an enterprising and accomplished lady, and highly respected.
WATSON E.L. CSA-Eigth Arkansas Inf.-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1200
NEWPORT
WEATHERLY J.M. CSA-Second Arkansas-Hindman's Legion-Civil War LEE CO.-page 628
J. M. Weatherly, farmer, Marianna, Ark. The subject of this sketch needs no introduction to the people of Lee County, for a long residence here and above all a career of usefulness and prominence, have given him a wide spread acquaintance. He was originally from Maury County, Tenn., where he was born in 1838, and is the son of David and Sallie J. (Taylor) Weatherly, the father a native of North Carolina and the mother of Tennessee. David Weatherly came with his parents to Tennessee when an infant, and settled with them in Maury County. After growing up he followed the occupation of farming in Tennessee until 1852, when he came to Phillips County (now Lee County) and settled close to where La Grange now is. He came here in the employ of Gen. Pillow and continued in his employ until 1857, when he purchased a farm and commenced tilling the soil, remaining thus engaged until his death, which occurred in 1889, at Haynes, where he had been living for some time. He was over seventy-nine years of age at the time of his death. Mrs. Weatherly died in 1862. Mr. Weatherly was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and was a member of the Masonic fraternity. After the death of his wife Mr. Weatherly married, in 1868, Mrs. Sellers, who departed this life in 1872. Mr. Weatherly was then married to Mrs. Turner and became the father of two children, both deceased. His last wife survives him and resides in Haynes. J. M. Weatherly's school days were spent in Maury County, Tenn., and he came to this State with his father in 1852, remaining with him until his twenty-first year. In 1857 he returned to Tennessee and attended school at Columbia for two years. He afterward returned to Arkansas, taught school and commenced the study of law at Helena, Ark., under Adams & Hanks, eminent attorneys of Helena at that period. About this time the war broke out and his legal expectations were doomed for the time being. He joined the Confederate army in 1861, was one of the men who formed the company known as Hindman's legion, but was afterward attached to the Second Arkansas. He was a member of Company F, and served on the east side of the Misssissippi River until after the evacuation of Corinth, when he was discharged on account of ill health. While on [p.628] that side of the river he was not engaged in any battles and after returning to Helena, Ark., he could not remain there but enlisted in Company F, of Dobbins' regiment, of which he was appointed sergeant. From that he was promoted to lieutenant, and surrendered the company as first lieutenant at Wittsburg in 1865. He was in Gen. Price's raid through Missouri. After the war Mr. Weatherly returned home and engaged in school teaching, which occupation he continued for a short time. In 1869 he embarked in the mercantile business at Spring Creek, but only remained there until 1877, when he sold out and went to Palestine, St. Francis County, where he carried on farming and merchandising. He remained there until about 1880, when he moved his mill and gin machinery to Marianna, known as Ringville, where he has since been occupied in ginning, farming, and has also followed merchandising until the last year, when he sold out. He owns 160 acres of land with eighty acres under cultivation, and his average ginning yearly yields about 600 bales. Mr. Weatherly has been twice married; first, to Miss Mattie Harvey in 1873, and the fruits of this union were two children: Edgar and John H. Mrs. Weatherly died in the winter of 1877. She was a much respected and esteemed member of the Baptist Church. In 1884 Mr. Weatherly married Miss Bettie Moye, who bore him two children: Emma B. and Bettie. Mrs. Weatherly died in March, 1888, at Hot Springs, whither Mr. Weatherly had gone for the benefit of his health, her health having always been unusually good. She lived but three weeks after arriving there. Mr. Weatherly is one of the public-spirited men of this section, and favors all public improvements.
WEBB WADE ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.B-Firfth Arkansas Regiment-Civil War
Wade Webb, a farmer by occupation, owes his nativity to the State of North Carolina, his birth occurring in Edgecombe County in 1841. John and Esther Webb, his parents, were natives of the same State. The ancestors came from England before the Revolutionary War, settling near Jones River in Virginia. Wade Webb passed his youthful days in the schools of North Carolina, and upon coming to St. Francis County, Ark., in 1853, began farming. He now owns 200 acres, with 120 under a successful state of cultivation. He was married in July, 1866, to Matilda V., daughter of Absalom and Matilda Barker, and to their union seven children were given, five living: John Lee, Remington P., Willie W., James R. and Filbert. Mr. Webb enlisted during the war in the Confederate army, in Company B of the Fifth Arkansas Regiment, serving until the final surrender. He participated in the battles of Murfreesboro, Jonesboro, Stone River, Perryville, Missionary Ridge and Cumberland Gap. At the battle of Murfreesboro he received a severe wound. Mr. Webb is an enterprising, energetic farmer and citizen, and contributes liberally to those movements which betoken the good or growth of the county.
WEBSTER LEE LEE CO.-page 628
Lee Webster, one of the most extensive merchants and farmers of Lee County, is a native of Mississippi, and a son of James and Jane (Bank-head) Webster, who came primarily from Tennessee and North Carolina, respectively. Mr. Webster was a mechanic by occupation, and was reared in Mississippi, to which State his father had removed when he was a small boy. He was a man of some education, and was highly thought of by all who knew him. He died near Mount Pleasant, Miss., at the age of sixty-five. He was a son of Walter Webster, a native of Tennessee, also a farmer by occupation, who, at the time of his death, at the age of ninety, was possessed of considerable property. Mrs. Webster was born in 1820 and died in 1871. She was the daughter of Thomas Bankhead, of Ireland originally, who came over to this country when seventeen years of age, and engaged in farming in South Carolina, where he died at the age of eighty years. The subject of this sketch was born in Marshall County, Miss., in 1849. He started in life as deputy sheriff of his native county, in 1868, which office he filled for several years. Then removing to De Soto County, he was occupied in trading on the Mississippi River until 1879, at which time he came to Lee County, and embarked in the mercantile business, and also in farming, both of which he still carries on. He is now the owner of four half sections of land, and has 800 acres under cultivation, devoted to the raising of cotton, of which he produces from 1,000 to 1,200 bales per annum. He opened up his store of general merchandise in 1879, with a capital of $1,400. The stock now averages over $6,000, and his annual sales have aggregated $35,000, though a more correct estimate would be $50,000 for the past year. He also owns and operates a steam grist-mill and cotton-gin, of fifteen bales capacity per day. Mr. Webster was married, in 1871, to Miss Alice Gruffe, who was born in Kentucky, in 1855. They had one son which died in infancy, and they have since taken several orphan children to rear, for whom he has made provisions in his will as though they were his own. The subject of this sketch being quite a young boy at the breaking out of the war never enlisted, but took part in several skirmishes near his home. He is a stanch Democrat in politics, and takes an active part in political work of his county. He has been a member of the board of supervisors for some time.
WELD W.P. LEE CO.-page 629
W. P. Weld, editor of the Marianna Index, was born in Cape Girardeau County, Mo., April 8, 1862. At the death of his mother, in September, 1875, the family was broken up, and after a two years' stay with relatives in Ohio, he came to [p.629] this county and located. In 1882 he went to Indiana and attended the Valparaiso Normal School, from which he graduated in 1883. He then returned here and was employed as book-keeper until 1886, when he was appointed deputy sheriff, in charge of the office and collecting department, which position he held until he purchased the Index, started by John Thomas in 1874. It is a Democratic paper and the only newspaper published in this county. Mr, Weld was married in Batesville, Ark., to Miss Annie Granade, a native of this State, and only daughter of Rev. H. M. and Mrs. Anna Granade. They are the parents of one child, Jean Powell. Mr, Weld was a son of Ludovicus Weld, who was born in Vermont in January, 1802, and who came to Missouri late in the 50's, and who was a brother of Theodore D. Weld, the noted Abolitionist. He came to Arkansas, in 1879, to live with his children, and died in Woodruff County, in 1885, at the age of eighty-three years. His wife, the mother of our subject, was Miss Jane Porter, who was born in Ohio, in 1826, and was the mother of three children. Mr. Weld is a member of the Presbyterian Church, and belongs to the Royal Arcanum, Knights of Honor, Knights and Ladies of Honor and the I. O. G. T.
WHITE JOHN N. CROSS CO.
John M. White, proprietor of the cotton gin at Levesque, Smith Township, Cross County, Ark., first saw the light of day in Michigan, in 1848, and was the second of six children born to the marriage of James and Jane (Williams) White, natives of England and New York, respectively. The father went to California in 1849, and after returning followed agricultural pursuits in Michigan at an early day. Both parents are living at the present time. John N. White attended the public schools and the college at Hillsdale, until twenty years of age, when he engaged in the hardware business for himself in that town. In 1873, he moved to Missouri, located in Cole County, and engaged in the timber business, which he continued for three years. He then came to Arkansas and engaged in the same business of the White River. In 1884 he came to Cross County, settled at Cherry Valley, erected a sawmill and there remained about a year in partnership with D.J. Burks. They moved the mill in 1885, continuing at this new location until the fall of 1886, and then bought the mill on the bay, where they were engaged in cutting timber for the railroad during 1886 and 1887. They then built a gin and saw mill on the railroad, at a point named Levesque, and soon erected and opened the first store at that place. This store was soon sold to O.A.Hamilton, and in 1887 the gin was burned down. Mr.White then bought his partner out and, in 1888, put up a new steam gin with a capacity of twelve bales daily. In 1889, he sold the saw mill to Smith, Cole & Davis. At present, Mr.White is engaged in the logging business in the St.Francis bottom and in his gin at Levesque. He is a prominent saw mill and timber man, is active and energetic, and although of northern birth, finds Arkansas good enough for him. He was married in 1884 to Miss Alice Cartright, of Pine Bluff, and to this union has been born one child, a son named Elmer.
WIDENER JOHN M. ST.FRANCIS
John M. Widener first saw the light of day May 25, 1834, in a farm house situated in the wilds of St. Francis County. He grew to manhood in that locality with no companions save his brothers and sisters, and without the advantages of schools and churches which his children now enjoy. After remaining in this county until 1862, he went to Shelby County, Tenn., but three years later moved to Saline County, Ill., returning home in about a year. Mr. Widener owns, at this time, some eighty acres of land on the St. Francis River bottoms, and in connection with farming is successfully engaged in stock raising and in the timber business, his earnest efforts and industry having yielded substantial returns. His father, Samuel Widener, was born in North Carolina, in 1798, and lived there for a number of years, then removing to Alabama, where he remained for a short time. His home was Tennessee for a while, from which State he came to Arkansas, settling in the wilderness of St. Francis County. Here he resided until his death, which occurred in 1842. His wife, Margaret (Evans) Widener, died in 1838, leaving a family of ten children, John M., our subject being the only one living. The latter has been twice married; first, in 1858, to Miss Lavina Land, a native of this State, who died in 1877, leaving four children, two of these survive: Mary J. (wife of Samuel A. Mead, a farmer of St. Francis County) and Samuel A. (living at home). Mr. Widener was married the second time, in June, 1885, to Mrs. Mary McGuffey, daughter of John Halbert, of Missouri birth. Mr. and Mrs. Widener are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in which they take an active part, Mr. Widener being steward. He is of German descent, and a prominent Democrat, and a leading citizen of this county. OBIT:Word has just reached us of the death of Uncle John Widener, which occurred at Heber, Ark., the latter part of January. Widener was one of the pioneers of St.Francis bottoms, having located there in 1840, near the site of the town of Widener, which was named after his brother. About a year ago he and his son moved there. He was universally loved and respected, his word was law, and many differences were settled amicably by his judgement. His old friends and acquaintances will grieve to learn of his demise. Peace to his ashes. 2-10-1905 CEMETERY UNKNOWN
WILKES JESSE A. CSA-CO.I-Ballentine's regiment-Army of Tennessee-Civil War LEE CO.-page 629
Jesse A. Wilkes, ex-assessor of Lee County, Ark., was born in Yalobusha County, Miss., in 1837, and in 1855 came to Arkansas, and located in Spring Creek Township, soon after entering the Arkansas Christian College, at Fayetteville, which institution he was attending at the breaking out of the late war. He immediately joined the Confederate army, and after participating in the battle of Oak Hill his company was disbanded and joined the Army of Tennessee, he being a member of Company I, Ballentine's regiment, and was at the battle of Atlanta. He was chosen as one of Capt. Harvey's scouts, and served in that capacity for about eighteen months. The close of the war found him at Atlanta, and from there he returned to Arkansas, making the journey on horseback, having gone there on horseback. He and his brother then formed a partnership, and for two years were engaged in the cotton traffic at Memphis, Tenn., and in Arkansas, but upon the death of his brother Mr. Wilkes returned to Arkansas to settle up their business here, but found things in such a bad condition that it took him some time to adjust matters satisfactorily. Since that time he has followed various callings, and acted in various business capacities, but is now giving his attention to farming, being the owner of some excellent land in Spring Creek Township, and in other places in the county. In 1885 he was elected county assessor, and held the position two years. In 1882 he married Mrs. Mary E. Pascal, who is a member of the Christian Church. Eight Wilkes brothers came from England to the United States at a very early day and settled in Virginia, and now have descendants in Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas, Texas and Missouri. The father of our subject was a farmer, and both he and wife died when Jesse A. was a child. The latter had one brother and one sister, both dead.
WILKINS W.P. CROSS CO. CSA-McGee's Regiment-Civil War
W.P.Wilkins was partly reared to farm life in Tennesee, where he was born, and also in Kentucky, his parents having removed to the Blue Grass state when he was twelve years of age. In 1847, he came to Arkansas and located in what was then St.Francis (now Cross) County, within two miles of his present place of residence, and was engaged for the next five years as a farm laborer. In 1852, he purchased a quarter of section of land, since which time he has added forty acres more, and now has over 100 acres under cultivation, with a good house, buildings, and orchard, etc. In 1861 Mr.Wilkins joined the Confederate service in McGee's Regiment, in which he served until the close of the war, participating in the battles of Big Creek, Ironton, Mo., Wittsburg, and a number of skirmishes. Mr.Wilkins was born in Tennessee, in 1827, as a son of William and Nancy J. (Sutfin) Wilkins. The father was a prominent Tennessee farmer, and in 1839 moved to Kentucky and settled in Jackson County, remaining there until the year 1845, when his wife died. Returning thence to Marshall County, Tenn., he also died, at the age of ninety-six years. Mr.Wilkins served in the Revolutionary War, and was present at the surrender of Cornwallis. He was also blessed with good health, and was never known to call a doctor in his life. He had been married twice; first to a Miss Ellison, who was the mother of four children, all deceased, and after her death to the mother of our subject, who bore eleven children, three living: Isabella (the widow of William Trout), B.F. (a resident of Yell County, Ark.), and W.P. The latter was married in 1849 to Mss Mollie Eldridge. They have a family of ten children, seven of whom survive: P.P. ( resident of Wynne), Isabella (wife of P. Anderson), N. J., John, Molllie L. (the wife of James Halk), Rufus C. and R.G. Mr. and Mrs Wilkins are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He is connected with the A.F. & A.M., and is a member of the school board. Mr.Wilkins is a prominent man here-abouts, and takes a active part in politics, having served as a constable of the townhship.
WILLIAMS JAMES A.- DR. LEE CO.-page 630
James A. Williams, M. D., who enjoys the largest practice of any physician in Haynes, was reared on a farm in St. Clair County, Ala., where he received a common-school education, later passing his time on a farm in Lee County, Miss. At the age of nineteen he was appointed deputy sheriff of Lee County, which position he held one year. He then entered the agricultural schools of Pontotoc, Miss., where he remained eighteen months, and was subsequently employed by Clifton & Hoyle, druggists, of Tupelo, one year. During this time he studied medicine, and after leaving the drug store attended a course of lectures at Vanderbilt University, at Nashville. In 1881 he came to St. Francis County and practiced with Dr. Zuber two years, then returning to the Medical College at Nashville, from which he graduated in 1883. ollowing this, Dr. Williams returned to St. Francis County, and in 1888 came to Haynes, where he has since been actively and successfully engaged in the practice of his profession. He was born in St. Clair County, Ala., February 12, 1857, and is a son of R. M. and Cordelia (Dill) Williams, also natives of that State. R. M. Williams enlisted in the Confederate army in 1861, in the Tenth Alabama Infantry, in which he held the position of first [p.630] lieutenant, afterward being transferred to the cavalry service and serving as captain of his company. His wife died previous to his enlistment. Our subject was married in September, 1882, to Miss Julia Thompson, a daughter of James Thompson, treasurer of St. Francis County. They are the parents of three children: James Roger, Vivian and Alemeth. In polities the Doctor is a Democrat, and he is a member of the Baptist Church and of the Knights of Honor. He also belongs to the Lee and St. Francis Counties Medical Association. He is well known throughout this locality, notwithstanding the fact that he is comparatively a newcomer.
WILLIAMS NATHANIEL G. ST.FRANCIS CSA-Fifth Arkansas Infantry-Civil War
N. G. Williams is a descendant of a Revolutionary hero, and it was only natural that his patriotism should demonstrate itself at the outburst of civil strife in 1861. His paternal grandfather was one of the early settlers of North Carolina, and a soldier in the War of the Revolution, serving under Gen. Greene. His parents, Hardin and Martha (Tanner) Williams, were both natives of Tennessee, and had a family of three children, two of whom are living: Jane A. (widow of Samuel L. Sutton, of Phillips County) and N. G. The latter was born in Maury County, Tenn., on April 27, 1832. He spent his boyhood on the old home farm in that State, receiving a good education in the common schools of his county, after which he attended the University at Lebanon, Tenn. Two years before becoming of age he commenced farming for himself in Maury County, and in November, 1855, moved to Arkansas, locating in St. Francis County, where he was engaged in tilling the soil on the St. Francis River bottom lands, until the breaking out of the war. Then he entered the Confederate forces in the Fifth Arkansas Infantry, but was in only a few engagements, as he held the office of commissary of his regiment. After peace was declared he settled down to farming again at Taylor's Creek, and in 1883 opened up a stock of merchandise, since which time he has carried on the mercantile business in connection with farming. His stock of goods will invoice about $1,500, and he enjoys a good trade. Mr. Williams was married in 1854 to Mary Lee Wortham, who died thirteen years later, leaving one son, Lawrence E. He was married to his second wife, Martha H. Mosley, in 1869. They are the parents of three children: M. E. Williams, N. G. and M. J., all at home. Mr. Williams now owns 500 acres of land, with 131 acres under cultivation. His life illustrates what pluck and energy can accomplish in connection with good common sense, for success is bound to follow persistent effort. OBIT: 10-23-1908 LAST ROLL CALL= On Thursday, Oct.15th, 1908, at Colt, our old friend and comrade, N.G.Williams, Sr., answered the last roll call, and his spirit passed to its maker. The remains were carried to Caldwell Friday and interred. Nat Williams was 76 year of age at the time of his demise. At the beginning of the "late unpleasantness" he enlisted in the 23rd Arkansas, and bravely followed the fortunes of the "bonnie blue flag" until it was laid away in peace. The few surviving old soldiers regret the passing away of old Nat, and join the Times in sincere sympathy to those of his family left behind. CEMETERY UNKNOWN
WILLIAMS NATHANIEL L. -REV LEE CO.-page 630
Rev. Nathaniel L. Willson is a native of North Carolina, and a son of John G. and Sophia (Norfleet) Willson, who also came from that State. J. G. Willson was born in Franklin County in 1782, and was married in September, 1818, his death occurring in Marshall County, Miss., in 1874, aged ninety-two years. His father was a native of North Carolina, and died at the age of fifty-eight, and his grandfather, of Ireland, came to this country in the early part of the eighteenth century, and took part in the Revolutionary War. The father of Mrs. Willson was of Scotland birth, a soldier in the Revolutionary War, being seventy-six years of age at the time of his decease. She was fifty-eight years old when called away from earth. Nathaniel L. Willson, the only one living of a family of eight children, was born in Person County, March 12, 182 , and remained there until fifteen years of age, at which time he removed to Marshall County, Miss., with his parents. He was engaged in managing his father's farm, and was employed in surveying a greater part of his time, after which he learned the tanner's and saddlery trade, following these occupations during the war and until his stock was destroyed by the Federal army. Since that period he has devoted his attention to agricultural pursuits, in connection with his ministerial duties. He was ordained as a minister of the Missionary Baptist Church in 1861, of which he has been a member since 1840. Removing to Arkansas in 1886, Mr. Willson purchased his present farm of 160 acres, situated within a short distance of Moro, Lee County, of which he has sixty acres under cultivation, devoted principally to the raising of horses and cattle. He was married in De Soto County, Miss., in 1857, to Miss Nannie E. Jones, a native of South Carolina, and daughter of William and Rachel Jones. She died April 10, 1884, leaving eight children, five sons and three daughters, six of whom are still living: Priscilla M. (wife of James H. Carmichael, a farmer of De Soto County), Lafayette A. (a farmer of this county), Ethelbert W. (also engaged in farming in this county), Nannie E. (widow of A. J. Biggerstaff, of this county), John Bunyan and Berea B. Mr. Willson married his second and present wife, Mrs. Sarah E. Robbins (nee Elmore), a native of Mississippi, and a daughter of Levi and Elizabeth (Bullin) Elmore, October 11, 1887. She is also a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, which she joined when thirteen years old. Mr. Willson was initisted into the Masonic order in 1855, and has taken the Royal Arch degree. Mrs. Willson married Lee A. Robbina, in July, 1861, a native of Tennessee, who died in Lee County, Ark., in December, 1883, leaving three children, two living: Thomas L. and Shem R. Robbins. Their grandfather, Thomas Robbins, was a native of South Caroliua.
WILLIAMS R. M. CSA-Tenth Alabama Infantry-Civil War LEE CO.-page 630
SEE JAMES A. WILLIAMS
WILLIAMS ROBERT-DR USARMY-REVOLUTIONARY WAR LEE CO.-page 589
SEE R.R.FOREMAN
WILLIAMS RUFUS G. ST.FRANCIS
R. J. Williams, attorney at law of Forrest City, made his first appeal for his rights in Winchester, Tenn., September 23, 1848. His literary education was received in the schools of that State, and afterward he entered one of the prominent universities of the South, commencing the study of Blackstone under the efficient tutelage of Walker J. Brooks, of South Carolina, in the class of 1869-70. Finally he graduated from a law school in Virginia, and commenced the practice of his chosen profession in this place in 1873, having taught school for two years after finishing his college career, to liquidate the expenses of that course. His clientage has gradually increased, and he is, without exception, now conceded to be one of the most able practitioners of the county. He represented the Seventh senatorial district in 1878, and served until 1881, with an ability and efficiency that not only satisfied his Democratic constituents, but the people at large. Mr. Williams owns some 400 acres of land, and has the finest residence in Forrest City. He was married in Summerville, Tenn., in 1872, to Miss Sallie T. Wainright, and by her is the father of two children: Lucy and Addie. Mr. Williams is the son of J. W. and Mary (McNabb) Williams, natives of Virginia. The former, a mechanic by trade, was for many years established in Winchester. He was judge of Franklin County during the civil war, and held a similar position for twenty years in Winchester. He is now residing in the latter place at the advanced age of seventy years. Mrs. Williams died in 1863. She and her husband had a family of six children, all of them living. Mr. Williams has attained an enviable reputation in his profession, but his popularity does not end there, for he is also a favorite in social circles. Cordiality and a pleasant word for all are among his many noble attributes, and though ready at repartee and jesting, there is no occasion to regret the word spoken. He is a member of the Blue Lodge of the Masonic order, and is High Priest of the Royal Arch Chapter, also belonging to Commandery No. 11, K. T. OBIT:Mr.R.G.Williams, died at Mud Lake Saturday, Oct.4,1902, of typhoid pneumonia, and his remains were laid to rest in the Forrest City Cemetery, Monday morning, Mr.Williams was the manager of the Mud Lake plantation, came originally from Tennessee, and leaves a wife and four children. 10-10-1902 CITY CEMETERY
WILSON EUGENE ST.FRANCIS CSA-Stevenford's Battery-Civil War
Eugene Wilson, proprietor of one of the largest bakeries and confectionery establishments in Forrest City, was born in St. Francis County, in 1870, and is a son of S. C. and Mary (Beck) Wilson, also residents of that city. Mr. Wilson and his partner, John Reno, do a large business in their line, their trade amounting to an average of $200 per week. The latter is a baker by trade, besides whom they also employ an experienced baker to meet the demands of a large trade, having, in connection with the bakery, an ice-cream parlor (that is liberally patronized), and the finest delivery wagon in the city. S. C. Wilson was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, in 1825, but was reared in Pennsylvania, where his parents moved when he was a small boy, settling on a farm, on which he worked when not attending school until sixteen years of age. At that time he was apprenticed to learn the carpenter's trade, serving three years in Lowell County, Ohio. After familiarizing himself with its varied details, he worked two years in New Castle, and then went South, locating in Blackhawk, Miss., in 1846, where he remained about ten years, following his adopted calling. Subsequently he was engaged in the saw-mill business until the war broke out, when he joined the Confederate army, serving in Stevenford's battery until the close of the war. He was captured at the battle Missionary Ridge, and taken to a Federal prison, being confined six months. He participated in the battles of Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga, Murfreesboro, and a number of skirmishes. After the war, returning to Mississippi, he was employed by J. H. Pait in his saw-mill until 1869, at which time he came to Arkansas, and located in St. Francis County, about three miles north of Forrest City. He erected a new saw-mill and operated it in connection with a grist-mill, until removing to the city, in 1881, since which time he has been occupied in the mercantile business, with substantial success. He has acquired some property, owning six houses in the city, besides other possessions. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are the parents of three children, all residents of this county: Mary E. (wife of William M. Hannah), Charles M. and Eugene (the principal of this sketch). S. C. Wilson is the son of Dr. Andrew and Mary (Simpson) Wilson. His paternal grandfather was of Irish parentage, and his maternal grandfather was born and reared in England, running away from home when a young man in order to marry the girl of his choice, an Irish lady, and a sister of Thomas Nugent, the noted warrior. They eloped and came to America, and were married in New York City, after which they settled in Pennsylvannia, where he engaged in farming. Mrs. Wilson died in March, 1889, and was a prominent member of the Baptist Church, to which she had belonged for over thirty years. Mr. Wilson is a prominent resident of Forrest City, and is the present deputy United States marshal of this district. He is Grand Master of the I. O. O. F. He is the patentee and inventor of the 'patent car coupler', of which he is the sole owner.
WINTERS H.C. CROSS CO. USARMY-War of 1812
H.C.Winters is widely remembered as an old settler of Bedford Township. A native of Alabama, he is the eldest son of Henry and Sarah (Rinfrow) Winters, who came originally from North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. Henry Winters went to Alabama in 1828, and settled in Morgan County, where he remained for five years, going thence to Tippah County, Mississippi. He was twice married, and by his first wife had two boys, one of whom is living: Aaron (now living in Pope County, Ark.). Mr.Winters was married to the mother of our subject in 1828. They were the parents of six children, all of whom are still living: H.C., J.J., Thomas, William C., Mary E. (now Mrs.Harbinger), and Sarah J. (Mrs.Vandover), all living in Texas excepting the first named. Mr.Winters was a soldier in the War of 1812, and died in 1852. Mrs.Winters was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and died in 1880. H. C. Winters was born in Morgan County, Alabama, in 1829, and was reared on a farm in Tippah County, Miss., remaining at home until twenty six years of age, when he came to St.Francis County, Ark., and was overseer for some five years on a plantation. In 1861, he enlisted in the Confederate service, Fourth Arkansas Infantry, and served in the Trans-Mississippi Dept., being wounded at the battle of Jenkins Ferry, and having the thumb shot from his left hand. After the war, Mr.Winters returned home and engaged in farming on his land, which he had bought in 1859, consisting of 160 acres. In 1880, he purchased the interests of the heirs of his father in law to his farm on which he now lives. It is a fine place, consisting of 240 acres of land, of which some sixty acres are under cultivation, and he also owns 600 acres besides, with forty acres improved. Mr.Winters had been twice married; first, to Miss Mary E.Meek, in 1866, who died in 1886, after having reared eight children, five of these are still living: H. L., R.M., W.T., J.E., and G.M. In December 1886, Mr.Winters was married to Mrs.Ada Edwards (nee McKey). She is a consistent member of the Baptist Church, his first wife being a member of the Christian Church as he himself is. Mr.Winters belongs to the A.F. & A.M., and is a charter member of Levesque Lodge No.227; he is also a member of the I.O.O.F.
WINTHOP H.W. ST.FRANCIS USARMY-CO.N-Fifty-Third Massachussetts Regiment-Civil War
H. W. Winthrop, one of the representative citizens of Forrest City, was born in New England (Vermont) in 1839, being the son of William and Ann (Herron) Winthrop. William Winthrop owed his nativity to England, and was of English and Scotch descent. When quite young he came to America, and became prominently identified with politics, serving as a member of the legislature, and at the date of his death, in his eightieth year, was holding the position of county judge, having acted in that capacity for twelve years. His wife was born in Ireland, but married in Vermont, and by her marriage with Mr. Winthrop became the mother of five children. She is now living with her son, H. W. Winthrop, having passed her eighty-eighth birthday. Grandfather Herron came originally from Ireland, and after losing his first wife there, emigrated to America about the year 1800, attaining a place as one of the richest men in Vermont. He left seventy-two grandchildren, all well-fixed, and the monument erected to his memory in Vermont is one of the largest in the State. The mother of H. W. (the subject of this sketch) is his daughter by the first wife. H. W. Winthrop ran away from home when a boy, but was found in Boston and brought back by his father. He then concluded that the locality in which he was settled did not suit him, so went West, and at the date of the war was in Massachusetts. Joining the Federal army, Company N, Fifty-third Massachusetts Regiment, he served three years, having been promoted first lieutenant, though not commissioned, and he did not go to his regiment. Resigning his position he went into the sutler's department, and was brigade-sutler over the Eleventh New Jersey Cavalry, Second Iowa and Third United States, finding himself at the close of the war in Memphis, Tenn. He purchased a steamboat at that place with the intention of doing a trading business on the St. Francis River, but after making one trip, and landing at Madison, this county, he was accosted by familiar faces, who inquired if he did not recognize them, and whether he was not the man who had captured them, while serving in an official capacity during the Civil War. He first hesitated in replying, but finally admitted the soft impeachment, though not without some fear of results. He indeed was the man, and immediately was at the mercy of several of his former prisoners. OBIT:A gloom was cast over the community last Sunday morning when it became known that Capt.H.W.Wintrhop had passed into the mysterious beyond. The fall from the balcony was the cause of his untimely death. H.W.Winthrop was a native of Ireland, of Scotch and English parentage. His parents emigrated to this country when he was 4 years old and settled in Vermont. the Captain, as he was familiarly called, cast his fortunes with St.Francis County in 1865, first locating at Madison, then the county seat. During his thirty two years of citizenship, the esteem of which he was held is manifested by the many offices of trust which he filled. He held the office of chief clerk of the United States Bureau, was United States Assessor for the Eastern District of Arkansas, United District collector for the same district, Assessor of St.Francis County for six years. He was elected Mayor of Forrest City for two terms, and many improvements stand as monuments to his interest in public affairs. At the time of his death, he was 55 years of age, and leaves a wife and two daughters to mourn their loss. The funeral was conducted under the Auspices of the Knights of Honor. At half past 3 o'clock the remains were brought from the parlor to the dining room, (the former place being unable to hold the multitude of friends and acquaintances) where the beautiful services of the Episcopal Church were read by Rev. Mr.Edward L. Ogilby. At the conclusion of the services the cortege that followed the remains to the "city of the dead" was perhaps the largest the city has known. Mrs.G.A.Winthrop wishes to express her gratitude to all the friends of her family for the many deeds of kindness offered during the period of her husband's illness and the final disposition of the remains; especially she wishes to thank the inmates and patrons of the hotel for their many kind considerations.2-26-1897 CITY CEMETERY
WITHERS THOMAS JEFFERSON ST.FRANCIS
Thomas Jefferson Withers came to this county with his father at the age of five years, and remained on the home farm until the father's death, which occurred in 1876. He then purchased a tract of land and commenced farming for himself, also being engaged in teaching school for three years. In 1881 Miss Mary E. Ratton became his wife. She was a daughter of William Ratton, of Kentucky nativity, and is now the mother of one son, Clarence W. Mr. Withers was born in Kentucky, March 26, 1862, as the son of Thomas Upton Withers, who was engaged in farming in the Blue Grass State (Kentucky), and after moving here was occupied in furnishing the Mississippi steamers with wood. At this calling he was making a good income, until 1858, when, during the high water he lost several hundred cords of wood, which financially crippled him. He then came to St. Francis County, where he resided until his death in 1867, at the age of fifty-nine. His wife, who was born here, survived him eleven years. Mr. Withers owns a farm of 185 acres, of which over 100 acres are under cultivation. He is engaged in stock raising principally, and is one of the most successful farmers in Griggs Township, although a young man not yet twenty-eight years of age. He is also a leading Democrat, and having served three years as justice of the peace, and at this time holds the office of school director, and supervisor of roads of his township, being a prominent member of the County Wheel. Mrs. Withers belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. OBIT:T.J.Withers Killed-Sam McFall, a farmer shoots him twelve times through the intestines. News reached here by telephone yesterday morning, Dec.31,1903, of an shooting affray between T.J.Withers, a merchant of Widener, and Sam McFall, a farmer, with whom he had business. McFall had brought a bale of cotton in, and after a spirited bidding between the buyers at Widener, it was sold by Withers consent to McBee, McFall claimed money for picking the cotton, and McBee told him to come back in the morning and he would pay it. In the meantime, Withers stopped this payment, claiming the cotton on account. The men were standing on or near the railroad track, in front of the business place of Withers, and had some conversation about this money for picking, McFall insisting that he was entitled to it and Withers should pay it. McFall says that Withers remarked to him, "Sam, you're going to keep on until I hurt you bad and quick; I'll do it now," and with that he backed off and drew his gun, a 32 calibre S & W, and began firing. McFall drew his gun, but it hung in his sweater, but in an instant both men emptied their guns. Withers shot five times at McFall, three shots taking effect one in his left forearm, and one on either side of his body, about six or eight inches below the armpits. None of these wounds are serious, all being flesh wounds. McFall shot four times, one cartridge missing fire, two of which took effect in the abdomen of Withers and from which he died in about three hours. McFall called the sheriff to give himself up,and then came over on the morning train. He was taken to the doctor's office, where he had his wounds dressed, and then was put in jail. Withers, though close in money matters and considered a hard man to deal with in a financial way, was a good citizen, a member of and leader in the church, and had the best interests of the community at heart. His untimely death is sorely regretted by a large circle of friends, and McFall himself says he is very sorry indeed that the tragedy occurred. His family has the sympathy of the entire community. 1-1-1904 WIDENER CEMETERY
WOLFF OSCAR PRESLEY ST.FRANCIS
In 1848, O.P.Wolff, Sr., and his wife Annie E. (Russell) Wolff, came to Arkansas from Philadelphia, their native home, and settled on the present site of the town of Colt, which he purchased from W.M.Taylor, consisting of 160 acres, with four acres of it cleared. Mr.Wollf improved the rest and bought adjoining lands, and in 1870, at the time of his death, was the owner of 600 or 700 acres. Soon after arriving here he opened up a stock of general merchandise, and as settlements were few and far between he had a large trade and enjoyed a profitable patronage, which he continued for some years after the war. The place was known as Taylor's Creek, by which name it was called until 1882, then being changed to Colt, after the railroad contractor who built the railroad through. Mr.Wolff was twice married, By his first union he was the father of two children, our subject the only one living; and by his second marriage there were three children: Fisk B., Cornelia W., and Sallie J. (wife of J.H.Hancock of Wynne). Oscar P.Wolff, the subject of this sketch, was born in St.Francis County, May 8,1852, and up to the time the death of his father enjoyed the advantages of attending schools of his neighborhood. After the senior Wolff's demise he went to Texas and was engaged for the following five years as a "cowboy," on the western plains. Returning home he entered into farming on the old homestead for seven years, but in 1882 was employed by Mr.Lesca as book-keeper and clerk. In 1883 he was appointed station agent at Colt for the Iron Mountain Railroad, which position he still holds. November 10,1880, Mr.Wolff married Miss Fannie Gurley. They are the parents of two children: Annie E. and Edward P. Mr.Wolff is a member of the Knights of Pythias and also the Knights of Honor. He is a Democrat in politics, and a well known citizen of Colt. OBIT:6-28-1912 DEATH OF MR.OSCAR PRESLEY WOLFF=Esteemed citizen succombs to tuberculosis after long and painful illness. Mr.Oscar Presley Wolff, one of the best known citizens of St.Francis county and a gentleman who was greatly esteemed by a legion of good friends, died yesterday, June 27,1912, at his home in this city and was buried this morning in the Loughridge graveyard in Johnson township. Deceased was sixty years of age the 8th day of May last, and since the spring of 1908 when he, in company with his friend Mr.S.M.Blalock of Colt, narrowly escaped being asphyxiated in a room at the Fransiota Hotel in Memphis, has steadily gone downward physically. For 5 or 6 months past, deceased had been in such a delicate and frail condiiton, he was unable to leave his home. O.P.Wolff was a native of St.Francis county, having been born at the old family homestead on Taylor's Creek, near Colt in Telico township. He was a brave and fearless man and for for quite a number of years was a prominent figure in the life of our city and county. At the time of his death he was, and for the past six or eight years had served the levee board as tax collector for this county. Prior to his election as collector for the levee board, he had served as City Marshall of Forrest City for several terms where he served with distinction. Deceased was married in the latter 70's to Mrs.Annie Gurley to which union three children were born, viz, Annie, Edward, and Loyd, the former now being the wife of Mr.Paul Logston of Little Rock, all of whom survive him. The funeral arrangements include passage of the remains on the Iron Mountain to Colt, and thence by hearse to Loughridge where Father Bearinger of the Catholic church will perform the last rites. LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY
WOODLAND E. N. -MAJOR CSA-Army-Civil War HEMPSTEAD-VOL3-page 1265
QUACHITA CO.
WRIGHT J.G.- DR CROSS CO. USARMY-Mexican War
J. G. Wright, M. D., one of the prominent physicians and surgeons of Cross County, is a native of Illinois and was born in 1830, as the son of T. J. and Mary (Griffin) Wright, originally from Virginia, and of English descent. The father moved to Illinois in 1829, and settled in Edgar County, where he farmed until 1855, then going to Worth County,Mo. Buying a farm he resided until his death which occurred in 1866, at the age of fifty-four years. Mr. Wright served as justice of the peace four years in Missouri. Mrs. Wright still survives him and lives in Worth County, and though eighty years of age, she enjoys the best of health. They had in their family five children (two of whom are living): J. G., Martha (the widow of Samuel Adams, late of Missouri), C. C., Ester (deceased) and Elizabeth (deceased). Mrs. Wright is a member of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. Dr. J. G. Wright joined the United States army at [p.389] the age of sixteen, and served in the war with Mexico, participating in the siege of Vera Cruz, and a number of other prominent battles. After the engagement at Vera Cruz he received his discharge and returned home. During his time of service in that war he marched 500 miles on foot, and was disabled and laid up for eight weeks at the hospital at Matamoras. After coming home he entered upon the study of medicine at the age of eighteen in the office of Dr. Lenbrook, of Paris, Ill., a graduate of the Jefferson College of Medicine at Philadelphia. In 1849-50 Mr. Wright attended the Rush Medical College at Chicago, and in 1850 began his career as practitioner under his former instructor, where he remained for six years, then going to Worth County, Mo. Locating at Oxford, he continued the practice of his profession until 1886 and also served as county justice for two years, and was postmaster of Oxford for eight years. He then moved to Ottawa, Kan., but after six months came to this county. Dr. Wright was married in 1851 to Miss Julia Daugherty, of Ohio. They are the parents of five children: Florence E. (wife of W. D. Sharp, of Ottawa, Kas.), Alice D. (wife of J. W. Cubine, of Coffeeville, Kas.), C. J. C. and T. J. (both at home) and Mary M. (now Mrs. J. M. Tinson, of Kansas City, Mo.). Mrs. Wright is a member of the Baptist Church. Dr. Wright is a very decided Democrat, but does not take an active part in politics. He has a large and extensive practice as the constant demands made upon his time amply indicate, and his kindly manner makes him welcome in the sick room.
WYLDS DANIEL ST.FRANCIS CSA-CO.K-Dobbin's Regiment-Civil War
Daniel Wylds, the son of David and Mary Wylds, natives of Georgia and Tennessee, respectively, was born in St. Francis County, Ark., in 1846. David Wylds, when eighteen years of age, enlisted in the War of 1812, serving through the entire period as orderly-sergeant of his company. About the year 1821 he moved to Arkansas, locating in St. Francis County, where he died at the age of seventy-four years, and it can be truly said that no resident of the county ever passed away who was more sincerely mourned than he. A genial and courteous gentleman, he was one whom it was a pleasure to meet, and his absence in business and social circles was always regretted. He was broad shouldered, well proportioned, with a shrewd, kindly face that was more remarkable for its intelligence and keenness than for its beauty of features. He was a sympathetic listener to the sorrows and ills of the poor and needy, and no one ever told his tale in vain, or went from his home empty-handed. At the time of his removal to Arkansas it was almost a wilderness, and had not then reached the dignity of being a State. He began opening a farm, working under difficulties incident to that period, such as few, if any, of the present generation realize. They had to put up bear meat in winter to do them through the summer. It required a man of nerve and indomitable courage to undertake the work that he did, and his thrift and perseverance formed a oundation for the home of beauty and plenty that Daniel Wylds now enjoys. It should be added in this connection, however, that the wealth and accumulation of property was not all inherited by the son, for he began for himself at the age of twenty years. Possessing in a large degree his father's ambition and energy, he chose for his profession that most independent of all vocations-farming, and has continued it ever since. He has been remarkably successful in amassing property, and now owns large landed estates of over 1,168 acres, aside from being an extensive stock raiser. He is considered one of the wealthiest men in the county. When seventeen years of age, Mr. Wylds enlisted in Company K, Dobbin's regiment, Confederate States army, participating in several battles, and receiving a wound at the battle of Jefferson City, Mo.; he was taken prisoner to Illinois, remaining there until March of 1865, when he was exchanged at Eichmond, Va., and again captured in April, 1865, following, then receiving his parole. After the war he started for home, but was obliged to make more than two-thirds of this distance on foot. Mr. Wylds was married in 1872 to Virginia I. Thompson, a daughter of William and Mahala J. Thompson, natives of Virginia. To their union five children were born: Charles A., Wilmoth O., Mary E. (deceased), Daniel T. and Allen G. Mr. Wylds' mother, who was a lovely woman, came to St. Francis County in 1816, when only eight years old, and made it her home until she died, at the age of sixty-six, a Christian and philanthropist. In politics our subject is a Democrat, and in secret [p.506] societies is identified with the Knights of Honor. In religions faith he is a Presbyterian. Mrs. Wylds is a member of the Baptist Church. He has always been a consistent and liberal contributor to the cause of religions and educational movements, and his private charities are numerous and judicious. He has worthily followed in the footsteps of his honored father, whose favorite text was, "God loves the cheerful giver." His ideas of charity are indeed broad.. Birth: Dec. 4, 1846 Death: Jan. 25, 1917 Note: Son of David and Mary Wylds (apoplexy) WYLDS CEMETERY
WYLDS DAVID ST.FRANCIS USARMY-War of 1812
SEE DANIEL WYLDS Birth: Oct. 12, 1793 Death: May 5, 1868 Note: Husband of Mary Wylds WYLDS CEMETERY
WYLIE E. F. PHILLIPS CO.-page 739
E. F. Wylie, farmer and stock raiser, Fairmount, Ark. Of that sturdy and independent class, the farmers and stock men of Arkansas, there are none who possess more genuine merit or stronger character than he whose name stands at the head of this sketch. Mr. Wylie owes his nativity to Indiana, where his birth occurred July 8, 1830. His father (A. M. Wylie) was a native of Kentucky, born in 1819, and in that State he received his education. Subsequently he emigrated to Indiana, and there married Miss Rebecca Farmer, a native of Indiana, and the daughter of Jesse and Rhoda Farmer. The fruits of this union were ten children: Augusta C., E. F. and Julia O. The remainder died while young. The father was a farmer by occupation, and this pursuit continued the principal part of his life. His wife died in 1849, and he chose for his second wife Miss Elizabeth Young, who bore him three children: Ellen, George and Lillie. Mr. Wylie held the office of sheriff of Tipton County, Ind., for three terms, and was a man who took quite an interest in church and educational matters. He died in 1881, but his wife is still living, and resides in Illinois. He was a member of the Baptist Church, to which his wife also now belongs. E. F. Wylie received his education in Illinois and emigrated to Missouri in 1853, where he married Miss Sarah J. Richardson, on May 24, of the same year. She was born in Indiana, and by her marriage became the mother of six children: Rebecca J. (deceased), Emma C. (wife of Fulton Harris), Martha O. (wife of John Vaughn), Augustus M., Norton W., Cora A. (who resides at home) and Charles E. The mother of these children died in 1886. Mr. Wylie emigrated from Missouri to Arkansas in 1874, and located in Prairie County, where he now resides. In 1887 he married Miss Emma E. Hollaway, and to this union has been born one child, Henry W. Mr. Wylie has followed farming and stock raising nearly all his life; is the owner of 400 acres of land, with sixty acres under cultivation, and is one of the progressive and enterprising farmers of the county. He was Master of the Grange for two years, and has held the office of justice of peace for fouryears. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Paul V. Isbell-Designed January 2009-Updated Dec.31, 2012

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