Back to Main Page


Cover.gif


1890 Goodspeed Biographies
St.Francis County, Arkansas

<
Name:Last/First/Middle/Title/Military Unit (If any)/Biography-Obituary (If any)
ABLES JOHN J. CSA-CO.B-Fifth Arkansas Regiment-Govan's Brigade-Civil War.
John J. Ables, proprietor of one of the leading groceries of Colt, is a native of this county, and when a boy worked on his father's farm, attending school at intervals; although not regular in attendance, he being a bright scholar and willing to learn, received a fair common-school education. In May, 1861, at the age of seventeen, he entered the Confederate service, enlisting in Company B, Fifth Arkansas Regiment, Govan's brigade, Pat Claburne's division, Hardee's and Cheatham's corps of the Army of the Tennessee, commanded by Beauregard, Albert Sidney Johnston, Braxton Bragg, Joseph E. Johnston and J. B. Hood, of Texas. Mr. Able's career as a soldier led him through many different battles-Chickamauga, Murfreesboro, Franklin, from Bowling Green, Ky., to Bentonville, N. C., via Nashville, Chattanooga and Dalton down the railroad and State line to Atlanta, thence to Jonesboro via Augusta, Ga., back to Bentonville. He fought the last battle under Johnston at that place, that famous general then falling back to Greensboro, N. C., where he surrendered. Mr. Ables took his chances for his home in Arkansas, and was in all the engagements of that march, soldiering through East Tennessee, around Knoxville, on Clinch River, at Clinton, with Bragg through Cumberland Gap to Kentucky. He was wounded in the right hand, losing his little finger, which, though a small and seemingly unimportant member, necessitated his absence from active duty for three months. He served throughout the war, and took an active part in every battle of his division in the Mississippi Valley, with the exception of those during the three months of his disability. Returning home in May, 1865, Mr. Ables was married the following August to Miss Mary A. Stutts. They are the parents of eight children, all of whom are living: Cora Belle, John W., Willis R., Anna C., Micager C., Samuel, James D. and Emma Lou. Following his matrimonial venture Mr. Ables engaged in farming, and now has a nicely improved farm of 160 acres. He was born in 1844, being the son of M. C. and Jane C. (Moore) Ables, natives of Tennessee and Alabama, respectively. M. C. Ables came to Arkansas in 1828, and settled in this county at a time when there were but few families in the locality. Here he bought a farm of 320 acres, on which he lived until the time of his death, with the exception of a year or two during his residence in Wittsburg, and also while in the Mexican War.In 1887 our subject sold out his farming interests and came to Colt Station, embarking in the grocery business, in which he is still engaged. In this he has been very successful. He held the office of constable of his township before moving to Colt, and was also justice of the peace for ten years, and has now a commission as notary public. Mr. Ables is a stanch Democrat and a member of the I. O. O. F. and Knights of Honor. . Enl 12Jun1861 at Wittsburg, AR. Reenl 17 Feb 1864. Received clothing 17 Sep 1864. Signed by X. Was in the disabled camp at Lauderdale Springs, MS 14 Mar 1865 and granted a 60 day furlough due to a shell wound. COLT TIMES-Mr.J.J.Ables has moved to Little Rock, and his son, Mr.J.B.Ables has taken charge of his drug store at this place. - Date:+3-6-1903
ADARE J.L.
J. L. Adare, a native of Northern Alabama, is a son of Samuel W. and Mary J. (Freeze) Adare, who also came originally from that State, the father being of French descent, and the mother of Irish ancestry. J. L. Adare assisted his father on the farm until twenty years of age, when he was engaged in clerking for about four years. In 1879 he came to Arkansas and located in St. Francis County, gave his attention to farming the first year, and the following year entered the employ of Mr. Vital Lesca, as clerk, and is now at the head of the business. Mr. Adare was born in Madison County, Ala., on December 27, 1850, and was married on September 8, 1889, to Mrs. Delia Lesca, widow of his former employer, and a daughter of Stephen Snowden, a native of Tennessee. Mr. Adare is a member of the K. of H., and is a well known citizen and highly respected. LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY
ALLEN WILLIAM E.
William E. Allen, active in the agricultural affairs of this county, was born in St. Francis County, Ark., being the son of William and Eliza L. (Oliver) Allen, natives of Louisiana, and Arkansas, respectively. The former began life for himself at the age of twenty-one years, and now owns 261 acres of valuable land, with 100 acres carefully improved and cultivated. Aside from his many farming interests, he is engaged in stock raising, making a success of that branch as with everything else. In 1877 Mr. Allen was married to Miss Florine L. Beazley, who died in 1884, leaving one child, Mary A. In 1888 Miss Ella E. Gray, a daughter of William F. and Sarah E. Gray, became his present wife. To their union one child has been born, Willie L. Mr. and Mrs. Allen are members in high standing of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and the former is a Democrat in his political views. He contributes liberally to all public enterprises, and is held in high esteem by the entire community. CITY CEMETERY
ALLEY W.H. -DR
W.H. Alley, M.D., in his connection with the professional affairs of this communtiy has attained a well-deserved prominence. Born in Mississippi in 1861, he passed his boyhood days in the common schools of that state, obtaining a practical education, and manifesting at an early age an unusally bright mind. At the age of fourteen he was head of classes in which majority were many years his senior. When seventeen years old he commenced the study of medicine under a tutor, and in 1879, entering the Vanderbilt University, was graduated from the Medical Dept. of that institution in March, 1881. He first located in his home in Mississippi, where he practiced with success for two years, but later became located at Lewsiburg, Miss., for one year, and then Bellevue, Miss., where he remained until 1888. Dr.Alley then came to Arkansas and settled in Forrest City, and though only a few years have elapsed since his entrance, he has built up a practice of which others of more advanced years and experience might feel proud. Dr.Alley's wife, the former Miss Emma L. Cobbs, daughter of Paul M. Cobbs, State and Land Commissioner of Arkansas. To their union one interesting little daughter has been born, Mary. The doctor owns an attractive home, which is furnished in excellent taste, and three valuable farms. He is a Democrat in his political views, a member of the Knights of Pythias and prominently identified with the County Medical Society. J.H. and Ophelia (McCombs) Alley, his parents were natives of Tennesseee. The father followed merchandising at Byahlia, Miss., nearly all of his life, but in 1884 came to Arkansas and is now engaged in operating a large plantation. Mrs.Alley is still living, and is of Scotch and Irish descent. The paternal grandfather was born in Virginia and the maternal grandfather. N.H.McCombs, came originally from North Carolina, spending the greatest portion of his life in Mississippi, where he died at the age of seventy-three years. The maternal grandmother's name was Reid; she was directly descended from the Scotch and Irish. BIO:Physicians-The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 39:Eight:Dr.J.O.Rush/Dr.L.H.Merritt/Dr.W.H.Alley/Dr.D.O.Bridgeforth/Dr.J.H.StoneDr.T.C.Strong/Dr.F.C.Smith/Dr.J.T.Longest-Born Mississippi, husband of Emma L. Cobbs b.abt 1864 in Arkansas, child Mary Alley b.abt.1888 Arkansas, source:http://worldconnect.rootsweb.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=arleneisgr8&id=I4806 CITY CEMETERY
ANDERSON MARGRET E. (HOUSTON)-MRS
On the first day of January, 1839, was born in St. Francis County the subject of this sketch. Her father, Alfred K. Houston, first saw the light of this world in South Carolina, December 21, 1814, and came to Arkansas with his parents at the age of five years, who settled in St. Francis County, Ark., where he was reared, and followed the occupation of a farmer, dying in this county in March, 1879. He was married to Miss Sallie Evans, of North Carolina origin, who came to Arkansas when a girl, and who departed this life in 1860. The issue of this union was seven children, four of whom are living: Margret E. (the principal of this sketch), Wellman C. (a farmer of this county), Hiram (living in this county, whose sketch is given elsewhere), Francis M. (also a resident of this county). Mrs. Anderson has been twice married, and is now a widow, her second husband dying some ten years ago. Her first marriage, on June 20, 1855, was to Aaron M. Hughes, of Georgian birth, and who died May 18, 1862; by this marriage were two sons, only one of whom is living, Wellman T., born November 15, 1860. She married again on June 20, 1867, to Robert Anderson, of South Carolina, and a son of Robert and Lucy (Beazley) Anderson, who died February 20, 1879. Four children were given to them, three of whom are still living: Sarah L., Robert K. and Nancy E. Of her husbands it can be said they were honest, industrious farmers, who succeeded in life and laid up some property for those who were dependent on them, and merited the great respect shown them. Mrs. Anderson is now living on her magnificent farm, situated on the banks of the St. Francis River, and in connection with this, owns a half-interest in 560 acres of valuable land, also the homestead, 115 acres. Her son, William T. Hughes, a model and rising young farmer, has the affairs of the farm under his supervision, and is making a decided success of it, and they have a happy home, wherein dwells ease, comfort and plenty. Mrs. Anderson is a member of and worships with the Methodist Episcopal Church. William T. Hughes is a member of the Knights of Honor.
APPERSON SAMUEL D.
Samuel D. Apperson, the present popular and capable assessor of St. Francis County, was born in Marshall County, Miss., near Holly Springs, February 22, 1853, being the son of W. T. and Martha (Howes) Apperson, originally from Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. The parents had a family of six children, three now living, of whom Samuel D. is the third in order of birth. The latter accompanied his parents to Arkansas when quite young, and having settled near Forrest City before the present site was located, can justly be deemed a pioneer of the community. He remained here until 1873, attending the schools of the county, and then drove stock over the States of Tennessee, Indiana and Mississippi. In 1875 he returned home and came to Forrest City, where he conducted a general freight and dray business until 1880. His fitness for the position becoming recognized, he was elected marshal of Forrest City and served two terms of one year each. In 1886 he accepted the superintendency of trestle work on the Bald Knob Railroad from Bald Knob to Memphis, receiving a salary of $115 per month. Returning to Forrest City he found employment awaiting him as farm superintendent, which position he held for one year. Mr. Apperson was then elected county assessor to fill a vacancy, and is now discharging the manifold duties of that office in a highly creditable manner. He is a member of the K. of H. and I. O. O. F. fraternities, and a Democrat in his political views. He is of French descent, his grandfather having been a native of France. Mr. Apperson is progressive in his ideas, and many improvements in the city owe their existence to his liberal support and hearty co-operation. OBIT:DEATH OF SAM APPERSON=It was with feelings of geniune sorrow and regret the people of Forrest City and St.Francis county, received the tidings of the death of Mr.Samuel D. Apperson. Sam, as he was familiarly called by everybody who knew him, had been in failing health for some time, but nothing of a serious nature, and was preparing to go to Eureka Springs last Tuesday. On Thursday evening of last week he was on the streets as jovial as ever; during the night he was attacked by acute indigestion. He had the best of medical aid, and was apparently doing quite well, but Friday afternoon, congestion ensued and his spirit passed to its Maker. Sam D. Apperson was born in Marshall County, Mississippi, near Holly Springs, Feb.22,1853, being the son of W.T. and Martha Apperson, originally from Virginia and Tennessee respectively, came to St.Francis County, in 1860, and has lived here till his death. Sam was a familiar figure in political and otherwise, and always took an interest in anything which pertained to progress. Congenial, jovial, charitable to a fault, he was well known and liked by everybody. The funeral took place Saturday afternoon at the Forrest City cemetery under the auspices of the Knights of Honor, of which he was a member. Rev.B.L.Wilford closing the ceremony. Amidst tears, regrets, and showers of flowers all that was earthly of Sam D.Apperson were consigned to the grave. CITY CEMETERY
BONNER EDWARD CSA-CO.G-Fifth South Carolina Regiment-Civil War
Edward Bonner was born in Spartanburg, District, S.C., in 1841, being the son of Andrew and Louisa Bonner, also natives of that state. Young Edward remained in the vicinity of his birthplace until grown to manhood, receiving but limited advantages for an education, and attending school only a portion of each year. When nineteen years of age he assumed charge of his father's farm, and after the latter's death remained with his mother conducting the business in a most satisfactory manner. When twenty years old he enlisted in the Confederate Army in Company G, Fifth South Carolina Regiment under, Captain Carpenter, commanded by Col.Jenkins, and participated in the first battle of Manassas, but being taken ill shortly thereafter, he was detailed to manage the Magnetic iron works, located at Cherokee Ford, S.C. This was one of the most important branches of industry in connection with the Southern cause. Mr.Bonner remained in this position until the close of the war, after which he commenced business as a merchant at Limestone Springs, S.C. After one year, at his mother's earnest solicitation, he returned to her home and resumed control of her extensive business. In 1869 he was married to Miss Julia G., daughter of Elijah and Julia (Ray) Harris, and their marriage has been blessed with three interesting children:Edward L., Carl Ray and Erma. The oldest child, Edward is a promising young man, and bids fair to be a leader among men, standing intellectually far above the average, a young man whose example is worthy of imitation. Mr.Bonner moved to St.Francis Co. in 1984, locating in Forrest City, and four years later was appointed postmaster at that place, serving in that capacity for five years, and also as agent for the Southern Express Company. The change of administration in 1883, or President Garfield's reign, caused his removal from the position of postmaster. Since leaving the office Mr.Bonner has been merchandising, and at present managing the co-operative store at Forrest City inaugurated by the people for their benefit. The stock is valued at $45,000 and under his efficient control is rapidly increasing in value, and is one of the city's leading enterprises. In politics our subject is a Democrat, and in religious belief a Baptist, as is also his wife. Mr.Bonner is a liberal contributor to all charitable movements, and, in fact, every act that betokens the good or growth of the county finds him a staunch supporter. Previous to the war his parents were quite wealthy, but the ravages incident to that period robbed them of nearly everything, their land being about all that they possessed. The paternal grandfather was a native of Virginia, born near Petersburg, but afterward moving to South Carolina, died there at the age of sixty three. The maternal grandfather was Joseph Camp, of South Carolina nativity, who was called to his final home at an advanced age. Mrs.Bonner's father was Rev.Elijah Ray, a Baptist minister of South Carolina. Her mother's father, Col.William Washington Harris, a native of North Carolina, was a soldier in the War of 1812, serving as Colonel in the volunteer service, and died at the age of eighty-eight years. He was one of the first settlers of Spartanburg, S.C. CITY CEMETERY
BYNUM CALVIN N. CSA-CO.G-Hart's Regiment-Civil War
Calvin N. Bynum, an extensive stock raiser and tiller of the soil. Born in Hickman County, Tenn., in 1838, is the son of James and Rebecca Bynum, natives of Virginia, who moved to St.Francis Co., Ark., in 1848. Mrs.Bynum only living a few months after their arrival. Mr. Bynum died the year following. Calvin N. began life on his own responsibility at the age of eleven, and in 1861 settled his present farm, which consists of 326 acres, with 225 under cultivation. From this land he receives excellent crops, and is also extensively engaged in stock raising. He enlisted during the war, in 1863, in Co.G, Hart's Regiment, serving until the final surrender. Mr. Bynum has been married three times; first in 1865 to Miss Emeline Price, who bore him three children; James H., Laura A., and Josephine. Mrs.Bynum died in 1870, and again Mr.Bynum was again married, his second choice was Miss Louise Price. By this union, there were five children, two now living:Sinah E. and Martha E. In 1877 Mrs.Bynum was called to her final home, and his third and present wife was formerly Lucy J. Price. To them seven children have been given, five surviving: Sara I., Francis C., William H., Charlie and John C. In politics Mr.Bynum is a Democrat, in in his religious faith is a Presbyterian. He contributes liberally to all public enterprises, and is regarded as one of the representative men of the county. HUGHES CEMETERY
CALDWELL JAMES L. CSA-FIFTH ARKANSAS REGIMENT-Civil War
James L. Caldwell is a native of Tennessee and a son of William and Amanda (Christan) Caldwell, who came originally from South Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. William Caldwell was born in 1811 and was reared on a farm, removing to Bedford Co., Tenn, when a young man, where he was married in 1844 to the mother of our subject. In 1861 they came to this county, and here the father engaged in farming and also in the milling business, in which he was occupied until his death in 1865. He was a prominent citizen of his county, a member of the Masonic order and of the I.O.O.F, and belonged to the Cumberland Presbyterian Church, and at one time, while a resident of Bedford Co.Tenn., represented that county in the State legislature. Mrs.Caldwell was born in Bedford Co.,Tenn. in Feb.,1816, and died in April, 1888. James L. Caldwell also first saw the light of day in Bedford County, his natal day being March 23,1846, and when a young man he took charge of his father's mill, continuing it until 1864. Then he enlisted in a company raised by C.M.Biscoe, which formed a part of McGee's regiment,(The Fifth Arkansas Cavalry), was elected second lieutenant, and a short time after promoted to First Lieutenant. After the war he returned home and engaged in merchandising for about a year, subsequently entering into the saw mill business, which he followed in this and Cross Counties until selling out to his brother in 1887. He erected a mill two miles west of Caldwell, and also took a contract for building ten miles of the Bald Knob Railroad which he completed the following year. Mr. Caldwell has built and owned fourteen different mills in St.Francis and Crittenden Counties, and now owns the mill near Caldwell and a half interest in a mill in the last named county; besides this he has and operates several farms in these two counties and Cross County, in all about 1,800 acres, with over 100 acres under cultivation, the rest being fine timber land. He aided largely in putting in most of the bridges in St.Francis and Crittenden Counties, and now has taken the contract for the erection of the buildings for the Little Rock Oil Company. He was married November 20,1974, to Miss Annie Halbert, a daughter of John Halbert, a native of Missouri. They are the parents of six children:Willie J., Lillie A., Mary Ann, Henry H., Tennie and James L. Mr. Caldwell was justice of the peace of Johnson Township for six years, and is one of the prominent men of his county. He is a member of the Masonic order, and belongs to the County Wheel, being made vice-president at its organization here. PROB.IN HUGHES CEMETERY
CLARK THOMAS GOODE CSA-CIVIL WAR
SEE WILLIAM THOMAS CLIFTON
CLIFTON WILLIAM THOMAS
William Thomas Clifton, an active carpenter of Forrest City, was born in Elerton, Jefferson Co., Alabama, near Birmingham, March 23,1823, being a son of Amza H. and Adeliss (Goode) Clifton, natives of Virginia and North Carolina, respectively. The paternal grandfather of our subject, William Clifton was a Scotchman by birth and came to America about the close of the Revolutionary War, settling in North Carolina, where he married a Miss Martha Rice, daughter of John Rice. Mr.Rice was in the employ of the United States Government as a surveyor under President Monroe, and assisted in moving the Indians west, receiving 5,000 acres of land for his services, part of which tract is the land on which Memphis in now situated, and to this day it is known as the Rice grant. The father of Adelissa Goode (Thomas Goode), was a soldier and served seven years in the Revolutionary War, and was commissioned colonel in Gen.Washington's body guard, and his grandson, Thomas Goode Clark, was a soldier in the late war, and fell at the battle of Gettysburg, together with his son; the pine boards which marked their resting place are now among the relics at the Libby Prison War Museum. Mr.Amza H. Clifton was born in Caswell County, N.C., and was married in 1821 at Hopkinsville, Ky. he settled in Jefferson County, Alabama, moved to Tennessee about 1828 and located in Covington, Tenn. where he lived about ten years, and then moved to Mississippi in 1837. In 1840 going to Memphis, Tenn., he resided their until his death in 1849. William T. Clifton gave his attention to the carpenter's trade under his father's instruction until of age, and in 1845 came to Arkansas, but remained only a short time, in 1847 making another trip. IN 1848 he was married to Miss Araminta Cathey, and settled in Mount Vernon near the present site of Forrest City, where he has since lived. He and wife are the parents of three children:Mattie C. (wife fo Joseph M.Davis, of this city), William a. ( a confectioner of Morrllton, Ark.), and Mollie, now Mrs.Ritter of the same place. Mr. and Mrs. Clifton are members of the Baptist church. He is a strong Democrat and a prominent citizen. OBIT:Death of An Old Citizen-On Monday night, Oct.16,1905, our people were startled and shocked to learn of the death of Mr.W.T.Clifton, one of the oldest residents of Forrest City. At 8 o'clock, his son, Mr.W.A.Clifton left home for a walk uptown, and at that time, his father was in his customary health. But shortly thereafter, he became ill and in less than two hours was dead of a heart attack. William Thomas Clifton was born on March 28,1823, at Halleyville, the present site of Birmingham, Alabama. In 1848, after his marriage, he left for Arkansas, making his home at Helena. Soon after the foundation of Forrest City in 1869, he came to this place, where he since resided. His wife died in 1899, and at 10 o'clock Tuesday morning he was laid to rest by her side. Three children-W.A.Clifton, Mrs.Mattie Davis, and Mrs.Mollie Ritter survive him. He was a good man, and a good citizen. SEE BIO. CITY CEMETERY
COFFEY W.H.-JUDGE CSA-Fourth Tennessee Infantry-Civil War
Judge W.H.Coffey, an eminent lawyer of St.Francis County, widely known and highly esteemed by his associates on the bench, is originally of Fayette Co., Tenn, but was taken by his parents when an infant, to DeSoto, County, Mississippi, in which state his father died two years later. His mother then returned to her father's home in Hardeman County, Tenn., and afterward married John Coates, of that county. In 1861 Mr.Coffey enlisted in the Fourth Tennessee Infantry, taking an active part in the battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga, and a number of others. He was captured and taken prisoner at the battle of Missionary Ridge, thence conveyed to Camp Morton, Ind., held in captivity for nine months, when he was exchanged, and receiving a furlough turned his face toward his native land, walking over 225 miles, and reaching home a short time before the surrender. He then took up farming for his livelihood, and in 1869 was married to Miss Mary E.Haris, who died in 1870, leaving one son, James W. In 1872 Mr.Coffey removed to Arkansas, and settled in St.Francis Co.,, on a farm nine miles from Forrest City, purchasing the first 160 acres of land, to which he has added from time to time, until know he owns 1,120 acres, and besides these he has his home farm, 225 acres, which are under cultivation.Two years after his removal to this county, he was elected justice of the peace, holding this office until 1886, when he was elected county judge, and was again elected to this office in 1888, and is now finishing his second term. In December, 1873, he was agin married to Mary A. Houston, a daughter of James M. Houston. They are the parents of eight children, five of whom are still living:Mary E., Martha T., Noma, Nora Belle and Clarence Elbert. Mr.Coffey affiliates with the Masonic fraternity, in which order he has taken the degree of Royal Arch., and in the thirteen years of membership, he has not missed but four regular meetings. He is also a charter member of the County Wheel, being one of the charter members of this lodge, and was its first president..
COLE JOHN H. USARMY-MEXICAN WAR
In passing through Eastern Arkansas it would be impossible to meet a gentleman of more marked characteristics than J. H. Cole, the subject of this sketch. He is a typical Tennessean, and a man of more than ordinary physical strength and activity, and the observer needs to be no expert to recognize in him a person of unyielding determination and will. He still stands erect and walks with the agility of a man of forty years, although three score years and two have passed their mantle upon him, his birth occurring in 1827. He spent his boyhood days in Stewart and Humphries Counties, Tenn., but the monotony of his quiet life made him restless and the opening of the Mexican War gave him an opportunity to see life in its most exciting phase. Eagerly embracing the opportunity, he enlisted in 1846, and followed the fortunes of the war until its close, participating in the famous battles of Monterey and Buena Vista At the close of hostilities he went to New Orleans, and for two years engaged in the drug business. Returning thence to Tennessee, shortly after he was married in Carroll County to Miss May Mathews, and moved to Hickman, Ky., where he accepted a position as marshal and wharf master. He then came to Madison, the old county seat of Arkansas, landing there in September of 1857, having made the journey from Helena in a dugout or canoe. In Madison he opened a livery business, acting as agent for the line to Hot Springs, and contractor for the lines from Helena to Cherokee Bluff. At the breaking out of the war he joined the Fifth Arkansas State Troops, under Ristor, but when they joined the Confederate army he left and took charge of Hardee's wagon train for Missouri. He was suddenly taken ill, and obliged to come home, but afterward reported to Col. Walker, and was with him in the fight at Helena. He was taken prisoner by Powell Clayton, a short time after receiving his parole; and was once charged with the burning of a boat, and on trial for his life, but Clayton proved him in his hands as a prisoner at the time, which act saved his life as soon as the war closed he opened at Madison the first store in St. Francis County, under the firm name of Cole & Prewett. He received all the goods with which to conduct it from New Orleans on credit, through the influence of friends, and from that departure made a fortune, The firm continued till the Governor of the State called for civil instead of marshal law. A committee was appointed to select some reliable man to go and secure the commission from the Governor, but, although various parties were appointed, no one would undertake the venture; accordingly Mr. Cole-always fearless as he was shrewd-started without telling any one of his intention. He went on horseback to Memphis, and from there by boat to Little Rock, where he secured an interview with the Governor, and received the commission. He then returned home and immediately called together some of the most reliable men of the county, appointing them to the various offices. Then in a field close to an old court house, he organized the first county court after the war. The records had been buried there during the war. The commissioner of the post came and ordered him to jail, but he read him the commission from the Governor, showing him that his time of service had expired the day before. Mr. Cole was not in favor of secession, but went with his State when it seceded. A man by the name of Inge was sent from Mississippi before the war for the purpose of preaching secession. Mr. Cole made the remark to Judge Pierce of the county, that it would have been better if South Carolina had slipped into the sea than to have slipped out of the Union. The secessionist procured a pistol and cowhide, and began to whip Mr. Cole. A fight ensued, in which Mr. Inge was killed. Our subject was afterward wholly exonerated by the court. When Forrest City became the county seat of St. Francis County, Mr. Cole closed up his business and came here. At this place Hugh H., the only child, died. He was a rising young attorney of the place, and a graduate of Lebanon Law School. Since his death Mr. Cole and wife have been disconsolate, and have tried to forget their sorrow in traveling. They have gone as far North as possible, visiting every point of interest mention able. They were for a period abroad, spending some time in Dublin, Ireland. Mr. Cole recently united with the church, a large audience congregating to hear his experience. He is beloved by all who know him, and is well worthy the respect and deference paid him, for though he is perhaps a trifle eccentric, a mean act is something he has yet to do. He is a favorite in society and business circles, and though witty and quick at repartee, he never wounds a friend and there is no sting in his mirth. He, with his honored wife enjoys that which is so much to be desired-an unsullied name, and the sincere love of a host of friends. His grandfather was a native of Virginia and the third settler of Nashville, Tenn. . 1880-FORREST CITY 46 John H. COLE Self M M W 52 TN Occ: Banker Fa: TN Mo: SC
COTTON J.N. CSA-Twenty-Third Arkansas Infantry-Civil War
SEE MARK WILSON IZARD
COUNCIL WILLIAM A. USARMY-Twenty Fifth Wisconsin Infanty-Civil War.
The village of Council Bend was named after Redwick Council, who built the first house in that locality, and who was the grandfather of the subject of this biography. His son Simeon, was born in North Caroliina, in 1805, and removed to Arkansas in April, 1822, settling in Crittenden county for a short time and then removed to Walnut Bend on the Mississippi River, being married in St.Francis county, in 1827, to Rebecca Lane, who was born in Alabama in April, 1811. He died in April 1848, and his wife in 1879. They were the parents of eleven children, three of whom are still living:Allen ( a farmer of St.Francis county), Mary J. (now Mrs.McKay, of Hood County, Texas), and William A. The latter was reared in this county and began life for himself at the age of nineteen. He was born here on December 28,1847, and was married, February 22,1874, to Miss Anna M.Smith, who died in July of that year. The following April, Miss Elizabeth Filingim became his wife, who died April 22,1881, leaving one child, now deceased. Mr. Council's third matrimonial venture was in February 1883, to Miss Margaret L. Hubbard, of Alabama nativity, who died two years later, having borne one child, that died in infancy. He joined the Union army at the age of 16, enlisting in the Twenty-fifth Wisconsin Infantry, participating in the battles of Buzzard's Roost, Big Shanty, Kenesaw Montain, Atlanta, and a number of others. After the conflict Mr.Council went to Wisconsin, and remained two years, then returning to Arkansas and settling in St.Francis County. He is now engaged in the timber business in connection with farming, and owns 160 acres on the St.Francis river, which is very fertile and well timbered. OBIT:John Stevens, of near Widener, was in town yesterday to secure a coffin for the remains of William Council, who died, at his (Steven's) residence the same morning of congestion. Mr.Council was taken sick at 11 o'clock Saturday morning, and died Sunday, Feb.5,1899, morning at 4:50. He was an old Union soldier and was employed by Mr.Stevens to take care of his cattle and hogs. It will be remembered that a Mr.Flowers, who was employed in the same capacity, died two weeks ago.2-10-1899 CEMETERY UNKNOWN
DAVIS ANTHONY CSA-31ST TENNESSEE REGIMENT-Civil War
Anthony D. Davis, also actively engaged in agricultural pursuits, was born in 1836 near the present site of Corinth, Miss., made historic during the war by one of the most famous battles of that period. His parents were Arthur and Elizabeth E. (Smith) Davis, natives of North Carolina. Anthony Davis did not receive many advantages from an education in youth, a few months passed in a neighboring school during the winter months, comprising the whole amount of his literary instruction. His first venture on his own account was at the age of nineteen, when he accepted a position as manager of a large plantation, discharging the manifold duties connected therewith in a most satisfactory manner. Soon becoming tired of this employment, and wishing to own land of his own, he resigned his position, much to the regret of his employers, and went to DeSoto County, Miss.. Not long after his arrival at that point the War broke out, which, of course, destroyed all his plans, for the time, at least. He enlisted Sept.15,1861, in Company G., Thirty-first Tennessee Regiment, Capt.Baker's company and Col.Bradford's regiment, and participated in the battles of Belmont, Chickamauga, Perryville, etc. At the close of the war Mr.Davis removed to St.Francis County, purchasing a farm of 240 acres, of which he has cleared and has in a good state of cultivation 140 acres. His improvements are such as would credit to any country, and his beautiful residence furnished in such excellent taste, gives evidence of culture and refinement. In addition to his farming operations he is an extensive stock raiser. In 1865 Mr.Davis was married to Miss Maria Prewett, and to them a family of four children were born:Daisy and Arthur now living, and Cheatham and William (deceased). In politics Mr.Davis is a Democrat, and in religious faith a Methodist. His wife is a Baptist, and a lady of many excellent traits and characteristics. mr.Davis is a liberal contributor to all worthy enterprises, but many of his generous acts never reach the ears of the world.
DAVIS D.W. CSA-Crittenden's Rangers-Civil War
D.W.Davis, a brother of John M.Davis, whose sketch appears in this work, and a relative of Jeff.Davis, is a son of Cornelius Davis, the latter having come to Arkansas from Kentucky, his former home in 1828. At that time the Territory was but thinly settled, the forests were filled with bear, deer, wild turkey and other game, and the mode of traveling was in ox carts or on horseback. Our subject was reared to farm life, but had no advantages for acquiring and education when he was a boy, and it is a fact that, up to his eighteenth birthday, he could neither read nor write. He was born in this county December 9,1833. In 1851 he ran away from home, and went to Fulton County, Illinois, where he attended school for three years, working for his board and enough to keep him in clothes. Then returning home he commenced teaching school, and in that way earned means to take him through college, after which he took a course in civil engineering at the McKendrie College. Subsequently he went to Leavenworth, Kansas, and took part in the border wayfarer in Missouri and Kansas. Becoming located at Omaha, he was engaged in his profession of surveying a short time, but later returned to St.Francis County, and in 1857-58 held the position of deputy sheriff. At the breaking out of the war he enlisted in the Crittenden Rangers, the first company raised in Arkansas. A few months later he helped Marsh Walker raise his regiment, of which he was made Captain and commissary. After the war, Mr.Davis came home and commenced farming, and also took up the study of law, afterward entering upon his practice, but soon abandoned the legal profession and resumed farming. This he still follows, and is also engaged in surveying, in addition being timber inspector of the Third district, comprising St.Francis, Cross and Poinsett Counties. He has the credit of sending in more money than any other inspector in the state. He has afine farm with over 100 acres under cultivation, upon which are good buildings and a fine orchard. His principal crop is cotton, but does not confine himself to that one product as do some. He has also tried introducing thoroughbred short-horned cattle, but the country is not yet educated up to seeing the value of fancy stock. Mr.Davis was married in 1863 to Mrs.McClintock. They are the parents of five children:Blanche (wife of James W.Steward, who was superintendent of the public schools for ten years), De Witt (nineteen years of age and who is studying surveying, of which he has practical knowledge, having at the State Fair at Little Rock competed and taken the prize for the best plot of a thirty-two sided farm and architectural drawings), Annie, David, and Mabel. Mr.Davis and wife are member of the Episcopal Church. He is also a member of the Knights of Honor, and is a strong Democrat. OBIT:Death of D.W.Davis=Two weeks ago today, Mr.D.W.Davis accidentally discharged his hammerless shotgun, the entire load of squirrel buckshot with which it was loaded passing into his foot. The wound was dressed by a local physician, and later, Dr.John Maury of Memphis, was called and he too dressed the wound. It was thought that he would survive, but ten days later, after the accident, June 27,1904, tetanus set in and in a few hours our friend and fellow citizen was a corpse. D.W.Davis was born in St.Francis county Dec.9,1833. He was son of Cornelius, a brother of John M. and T.J.Davis, Mrs.John C.Lynch, Mrs.F.D.Hayden, of Arizona, and a half brother of James M.Davis, formerly of this county. He was related to the Honorable Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederacy, and was an exemplary citizen, who took a lively interest in all affairs which affected the people. His father came to this county from Kentucky in 1828, and our subject was reared in the wilds of this territory at that time. He spent a great deal of his time in the hunt and chase, and it is remarkable that he was always so careful with his guns and that at last he should lose his life accidentally by his own hand. Mr.Davis had meagre school advantages in his younger days, but as he grew older, and greater opportunities presented themselves, he took advantage of them, and at his death there was perhaps not a better posted man in this county. He taught school and earned the means to take him through college, and finally took a course in civil engineering in McKendrie college. From Biographical and Historical Memoirs of Eastern Arkansas, we learn that subsequently he went to Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and took part in the border warfare in Missouri and Kansas. He then followed surveying in Nebraska for a short time, when he returned to this county and held several political positions. When his country called to arms, he enlisted in the Crittenden Rangers, the first company raised in Arkansas. A few months later, he aided Marah Walker in raising his regiment,of which he was made Captain and Commissary. After the war, he came home, took up the practice of law, but soon resumed farming, and was later engaged to some extent in politics. In 1873, he was President of the Board of Supervisors of this county, a position at the time was about the same as that of County Judge. The county seat was at Madison at that time, and he and Capt.John Parham, now deceased, devised a scheme whereby it could be lawfully done, and did it one night while the inhabitants were asleep and without their consent. The extended the corporate limitsof the town of Madison westward about ten miles to L'anguille river, which was accordingly done, and that night the records were removed to Forrest City at the courthouse on Front Street. He was married in 1863 to Mrs.McClintook, and five children blessed their union:Blanche, now Mrs.J.S.Stuart, of Texarkana; DeWitt, also of Texarkana; Annie, David and Mabel, the later now Mrs.S.G.Norton, all of whom survive him. All were at the funeral from the residence, to interment at the Forrest City Cemetery. Rev.George E. Hancock officiating. Mr.Davis was a member of the Episcopal church, the Knights and Ladies of Honor, and in politics, a Swamp Democrat. He served on the Board of Directors for the public schools here, and styled himself as father of free schools in one campaign. He leaves his wife in fortunate circumstances, and each of the children have deeded their interest to their mother.Stevens, of near Widener, was in town yesterday to secure a coffin for the remains of William Council, who died, at his (Steven's) residence the same morning of congestion. Mr.Council was taken sick at 11 o'clock Saturday morning, and died Sunday, Feb.5,1899, morning at 4:50. He was an old Union soldier and was employed by Mr.Stevens to take care of his cattle and hogs. It will be remembered that a Mr.Flowers, who was employed in the same capacity, died two weeks ago.2-10-1899 CITY CEMETERY
DAVIS JOHN M.
John M. Davis is numbered among the well-known farmers and stock raisers of Franks Township. He was born on the farm on which he still lives, in 1845. His parents Cornelius and Eliza (Holbert) Davis, were natives of Kentucky. The former came to Arkansas in 1828, and remained one year, then returning to Kentucky, where he was married in 1832, moving permanently to this county, and engaging in farming. At that time the country was very thinly settled, the nearest market being Helena. He first entered 160 acres of land, but at the time of his death, in 1868, at the age of sixty-three years, owned 600 or 700 acres. John M. Davis grew to manhood on his father's farm, his early educational opportunities being limited, as the senior Davis was one of those men who believed in acquiring a competency before spending it. When eighteen years old John went to Kentucky, and attended school for about two years. After the war, in which he did not take part on account of poor health, he returned to Arkansas and resumed farming, and is now conducting the old homestead which his father entered and improved on coming to this State, and where he was born. Mr. Davis has been twice united in the bonds of matrimony. First, in 1868, to Mary C. Folbre, who died in 1871, leaving one son, Thomas C., who was killed in a railroad wreck in 1887. Mr. Davis took for his second wife Miss Hester A. Davis, in January, 1874, a daughter of Rev. Arthur Davis, of Western Tennessee. They are the parents of ten children: Benjamin, Arthur W., Mattie P., Drucilla, John, Susie, Eliza, Myrtle, Claudia and Elizabeth. Mr. Davis is one of the most prominent Democrats of this locality, and is now the efficient sheriff of St. Francis County, and a man whose name is a terror to law breakers. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Davis is also connected with the Masonic order. CITY CEMETERY
DOOLEY HAMMOND PORTER -DR CSA-McDonald's Company of Tennessee Cavalry-Civil War
Among those who have contributed liberally to the numerous enterprises of Forrest City, and are recognized as leading citizens the name of H. P. Dooley, dentist, is a familiar one. He is a native of Tennessee, his birth occurring in Maury County in 1847, being the son of W. A. and Sarah (Joyce) Dooley. W. A. Dooley was born in 1820, participated in the Civil War and died in 1877. The grandfather came originally from North Carolina and raised the first company of soldiers in Tennessee for the Creek War. He entered the service as captain, but came out as colonel, dying a few years afterward. The great-grandfather was of Ireland origin, and the great-grandmother from Scotland. H. P. Dooley, the subject of this sketch, received his literary education in the schools of his native State, afterward entering a seminary near Memphis, where the breaking out of the war found him. Putting away his books, despite his ambition to obtain a good education, he joined McDonald's Company of Tennessee Cavalry, serving in the Confederate army two and a half years. He was twice wounded, first receiving a severe wound in the leg, and the second time his arm was broken. Eighteen of his company were shot down, and a ball, which passed through his arm, knocked the mounting from his gun and injured him quite seriously. After recovering sufficiently to admit of his again entering the service, he returned and remained until the final surrender. The first year after the war Mr. Dooley engaged in farming, but attended school the winter of 1866, subsequently commencing the study of his profession under the tutelage of R. G. Edwards and next with one W. F. Southern. After one year spent in traveling in Northern Mississippi he came here, locating in Forrest City in 1870. When he began he had but very little, except undaunted courage and a determination to succeed, which is doubtless the secret of his present prosperity. He has amassed quite a fortune, and owns one of the most attractive residences in the city. He takes much interest in fine stock, paying careful attention to raising the same, and is trying to get the people interested generally in this industry. Mr. Dooley was married in Forrest City to Miss R. H. Johnson, a native of Arkansas and a daughter of G. V. C. Johnson. He was sheriff of this county at the time of his death. His father, John C. Johnson, was representative of St. Francis County for several years. Mr. Dooley has traveled quite extensively, and is a genial, courteous gentleman, one who makes friends wherever he may go. His business takes him in various parts of the State, and his reputation as an efficient dentist is an enviable one. He became a member of the Masonic lodge when it could boast of only seven members, and to him the lodge owes its present prosperous state. He was Worshipful Master four years, but recently refused to act any longer, though prevailed upon to accept the secretaryship; he has held an office ever since becoming identified with the order in 1872, in which year he was made Master Mason. He was married to Rhoda H. Johnson (daughter of G. V. C. Johnson and Cynthia A.) in 1872. Rhoda H. Johnson was born in 1851 in Arkansas. CITY CEMETERY
DORRISS HAMLET A. USARMY-MEXICAN WAR
SEE O.E.DORRISS
DORRISS JAMES S. USARMY-War of 1812
SEE O.E.DORRISS
DORRISS O.E. CSA-FIFTH ARKANSAS REGIMENT-Civil War
O. E. Dorriss, one of the oldest and most prominent of the early settlers of St. Francis County, was born in Jackson County, Ill., in the year 1819, being the son of James S. and Catherine Dorriss, of English and Irish descent, respectively. James Dorriss was a soldier in the War of 1812, and his father was chaplain to Andrew Jackson during the Creek War, participating in the famous battle of Horseshoe. Hamlet F., a brother of O. E. Dorriss, served in the war between Mexico and Texas, taking an active part in all the engagements of note, and was present at the capture of Gen. Santa Anna at Santa Jacinto. O. E. Dorriss' advantages for an education were extremely limited, but his constant reading and keen sense of observation have made him a well-informed man, conversant on all the important topics of the past and present. At the age of fourteen he left home, starting out to make his own fortune. In 1834 he came to Arkansas on a trading expedition, going south west, and upon reaching the Saline River, in the southwest part of the State, he was suddenly taken ill, which put a quietus to his business prospects for some time. After recovering he discovered to his horror that his partner had absconded with all the finances. This left him entirely destitute and among strangers, but in time he made his way to Little Rock, suffering many privations during his long journey. At this point he was met by his father, who had come to him in response to an appeal, written in a trembling hand during his convalescence. He returned to his home in Missouri, but soon after returned to St. Francis County, arriving here in 1835, and locating on a farm of 320 acres, which he improved and has since made his home. Mr. Dorriss ran among the first steamboats that ever plied up the St. Francis River, in the years 1844-45. In 1847 he was married to Miss Julia Hanson, of Morgan County, Ga., and to their union nine children were born: Josephine, Georgia A., Lugene, Franklin, Jenette, Julia, Sallie Vick, Lou Kate and Lee, of whom four are now living. In March, 1865, Mrs. Dorriss died, and in 1866 Mr. Dorriss married Miss Ann T. Ellis, who bore him six children: James, Mary, Ada, Willmorth, George and Thomas; of these three are deceased. Mr. Dorriss was a member of the Fifth Arkansas Regiment, Confederate army, during the war, and represented his county in the legislature of 1866. for ten years he was justice of the peace, discharging the duties of that office in a highly commendable manner, and during his entire term of office, from 1856 to 1866, only one of his decisions were taken to a higher court. He filled the office of sheriff by appointment for several years, and in this, as in everything else, gave entire satisfaction. In his political opinion he favors the Democratic party, but is not an enthusiast. Mr. Dorriss assisted in the removal of the Indians to their present home in the Indian Territory, and also gave his valuable support in laying out and opening up the old military road in this county in 1835-36. In addition to Esquire Dorriss' many enterprises he is running a fine steam-gin, with a capacity of eighteen bales per day, and a self-acting, or automatic, press of the latest improvement. He is a liberal contributor to all movements that have for their object the advancement of educational and religious matters. Mrs. Dorriss is a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. .
DOUGLAS JOHN E. CSA-Twenty-third Arkansas Infantry-Civil War
John E. Douglas has attained to a position of credit as a farmer and surveyor of St. Francis County. A native of Tennessee, he is the son of John E. and Elizabeth (Sparks) Douglas, who came originally from Alabama and Tennessee, respectively. The principal of this sketch was born on January 18, 1837. His father died when he was less than two years old and his mother then came to Arkansas and settled in St. Francis County where she was shortly after married to Curtis G. Tyer. Young John lived with his mother after her second marriage, and had the advantages of a good education in the subscription schools of the county, at the age of seventeen engaging in teaching in order to raise money enough to enable him to continue his studies, as he was very desirous of taking a thorough course in civil engineering. Three years later he was offered the position of assistant teacher in St. Francis Academy, where he completed his education, acquiring a superior knowledge of surveying, in both its theoretical and practical phases. Following this he resumed teaching until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in the Twenty-third Arkansas Infantry and served in Price's famous raid through Missouri. After the war Mr. Douglas again turned his attention to the instruction of the young, continuing it until 1868, when he bought 120 acres of land and commenced farming. He was married on March 7, 1866, to Miss Mary A. Casbeer. They are the parents of six children: Charles M., Thomas E., Nathaniel E., Effie D., Lucy A. and Leta J. Mr. Douglas owns a fine farm with good buildings, his large orchard containing all kinds of choice fruit, and also owns forty acres of desirable land in Cross County. In 1880 he was elected census enumerator, and the same year was made county surveyor, which position he has held since that time with a faithfulness and ability which have redounded largely to his personal esteem and worth. Mr. Douglas is a member of the Knights of Honor and is an enterprising citizen, contributing liberally toward those enterprises which tend to the development or improvement of the community, physically, morally or intellectually. BURIED LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY-CROSS & ST.FRANCIS CO.LINE
ELLIOTT WILLIAM CSA-CO.A-FIFTH ARKANSAS REGIMENT-Civil War
Prominently identified with the prosperous and influential citizens of St. Francis County is William Elliott, who is a native of Alabama, his birth occurring in Huntsville, in 1826. He was the son of Allen and Jane Elliott, originally from the same State. When William was one year of age his parents moved to Arkansas, settling in St. Francis County, where his early boyhood days were passed in assisting his father on the farm. At the age of twenty-one years he homesteaded the place on which he now resides. This farm consists of 200 acres, with 125 acres under cultivation. Mr. Elliott is, aside from his many farming interests, quite extensively engaged in stock raising, and also has an interest in a good steam-gin, with a capacity of ten bales per day. He was united in marriage in 1851 to Miss Sarah Styres, and by her became the father of three children: John A., Sarah and Jane (all deceased). Mrs. Elliott died in 1854, and for his second wife Mr. Elliott chose Miss Adeline E. Adams, who bore him three children: James H. and Benjamin F. (both deceased) and William H. In 1861 Mr. Elliott enlisted in the Fifth Arkansas Regiment, Company A, and participated in several of the most important battles of the war, among them being Paducah, Tupelo, Prairie Grove and Union City. In 1863 he was married to Melissa J. Adams, and their union has been blessed by five children: Robert L., Elisha T. (deceased), Mary E. (deceased), Martha and Mary. Mr. Elliott is a Democrat, and with his wife is a member of the Baptist Church. He has held the office of magistrate, coroner and deputy sheriff in his township, serving acceptably in these various positions. He is one of the public-spirited citizens of the community.
ELLIS WILLIAM T. CSA-Second North Carolina Infantry-Wounded at Battle of Petersburg, Va.-Civil War
William T. Ellis, another enterprising farmer of St. Francis County, was born in North Carolina in 1858, as the son of James G. and Christiana Ellis, both also natives of the same State. The father enlisted in the Second North Carolina Infantry during the late war, but being wounded in the battle of Petersburg, Va., received his discharge and returned home. In 1871 William T. removed to Cross County, Ark., with his parents, with whom he remained until twenty-six years of age. However he had been married during this time to Miss Martha C. Hall, who lived only a short time after her marriage. In 1883 he was married to Melinda O. Hall, and by this union four children have been born: Mattie S., Mollie A., Thomas J. and James L. Mr. Ellis owns a farm of 123 acres, with thirty-two acres under cultivation, being engaged principally in stock raising. He is a stanch Democrat and a member of the County Wheel, and he and his wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Mr. Ellis is justice of the peace of his township, which office he has held for the past twelve years. He is well known throughout this part of the county, and is generally liked and respected, lending his aid and influence to all public movements for the good of the order.
EVANS J.J.
J. J. Evans, of the prominent and substantial firm of H. Evans & Co., druggists of Forrest City, was born in this county in 1864, being the son of H. and Eliza (Ragsdale) Evans, also natives of Arkansas. Mr. Evans is now one the wealthiest planters of St. Francis County, and has the satisfaction of knowing that his fortune has all been acquired by his own personal industry and integrity. He received limited advantages for obtaining an education in youth, but determined that his children should receive a good, practical literary instruction, and is giving them every chance to become scholars and students in whatever right direction their ambition may lie. To himself and wife a family of eleven children have been born, eight of whom are now living, our subject, the youngest. Mr. Evans is still living, and, though having reached an advanced age, is quite active in business, managing the affairs of his large plantation with a sagacity that would put to shame many men of younger years who take pride in their superior and advanced ideas. J. J. Evans finished his literary education in Louisville, Ky., graduating from Bryant & Stratton's College in the scholastic year of 1883 and 1884. He had been occupied in laboring on the farm before going to college, earning enough money to defray his expenses, and although his father was generosity itself, he preferred to pay his own way, and at the end of his career, still had some $4,000 with which to commence business. Having a great admiration for, but no experience in the drug business, Mr. Evans engaged the services of an expert pharmacist and established a store at this place, and has made his business house as good as can be found in an average city of 40,000 inhabitants. The store is 23x180, and the stock contained therein is worth about $12,000, an annual business of between $10,000 and $12,000 being accorded this firm; this necessitates the services of three clerks. Mr. Evans is not a benedict, but a sincere admirer of the fair sex. He is a member of the K. of P. and A. F. & A. M., and is a Democrat in politics.
FEATHERSTON L. B.
Hon. L. B. Featherston deserves prominent mention in the present volume not only as the efficient ex-president of the County Wheel at Forrest City, but on account of his worth as a citizen. A native of Mississippi, he was reared in Tennessee, and received a thorough, common-school education, and then attending the Law School at Lebanon, Tenn., which he was obliged to leave and give up the study of law on account of his eyesight, having lost one eye by hard study. He was then engaged in farming in Tennessee until 1881, when he removed to Arkansas and settled in St. Francis County, buying a farm, and now he owns 16,000 acres of land, with between 300 and 400 acres under cultivation. In 1886 he was elected to the State legislature from this county and served for two years. He entered politics to defeat the influence of the 'American Oil Trust', and introduced into the legislature the first anti-trust bill ever presented before any legislative body in the United States. The bill passed the house by a vote of seventy-two to five, but was defeated in the senate, and not allowed to come to a vote. Mr. Featherston was the recent nominee for the United States Congress, of a convention which met at Jonesboro, having for its platform, 'Fair ballot and free count for every citizen of the United States.' He is a man of influence and thought and willingly assists the promotion of what he considers the best interests of his adopted section. Mr. Featherston was born in 1851, being a son of Lewis and Elizabeth (Porter) Featherston, natives of Alabama and Virginia, respectively. The former is of Scotch descent, and removed to Georgia with his father and brother at an early day, then going to Alabama and later to Mississippi; he is now a respected resident of Shelby County, Tenn. The subject of this sketch was married in 1874 to Miss White, a daughter of E. A. White, of Memphis. They are the parents of five sons: Elbert, Lewis, John D., Paul and Douglass.
FERGUSON WILLIAM C.
William C. Ferguson, the son of Joseph L. and Bettie E. Ferguson, was born in Shelby County, Tenn., in 1848, being denied in youth even such advantages for an education that were to be obtained at that period. When eighteen years of age he began life on his own responsibility, choosing for his vocation the most independent of all callings, farming. In 1874 he came to St. Francis County, Ark., locating on his present farm, which consists of 539 acres, with 340 cleared and carefully improved. He has also a gin (steam) with self-acting press, and a capacity of twenty bales per day, ginning on an average 700 bales each year. He is also extensively engaged in stock raising, in which he has been quite successful. In 1887 Mr. Ferguson opened a store on his place, carrying a stock valued at $3,500, from which he is realizing very satisfactory returns. He was married in 1870 to Miss Bettie E. Ligon, a daughter of J. A. and Bettie A. Ligon, natives of Dixon County, Tenn. The result of this union is nine children: Emma D., William R., Annie V., Joe, Elton T., Cleveland, Blanche, Lulu M. and Cora E. (deceased). Mr. Ferguson is a Democrat in his political views, and in religious belief, a Presbyterian. Mrs. Ferguson is a member of the Missionary Baptist Church. In secret societies he is identified with the Knights of Honor. His maternal grandfather was a soldier in the War of 1812, and died at the advanced age of eighty-six years. The paternal grandfather, a native of South Carolina, reached four-score years and six. OBIT:Death of Mr.Will C.Ferguson=Mr.W.C.Ferguson, a well known and highly esteemed citizen of St.Francis county died at his residence, corner of Dillard and Rosser Streets, yesterday morning, May 24,1906, of cancer of his kidneys, and was buried this forenoon in the McDaniel cemetery. Elder J.A.McCord in charge of the funeral. Deceased was 58 years of age, a native of Tennessee, he came to Arkansas in 1874, locating at Fergusonville, where he raised a large family and seven children by his first wife, namely Miss Emma Logan, W.R.Ferguson, Mrs.Anna Brittain, and Joe, E?, Blanche, and Lula Ferguson. He was married to Miss Kate Rogers, and she together with two daughters, Mrs.Peyton T.Scott, and Nonie Rogers are also left to mourn the loss of a good and kind indulgent father. Mr.Ferguson had not been well for some time, but had not taken to his bed on last Sunday night. Four brothers, namely: James N.Ferguson, Huntington, Ark.;L.D.Ferguson and wife of Memphis; W.D.Ferguson of Pine Bluff; and C.H.Ferguson and wife of Memphis, attended the funeral. The writer has known the gentleman for twenty years, he was a good man, above the average. He was not the member of any church, but he was honest and conscientious in his dealings with the world. SEE BIO. 5-25-1906 McDANIEL CEMETERY
FITZPATRICK EDMUND USARMY-War of 1812
SEE THOMAS O.FITZPATRICK BURIED LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY, ST.FRANCIS CO.,ARK.
FITZPATRICK THOMAS O.
Thomas O. Fitzpatrick, a successful resident of St. Francis County, is of Scotch-Irish descent, his great-grandfather having been obliged to come to this country from Ireland for political causes. He struck for the liberty of his countrymen. Upon arriving in the United States in the forepart of the eighteenth century, he served in the Revolutionary War. His son, Edmund Fitzpatrick, (grandfather of our subject) took part in the War of 1812, in which he held the position of captain. He had a family of nine children. David Fitzpatrick, the father of Thomas O., was born in Charlotte County, Va., on February 19, 1813. He was twice married; first to Miss Clementine Walker, a native of Virginia, and next to Permelia Hargrove who was the mother of three children: Marietta (the wife of Rev. C. H. Ford), Isabella (wife of E. H. Sanders, of Little Rock) and Thomas O. David Fitzpatrick was engaged in speculating in real estate until the panic of 1837, when he was financially ruined, after which he followed farming in Arkansas. Thomas O. was born in Lauderdale County, Tenn., in April, 1849. He spent his younger days on the farm, and attended the common and high schools of his county, and also had the advantages of a private tutor. On his return from school he was appointed county surveyor of Cross County, which position he held, also giving his attention to teaching, until 1871. He then started the Wittsburg Gazette, the first paper published in that county, which he continued to operate until he was elected clerk of the circuit court, and in this capacity remained until the adoption of the new constitution in 1874, when he was again a candidate on the Republican ticket, but was beaten by seventy votes. Coming to St. Francis County he embarked in farming, and also erected a steam-gin, which has proven a very profitable enterprise. In April, 1872, Mr. Fitzpatrick was united in marriage to Miss Sallie E. Eldridge, and they have five children: Eola, Garnett, Ernest D., Kate and Garfield. In 1883 Mr. Fitzpatrick was appointed postmaster of Forrest City, holding that office until Cleveland's administration. In September, 1886, he was elected county clerk, and still discharges the duties of that position with satisfaction to the community, and with credit to himself. He has also been a candidate on the Republican ticket for State senator. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., K. of L., K. of H. and of the County Wheel. LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY
FOLBRE THOMAS C. SR.-LT. CSA-CO.A-FIFTEENTH ARKANSAS-Civil War
The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 81:This sketch is about Judge Thomas C. Folbre, now judge of the County and Probate Courts of St.Francis County, and one of the most popular and efficient officers the county has ever had. He is a son of Charles L. and Mary J. (Baldwin) Folbre, and was born on June 15, 1841, at Aurora, Indiana. He was educated in private schools in Indiana and Kentucky, and in 1850 became a citizen of Arkansas. At the age of sixteen years he began business for himself at Linden. in this county. He came to Forrest City from near that place in 1869, to accept a situation as salesman for the Altheimer Brothers, who were then doing a general merchandise business on the corner of Washington and North Front Streets, now occupied by the Rollwage building in which J.S. Shields & Co. are doing general drug business. Forrest City was incorporated the following year, 1870, and he was elected the first Mayor, and G. Altheimer and Capt.Frank M. Prewett were also members of the Board of Aldermen. During his residence he has frequently been elected to the Town Council, Board of Health, and other official bodies, and in 1894 was elected Circuit and County Clerk, which he held two years. He was elected in 1902 to the office of County and Probate Judge of St.Francis County, and was re-elected in 1904. Judge Folbre was a gallant Confederate soldier. He enlisted in Confederate service in August 1861, and served through the entire period, surrendering May 25,1865, at which time he held the rank of Lieutenant of Co.A., Fifteenth Arkansas Infantry. He was the father of ten children. His wife was Mary M.Folbre and died earlier in 1886. OBIT:AGED CITIZEN PASSES AWAY=Judge T.C.Folbre, stricken by icy hand of death Saturday afternoon, Aug.10,1912. Again are the people of Forrest City and St.Francis county called upon to mourn the death on one of their most prominent and poplular fellow citizens, a good man, honest and true, in the person of Thomas C.Folbre, Sr., who departed this life last Saturday evening, after having suffered for several months with a malady that had held him prisoner in his home, and mostly confined to his bed. Judge Folbre had been in extremely bad health since early in the spring, and though all that medical skill and the skillful attentive care was done for him, all to no avail. Thomas C.Folbre, Sr., was born in Aurora, Indiana in 1841. He received his education in the public schools of that state and Kentucky, and came to Arkansas in 1850, settling in this county. At the age of sixteen he began business for himself at Linden in the southern edge of this county, and in 1869 came to Forrest City as a salesman for Altheimer Bros., a general mechandise on the corner of Washington and Front Streets, where the Rollwage building now stands. In 1870, when Forrest City was incorporated, he was on the first city council. He was tax assessor of the county for four years, as well as a salesman for L.Rollwage & Co. In 1894, he was elected circuit and county court clerk, which he held for two years. Next he was selected to be the office of county and probate judge for three terms, retiring in 1908. He was a continous resident, except two years spent in San Antonio for his health. Judge Folbre was a gallant Confederate soldier, having enlisted in August, 1861, and served throughout the entire war, surrendering on May 1865, at which time he held the rank of lieutenant in Company A, Fifteenth Arkansas Infantry. Just before the the last resting place of the body was begun, taps were sounded by Bugler Joe Reltano of Wynne and Forrest City, and this remembrance of what he had been as a soldier, and citizen, and his now departing, brought fresh tears to the eyes of not only his devoted family, but of the onlooking friends. He was a member of the Episcopal church, the Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows, and Knights of Honor, Knight and Ladies of Honor, and Red Men. Judge Folbre was married, first in 1870 to Miss Henry Adams, the wedding taking place on the Walker place, near Haynes. One child, a little girl who died in infancy, was born to this union, and its mother only lived two years after the marriage. In 1874 he was married to Miss Dora McCrary, of this county, and the couple lived together for about eight years, before they separated. To this union four boys, Thomas, Jr., Claude, Herbert, and Homer, all except Claude survive him. In 1889, he was married to Mrs.L.J.Andrews, the marriage taking place when she visited her sister, Mrs.J.M.Brown. To this union were born four children, three of whom survive, Frank, Gene and Gerald. He also leaves three cousins, Misses Clara, Elizabeth, and Mary Folbre, of Aurora, Indiana; a nephew, Mallon Folbre, a step daughter, Mrs.W.R.Ferguson, and grandchildren:Reullura and Lillian Ferguson. Hubert's two children, Charles Hubert, Jr. and Thomas Walthall; and Homer's daughter, Dora Belle. Funeral services were held at the home, and interment was in the Forrest City cemetery, Rev.E.T.Mabley officiating. The services were under the auspices of the Geo.P.Taylor Lodge No.196, I.O.O.F., and the pall bearers from that lodge: W.A.Pearson, George Swartz, Robert Brittain, Max Yoffie, J.R.Carder, and P.W.Lewis. 8-16-1912 CITY CEMETERY
FULKERSON ANDREW J.
Andrew J. Fulkerson was born in 1855, St. Francis County, Ark., claiming the advent of his birth. He is the son of John J. and Frances E. Fulkerson, natives of Arkansas and Indiana, respectively. Mr. Fulkerson died in 1880 and his wife in 1858. Andrew J. received but limited advantages for an education, and when only nineteen years of age commenced farming on his personal responsibility. He was married in 1877 to Becky J., daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John H. Casteel, and to their marriage five children have been given: Frances E., John H., James Arthur, William A. and Charles. Mr. Fulkerson owns 563 acres of excellent land, with over ninety under cultivation, and everything on his plantation gives evidence of thrift and prosperity. He is a Democrat in his political views, and in his religious faith a Baptist. He is a member of the Wheel and the K. of L. Mrs. Fulkerson belongs to the Methodist Church.
GOODE THOMAS USARMY-REVOLUTIONARY WAR-COLONEL
SEE WILLIAM THOMAS CLIFTON
GOODLOE GRANVILLE- DR CSA-3RD LT.35TH ALABAMA REGIMENT-Civil War
Granville Goodloe, M. A., was born at Tulip, Ark., January 23, 1857. He was the eldest of twelve children of the Rev. Dr. A. Theodore Goodloe and Sallie Louise, daughter of Granville La Force Cockrill and Louise M. Turner. Dr. Goodboe was a native of Maury County, Tenn.; was educated at the University of Virginia, took the degree of M.D. at Hampden Sidney College, Virginia, and practiced two years in Bellevue Hospital. Just before the war he settled with his brother in St. Francis County, Ark., and engaged in farming. He entered the Confederate service in April, 1862, as third lieutenant in the Thirty-fifth Alabama Regiment; the same year he was promoted to first lieutenant, for gallantry; he served through the war, and in 1868 entered the ministry of the Methodist Episcopal Church South, as an itinerant preacher, in which he is still engaged. His wife is a native of Tuscumbia, Ala., and a relative of the Cockrills and Hardings, of Nashville; her great-grandfather, John Cockrill, was the first white man married in Middle Tennessee. His wife was a sister of Gen. James Robertson. The subject of this sketch, Mr. Granville Goodloe, was a pupil of the Culleoka Institute (Webb. School) for three and one-half years. In 1873-75 he was a student of Emory and Henry College, Virginia, and from 1875 to 1879 of the Vanderbilt University, where he was the first to take the degree of M. A., May 30, 1879. In 1879-80 he was principal of the Black River High School in Smithville, Ark. In the summer of 1880 he became associated with his classmate, the Rev. E. R. Chappell, as joint principal of McKenzie College, as McTyeire Institute was then called. He still presides over this institution. He is a member of the Methodist Church. Birth: Jan. 23, 1857 Death: Mar. 24, 1911 Inscription: "Eldest son of Sarah L. Cockrill and A. T. Goodloe, born near Forrest City, Ark." Burial::Rose Hill Cemetery ArkadelphiaClark CountyArkansas, USAPlot: Block 3 ROSE HILL CEMETERY
HALL ORVILLE JESSE CSA-Sixth Kentucky Infantry-Civil War
Orville J. Hall, enlisted during the Civil War, in the Confederate service, at the age of twenty-four, serving in the Sixth Kentucky Infantry, under Col.Lewis, who is now judge of the supreme bench of Kentucky. He entered as a Private, but was appointed a Corporal, later made Third Sergeant, and at the close of the war was virtually Captain of a Company, although he had not received his Commission papers. He participated in the battles of Shiloh, Vicksburg, Baton Rouge (in which he was wounded), Murfreesboro, Chickamauga, Atlanta, Peach Tree Creek, Jonesboro and a number of minor engagements; was captured at the battle of Jonesboro and taken to Nashville, where he was held for twenty days. After his exchange he returned to his regiment, and during the service was on detached duty, being attached to the provost-marshal's division. Following the war period, Mr.Hall returned to his home in West Point, Ky., and commenced farming on his father's old place, his mother living with him. He was born in West Point, Ky., on Sept.3,1837, being a son of John Hall, also a Kentuckian by birth, born in 1802, who removed to West Point, Ky., a short time after his marriage, and engaged in the hotel business; he was the proprietor of the well-known West Point Hotel, and also owned considerable property at the time of his death, which occurred in 1852. His wife came upon the stage of life's action at West Point, Ky., in 1805, and is still living at that place. In their family were seven children, three of whom are living. In 1867 Orville H. Hall removed to Crittenden County, and the following year came to St.Francis County, carrying on the timber business for a year and the next year rented a farm. He was married to Miss Margaret E.Davis, daughter of Jasper N.Davis, an old settler of this county. They are the parents of ten children, eight living: Margaret, John William, Orville Jesse, Robert Young, Samuel Davis, Henry Russell, Edwin Winchester and Hugh. Following his marriage, he bought a farm of 200 acres, with fifty seven under cultivation, lying in the fertile valley of the St.Francis river. He is a good Democrat. Mrs.Hall is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. WIDENER CEMETERY
HIGGINS WILLIAM H. CSA-CO.H-Fortieth Tennessee Regiment-Civil War
William H. Higgins was born in St.Francis County, Arkansas, in 1844, a son of Jeremiah and Martha Higgins, natives of Indiana and Arkansas, respectively. He passed his boyhood days in much the same manner as other farmer lads, receiving such advantages for an education as could be obtained from the meager facilities of the district. His father moved to Texas in 1853, but returned after a residence there of two years. Young William began fighting life's battle at the age of twenty-three, choosing the occupation of farming, which he has since continued. He was married in 1867 to Miss Mary E.Saratt, who died in 1879, leaving seven children: Martha A., Mary J., Melissa E., Josephine, Melinda C., Auazablin, and Rosie L. Mr.Higgins was married in 1883 to Martha A. Ellis, who was also called from earth three years later, having borne one child: Elsie J. For his third, and present wife, Mr.Higgins married Martha J. Elliott, an estimable lady of culture and refinement. Mr.Higgins enlisted in the Confederate army in 1861, in Company H, Fortieth Tennessee Regiment, participating in the battles of Island No.10, Dalton, (Ga.), Altoona and Resaca. At the first named engagement he was captured and removed to Springfield (Camp Butler, Illinois), and at the battle of Altoona, again taken prisoner and sent to Camp Chase, Ohio, remaining in prison for seven and a half months. He was exchanged at Richmond, Va. and released on parole, but before this term expired the final surrender took place.. After the war Mr.Higgins returned home, where he resumed his occupation of farming, and now owns 424 acres, with 110 cleared and improved. He is also successfully engaged in stock raising. He is a member of the Wheel, and Alliance. His views politically are Democratic, and in religious faith he is a Methodist. He is a leader, not a follower, in all public enterprises, to which he contributes liberally, and under his able and efficient management the success of any movement is largely assured. Mrs.Higgins is a member of the Baptist Church. BARNISHAW CEMETERY
HINTON CEPHAS F.
Cephas F. Hinton, a prominent druggist of Forrest City, has been a resident of this county all his life. His father, A. G. Hinton, a native of North Carolina, came to what was then considered the wilds of St. Francis County, in 1850, where he died in 1874, at the age of forty-seven years. He had a family of twelve children, six of whom are still living: M. D. (now Mrs. Gwynne, a resident of this State), Frank M. (of this city), Lucretia M., Annie G., R. E. and C. F. The latter remained on the farm until his eighteenth year, when he came to Forrest City and embarked in general merchandising with T. E. Hastings, with whom he was connected as a partner until 1874. Then selling out to his associate he commenced in the drug business, but was unfortunate in having all of his stock destroyed by fire, on which there was no insurance, and later he entered the employ of Fussell, Pollack & Co. Three years afterward he went into the grocery business, and continued it about two years, when he was seized with a desire to alleviate the sufferings of humanity, and the study of medicine occupied his attention the following two years, after which he again entered into the drug business. The high water at that time stopped traffic on the railroad, and the goods which he had ordered with which to commence business, were laid over at Mariana. Mr. Hinton obtained help and loaded his stock on a handcar, which was pushed by hand to Forrest City, and thus was made his second start in the drug trade. He has by strict attention to business and honest dealing, built up a large and lucrative patronage, and now carries a stock of goods valued at $4,000. He was married in 1874 to Miss Mary A. Brown, a daughter of John Brown, and a native of Mississippi. They are the parents of four children: Robert Emmet, Arthur Gordon, William W. and Mary Bertha. Mr. Hinton also owns several hundred acres of land, and is one of the most prominent citizens of the county seat of St. Francis County, having held the position of mayor for seven years in succession. He is a decided Democrat, and a member of the K. of H.
HODGES JESSE B. CSA-CO.G-Thirteenth Arkansas Regiment-Civil War
Jesse B. Hodges, one of the prominent tillers of the soil in this section, was born in Beaufort County, N.Carolina, in 1837, being the son of John L. and Cynthia (Rodgers) Hodges, natives of N.Carolina. Jesse B. came to Arkansas with his parents on 1859, settling on a farm not far from his present residence. His educational advantages were limited, his help needed on his father's farm, but notwithstanding this fact, he is a well informed man, having given considerable attention to reading, which added to keen observation, has enable him to be conversant on all the important topics of the past and present. When twenty-two years of age he accepted a position as manager of a farm, so continuing until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in 1861, in the Confederate service, in Company G, Thirteenth Arkansas Regiment, participating in the battles of Shiloh, Richmond, Perryville, Murfreesboro, Liberty Gap, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, New Hope, Resaca, also Peach Tree Creek, Decatur, Jonesboro, Spring Hill, Franklin and Bentonville. Subsequently, or at the close of the war, his regiment surrendered to Sherman at Greensboro, N.Carolina, on April 26, 1865. As this sketch will show, Mr.Hodges participated in all of the principal engagements of the war, in which the Tennessee Army took part. After peace was declared he returned home, resuming the occupation of farming, and in 1868 was united in marriage to Miss Mary F, Matthews, a daughter of Lawrence and Lydia A. (Crawford) Matthews No children have been given them. Mr.Hodges owns 400 acres of excellent land, with 275 under cultivation. He has a pleasant, comfortable place, and all the improvements and conveniences that add so much to the happiness of home. He also is quite extensively occupied in stock raising. His political views are Democratic. Himself and his wife are members of the Baptist Church. 2-10-1911 DEATH=The Forrest City Times, Feb, 10, 1911. Another Pioneer Dead. "Uncle" Jesse B. Hodges Goes to His Reward Last Sunday Night as Result of Paralytle Stroke. A brother of St. Francis County's loved citizens answered the final summons on Sunday night at 10:12 o'clock when MR. Jesse B. Hodges, or "Uncle Jesse," as he was familiarly called by those who knew and loved him as well, passed to his eternal reward, after a long and useful life, as an upright, conscientious Christian gentleman. Mr. Hodges had been in feeble health for a number of years, but had not until recently been confined to his room and bed. On Sunday he had been up and about as usual until about the middle of the afternoon he was stricken with the fatal stroke, from which he never recovered, and to which his gallant spirit finally succumbed, in spite of all that scientific skill and kindly loving care could do to alleviate his suffering and prolong his life. Mr. Hodges was in his 74th year, and had long been a resident of this county, where he lived and worked, and had all of his interests. He was a life long member of the Missionary Baptist church, and was one of the founders of the church of that denomination at Popular Grove. The following brief sketch of his life taken from "Memories of Eastern Arkansas," a volume published in 1890, bells in better language than we could hope to express, his life story up to that time: "Jesse B. Hodges, one of the prominent tillers of the soil in this section, was born in Beaufort county, N. C. in 1837, being the son of John L. and Cynthia (Rodgers) Hodges, natives of North Carolina. Jesse B. came to Arkansas with his parents in YOCONA CEMETERY
HOUSTON HIRAM
Hiram Houston is a native of this county, and as he was reared in a locality but thinly settled, his advantages for a schooling were somewhat limited, but these were enough to lay the foundation for his success in life as a farmer, which occupation he engaged in for himself at the age of twenty-two, and now owns 223 acres of fine bottom land on the St. Francis River, seventy-five acres of which are under a fair state of cultivation. He also owns a steam grist-mill and cotton-gin. He was married November 2, 1884, to Miss Annie L. Clark, a daughter of Thomas A. and Susan A. Clark, originally of Kentucky and Ohio, respectively. They are the parents of three children, only one of whom is living: Nannie E. (at home). Mr. and Mrs. Houston belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. Alfred K. Houston, the father of our subject, was born in North Carolina in 1814 and died in St. Francis County in 1879, and was a most successful farmer. He married Sarah E. Evans, a South Carolinian by birth, and who was the mother of seven children, four of whom are still living: Margaret E. (widow of Robert Anderson, of this county), William C. (a farmer of this county), Francis M. (also a farmer of St. Francis County) and Hiram (the principal of this sketch).
HUGHES ELIJAH C. CSA-CO.B-McNEIL'S REGIMENT-Civil War
Elijah C. Hughes, of St. Francis County, Ark., is too well known in this vicinity to render a formal introduction necessary, but in compiling a volume of biographical sketches of prominent men hereabouts, the omission of his biography would leave the work incomplete. His farm, which is one of the finest in the county, consists of 2,000 acres of valuable land, with 900 under a successful state of cultivation. He grows from 350 to 450 bales of cotton yearly, 4,000 bushels of corn, and is extensively engaged in stock raising. Mr. Hughes was united in marriage, in 1857, to Miss Martha M. Reddill, and by her became the father of five children, all deceased. He enlisted in the Confederate service during the war, as a member of Company B, McNeil's regiment, and participated in the battle of Cotton. He afterward employed a substitute and remained at home, running his steammill for the Confederate army. Mr. Hughes is a stanch Democrat, and though not a member of any church is an adherent to the Methodist doctrine, as is also his wife. His birth occurred in Marengo County, Ala., in 1837, he being the son of John and Susan Hughes. When only one year old his parents moved to Arkansas, which has been our subject's residence ever since, with the exception of eight years spent in Shelby County, Tenn. He has served as magistrate in this county for some time, discharging the duties of the office in a highly commendable manner. He is a member of no secret organization. Mr. Hughes lends his support to all movements of a worthy character, and is considered one of the most responsible and influential men of the county, winning by his courteous manner and honesty in all business details, the respect of those who know him. E.C.Hughes died at his home in Haynes, Lee county, Sunday night, Sep.12,1897. This death removes one of the oldest landmarks of Eastern Arkansas. He had resided in St.Francis and Lee counties for many years and had always been prominently connected with the interests of his locality. He leaves a large estate, a wife and many friends.-9-17-1897 OBIT:9-17-1897 - Hughes - E. - C. - E.C.Hughes died at his home in Haynes, Lee county, Sunday night, Sep.12,1897. This death removes one of the oldest landmarks of Eastern Arkansas. He had resided in St.Francis and Lee counties for many years and had always been prominently connected with the interests of his locality. He leaves a large estate, a wife and many friends. PROB.BURIED IN CASTEEL CEMETERY, LEE & ST.FRANCIS CO. LINE,ARK.
HUGHES JOHN J.
John J. Hughes is the son of John J. and Mary S. (Patrick) Hughes, natives of Georgia and Alabama, respectively, who were residing in the latter State when John J. was born, his birth occurring in the year 1828. Twelve years after they moved to Arkansas and located in St. Francis County, where Mr. Hughes died four years later, his wife surviving him only one year. The subject of this sketch was married in 1855 to Miss Margaret Ross, daughter of James F. Ross, and their union has been blessed by seven children: William S., John J., James L., Robert Lee, Leona, Bertha R. and Cora E. The boys are engaged in the mercantile business at Haynes Station, Lee County, Ark. Leona and Cora are deceased, Mrs. Hughes died in 1873, and two years later Mr. Hughes was married to Miss Fannie J. Ballout, by whom he became the father of three children; Thomas S., Walter E. and Samuel T. Thomas S. is the only child surviving. The estimable wife and mother departed this life in 1885. Mr. Hughes owns 1,000 acres of land, with 550 acres under cultivation, and the numerous late improvements placed upon it indicate the owner's spirit of progress. A comfortable and pleasant home, furnished in a quiet, refined way, show that culture and good taste have not been lacking in his busy career. Mr. Hughes has a gin with a capacity of fourteen bales per day, and he is also engaged in raising stock. In his politics he is a Democrat, and in religious faith a Baptist, though not a member of any church.
INGRAM JOSEPH L. CSA-Army-Civil War
Joseph L. Ingram owes his nativity to North Carolina, and is a son of Thomas and Ellen (Covington) Ingram, who also came originally from that State. Thomas Ingram in 1849 removed to Northern Mississippi, where he resided until his death, reaching the age of seventy-five years. His grandfather, whose name he bears, was a Virginian by birth and a wealthy planter of the old Dominion, subsequently removing to North Carolina where he lived until his final summons in 1825, when about eighty-five years old. Joseph L. Ingram was born in North Carolina in 1830. At the age of twenty-seven he commenced business for himself, and the following year was married to Martha Young, daughter of Tandy K. Young. They were the parents of four children: W. C., Martha Y., Eben J. and Lady. Mr. Ingram was engaged in farming in Mississippi from 1848 to 1885. He then removed to Arkansas and located in St. Francis County, where he purchased a farm and is still employed in planting. He joined the Confederate army in 1862 and served two years, then returning to his plantation, which he found in a bad state of delapidation, the crops and stock having been confiscated by both armies. He was justice of the peace for several years while in Mississippi, and also served on the board of county supervisors for a term of years. Mrs. Ingram died in 1888 at the age of fifty. Mr. Ingram is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and of the A. F. & A. M. and also the Knights of Honor. .
IZARD MARK WILSON
M. W. Izard & Co. are the owners and operators of the largest saw and grist mills and cottongin in St. Francis County, located near Colt Station. The firm is composed of M. W. Izard and John N. Cotton, both representative, active young business men, and thoroughly worthy of the position to which they have attained. Mr. Izard was born in Fayette County, Tenn., on March 3, 1855, being a son of F. J. and Sarah E. (Whittaker) Izard. Reared in this county, he attended public and private schools and received a good education, and at the age of seventeen was employed as a clerk, which occupation received his attention for about ten years. Subsequently he went into business for himself as a butcher, and two years afterward entered in the saw-mill business, later forming a partnership with his father-in-law, John N. Cotton, in the grist-mill and cotton-gin business. He also owns a large farm of 190 acres of land, with sixty-five acres under cultivation, having good improvements, a small orchard, etc. Mr. Izard was married June 12, 1879, to Miss Emma Cotton, daughter of J. N. Cotton, his partner in business. They are the parents of two boys: John and Mark W. Mr. Izard is an outspoken Democrat, and he and wife are members of the K. & L. of H. John N. Cotton owes his nativity to Western Tennessee, where his birth occurred March 2, 1834. His parents, John and Easter (Nelson) Cotton, were natives of Virginia and of English descent, their ancestors coming to this country in colonial days and taking part in the great struggle for liberty. Mr. and Mrs. Cotton moved from Virginia to Kentucky, and in 1834 to Arkansas, settling on a farm in this county, where they both died within two years after their arrival. John N. worked on a farm, and attended school three months during the first seventeen years of his life, improving his spare moments and finding opportunity to prosecute his studies for a few terms after reaching that age. Thus he acquired a good common-school education. He was then engaged in clerking in a grocery at Taylor's Creek, now Colt, until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in the Twenty-third Arkansas Infantry and served as first lieutenant until the close of hostilities. After peace was restored he embarked in the general mercantile business in Forrest City, followed it for ten or twelve years, and then entered into the tie and timber business in company with his son-in-law, M. W. Izard. Mr. Cotton was married on June 20, 1861, to Miss Taylor, who died in 1865, leaving one daughter, Emma, the wife of Mr. Izard. He was married the second time, September 2, 1867, to Mrs. Gullett. They are the parents of three children: Edna, Guy and Willie. Mr. Cotton has held several important offices since living in Forrest City, among them chief magistrate of the city, and deputy sheriff of the county. His family are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. He is a member of the Masonic and I. O. O. F. fraternities and of the County Wheel, belonging, too, to the K. & L. of H. He is also a thorough Knight of Labor. Per Mrs.Julia Izard Hemenway's book on Izard Family in 1935:M.W.IZARD CELEBRATES HIS 80TH BIRTHDAY-MAY 3,1935Mark Wilson (Linnie) celebrated his 80th birthday on May 3,1935. As it came on Sunday, following his usual custom, he attended the Landmark Baptist Sunday School and church of which he has been a member for many years. Rev. Bogard spoke of his long and faithful membership. When he returned home, a special dinner awaited him. At the table with him were his wife, Mrs.Emma Cotten Izard; his son in law, C.L.Hendrix, and daughter Mrs.Letha Hendrix; his two sisters, Mrs.Julia Izard Hemenway, and Mrs.Linnie Izard Beauchamp. Also a friend, Mrs. Vesta Petree. She had brought a birthday cake and large bowl of boiled custard. Altogether it was a very happy occasion.
IZARD NICHOLAS USARMY-War of 1812
SEE VAN BUREN IZARD-NICHOLAS HOFFMAN8 IZARD (NICHOLAS7, GABRIELLE6, MICHAEL III5 ISARD, JR. IZARD4 MICHAEL, SR. IZARD3,HENRY2 IZZARD, HENRY1 IZARD) was born August 04, 1776 in Cape May, NJ, and died August 09, 1836 in St.Francis, AK. He married REBECCA WHITAKER January 12, 1800 in Lexington, KY, daughter of MARKWHITAKER and CATHERINE BOONE. She was born June 19, 1780 in KY, and died December 03, 1860 inSchulenburg, TX.Children of NICHOLAS IZARD and REBECCA WHITAKER are:9. i. MARK WHITAKER9 IZARD, b. November 12, 1800, Ashland Co., KY; d. August 08, 1866.ii. CATHERINE IZARD, b. May 23, 1802, KY.iii. JOHN G. IZARD, b. March 20, 1805, KY.iv. NICHOLAS HOFFMAN IZARD, b. November 30, 1807, KY.v. MARY ANN IZARD, b. August 16, 1809, KY.vi. NANCY IZARD, b. June 05, 1811, KY.vii. GABRIELLE JONES IZARD, b. 1813, KY; m. 1832, St. Francis Co., AK.viii. THOMAS ARGYLE IZARD, b. 1819. MT.VERNON CEMETERY
IZARD RICHARD J.
R. J. Izard, one of Forrest City's most prominent attorneys at law, was born in St. Francis County in 1865, being the son of Col. V. B. and Mary T. (Fondren) Izard. [See sketch of Col. Izard.] R. J. was educated at Jackson, Tenn., and after being prepared at that school for the study of law (which had been the ambition of his youth) he entered the office of R. J. Williams, of Forrest City. Subsequently he attended the Law Department of the University at Lebanon, Tenn., and was graduated with honors from that institution in June, 1887, at once returning to the office of Mr. Williams, where his career has been a creditable one. He is now city attorney, having been elected to that position in April, 1889. In August, 1889, Mr. Izard was united in matrimony to Miss Effie Howell, a daughter of Capt. J. L. Howell, in whose honor the town of Howell, Ark., was named. Although young in years, Mr. Izard has attained a prominence that would compare favorably with others of maturer years and wider experience. He is loyal to his profession and clients, and numerous personal characteristics of worth have endeared him in the hearts of many friends and acquaintances, a confidence and respect which he will not do aught to misplace. CITY CEMETERY
IZARD VAN BUREN-COLONEL
Col. V. B. Izard, whose name is identified with only that which is good and noble, and who has attained an enviable position in the hearts of the citizens of Eastern Arkansas, owes his nativity to St. Francis County, Ark., where he was born in 1837, being the son of Mark W. and Permelia (Shackelford) Izard. The genealogy of the Izard family is traced to Scotland, whence at an early day the great-grandfather of our subject emigrated to the New England States. Three of his sons afterward settled in South Carolina, and some time subsequent the grandfather of Col. V. B. Izard separated from his two brothers, and located permanently in Lexington, Ky. His occupation was that of a farmer, and he was a gallant soldier in the War of 1812. His son, Gov. Mark W., was born in Lexington, Ky., in 1800, removing from his native State to St. Francis County, Ark., in 1824. Here he was successfully engaged in mercantile pursuits for some years, and also opened one of the first farms or plantations in the county. Mark N. Izard was not a man who attained high intellectuality as the result of a collegiate education, for he had scarcely more than ordinary literary attainments. Something besides scholarly accomplishments drew around him hosts of friends in the pioneer days of Eastern Arkansas, it may have been his inborn worth, and intuitive genius. He entered the political field with no other qualifications to recommend, or guide him, than his own broad sense, untiring energy and clear judgment. First elected to the Territorial legislature, he sarved as a member of the Constitutional Convention, distinguishing himself in both cases, and to the credit of his county. He afterward served in both branches of the Arkansas State legislature (two or more times each), assisting first as speaker of the house, and later as president of the senate. While still actively engaged in the affairs of his own State, a candidate for another term in the State senate, an incident occurred which changed the field of his political labors from the State of Arkansas to the then Territory of Nebraska. This was his appointment as United States marshal of the Territory mentioned, by President Franklin Pierce, the first to hold that office. The demise of Gov. Burt, the incumbent of that position when Gov. Izard was serving as marshal, made it necessary that another Governor should be appointed. There were, of course, many aspirants for the place, but Gov. Izard with his usual characteristic originality of method, carried the official news of Gov. Burt's death to the President, and solicited the influence of the then two senators of Arkansas, W. K. Sebastan and R. M. Johnson, to have him made Governor, but they thought action on their part useless. This rebuff, however, did not daunt him. Going in person to President Pierce, after a clear statement of his ideas, he received the appointment to the coveted office. The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 114:Probably the best-known man in St. Francis County is Mr.Van Buren Izard. He was born February 27,1837, and enjoys the distinction of being the first born white-child in the territory of what is now Forrest City. His parents, Mark W. and Permelia (Shackleford) Izard, were among the early pioneers, having located here in 1824. Mr. Izard saw the first light on the site of the old Baptist church on the hill near the cemetery. His father was a noted man. He was twice speaker of the house in the Arkansas legislature and twice the president of the senate, which is an unusual record. By appointment of President Pierce he was made governor of the then territory of Nebraska, and his incumbency was continued under President Buchanan. He was appointed the purchasing agent and made superintendent of construction of the first capitol building of Nebraska at Omaha. Mr. Izard was a large slave holder, and with his help did much to develop this section. He was educated in the private schools of St.Francis county, public schools at that time being an unknown quantity. When the war came he enlisted and was a participant in the battles of Prairie Grove and Helena, besides numerous minor engagements. He was a member of Co.E, McRae's regiment, of the Confederate Army. Col. Izard was appointed by Governor Berry to be Colonel of the militia of the eastern district of Arkansas, and that commission was never revoked. When the troubleness times of 1889 came he was appointed Sheriff by Governor Eagle, and he was a very strong factor in conserving peace of our town and county. He has been a member of the city council at various times from the establishment of municipal government here, and his work on the school board, of which he was a member for several years, was of a most valuable and conscientious sort. On January 29,1859, Colonel Izard was married to Miss Mary Fondren, of Oxford, Mississippi, and five children were born to them. Lena, the eldest, is the wife of Mr.J.W.Williams, the successful merchant of Wynne; Richard J. Izard is a thriving lawyer and insurance man of Forrest City; Kate is now Mrs. E.A.Long, and also resides in this city; Van B. Jr., is in a large mercantile establishment at DeVall's Bluff; Pearl died at the age of four years. CITY CEMETERY
JOLLY WILLIAM CSA-CO.A-McNeil's Regiment-Civil War
William Jolly was born in Beaufort County, N.Carolina, in 1844, being the son of Isaiah and Senia (Williams) Jolly, natives of the same state. He came to Arkansas with his parents in 1852, locating in the eastern part of St.Francis county. His schooling was limited to a few months in the district school, as he was obliged to assist his father on the farm, and when he was twenty-two years old he purchased a farm near the home place in 1867, being married to Miss Mattie Cummings, a daughter of Sam and Martha Cummings, of Tennessee. Mr.Cummings was among the the early settlers of the county. To Mr.Jolly's marriage five children were born: Samuel E., Katie Sliza, Lee A., Georgia Beulah and Julius H. He enlisted in 1862 in Company A, McNeil's Regiment, of the Confederate Army, participating in the engagements of Jenkin's Ferry, Helena, Little Rock, Mansfield and Prairie Grove. At the battle of Helena he received a wound, but which did not prove serious. He surrendered at Marshall, Texas, and returned to his home, resuming his occupation of farming, and accepting the results of the war, as a final adjustment of the difficulties between North and South, Mr.Jolly cheerfully turned his attention to the recovery of his lost fortune, though his entire stock in trade consisted of $1.25, which he obtained from a Yankee in exchange for Confederate money. His success was swift and sure, and in 1868 he located on his present farm, numbering 125 acres, cleared and in a fine state of cultivation. A beautiful residence with all the modern improvements, gives evidence of his spirit of progress and prosperity. He is a member of the Masonic order, and a Knight of Honor, a Democrat in his political views, and with his wife is a member of the Baptist Church. Mr.Jolly contributes most generously to all public movements, and is one of the representative men of the county, commanding respect of the entire community. ENLISTED JUN.19,1862 AT MADISON
JONES NATHANIELM. CSA-Army-Civil War
Nathaniel M. Jones came to St. Francis County with his father in 1832, when nine years of age, the country at that time being a comparative wilderness. He remained with his father until his death, which occurred in 1851, and in 1856 was married to Martha A. Agerton, who has borne five children: Mary C., Nancy, James P., Cleopatra and Senoth. Mr. Jones was born in Lawrence County, Ala., in 1823, to the union of Branch and and Nancy Jones, natives of Virginia and Tennessee, respectively. Mr. N. M. Jones owns a farm of 146 acres, with sixty acres under cultivation, and is extensively engaged in stock raising. He is a Democrat in politics, and was a firm adherent to the Southern cause during the late war, serving in the Confederate army throughout that conflict. He is a member of the Baptist Church (as are also all of his family, with the exception of one of the children), in which he has been an active worker. Few men have led a more honorable life or contributed more liberally to the support of religious and educational enterprises than Mr. Jones.
LITTELL PHILANDER CSA-FIRST ARKANSAS REGIMENT-Civil War
Philander Littell, attorney at law of Forrest City, first saw the light of day in Chicot County, Ark., being the son of Philander and Martha Littell. He received his literary education in the schools of Arkansas, and in the Lebanon University of Tennessee, and commenced the study of law at Helena, Ark., under the prominent and able Supreme Judge Hanty. At the breaking out of the war he joined the First Arkansas Regiment, serving until the final surrender. He was aid-de-camp to Gen. Walker after the battle of Shiloh, in which battle he was badly wounded, and at the time of his duel with Marmaduke was sent by Gen. Starling Price around the Federal army to carry the news of the wounding of Gen. Walker to his family, also to bring his wife to see him. This he did, but Walker had died of his wounds before her arrival. Mr. Littell being financially embarrassed by the war, read privately and taught school for several years, and began the practice of his profession in this city, receiving the license to practice law in any State in the year 1869. He followed farming here from the time of his admission till entering upon the prosecution of his chosen profession in Forrest City, owning several considerable plantations, and is now opening a large stock farm. His father was a native of Kentucky, and an attorney for many years, afterward practicing medicine. He died in this county in 1864. The name Littell, as would be imagined, is decidedly French. Philander Littell is a Democrat in his political views, and a man noted for his thorough knowledge of law, and is perhaps better versed in land matters and titles than any other man in this part of the State. While he has a vast amount of land devoted to the growing of cotton, he takes decided interest in stock raising, in which he has been quite successful. Mr. Littell is conservative on all questions, and a man whose judgment is seldom biased. He believes that the race question could be solved without difficulty if it were not for local politicians, whose zeal for county offices rushes them into the perpetration of many blunders, irrespective of party. Mr. Littell was united in marriage with Miss Annie Seaborn, of this county, their marriage being solemnized in 1883. . Mr.Philander Littell shot by J.W.Hines, who he quarreled over a settlement. It was ruled a justifiable homicide by the Cornoner's Jury. On the afternoon of last Wednesday, April 15, about 8 o'clock, on Littel's place, on Linden Island, Philander Littell, a member of the bar, met his death at the hands of J.W. (Pony)Hines, a tenant farmer living on the place. A pistol was found in the deceased's pockets during the inquiry, and this gave reason for Mr.Hines having to defend himself with his shotgun which he had out in the quarrel.-4-17-1896
LITTLEFIELD GEORGE W. CSA-CO.C-Twenty-Third Arkansas Regiment-Civil War
George W. Littlefield is the son of Andrew J. and Betsy Littlefield, his birth occurring in Gibson County, Tenn., in 1844. His boyhood years were passed in Panola County, Miss., and in 1861 he came to St. Francis County, and purchased a farm of 120 acres, fifty acres of which are in a good state of cultivation. He is also engaged in raising stock, and at this occupation has been quite successful. Mr. Littlefield enlisted in 1861, in Company C, Twenty-third Arkansas Regiment, participating in the battles of Corinth, Iuka, Ripley and Port Hudson, La., and served until the final surrender. He was married in 1866, to Miss Druecillar Halbert, and by her is the father of three children: John, Maggie and George. In his political views he is a Democrat, and socially is identified with the Knights of Honor. Mr. and Mrs. Littlefield are members of the Baptist Church, and while not wealthy in the possession of this world's goods, they have that which is more to be desired-an unsullied name, and the love of a host of friends. Enl l2Feb1862 in St Francis Co, AR. by John A. Higgs. Slightly wounded and missing at Corinth, MS Oct1862. Captured 9Ju11863 and paroled 10Jul1863 at Port Hudson, LA. Paroled 25May1865 at Wittsburg, AR. Age 20, eyes black, hair black, complx fair, ht 5'7"born MS
LYNCH JOHN F. CSA-CO.B-McNEIL'S REGIMENT-Civil War
John F. Lynch first saw the light of day in St. Francis County, Ark., August 7, 1828, being the son of John and Pollie (Barnes) Lynch, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. The father moved to Arkansas in 1817, some time before it was made a State, and saw it rise from an insignificant territory to a community of wealth and affluence in the sisterhood of the Union. His father, a native of North Carolina, was a resident here for many years, dying in his sixty-eighth year; he was the first man buried in the county. John F. (the subject of this sketch) began farming for himself at the age of eighteen, but at the breaking out of the war, laid aside the inoffensive implements of the farm, to take up those that robbed the country of so many of her sons. He enlisted in Company B, Capt. McNeil's regiment, and received his discharge just before the final surrender. Upon his return home he found he had suffered serious losses, in fact everything being gone but his land. Mr. Lynch was married in 1853 to Miss Lizzie Davis, a daughter of Cornelius and Eliza Davis, who came to Arkansas from their native State (Kentucky) in 1828. To his marriage with Miss Davis three children were born: Albert Sidney, Kate and Bessie. Albert is residing with his father; Kate was married in 1882 to Perry Minor, living at Phoenix, Ariz., engaged in the manufacture of ice, and Bessie, the youngest, is attending school at Lebanon, Tenn. Mr. Lynch owns 220 acres, with 150 carefully cultivated, and is also engaged in stock raising. He has amassed quite a large fortune, and is considered one of the representative men of the county, his success not having made him penurious, as is so often the case. He is always ready to assist in worthy enterprises, aiding in many movements having for their aim the growth of the country. The needy ever find in him a sympathetic listener, and many of his acts of charity never reach the ears of the outside world. He has passed his sixty-second year, and his whole life has been one of upright and honorable principles. The respect and esteem accorded him is as wide as his acquaintance. . Death of John C.Lynch=The news of the death of Mr.John C.Lynch, which reached this city yesterday, was most shocking to his large number of friends. He was in town Monday, and seemed as well as usual, though he has almost been an invalid for several years from rheumatism. He was taken sick Tuesday morning with dropsy, and died Wednesday night, May 12,1906. He was fifty nine years of age, a native of Lee county, and died on his father's old homestead. He leaves a wife, and two children, namely Mrs.Custer Fryer and Miss Annie Lynch besides numerous relatives and a host of friends to mourn his loss. John C.Lynch was of sturdy stock, a man of honor, and the highest sense of right. He was a Mason, and lived as near to Masonic teachings as was possible for him to do. He was a friend in need, and always had a kind word for all with whom he came in contact. The remains were interred in the family cemetery yesterday afternoon, Elder W.H.Paslay conducting the funeral services. Peace to his ashes. 5-11-1906 LYNCH CEMETERY
MALLORY JOHN W.
John W. Mallory was born in Petersburg, Va., in the vicinity of which he resided with his mother until the year 1842, when she moved to Fayette County, Tenn.Leaving home in 1843, when fifteen years old, John went to Memphis, Tenn., and became engaged in clerking in a dry-goods store, continuing at that business until 1849. During his stay in Memphis he enlisted in a company fitting out for service in Mexico, but as their services were not needed it was soon disbanded. In the winter of 1848 he returned to Fayette County and in the January following was married. In 1852, moving to St. Francis County, Ark., he engaged in the mercantile business at Mount Vernon, at that time the county seat. To Mr. Mallory's marriage nine children were born: Etta, Cora, Emmett, Bessie, Eddie, John, Roger, Robert and Neeley. He now resides on his farm where he has made his home for thirty-seven years. He is a Mason, having passed the Blue Lodge to the Chapter, and thence to the Knight Templar degree. He is also a member of the L O. O. F. and K. of H. Mr. Mallory's father was a native of Louisa County, Va. He was of Scotch descent and his mother of French, descended from the Huguenots who fled to America on account of religious persecution. At an early age he moved to Petersburg, Va., and engaged in business, subsequently enlisting in the War of 1812 as a member of the Petersburg Blues, and served in Canada under Gen. William Henry Harrison. He was present at the principal engagements of that war, among others the battle of the Thames, in which the celebrated chief, Tecumseh, was slain, and he was only a short distance from him when he fell. He secured his tomahawk, which is still in the possession of the family. It is a piece of wonderfully unique and grotesquely finished workmanship. After the close of the war he was elected high sheriff of Petersburg, which office he held until his death in 1830. In commemoration of his untiring energy and devotion to his office the city council presented him with a silver cup, bearing the date of his birth, March 10, 1790. It is now in the possession of his son, the subject of this sketch. OBIT:6-24-1910 JOHN W.MALLORY-Veteran Citizen and Knight Templar Passes Away at an Advanced Age-John W.Mallory was born near Petersburg, Va. on March 25,1828. At the age of fourteen years he came west with his father's family, and settled in North Mississippi. There in 1846, he was married to Miss Martha Parham, and to that union nine children were born, six of whom survive him, namely:Mrs.F.Laughinghouse, Mrs.Cora Crews, Mrs.Nelle Buford,Mr.J.E.Mallory, and Mr.Ned Mallory. Two sons, Roger and Robert, and one daughter, Mrs.Lowry Mallory preceded him to the grave. In 1852 he came to Arkansas where he made his home and lived here until his death, which occurred last Saturday, June 18,1910. He united with the Methodist church in early boyhood, and was the Senior Mason in this county, having taken the Knight Templar degree. At his death he was 82 years, 2 months and 24 days. The funeral sermon was delivered by Rev.B.L.Wilford and the remains were followed by a large number of friends and acquaintances of the family to beautiful MT.VERNON,which has been the family burying grounds for half a century or more, and were their interred, the services at the grave being conducted with the beautifully Masonic ceremonies. Dr.H.R.Clark, Worshipful Master of the local lodge officiating, and Rev.Geo.H.Kirker offering the prayer. The following gentlemen were the active pallbearers:Mr.V.B.Izard, Mr.J.F.Stockard, Mr.J.M.Davis, Capt.Jas.Fussell, Mr.Ellis Turley, Mr.M.Isaacs. Honorary pallbearers:Mr.Eugene Williams, Mr.E.A.Rolfe, Mr.R.J.Williams, Mr.H.T.Mallory, Mr.John Eldridge, and Mr.John Gatling. MT.VERNON CEMETERY
MALLORY LOWRY
Lowry Mallory is a native of Alabama, and grew to manhood in his native State, supplementing his primary education by an attendance at Oxford College. Upon leaving school he came to Arkansas, locating on White River, in Jackson County, where he opened up a farm and remained for twelve years, improving his land; but overwork impaired his health, and he was obliged to travel for a few years. Thus were spent all the savings which he had made during that time in seeking restoration to his former condition, and he had only about $50 remaining. He then went to West Point, and was engaged in the real-estate business until 1884, when he entered the employ of the Little Rock Oil Company, and for four years was occupied as general purchasing agent of the company, employed in buying cotton seed. Mr. Mallory's marriage was to Miss Bessie Mallay, who was born in St. Francis County. She died in 1886, leaving three children: Walter E., J. W. and Bessie. William Mallory, the father of our subject, is a Virginian by birth, and moved to Alabama at an early date, being one of the pioneers of that part of the State. He was there married to Miss E. J. Blackwood. He was a son of a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and was of Irish descent.
MANNING WILLIAM USARMY-Thirty-Seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry-Civil War
William Manning was born near the city of Cork, Ireland, on August 12, 1835. In 1844 his father and mother emigrated to the United States, and located in Dutchess County, N. Y., the subject of this sketch, with the other children, following in 1845. The family remained in New York, engaged in the nursery business and farming, until 1856, when all moved to Will County, Ill., and settled on a farm. There our subject continued till 1866, the time of his removal to Jasper County, Iowa, where he was engaged in the nursery business until 1874. Selling his nursery, he returned to Illinois, and remained on the homestead until 1876, when he moved to his present location in St. Francis County, Ark. He was married on April 8, 1863, to Miss A. D. Harrah, a native of Pennsylvania. In September, 1861, Mr. Manning enlisted in the band of the Thirty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged in June, 1862, when the band was mustered out of service. While in Illinois he served one term as commissioner of highways, and one year as collector of taxes. In 1888 he was elected representative from St. Francis County on the Fusion ticket. He is a Democrat in politics, but not of the ballot-box stuffing variety. In the legislature he upheld every measure that was in the interest of progress and development, and supported every local temperance measure, and was largely instrumental in securing the passage of the native wine bill. His family consists of seven boys and one girl, ranging in age from four to twenty-five years. Since coming to Arkansas Mr. Manning has been engaged in farming and stock raising, and has been fairly successful.
MATTHEWS W. J. -DR. CSA-Army of Tennesee-Surgeon-Civil War
W. J. Matthews, M. D., a popular physician of Forrest City and a credit to the medical fraternity, was born in Maury County, Tenn., May 28, 1831, being one of eight children born to James W. and S. K. (Dooley) Matthews, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. James W. Matthews was a pioneer of Tennessee, a farmer by occupation, and surveyor of Maury County for many years. He died in his eighty-third year, his wife having gone before in her sixty-fourth year. The paternal grandfather was born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee when James W. was a small boy, dying in Tennessee at a very old age. The maternal grandfather also owed his nativity to Tennessee, and served in some of the Indian wars, and was given the euphonious title of 'Old Capt. Dooley.' The great-grandmother was killed by Indians while holding the grandmother (a baby at the time), and engaged in spinning flax. W. J. Matthews passed his early life in the schools of Maury County, Tenn., afterward becoming enrolled as a pupil of Erskine College, South Carolina, remaining away from home for three years. On the completion of his literary education he returned home and began the study of medicine under A. T. Boyd and J. M. Buldridge of Maury County, Tenn., and after having graduated from the Medical Department of the College at Nashville, Tenn., 1860, went immediately to Taylor's Creek, St. Francis County, Ark. In June, 1861, he entered the Confederate army as a private, this company being commanded by Hon. Poindexter Dunn. After three months Dr. Matthews was promoted to the position of surgeon of the Third Confederate Regiment, and served in that company in the same capacity till the close of the war. Of a company of 100 men from this neighborhood, all [p.485] were unmarried, with the exception of the captain. They were in the Army of the Tennessee, and participated in the hard-fought battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga, Kenesaw Mountain, Ringgold Gap, Golgotha Church, Jonesboro, Franklin and Perryville. Pat. Cleburne was the major-general, and Dr. Matthews was on the field when he met his death. Twenty-one men of the original number (100) returned home, and nine of them are now living. At the close of the war Dr. Matthews resumed his former practice, which he had established a year previous to the war at Taylor's Creek, and though he voted against secession, he went with his State when it seceded. Coming to Forrest City, in 1871, he has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession, and has attained an enviable position, both in social circles and as a competent physician. Dr. Matthews was married in 1866 to Miss Ella Eastham, of Summerville, Tenn., but death claimed her in 1871, she having borne two children, now deceased. His second wife was Mrs. Carrie Prewitt, of Saulsbury, Tenn., and to them one child was born, Lets B. Mrs. Matthews died, and his third and present wife was Miss C. M. Gray. Dr. Matthews is a member of the State Medical Association, secretary of St. Francis County Medical Society, and a member of the A. F. & A. M., I. O. O. F., K. of H., and K. & L. of H. He is also an earnest worker in the Presbyterian Church. -He was married to Mary Ella Eastham on 9 Jan 1866 in Maury County, Tennessee. Mary Ella Eastham was born in 1844 in Tennessee. She died in 1871.He was married to Carrie Prewitt about 1875. Carrie Prewitt was born in 1841 in North Carolina. William J. Matthews and Carrie Prewitt had the following children: 365 i. Leta B. Matthews was born in 1877 in St. Francis County, Arkansas.He was married to C. M. Gray on 23 Dec 1884 in St. Francis County, Arkansas. 1880-FORREST CITY 134 Wm J. MATHEWS Self M M W 49 TN Occ: Doctor Of Medicine Fa: NC Mo: TN- OBIT:FORREST CITY TIMES-SEP.18,1896: TO THE GOOD PEOPLE OF ST.FRANCIS COUNTY-ON LAST FRIDAY EVENING, SEPT.10,1896, THE REMAINS OF ONE OF THE TRUEST AND KINDLIEST OF MEN WAS LAID AWAY IN THE CEMETERY AT FORREST CITY AND WHILE THE LAST SAD RITES WERE PRONOUNCED, WHILE EIGHT OF HIS FELLOW BROTHER TEMPLARS KNELT AROUND THE NEW MADE GRAVE AND WITH CLASPED HANDS REPEATED THE GRAND APPLICATION, "OUR FATHER, WHO ART IN HEAVEN." , IT SEEMED TO ME I HAD NEVER REALIZED THE AWFUL MAJESTY, THE GREAT SOLEMNITY OF DEATH. DR.MATTHEWS WAS INDEED THE GOOD SAMARITAN TO HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE OF ST.FRANCIS COUNTY. AFTER AN ACQUAINTANCE OF THIRTEEN OR FOURTEEN YEARS WITH HIM, I CAN TRULY SAY THAT HE MUST HAVE KNOWN THAT FOR MUCH OF THE SERVICE, NO REWARD WOULD EVER BE RECEIVED BY HIM ON THIS EARTH. MISS NONIE PREWITT AND BROTHER, P.H.PREWITT, ATTENDED THE FUNERAL LAST WEEK OF DR.W.J.MATTHEWS, AND SPENT SEVERAL DAYS WITH FRIENDS. CITY CEMETERY
MAY ARCHIBALD S.
Archibald S. May, a well-known farmer of St. Francis County and numbered among its younger citizens, was born in that county in 1854, being the son of R. A. and L. C. May, natives of North Carolina and Georgia, respectively. With the exception of a few months spent in Texas he has passed his entire life in Arkansas. Mr. May was not fortunate in receiving a liberal education, the advantages at the period of his boyhood being far from satisfactory, but by constant and close application to study of late years he is conversant with many topics of importance of the past and present. He was married in December, 1888, to Miss Mollie Taylor, a daughter of James H. and Lucinda C. Taylor of Arkansas. Mr. May is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and also of the Wheel. His principal business is that of stock raising, and he is a man who stands high in his community-possessing true worth and integrity and being a liberal supporter of all public enterprises. HUGHES CEMETERY
McDANIEL WILLIAM HOWISON CSA-Thirteenth Arkansas Volunteer Infantry-Civil War
The father of this respected citizen, John McDaniel, of Scotch origin, was born near Lexington, Ky., January 25, 1799, but grew to manhood in Virginia, where he married Miss Nancy Calvert, of Welsh descent. Soon after that event they decided to move, the tales related of the rich valley beyond the 'Father of Waters,' inspiring them to seek a home in the then new territory of Arkansas, coming of ancestors who were used to conflicts with the Indians, and the hardships of pioneer life, they did not hesitate to start for this new land of promise. Their trip was made by boat to a point several miles above the mouth of L'Anguille River, where they landed in 1824, and set ashore their worldly goods, consisting of one pony, two cows, and what household goods the pony could haul on a sled, and 12 cents in money. With his family, which then consisted of his wife and two children, and with no guide but the compass, Mr. DcDaniel struck out through the forest and staked off the farm now owned and occupied by the principal of this sketch. At that time there were not more than twelve families within the limits of the present St. Francis County. Upon the breaking out of the war, Mr. McDaniel was worth over $75,000 in lands, negroes and stock, all accumulated in a little over thirty years, in a wild and unsettled country, and upon a start of only one shilling; such a record is marvelous, and shows the latent force and energy, which was lying dormant in the character of John McDaniel when coming to this locality. Mr. McDaniel lived to a ripe old age, and died October 31, 1869, his wife surviving him only four years. She died September 15, 1873, aged seventy-four years and six months. Ten years after their arrival here, January 17, 1834, was born William H. McDaniel, who, together with his brother, John L., are the only survivors of this pioneer family. The early life of William H. was spent on the farm, helping his father clear up the land which he had settled when coming to Arkansas; the outbreak of the war found him still on the old homestead, but with the enthusiasm of a patriot, and the love of his native State burning in his breast, he enlisted in the Thirteenth Arkansas Volunteer Infantry. Entering as a private, his bravery and good conduct were soon rewarded by his being promoted, first to the position of orderly-sergeant, then first lieutenant, and after the battle of Shiloh to the rank of captain. He participated in the battles of Belmont, Shiloh, Richmond and Murfreesboro (where he was wounded and disabled for a short time, also being wounded at Chickamauga) then at Missionary Ridge, and a number of other hard-fought battles, among which was the battle of Atlanta, July 22, 1864. In August, 1864, the Captain was sent west of the Mississippi, to gather up recruits for the service, and while on duty, in October of that year, was captured and taken to Chicago, and then to Johnson's Island, where he was held until the close of the war. Then returning home, he has since been engaged in farming in this county,. with substantial success, and now owns 1,480 acres in one tract, having 900 under cultivation. His principal crop is cotton, and he owns his own cotton-gin and saw-mill, and a supply store to furnish goods for his tenants. On January 24, 1867, Mr. McDaniel married Miss Mollie E. Fondren, of Tennessee. They are the parents of three daughters: Willie, Nannie and Ads. Several years ago Mr. McDaniel moved his family to Forrest City, where he has since lived, and has been a member of the city council for a number of years; also a member of the school board, and at one time was coroner of the county. OBIT:Death of Capt.W.H.McDaniel-The dealings of providence with the beings created by omnipotent power are wonderful, mysterious, and oft-times perplexing. When on last Friday, it became known that the spirit of Capt.W.H.McDaniel had left its frail, enfeebled body, friends remarked on the vitality and strength of constitution which enabled him to battle so many years against the inroads of time. William Howerson McDaniel was born in St.Francis County Jan.17,1834, and died Oct.21, 1904. His love for his native state and county, was shown by his continued residence here during his entire life. When the Civil war began and volunteers were first called he was one of the first to enlist, joining the 13th? Arkansas as a First Lieutenant. At the battle of Shiloh, he replaced his captain lost in battle. He survived the war, being wounded several times at Murfressboro. At Chickamauga, when the smoke had cleared of that great battle, he and his friend, Jesse Hodges stood among the thousands of dead and dying, and being the sole survivors of their company. He chose to return home to enlist more to the cause, when he was captured on this trip, and sent to Johnson's Island where he remained until the end of the war as a prisoner. At the close of the war, he returned home and married Miss Mollie Elender Fondren, of Tennessee, on Jan.24,1867. They were the parents of three children:Mrs.John W.Naylor, Mrs.Sydenham R.Trapp, Jr., and Mrs.Percy H.Barker, all of whom were with him, and ministered to his wants. He was a successful businessman, an interested citizen. The services at the church were simple, Rev.W.H.Paslay officiating, and then the body was laid to rest in the Forrest City cemetery by his Confederate Veteran comrades with the battleflag entwined with crepe over all that was mortal of W.H.McDaniel. 10-28-1904 CITY CEMETERY
McDONALD JAMES P. USARMY-Army-Civil War
James P. McDonald was born in Kingston, Canada, in the year 1830, and is of Scotch-Irish descent. When quite a young man he left the parental roof, engaging in the lumber business, some little distance from home, and afterward worked on the Erie Canal, in 1854 going to sea. He next went to New Orleans, and having commenced boating on the Mississippi, followed that occupation until 1857, only discontinuing to accompany Albert S. Johnston to Salt Lake City.After sojourning in the land of the 'Mormons' for a while the spring of 1859 found him in California. Later he went to Leavenworth, Kas., and from there to Hagerstown, Md., where he accepted the position of wagon master in the Federal service, gaining the approbation of his superior officers for his faithful attention to every detail of his business. In 1864 Mr. McDonald moved to Memphis, Tenn., and remained until 1866, leaving to take up his permanent abode in St. Francis County, Ark. In 1870 he was united in marriage with Mrs. Williams, who died two years later. In 1874 Miss Lucy Halbert became his wife, and by her he had two children, who have since died: Rosie A. and Sallie Baker. Mrs. McDonald closed her eyes to the scenes of this world in 1876, and in 1881 Mr. McDonald was united in matrimony with Mrs. Lane, his present wife. Mrs. McDonald is a very estimable lady, and enjoys the respect of a wide circle of acquaintances and friends. In secret organizations Mr. McDonald is identified with the Masonic order, and is also a member of the Wheel. In politics he votes the union labor ticket, and with his wife attends the Baptist Church, in which they have been members of many years standing. OBIT:3-25-1910 - McDONALD - J. - P. - - - unk - 3 9 1910 - UNKNOWN - Resolutions of Respect=To the Worshipful Master Warden and brethren of Rising Star Lodge No.211, F. A. and M. We, your committee appointed to draft suitable resolution to the memory of our deceased brother, J.P.McDonald, who died the 9th day of March, 1910.Robt.Brown,David Duncan,Henry Hughes, Committee. CEMETERY UNKNOWN
McGOWEN JOSEPH
Joseph McGowen, a native of North Carolina, was left an orphan at the age of seven years, his mother having died in 1836 and his father four years later. He was then bound out to a Mr. Turnage, with whom he remained until his seventeenth year, when he commenced working for himself at common farm labor in Shelby County, Tenn., and in 1852 purchased a farm in Tipton County. He was married November 19, 1854, to Cordelia A. Joyce, a native of Tennessee. They were the parents of thirteen children, seven of whom are still living: William Oliver (born January 15, 1856), Eugenia H. (born September 6, 1857) and Thomas Martin (born April 26, 1862), who are married; Edward G. (born October 1, 1860), Annie Eliza (born January 10, 1867), Mary Frances (born December 25, 1868) and James Taylor (born June 28, 1872). Eugenia H. was married to William Williams March 4, 1875; William Oliver was married to M. J. English December 28, 1881; Thomas Martin was married to Gertrude Tennant December 21, 1887. Mr. McGowen remained in Tipton County until 1878 when he removed to Lee County, Ark., but after one year there, came to St. Francis County, where he still resides. He owns a quarter section of land with all but twenty acres under cultivation. Mr. McGowen has always been an active Democrat, and is a strong advocate of the public school system.
NAIL IRVING R. CSA-Thirteenth Arkansas Infantry-Johnston's Co.-Civil War
Irving R. Nail owns one of the carefully cultivated farms of St. Francis County, Ark., it consisting of 120 acres, a greater portion of it being under the plow, and the general impression of the observer, is that thrift and prosperity prevail. He owes his success to no one, being thrown on his own resources at the age of thirteen, and though the prospect was not one to encourage one, he never grew despondent, but kept bravely on, with what success is already known. He was born in Tennessee in the year 1825, being the son of Andrew and Lucy, natives of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. Mr. Nail came to St. Francis County in 1838 where he breathed his last a few years later. Irving R. Nail enlisted in the Confederate [p.486] army in 1861 in Johnston's Company, Thirteenth Arkansas Regiment, participating in the battle of Belmont. He was shortly after discharged on account of illness, this ending his war career. He was married in 1863 to Amanda Raney, a daughter of Thomas and Jane Raney. The result of this union was four children: Martha J., William R., Dorinda and John C. Mrs. Nail died in August, 1877, and Mr. Nail remained a widower until January, 1881, when he took for his second wife Miss Nancy Cobb, whose father, W. M. Cobb, immigrated from South Carolina to Arkansas in 1855, having been born in 1825. Mr. and Mrs. Nail are members in high standing of the Baptist Church, to which the former lends his hearty support and influence. He is a Democrat politically. Horton-Obituary-Died on May 18,1899, at his home in this vicinity, after a long and tedious illness, Mr.Earl Nail, aged 73 years. Was born in Tennessee. Came to this county when very young and has resided here most of his life. Was laid to rest in the Barney Shaw (probably Barnishaw). He leaves to mourn him two sons, who found him a loving father and numerous friends who regret the loss of a Christian gentleman and true friend. For the past thirty three years he had been a consistent member of Bible Union church. While we tender our sincere sympathy to the bereaved family, we will say, grieve not, for Christ will claim his own at the appointed time. We can only find consolation by putting our trust in the Lord, Who giveth and Who taketh, but doeth all things well. A Friend. Shown as Alexander Irvin Nail on FindAGrave site and birthdate as Sep.20,1825.5-26-1899 BARNISHAW CEMETERY
PARROTT JOHN USARMY-War of 1812
SEE JOHN M.PARROTT
PARROTT JOHN M. CSA-Army-Civil War
John M. Parrott, a retired lawyer of Forrest City, is native of Tennessee. His father, John Parrott, moved to that State at a very early day in its history, where he engaged in the saddlery business, serving as a soldier in the War of 1812. He died in 1845, his wife surviving him twenty years. They were the parents of a large family, of whom John M., our subject, who was born in Jefferson County, Tenn., in October, 1814, is the only survivor. He lived at his native town, Dandridge, attending the academy at that place, until seventeen years of age, when his father moved upon a farm in the vicinity. In 1836 he commenced life for himself at Blountsville, Ala., going into the mercantile business, and three years later came to St. Francis County, continuing the same business at Madison. In 1840 he was appointed deputy clerk by Isaac Mitchel, then clerk of the St. Francis circuit court, and in 1842 was elected circuit clerk, which office he filled with such satisfaction to the citizens that he was made his own successor for fourteen years in succession; during this time he applied himself closely to the study of law, and in 1856 he was admitted to the bar and commenced practicing, which he followed until within a few years, when be retired from active professional life. In 1864 Mr. Parrott was elected to the legislature, but did not serve the term, owing to the fact of there being no session that year. In 1874 he was delegate to the constitutional convention. He was a candidate for nomination for the office of auditor of State in 1876, but was beaten by John Crawford. During the war he entered the Confederate service and acted as assistant adjutant, though being in no engagements. Mr. Parrott has been twice married; first, in 1841, to Rhoda Johnson, who died in 1858. His second union, in 1859, was to Mrs. Johnson (nee Witter). They are the parents of six children, three of whom are still living: Kate C. (now Mrs. Martin), Ida Lee (now Mrs. Miller) and Mattie A., all residing in this county. Mr. Parrott has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for the past forty-five years. He is also connected with the Masonic order. OBIT: It is with the feeling of great sorrow that the Times chronicles the death of Judge John P.Parrott. which sad event occurred at his home, five miles north of the city, on Monday, March 23rd, 1896, in the eighty second year of his age. He was buried in the family cemetery, near Andrew's Landing, on the following day, under the auspices of the F.& A. Masons. Judge Parrott settled in this county in 1835, having moved from Knoxville, Tenn. He represented the county in the only two constitutional conventions held by our state, and held the office of circuit court clerk for fourteen years., and served as County and Probate Judge for one term. There never lived a purer or more honored citizen in this county, and to his last day on earth wore his crown of labor, love, and forebearance meekly, submitting to his long suffering with resignation and courage to the last. May the rising generation imitate his noble life, and that in death they too may be prepared to go in peace. Judge Parrott was a member of the Bar of Eastern Arkansas, and highly esteemed by all the courts. The service was officiated by Dr.H.P.Dooley and Gen.Geo.P.Taylor, in a sweetly impressive manner. He was a charter member of the W.M.W. and brethren of the Rising Star Lodge, and was the first Secretary of the lodge.-3-27-1896 CITY CEMETERY
PASLAY W.H. -REV.
Rev. W. H. Paslay, prominently associated with the Baptist Church of Forrest City, first saw the light of day in South Carolina, December 18, 1831, being the son of H. W. and Mary (Wright) Paslay, born in South Carolina, in 1803 and 1802, respectively. H. W. Paslay was a graduate from the Medical Institute of Charleston, and also a minister of the Baptist Church. He was recognized as a gentleman of unusual attainments, both in his practice of medicine, and as a minister of the Gospel. He immigrated to Arkansas in 1857, where his death occurred in 1872. To himself and wife a family of eight children were born. The mother of Mr. Paslay closed her eyes to the scenes of this world in 1873. W. H. Paslay received his education in the schools of his native State, afterward taking a full course in the well-known Furman University of South Carolina, graduating therefrom in the year 1855. He then taught school for several years, and was ordained in Alabama, where for fifteen years he was engaged in preaching and teaching. Coming to Arkansas in the fall of 1872, he located in Monroe County, and has endeared himself to many friends and acquaintances by his conscientious and faithful work in the church, as well as by his efficient discharge of the manifold duties of teacher in the schools. He has been occupied in preaching (as at present) in St. Francis, Lee, Monroe and Phillips Counties, his work covering a period of over thirty-one years. During the Civil War he was prevailed upon by many soldiers, who went into active service, to remain at home to look [p.487] after their families, they feeling that his watchful care would keep them from all harm, so his work in the war covered only a short time. Mr. Paslay was first married to Miss Geraldine Rupum, of Alabama, who left four daughters, viz.: Mary Tula, Ora Lana, Alna Mona and Etta Leta. He was next married to Miss Julia Prince of Alabama, who died leaving one child, Estelle. His third and present wife was formerly Miss Ann Dozier of Jasper County, Ga., and by her he became the father of three sons; W. H., Woode D. and Rob E. Mr. Paslay in connection with his many other duties, carefully cultivates a farm of 320 acres of valuable land. He is a Mason in the Blue Lodge and Chapter, and also a Knight of Honor. OBIT: 2-10-1911 DEATH=REV.W.H.PASLAY=The Forrest City Times, Feb. 10, 1911. DEATH OF ELDER PASLAY. Venerable Reverend Passes Away Sunday Afternoon After Long Illiness. The death last Sunday afternoon at his home in this city of Elder. W. H. Paslay marks not only the passing of an able, earnest disciple of the Creator, but the one of the old landmarks of St. Francis county and of Forrest City. Another beloved citizen has gone to his reward, The voice of an able churchman is stilled, and in the hearts of countless congregations of those who in years gone by have listened to him as he expounded the gospel, as it was given to him to preach, a feeling of an expressible sadness comes, and in all of our city there was not a heart but quickened with pain and many eyes, but held a tear, when the sad tidings flew, as sad tidings always do, on Sunday afternoon, of the death of that venerable partriarch, who for so many years had faithfully served this people, and though his death was not unexpected, yet none the less were the tidings sad, and . . . less the tears that flowed. Elder W. H. Paslay was born in Laurens county, South Carolina, on December 18, 1831. His father was a Baptist minister and a physician of note. After receiving an academic course in the different branches of studies, he entered Furman University, in Greenville, S. C., and graduated with first honors from that unstitution. After this he moved to Dallas county, Alabama, where he taught school. In 1858 he entered the ministry, in which he has since been actively engaged. Mr. Paslay came to Arkansas in 1872, and located on a farm near Wheatley. He has been married three times, and has now living three sons and three daughters, as follows: Mr. H. W. Paslay, of this city; Messrs. R. E. and Willie Paslay, of Oregon; Mrs. J. T. Johnson and Mrs. Murray Hambleton, of ;this city, and Mrs. C. H. Paslay, of Memphis. Elder Paslay was greatly honored by his denomination, being elected Treasurer and Moderator of Mt. Vernon Association consecutively for the last thirty years. He held the position of County Examiner for several years, and was closely identified with the educational interests of this state and county. He was also a member of the Masonic fraternity, having taken the degrees of the Commandery, and was ever ready to put into practice the honorable tenants of this illustrious fraternity, dispensing light in darkness, joy in sorrow, and sustenance to the needy. Elder Paslay had been in feeble health for a number of years, but only recently would he consent to give up the work he had so long and faithfully performed. He had been confined to his room and bed for over twelve months, and though all that medical skill, and the loving care and attention of a devoted family could do, was done to prolong his life, all efforts wre unavailing, and the gentle spirit passed to the Maker, whose disciple he had been through all the years of his maturity, and ". nls" was written in the story of a life well spent - a life that was not lived in vain. In his daily CITY CEMETERY
PEARSON EVERETT CSA-Sixth Mississippi Regiment-Died in Service-Civil War
SEE GEORGE W.PEARSON
PEARSON GEORGE W.
G. W. Pearson, deputy circuit and county clerk of St. Francis County, was born in Mississippi December 25, 1830, being the third in a family of nine children born to John A. and Nancy (Nichols) Pearson. They were natives of North Carolina (near Fair Bluff), and married there, moving to Southern Mississippi in 1829. At the date of their deaths they lived near Brandon, Miss. John A. Pearson was a Methodist Episcopal minister, and had preached from the earliest recollections of his son until his death, in 1842. Of their large family of children, G. W. is the only one now living. Everett died at Nashville, Tenn., in the Confederate army, in the Sixth Mississippi Regiment; John was waylaid and shot by a negro; the sisters married and all died after the war. G. W. has in his possession a cane which was made by his grandfather (a native of North Carolina) when a young man. He was a carpenter and natural mechanic, and died in his seventy-third year. G. W. Pearson received his education in the schools of Mississippi, and selected farming as his occupation, in which he was actively engaged until coming to Arkansas, in 1872. He was married in Mississippi to M. A. Taylor, and their union was blessed by two children: William Atkins and Annie Everett. Mr. Pearson owns a residence in town. He was agent for the Memphis & Little Rock Railroad for nine years, subsequently being appointed magistrate, and has been filling the position of deputy county clerk since May, 1889, discharging the duties of his office in a highly creditable manner. The grandfather of Mr. Pearson and two brothers were taken captives by Indians and carried far back into the interior of the country, after which the savages held a council to determine the best way to dispose of their captives. The brothers were lashed to the ground to await their terrible death, but an Indian maiden became enamored of one of them-a very handsome man-and went to his relief, cutting the lashes that bound him, and telling him at the same time to flee for his life, which injunction he was not slow to follow. He released his brothers, and after running nearly all night, they crawled into a large log, whose capacity was sufficient to hold them all. The Indians followed in hot pursuit, and were close upon them when a herd of deer crossed their path, thereby destroying the trail. The redskins gave up the chase, and actually seated themselves on the log in which the brothers were secreted, and in which they remained until night. They had been without food for three days, and when an opossum crossed their path they killed and devoured it without waiting to have it broiled, their intense hunger making them forget that it was raw. They made their way to a white settlement, and then on to their old home, where they were welcomed by their relatives and friends, who had despaired of ever seeing them again. Mr. Pearson has not been particularly fortunate in amassing property, but he and his honored wife enjoy that which is of far more consequence-an unsullied name and the sincere love of a host of friends. He is a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, his wife also being connected with the same church. OBIT:DEATH OF GEO.W.PEARSON=Passes away peacefully after long illness, at advanced age. Was Efficient Recorder. "Mr.George W.Pearson, died on Tuesday, Dec.5,1905," The funeral was on the following day, Elder J.A.McCord presiding over the religious ceremonies. The hand of disease was laid on Mr.Pearson almost a year ago, and although a sufferer for so long, he continued to take an active interest in the affairs of this life, discharging his business duties until the last day. On Friday previous, he worked on the books as Recorder, trying to leave them in order. The disease, although not painful, was very wasting in its effects, and in spite of a strong constitution and a determined will, the brave man was compelled to take to his bed, but not until a day or two before the end. The services at the church were edifying and comforting, and the Masonic ritual at the cemetery impressive. Mr.Pearson had lived in Forrest City for many years, and ever in his business relations was found just and robust, and in social and religious activities, kind, true, reliable and faithful. To his wife and children, a tower of strength, to his fatherless sister-in-law, a father and friend. CITY CEMETERY
PEEVEY ROBERT W. CSA-Colonel Robinson's Regiment-Major-Civil War
Hon. R. W. Peevey, farmer, stock raiser, and one of the prominent old settlers of St. Francis County, owes his nativity to Alabama, being a son of W. H. and J. A. (Childers) Peevey, originally from Georgia and Tennessee, respectively, and of Irish descent. The parental grandparents of our subject came to this country shortly after the Revolutionary War. R. W. Peevey was born January 8, 1827, and was the fourth son in a family of seven children. He spent his boyhood [p.488] days on his father's farm, and before his twentieth birthday was married to Miss Nellie A. Collier, who died in 1850, leaving three children, two still living: James J. and Emma J. (wife of W. H. Fogg), both in this county. In 1862 Mr. Peevey enlisted in the Confederate army and served in Col. Robinson's regiment, being elected captain of his company at starting out, and in May, 1863, he was promoted to major. He participated in the battles of Vicksburg, Baton Rouge, Corinth and a number of others. After the war he engaged in farming in Madison County, Ala., until 1873, when he came to Arkansas and located in St. Francis County, where he bought his present farm. In October, 1859, he married Miss Louisa Curry. She died in August, 1878, having borne seven children, and of these four survive: Thomas Elbert, Robert H., William H. and Luther B. Mr. Peevey married his third wife, Mary J. Dew, in January, 1880. He is a prominent Democrat, and has ably served his county in the State legislature, to which he was elected in 1876. He also held the office of justice of the peace for several terms, and is still filling that position. A member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, he is also connected with the Masonic fraternity. OBIT: Capt.R.W.Peevey died at his home near Newcastle, in Johnson township, Wednesday night, Aug.22,1906, of old age and general debility. He was in his 80th year, and had lived in this county since 1871, coming from Alabama. He represented the county in the legislature for one term, and for many years was one of the staunchest and hardest working democrats in the State. He was a good man and honest, and besides his family, consisting of a wife and four sons, viz.:Jim, Hall, Luther, and Will, and a sister, Mrs.Baxter, formerly of this city, leaves many sorrowing friends. He was a Mason, Knight of Honor, member of Camp 923 United Confederate Veterans, and a member of the Methodist church, being a leader in the Sunday school work of his neighborhood for many years. His remains were interred in the Loughridge cemetery yesterday afternoon, under auspices of Rising Star Lodge. Peace to his soul. LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY
PREWETT FRANK E.
George C. and Frank E. Prewitt are now prominent young farmers of this county, though natives of Missouri. They removed to St. Francis County, Ark., in 1886, and settled on the St. Francis River, a section noted for its fertility and productiveness. Their father, Joseph E. Prewitt, was a native of Scott County, Ky., where he was reared and married, Miss Naomi M. Nash, a native of Covington, Ky., becoming his wife. She was a daughter of William and Elizabeth Nash, and died in 1879, leaving six children: Robert C. (M. D.), William L. (a teacher in Missouri), Bettie A. (wife of George W. Watts), George C. and Frank E., and Mattie C. (now Mrs. Clifford, of Missouri). Mr. Prewitt died in 1874 at the age of sixty-five. George C. Prewitt was born on May 20, 1850, and received a good education, being instructed in the rudiments of farm work by his father, who was an agriculturist of advanced ideas. At the age of twenty he commenced farming for himself. Frank E. was born in Pike County, Mo., June 18, 1859, and started out in life as a tiller of the soil at the age of nineteen, in 1886 becoming associated with his brother George. They are industrious and enterprising young farmers, and are turning their attention to that most lucrative branch of agricultural pursuits, as well as that most beneficial to the community, the breeding of fine stock, in which they will undoubtedly make a decided success. They are Democrats in politics and liberal donators to all charitable and worthy enterprises. MT.VERNON CEMETERY
PREWETT FRANK M. CSA-Capt.Mallory's Company-Captain-Civil War/USARMY-MEXICAN WAR
Frank M. Prewett, one of the oldest and most respected merchants of Forrest City, was born in Bedford County, Tenn., November 4, 1827, and at the age of sixteen went to Texas and volunteered in the Mexican War, under Capt. James Arnold and Col. Albert Sidney Johnston. He participated in the battles of Monterey and Buena Vista, receiving an honorable discharge at the end of two years. On his way home he stopped at Mount Vernon, and then and there became ensnared in cupid's toils, yielding up his affections to the charms of Miss N. E. Izard. Ten days after they met she wore his engagement ring, and eight months later they were married. Mr. Prewett located at Mount Vernon and engaged in the grocery business, and, notwithstanding that he started with very little capital, he possessed at the breaking out of the war, a large plantation and twenty-nine slaves. He enlisted in Capt. Mallory's company as first lieutenant during the civil strife, and was promoted while at Cotton Plant to the office of captain. His health giving way necessitated his resignation, which took place in the northern part of Arkansas, inflammatory rheumatism, caused by exposure, rapidly making inroads upon his usual health. At the close of the war he found his fortune all gone, and many debts previously contracted staring him in the face. His slaves remained with him, but the expense of keeping them was much more than they could possibly liquidate. One morning Uncle Frank (as he is familiarly called) was viewing his gloomy situation, naturally becoming more and more despondent, when he was accosted by Mr. J. H. Cole, an acquaintance of many years, who proposed that they go to Madison and enter into business, Mr. Prewett not to furnish any capital. The result was the establishing of a mercantile establishment under the name of Cole & Prewett. After a few months Mr. Prewett discovered something which he considered more profitable, and desired a dissolution of partnership, his share of the profits being $1,900. Mr. Cole presented him with a fine horse and saddle, which he traded for a small box house, the first house erected on the present site of Forrest City, and since converted into a saloon. Here, in connection with Col. Izard, he amassed a fortune in the grocery business, while the Little Rock & Memphis was being built. They afterward failed for $45,000, and were obliged to dispose of a large amount of real estate in order to cancel their indebtedness. Mr. Prewett went out of the business and resumed farming for ten years, at the expiration of that time coming back into the same business, where he is to be found at present. Mrs. Prewett, who died in her fifty-fourth year, was a faithful worker and member of the Baptist Church, and a most exemplary lady, being thoroughly beloved by all who knew her. By her marriage with Mr. Prewett she became the mother of eleven children, seven now living: John M. (attorney at law of Forrest City), Mark W. (mail clerk from Helena to Knobel), Thomas E. (city marshal of Forrest City), Blanche (wife of T. L. Briscoe, of Helena), Oscar (a railroad man), Mary E. and George Emma (at home). Mr. Prewett is a son of P. H. and Judy (Whittaker) [p.489] Prewett. His father was born in Bedford County, Tenn., and in 1854 immigrated to Texas, breathing his last in the latter State, in 1866, at the age of seventy-two. Mr. Prewett is a Royal Arch Mason, an Odd Fellow and a member of the Baptist Church. UNMARKED GRAVE CITY CEMETERY
PREWETT GEORGE C.
George C. and Frank E. Prewitt are now prominent young farmers of this county, though natives of Missouri. They removed to St. Francis County, Ark., in 1886, and settled on the St. Francis River, a section noted for its fertility and productiveness. Their father, Joseph E. Prewitt, was a native of Scott County, Ky., where he was reared and married, Miss Naomi M. Nash, a native of Covington, Ky., becoming his wife. She was a daughter of William and Elizabeth Nash, and died in 1879, leaving six children: Robert C. (M. D.), William L. (a teacher in Missouri), Bettie A. (wife of George W. Watts), George C. and Frank E., and Mattie C. (now Mrs. Clifford, of Missouri). Mr. Prewitt died in 1874 at the age of sixty-five. George C. Prewitt was born on May 20, 1850, and received a good education, being instructed in the rudiments of farm work by his father, who was an agriculturist of advanced ideas. At the age of twenty he commenced farming for himself. Frank E. was born in Pike County, Mo., June 18, 1859, and started out in life as a tiller of the soil at the age of nineteen, in 1886 becoming associated with his brother George. They are industrious and enterprising young farmers, and are turning their attention to that most lucrative branch of agricultural pursuits, as well as that most beneficial to the community, the breeding of fine stock, in which they will undoubtedly make a decided success. They are Democrats in politics and liberal donators to all charitable and worthy enterprises. COULD BE MT.VERNON
ROLLWAGE OTTO B.
Hon. Otto B. Rollwage, mayor of Forrest City, and a member of the firm of Rollwage & Co., one of the leading mercantile houses in Forrest City, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1854, being reared and educated in that city. At the age of twenty years he came to Forrest City, and engaged as salesman in a store in this city for three months, after which he entered into the mercantile business with his brother Louis. They commenced on a small scale, but by close attention to business and strict economy, enjoy a very extensive trade, employing eight salesmen in their store. They own five business houses besides the one they occupy. Mr. Rollwage was a member of the board of aldermen for some time, and so efficient were his services in that capacity, and so diligently did he attend to the duties devolving on him that he was complimented with a nomination for mayor of Forrest City, while away from home, and without his knowledge. His administration has been very beneficial to the city, he having enforced the many ordinances that were before a dead letter on the status, and especially has he been vigorous in the prosecution of all parties violating the whisky laws; as a result there is now no better regulated city in the State. In his domestic relations Mr. Rollwage is not less happily situated than in business circles. He married Miss Jennie Anderson, of Monroe County, a graduate of a female college in Tennessee, and a highly educated and refined lady. She is a leader in the society of Forrest City, and is one of the prominent members of the W. C. T. U. in Arkansas, having been a State delegate to the National Convention held at Nashville in 1887. This worthy couple are the parents of five children: Norma, Otto, Tolise, De Velling and Madeleine. Mr. R. is a son of Frederick and Mina (Kuker) Rollwage, both natives of Germany. Frederick Rollwage is still living and resides in Cincinnati, but spends about half of his time with his son, our subject. -The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 94:Hon.Otto B.Rollwage is a lawyer by profession, and is a native of Cincinnatti, Ohio, where he was born On Sept.23,1853. He is a son of F. and Mena (Kuker) Rollwage, who emigrated from Germany in 1838. His father was a tailor by trade, who continued at his chosen calling until sixty-five years of age, when he retired. Our subject was reared in Cincinnatti and educated in the common schools of that city. In 1874, at the age of twenty years, he came to Forrest City and was engaged as a salesman for the firm of Sparks & Rollwage, said firm being composed of William Sparks, and L.Rollwage, brother of our subject. They then formed L.Rollwage & Co. and operated until December 31,1902, Otto Rollwage retired from the firm and soon thereafter, admitted to the bar, and since has been practicing law with marked success. In 1877 he was happily married to Miss Jennie E. Anderson, of Monroe County, who was born and reared in Arkansas, and is a highly educated and refined lady whose friends are legion. Ten children have blessed this match, namely, Talbert, Norma, Otto, Tolise, DeVeiling, Madeline, Ardale, Herman, Virginia and Ralph, all of whom, their first born, Talbert, who died when four years of age, are now living in this city. He was a member of the board of aldermen for three years, and Mayor for two terms, having been nominated for the latter the first time while away from home and without his knowledge. He was chosen President of the Arkansas State Merchant's Association in 1900 at it's organization in Little Rock. CITY CEMETERY
ROWLAND CHARLES CSA-Army-Civil War
SEE GEORGE M.ROWLAND
ROWLAND GEORGE M.
George M.Rowland, a prominent farmer of Utica Township, is a native of Mississippi, and a son of Charles and Mary (Lewis) Rowland. who were Virginians by birth. In 1830 they left the Old Dominion for Marshall County, Mississippi, then a new part of the state, from which the Indians had just been moved. Here the father lived on a farm which he entered until 1840, then going to Benton County, where he made his home until called by death, in 1863. His wife survived him to 1876. They were the parents of six boys, three of whom are still living: W.L. (on the old place), J.E. (a resident of St.Francis County), and George M. The latter was born in Marshall County, Miss., Feb.22,1850. His father, like a number of other Southerners, was a Union man, when he announced his allegiance to his native state, and gave three sons to the Southern cause. After the battle of Shiloh the brothers returned home on furlough, and were surprised by the Federals, but would not have been captured for the treachery of a companion. The three boys and the father were taken prisoners, and carried to Cairo, Illinois, afterward being exchanged, but the father died within eight days of his return, from exposure coming down the river. George M.Rowland remained at home during the war, being too young to enter the service, though he heard the bullets whistle on more than one occasion. In 1868, he went to Gibson County,Tennessee, was engaged in teaming for a man named Davis, and the following year took charge of a large farm, In Hardeman County, belonging to the same party, where he remained until 1876. Going home on a visit, the month of January, 1876, found him enroute for Arkansas, in charge of stock for J.D.Beans of Forrest City, for whom he clerked the rest of the year. The next year he rented a farm, and has since been occupied in that occupation, now owning two farms, one of 214 acres, and one 185 acres in extent, with over seventy-five acres under cultivation. Mr.Rowlans has been twice married, first in 1879 to Miss Mollie V,Jeth, who died in 1881. His second wife was Mrs.Allie S.Johnson (nee Hill). They are the parents of one child, Charlie Pike, born in 1887. Mr.Rowland is an influential Democrat, and has served as justice of the peace two years. He is a member of the Knights of Honor, and at one time belonged to the County Wheel. OBIT:2-5-1904 - ROWLAND - GEORGE - M. - - - 1852 - 2 4 1904 - UNKNOWN - Death of George M.Rowland=George M.Rowland, Assessor of St.Francis County, died last night, Feb.4,1904, at his home in Colt; after an illness of about three hours. While working in his barnyard about 6 pm, he was taken with a pain in his jaw, and the pain increased down his neck and into his left side. He suffered terribly, and Dr.L.H.Merritt was sent for and arrived about 8 pm. Everything was done that could be thought of, and a few minutes before he died, he seemed to be resting much easier. Death had put its quieting hand upon him, and he passed away around 9:15 pm. George Rowland was widely known, loved, and respected throughout the county, and his death is regretted by hundreds of friends and acquaintances. He was about 52 years of age, and leaves a wife and one child, a boy of 14 years. The remains will be interred in the Hughes or Roy cemetery today. HUGHES OR ROY CEMETERY
ROY JOHN LEWIS
John L. Roy, active in the agricultural affairs of Utica Township, is a native of Tennessee, and a son of James and Mary Roy, originally from Virginia and Tennesee, respectively. John L. came to St.Francis County, Arkansas, with his father in 1828, being at that time only one year old. Though not having been consulted as to this change in residence, he has never regretted being a citizen of the state of Arkansas, as he is entirely satisfied with the country and people. He grew up to farm life, and while living in the country for a day when it was but thinly settled, received a good education, attending school regularly until he grew to manhood. At the age of twenty-one he commenced life for himself as book-keeper at a store in Helena, but resigned that position in a short time to take charge of a trading boat on the Mississippi River. Two years later he went to New Orleans, and resumed clerking in a dry goods and grocery house for two years, after which he returned home, and since has been occupied in farming. Mr.Roy was married in 1853, to Miss Lucy E.Dallor, daughter of James and Mary Dallor, natives of N.Carolina. They are the parents of nine children: Mary E., Thomas J., Mark G., Martha J., Sarah F., William E., Nettie A., Richard L., and John A., the last two being twins. He owns a farm of 160 acres, with sixty-five under cultivation, and is engaged in raising stock and farming, principally. He is a member of the Masonic order, and of the Knights of Honor, and also of the County Wheel, and he and his family are members of the Baptist Church. In the early days when the parents of our subject first came to this country, and for a number of years after, game was plentiful, and John L. had many exciting bear hunts. At one time, while his father and William Stags were out hunting, their dog was in danger of being killed by a bear, whereupon the former caught the wild animal by the ears, and held him until Mr.Stags shot him; this exploit gained him quite a reputation as a bear hunter. OBIT:UNCLE" JOHN LEWIS ROY, A NATIVE OF ST.FRANCIS COUNTY, AND THE OLDEST RESIDENT OF THE COUNTY, DIED AT HIS HOME SEVEN MILES NORTH OF THE CITY, MONDAY AFTERNOON, OCT.11,1896. HE WAS 69 YEARS OF AGE, A MEMBER OF THE MASONIC FRATERNITY, THE KNIGHTS OF HONOR, AND A DEVOUT MEMBER OF THE BAPTIST CHURCH. HE HELD THE ESTEEM OF ALL WHO KNEW HIM, AND IN HIS DEATH THE COMMUNITY LOSES ONE OF IT'S MOST WORTHY CITIZENS. 10-16-1896 PROB.ROY CEMETERY
SEABORN G.W.
G. W. Seaborn, deputy sheriff of St. Francis County, is well known to the residents of that section of Arkansas, and enjoys the esteem of all, except from those whose disregard of law compels him to discharge the duties of his office in an impartial manner; at such a time he would scarcely be recognized as a jovial companion or the perpetrator of many amusing jokes. Mr. Seaborn was born in St. Francis County in 1853, being the son of G. W. and Frankie (Casteel) Seaborn. The former, of Tennessee nativity, came to Arkansas when about nineteen years of age, locating in St. Francis County, and being the first man to bring a flat-boat load of merchandise up the St. Francis River. He purchased the goods in New Orleans, and established an extensive business near Mount Vernon, when that was the county seat. He was the first sheriff of the county, holding that office for twelve years, and subsequently served in the State legislature, and was a member of that body at the breaking out of the late war. In 1863 he moved to Tennessee, and upon the close of hostilities opened a mercantile establishment at Jefferson, Texas. In 1872 he returned to St. Francis County, and died in 1875 at the age of sixty-three years. Mrs. Seaborn accompanied her parents from Tennessee to Arkansas when quite small, and has resided in this county ever since. She was married in St. Francis County and became the mother of two children, G. W. being the youngest. Annie, his sister, is now the wife of B. F. Elington of Atlanta, Ga. Mrs. Seaborn owns a large farm, but resides with her children. G. W. Seaborn grew to manhood in St. Francis County, receiving his education in Texas, where the facilities afforded him were unusually liberal. After finishing his schooling, he came back to his old home and engaged in farming for four years, and with the exception of four years spent in the livery business at Forrest City, has made agricultural pursuits his principal avocation. He now owns about 600 acres in this and adjoining counties. Mr.Seaborn was married in 1876 to Miss Mattie Cabbs, a daughter of Dr. J. H. Cabbs, brother of the present land commissioner. Dr. Cabbs' mother is living in this county at the advanced age of ninety-three years. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Seaborn three children were born. Mrs. Seaborn died in 1883, leaving many friends to mourn her death. In his political views he sides with the Democratic party.
SKINNER JAMES W. CSA-Army-Civil War
James W. Skinner was born in Fleming County, Ky., in 1842, as the son of Benjamin F. and Lucinda SkinnerHis early life was passed in the schools of his native State, from which he received a superior education, and at the age of nineteen he began in business on his own responsibility in New Orleans, making many friends both in social and business circles during his stay in that city. In 1861, going to Memphis, Tenn., he enlisted in the Confederate service, where he remained for one year and then commenced steamboating on the Mississippi River, following this business until the Federals gained control of the river. In 1868 he came to St. Francis County, Ark., and embarked in the manufacture of staves. Two years later he settled his present farm, which is well improved and gives evidence of thrift and prosperity. Mr. Skinner is a believer in the Christian Church, and in his political views is a Democrat. He is liberal in his support to all worthy enterprises, and a man generally esteemed by the entire community. His ancestors came from Ireland, having emigrated to America previous to the Revolution, in which conflict his grandfather was a gallant soldier. OBIT:Justifiable Homicide=An unfortunate killing occurred in Johnson township, near Fulwood, on Wednesday afternoon, July 15,1903, between 6 and 7 p.m., when J.W.Skinner, a well known and familiar figure in this city was intstantly killed. The circumstance which led up to the shooting were as follows: T.J.Wall and J.W.Skinner were planting a crop together on Skinner's farm, and Wall and wife occupied the residence. Skinner had his faults, and Wednesday afternoon a quarrel arose between the two men relative to the crop and Skinner picked up a club and approached Wall threatening him. Wall backed to the hosue and reached for a shot gun, at the same time trying to pacify Skinner by saying "let us talk the matter over." "Damn you, I'll show you how to talk," replied Skinner, raising the club to strike, whereupon the gun was discharged, tearing away part of Skinner's head, killing him almost instantly. Wall said he did not intend to shoot, and regrets the killing very much. An inquest was held by Squire McLaren, and a verdict of justifiable homicide was determined, and he was released. Later-Wall was arrested yesterday by Deputies Murphree and Swan, lodged in jail. He will have a preliminary hearing tomorrow.7-24-1903 Another story has come forward about the killing, it is said Skinner was sitting in a chair in his room when a shot from behind was fired, as evidenced by the blood, and afterwards the body was taken out into the yard. Skinner was 60 years of age, and a respected member of the community. Could be James W.Skinner, bio online born in 1842. Judge Folbre is hearing the case, and the body was exhumed to study the wounds. Hon.R.J.Williams represents the defendant, and the state is represented by W.J.Lanier. 8-3-1903 Witnesses that were part of the inquest were questioned about their part in the story of Wall, as it appears Skinner was shot, probably asleep, while sitting on his porch, and pulled out into the yard afterwards. Afterwards the County Court in granted bail of $2000 for Wall in habeus corpus proceedings. 7-17-1903 CEMETERY UNKNOWN
SNOWDEN STEPHEN F.
Stephen F. Snowden was born in Gibson County, Tenn., in 1844. His father and mother immigrated from North Carolina at an early day and when he was about two years old the father died. At the age of ten years his mother moved to Memphis, Tenn., where she still resides. Stephen's first work in Memphis was in a butcher shop, where he remained about three years. He then went on the Mississippi River as cabin boy, continuing for some time in this and other capacities, or, till about 1863, when he entered the employ of the Memphis & Charleston Railroad as brakesman. He remained at this business about one year. In 1864 Mr. Snowden farmed and cut cord wood on Island Forty in the Mississippi River eighteen miles above Memphis. In 1865-66-67 he was employed on a tug plying the Mississippi River above and below Memphis. His last work on the water was acting as mate on a steamer running up and down White and Black Rivers in 1868. On the second day of March, 1869, he landed in St. Francis County, Ark., where he still resides. He has been occupied in farming since his arrival and now owns 250 acres of land, seventy acres of which are in a high state of cultivation. W. Snowden's father dying when he was quite young and leaving his mother in indigent circumstances caused him to be raised without any education. Consequently he had to depend on mother wit alone, but to his credit be it said he is in better circumstances than many who have had the advantage of a good schooling. Mr. Snowden was married in 1871 to Miss Temperance M. Claiborn, daughter of Thomas and Laura A. Claiborn. To Mr. and Mrs. Snowden have been born four children: Johnie (born May 18, 1873, and died October 6, 1875), Vital (born January 1, 1876), Delia (born August 14, 1878) and Mildred (born November 2, 1882). Mr. Snowden is a Democrat of the first water, and with his wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He is a member in high standing of the Knights of Honor and enjoys the respect of all who know him. He is a liberal supporter of all worthy objects that indicate the growth and prosperity of the country.
SPARKMAN R.H. -DR CSA-McNeil's Regiment-Civil War
R. H. Sparkman, M. D., one of Forrest City's enterprising citizens, was born in North Carolina, May 10, 1828, being the son of John and Nancy (Wooten) Sparkman. John Sparkman owed his nativity to North Carolina, but moved to Tennessee when the subject of this sketch was quite small, locating in Shelby County, Tenn., where his death occurred in his fifty-ninth year. Mrs. Sparkman was also of North Carolina origin and by her union with Mr. Sparkman became the mother of five children, R. H. being the only one now living. The name Sparkman, as might be supposed, is Irish, the ancestors of the family coming at an early day from the Emerald Isle. The grandfather was a soldier in the War of the Revolution, and the maternal grandfather served in the War of 1812. Dr. Sparkman received a good common education in the schools of Shelby County, and afterward attended his first course of medical lectures in Cincinnati, his early ambition having been to be a physician, and by his determination and diligent application to his studies he became a credit to that most noble of all professions. He graduated with honors from the Medical School at Memphis in 1857, and immediately began practice in Shelby County, but a year afterward, in 1858, making a trip to Arkansas became convinced that that State promised a better opening, so located on the Helena road, five miles from Forrest City. At the breaking out of the war he had built up an enviable practice. He joined the Confederate army, McGee's company, McNeil's regiment, afterward becoming surgeon of that regiment. The company was soon made independent and reported to Col. Dobbins, Dr. Sparkman remaining in the service about two years. He returned to Arkansas and practiced until 1875, but succeeded in collecting only about half of his bills, some of them of long standing. He has since retired from active practice, and is now engaged in farming, owning 450 acres of valuable land. Dr. Sparkman was united in marriage on December 23, 1859, to Mrs. Liza (Purvis) Daniel, of North Carolina. Dr. and Mrs. Sparkman are members of the Baptist Church, and the former is a member of A. F. & A. M. . OBIT:Dr.R.H.Sparkman died Wednesday night, and was buried yesterday in the Forrest City Cemetery. Fuller notice next week.1-2-1903-1-9-1903 DEATH OF DR.R.H.SPARKMAN-One of St.Francis County's pioneers, died at his home in Forrest City Dec.31,1902, just as the old year was passing away into the past to be forgotten by many and revered as a memory by others. The remains were interred in the Forrest City Cemetery on New Year's day, and were followed to their last resting place by relatives and many old time friends. The funeral tookplace from the family residence and was conducted by Eld.W.H.Paslay. Dr.Sparkman was a mason, a good citizen and a christian gentleman. He was quiet and unostentatious, and was loved, honored and respected by all who knew him well. At the time of his death he was in his 75th year, and his demise was probably due as much to his years as to any other cause. He leaves the partner of his life's joys and sorrows in her declining years to mourn her loss alone. In her deep affiction and loneliness our hearts go out to her in tender and sincere sympathy. May she be comforted with the thought that all things are ordered by an all-wise Creator for the best, and that the parting will but make the meeting a greater joy. CITY CEMETERY
STAYTON D.H. -DR CSA-Army-Asst.Surgeon-Civil War
D. H. Stayton, M. D., was born and reared in Phillips County, Ark. His father, Thomas N. Stayton, made his advent into the world in Delaware, in 1809, and landed in Arkansas on February 14, 1829, settling in Helens, which was at that time only a village numbering but seven families. Mr. Stayton painted the first house in that present city. His father, Hill D. Stayton, was employed as State surveyor at the time, and helped to lay out the section lines of those counties. Pioneers of such early days depended largely on their rifles for subsistence, as the farms were small and not cleared, but their children are the large land owners and prosperous farmers of the present. Mr. Stayton was married after coming to Arkansas to Miss Easter Harris, a daughter of William R. Harris, who moved to this State in 1833. They were the parents of five children, three of whom are still living: John W. (a lawyer of Jackson County and at one time judge of the court), Ruth (now the wife of Dr. Hearing, of Brinkley, Ark.) and D. H. (the subject of this sketch). The latter was born on September 13, 1837, being reared on the farm in Phillips County. His first absence from home was to attend the University of Louisville (Ky.) Medical Department. After taking his first course he served four years as assistant surgeon in the Confederate army. At the close of the war he practiced in Lee County until 1870, when he returned to the University and completed his course, which hostilities had interfered with, and graduated in the spring of 1871, afterward resuming his practice at his old home. In 1887 he came to and located in St. Francis County, at Palestine, where he has since been engaged in attending to the prosecution of his chosen profession, his practice being large and steadily increasing. Dr. Stayton was married May 9, 1862, to Mrs. Caroline Bowden (nee Lockart), a daughter of Thomas Lockart, of North Carolina. They have a family of three children: David H. (who is married and lives near Palestine), Thomas L. and Lelia C. Dr. Stayton was once president of the board of medical examiners of Lee County, and is medical examiner of the Royal Arcanum; he is also a member of the United States board of pension examining surgeons for this locality, and examiner of the K. of H. and of the K. & L. of H. Besides being a member of the three lodges named he belongs to the Masonic order, in which he has occupied all of the positions of honor. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is now lord mayor of the incorporated town of Palestine, Ark. OBIT:Dr.D.H.Stayton, formerly of this county, more recently, of Searcy, died at his home Monday. He is the brother of Judge J.W.Stayton of Newport.8-23-1895
STERN J.G.-CAPTAIN USARMY-Eighty-Fourth Pennsylvania Infantry-Civil War
Capt. J. G. Stern's first trip south was an unwelcome one, but he remained for some time, boarding at Libby Prison and Belle-Isle. After his exchange he was again taken prisoner at the siege of Petersburg. Preferring death to that of prison life, he took the desperate chances and left his captors on the field of battle; this being done in daylight on the run. He was given a parting salute by a volley of musketry. The patriotic enthusiasm with which it was given was shown by a bullet hole through his equipage and one through his coat. Although given such a hearty farewell he stopped not until he reached his regiment, the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry. He participated in a number of battles, among the principal ones were Fredericksburg. Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Appomattox Court House, through the siege of Petersburg, and was present at the surrender of Gen. Lee. He was born April 17, 1844, in the State of Pennsylvania. At the close of the war he followed his parents to the State of Illinois, where he completed his education, which was very limited up to that time. During the latter years of his residence in that State he was employed in teaching school. In 1872 he went south a second time and located in Arkansaw, Phillips County, at the mouth of St. Francis River, where he worked as a laborer in a saw-mill. He soon engaged in business on his own account, getting out logs and staves. A few years later he accepted a position as agent for the Helena Lumber Company, and purchased a half interest in a boat running on the St. Francis and Mississippi Rivers, of which he was captain and pilot. Selling out his interest in the boat about seven years ago, he came to Madison, where he is now engaged in the timber and shingle business. He leased a shingle-mill about five years ago with a capacity of from 8,000,000 to 10,000,000 shingles per year. He owns a number of thousand of acres of timber land, located near his mill and to which he is connected by a tramway, operated by steam-power and leading into the woods for several miles. His parents are both living in the State of Illinois, his father at the age of seventy-one, and his mother one year younger. They were the parents of nine children, six of whom are living.
STEWART JAMES M. CSA-CO.A-Fifth Arkansas Infantry-Hart's Regiment-Civil War
James M. Stewart, of the representative firm of Stewart & Taylor, abstract, loan and general insurance agents of Forrest Citywas born at Collierville, in Shelby County, Tenn., in 1842. In 1859 he came to Arkansas, locating at the old county seat of Madison, in St. Francis County, where for two years he was engaged as clerk and book-keeper by an establishment at that point. When the war between the States was declared he went to Kentucky to join the cavalry service, but the delicate condition of his health caused him to be rejected, much to his chagrin. Giving his supplies to a companion who had been more fortunate in being accepted, he returned to Arkansas and joined the Fifth Arkansas (Hart's) Regiment as a private of Company A; he was afterward adjutant of his regiment, and at the close of the war was commanding Company A, in the Trans-Mississippi Department. He served for four years, and participated in all the principal engagements of the State. When peace had been declared Mr. Stewart accepted a position of trust with a firm at Memphis, Tenn., where he remained until 1868, leaving at that time to return to St. Francis County to fill a position as clerk and book-keeper. In 1879 he was elected clerk of the circuit court, in which capacity he served for four consecutive terms, in a manner eliciting the satisfaction and admiration of all concerned. Mr. Stewart then ceased to be an aspirant for office, and at that time was more popular with the people of the county than he had ever been before. By this prudent and all-wise step he still remains one of the most esteemed and influential men in the community. Soon after leaving the clerk's office he, in company with Mr. Taylor, formed the present real-estate firm, which is one of the most widely known and substantial establishments of this branch of business in this section of the State, they owning over 10,000 acres of valuable land. In societies Mr. Stewart is identified with the F. & A. M., K. T., K. of H. and K. & L. of H. Washington G. and Sarah W. (Griggs) Stewart, his parents, were natives of South Carolina and Tennessee, respectively, he being the fourth of a family of nine children born to their union. Washington Stewart was a millwright by trade, and enjoyed an extensive business in Tennessee and Mississippi. He executed a greater part of the work on the plank road out of Memphis, Tenn., through Mississippi, on Big Creek Plank Road, and many other public highways. He was a man of prominence and influence, and was one of the first mayors of Madison, the old county seat of St. Francis County. He died in 1868. J. M. Stewart was married, in 1866, to Miss Ollie E. Colson, of Paducah, Ky., and by her became the father of three children: James H., Elbert and Mary E. Mr. Stewart, besides his other interests, is a stockholder in and one of the incorporators of the Forrest City Hotel Company. He was elected secretary of that company at its organization, serving as such until forced by ill health to vacate in the winter of 1888. He is also a stockholder in and one of the original incorporators of the Bank of Eastern Arkansas, located at Forrest City. A member of the city council of the town of Forrest City and chairman of the finance committee, he was also twice elected a member of the school board of the special school district of Forrest City, and as such took an active interest in educational affairs. He served as Master of the Masonic Lodge here several terms and was Grand Marshal of the Grand Lodge of this State, also Dictator of the Lodge of K. of H. at same place, several consecutive terms. CITY CEMETERY
STONE J.E.--DR. CSA-CO.B-First Arkansas Mounted Rifles-Civil War
J. E. Stone, M. D., has reached an eminence in his profession which renders his name almost a household word throughout Forrest City, and the surrounding locality. He received his literary education in Tennessee, and commenced the study of medicine under a tutor in Arkansas, afterward entering the Missouri Medical College (known then as the old McDowell College, and situated in St. Louis), where he was graduated with honors. Entering the Confederate army in May, 1861, in Company B, First Arkansas Mounted Rifles, he served over four years, participating in the battles of Oak Hill (where he was severely wounded) and Pea Ridge, and was then transferred across to the Army of Tennessee, just after the battle of Corinth. He also took an active part at Jackson (Miss.), Chickamauga, Duggers' Gap, New Hope Church, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Franklin, and several other engagements of minor importance. After the war Dr. Stone located in Van Buren County, Ark., where he actively followed the practice of his chosen profession for five years, then going to Memphis, and thence to Walnut Bend, Ark. In 1883 he came to Forrest City, and still enjoys an extensive patronage, besides a large livery business, also owning considerable land, both here and in Lee County. He is one of Forrest City's most enterprising and influential citizens, and has done much in his own peculiar way toward the present advancement and prosperity of the place. The Doctor has been twice married, his first union occurring in Tennessee, and the second in Arkansas. He was born in Virginia in 1839, and is the son of M. G. and Martha (Stovall) Stone, also originally from the Old Dominion. Dr. Stone is a member in high standing of the various Masonic lodges of this place. OBIT: 3-15-1912 DR.STONE PASSES AWAY FRIDAY MORNING=After a well spent life of 73 years, the spirit of Dr.J.E.Stone took its flight Friday morning, Mar.15,1912. His death was not unexpected, for he had been in ill health since the the greatest sorrow of his life occurred-the death of his beloved on May 8,1905,-but nevertheless his passing away causes regret and sorrow among his many friends here and elsewhere. Dr.Stone was a native of Virgiinia, having been born in Boyton, Va. on Feb.10,1839. He attended the schools of his native county until early childhood, but received his literary education principally in Tennessee. He began the study of medicine, however in Arkansas, under a tutor, and graduated with honors from the Missouri medical college located at St.Louis. Dr.Stone was a brave and gallant soldier, entering the Confederate army in May 1861, in Company R, First Arkansas Mounted Rifles, and serving over four years. He was an earnest and fearless participant in the battles of Springfield, Missouri and Pea Ridge, Ark., was severely wounded during the former. He was then transferred to the Army of Tennessee, and took an acitve part in the engagements at Jackson, MIssissippi; Chickamauga, Richmond, Kentucky, Duggin's Gap, New Hope church, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Franklin and elsewhere. When hostilities ceased, he located in Van Buren county, Arkansas, where he practiced his profession for five years. He then went to Memphis, and thence to Walnut Bend, Arkansas, and in 1883 came to Forrest City where he has since continuously resided. He had been in the city council at intervals for twenty years, and also was twice elected mayor. He was a member of the Episcopal church and of several Masonic lodges of the city. Funeral Sunday morning, at the Forrest City cemetery, under the auspices of the Masonic lodge, services by Rev.E.T.Mabley of the Episcopal church. Dr. Stone was married to Miss Ora Branch, of Shelby Co., Tennessee, on the 22nd day of October, 1872, who died on the 24th of October 1874. He was again married on May 10,1879, to Miss Mansfield Rodgers Dupuy, to whom he has been entirely devoted until her death May 3,1905. He owns considerable property in this and Lee county. CITY CEMETERY
STOUT J.W.-CAPTAIN CSA-FIRST BATTALION-ARKANSAS CAVALRY-CIVIL WAR
Capt. J. W. Stout enlisted in the Rebel army, in 1862, in the First Battalion, Arkansas Cavalry, Gen. Price commanding. He was captured at the battle of Big Black Bridge, Miss., May 17, 1863, and sent to military prison on Johnson's Island, in Lake Erie, where he was kept till February, 1865. After the collapse of the Confederacy, he returned to his family, and subsequently removed to Cross County. Ark., remaining there till 1871. Coming to St. Francis County, he purchased a home of 200 acres of land, and has since followed farming regularly and successfully, also serving the public as a mill and gin proprietor. Capt. Stout was born in McMinn County. E. Tenn., in 1829, and is of German descent, being a son of Daniel and Elisabeth Stout. His father was born in Virginia, and his mother in Kentucky. Her maiden name was Franklin. The senior Stout was a professional school-teacher in McMinn County, E. Tenn., for a series of years, and taught ten years in succession in the same academy. J. W.'s boyhood was spent in Tennessee, in attending school, and in 1851 he moved with his father to Walker County, Ga., following farming for about one year. Then he was engaged as salesman with Parham & Lee, in the mercantile business, till December, 1854. He was married December 26, to Mrs. Elizabeth B. Brooks, daughter of Benjamin C. Hardin, who had one daughter. They have had nine children born to them, four of whom are dead, three sons and one daughter. Five children are living, two sons and three daughters: Minnie (the wife of Rev. W. W. Hendrix), Hollace W., Flora (wife of Dr. A. A. Berry), Thomas J. and Ophelia. Georgie A., the daughter of Mrs. Stout, is the wife of A. C. Shaver. Capt. Stout and wife, and all the children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He also belongs to the Masonic order and the Knights of Honor. His wife is a member of the K. & L. of H. He is Democratic politically. OBIT:Colt-Capt.J.W.Stout, an old and respected citizen of New Castle, died last Thursday. His remains were buried in the Loughridge graveyard last Friday, where they were followed by a large concourse of friends.8-5-1898-Capt.J.W.Stout, who was favorably known throughout the county, died at his home ten miles north of Forrest City, July.28,1898, ages 69 years. The death of Capt.Stout caused deep gloom in the family circle and the entire community. His presence will be greatly missed by his daily associates; he was a kind husband, a kind an charitable citizen. He was a member of the Methodist church and of the Masonic fraternity and was buried by that fraternity at LOUGHRIDGE. Capt.Stout leaves a wife and four children, and a host of friends to mourn his loss. A Friend.FORREST CITY TIMES 8-5-1898 LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY
TAYLOR GEORGE PRESSLEY
George P. Taylor enjoys the friendship of, perhaps, a larger number of personal acquaintances than any man in Eastern Arkansas. Of magnificent physical proportions, standing over six feet high and weighing above 195 pounds, he attracts attention in any gathering. He was born in Cooper County, Mo., October 13, 1850, and traces his ancestry back four generations to John Taylor, of Scotch and Irish descant, who was the founder of that branch of the family on this side of the continent. He came to America before the great 'Stamp Act' and 'Boston Tea Party' occurred, and settled among the colonists of South Carolina. He was loyal to the country of his adoption when the great conflict began which announced the birth of the greatest nation on the face of the globe, and gave one of his sons to the cause of freedom. Early in the history of Kentucky John Taylor emigrated to this new territory, and here was born and reared his son, upon whom was conferred the family name of John. He grew to manhood in a locality even then thinly settled, but being lured by the tales of the new region across the Mississippi, followed the train of emigrants westward, and among the prominent names in the early history of Cooper County, Mo., appears that of John Taylor. He was there married to Miss Cochrell. After remaining in that county until the breaking out of the war he moved to St. Louis. George P. Taylor spent his early life in his native State, and attended school at Boonville, conducted by the renowned Dr. Kemper. He was fourteen years of age when his father removed to St. Louis, and in 1867 removed to Arkansas, settling in Lee County, on a plantation, where he remained until 1873. Then he came to Forrest City and died here in 1879 of yellow fever, his wife preceding him about one year. George P. Taylor located as a citizen of St. Francis County in 1870, where he was engaged in farming, being married in February, 1873, to Miss Alice Koonce, a native of this county. She is the mother of six children: Edgar P., Walter R., Alva J., Alice N., Nannie and George P., Jr. In 1874, after the reconstruction act, Mr. Taylor was elected representative from St. Francis County, though at that time only twenty-four years of age; he was re-elected in 1878, and in 1880 was appointed county collector. In 1880 he entered into the real-estate business at Forrest City. In 1885 the 'Forrest City Manufacturing Company' was formed, with Mr. Taylor as president, but a $5,000 fire shortly after caused the dissolution of the company. In 1884-85 he formed a partnership with Hatcher & Mann in the mercantile business, this remaining for two years. December, 1886, he was associated with James M. Stewart, as real-estate agents and brokers, then the only firm of the kind in the county. He is one of the organizers and is secretary of the Forrest City Hotel Company, a corporation with a capital stock of $24,000, and is also a stockholder and director of the Bank of Eastern Arkansas, located at Forrest City, which has a capital stock of $50,000. Both enterprises yield good returns, and their stock is quoted above par. Mr. Taylor also owns several large plantations in this county, and is conceded to be one of its most prominent citizens, especially having the esteem and confidence of the Democracy of this locality, as is shown by the fact that for eight consecutive years he has been chairman of the County Central Committee, and was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention of 1888. He was also a delegate to the National Farmers' Congress, held at Montgomery, Ala., in November, 1889. Mr. Taylor is a member of the Masonic order, in which he holds the office of Master, also belonging to the order of Knights of Pythias. Besides these he is a member of the I. O. O. F., and of the Knights and Ladies of Honor. Mrs. Taylor is a member of the Baptist Church. Their home in Forrest City is one of the finest here, elegantly furnished, and contains one of the largest and best-selected libraries in the county, OBIT: 5-16-1902 JUDGE TAYLOR PASSES AWAY=Buried under the auspices of the Masons. Judge George P.Taylor, who was stricken with apoplexy on May.7, died Tuesday, May 13,1902 at his home. He never spoke again from the attack on the 7th, but lay unconscious until death claimed its victim, and he passed away peacefully and without a struggle. "Death loves a shining mark," in claiming Hon.George P.Taylor as its victim, it has robbed the family of its mainstay and protector; of a loving husband, and a kind and indulgent father. He was perhaps better known and more universally esteemed than any other character in Eastern Arkansas. He has been prominent in social, business, church, political, and fraternal circles for many years, and in the discharge of his duties as a representative of his constituents here and following of his inclinations, has mingled with the great men of the state and nation among whom he has a legion of friends. The writer has known the Judge for sixteen years, and he has always been our friend, and his counsel was always wise and never selfish. The funeral sermon was delivered by Elder W.H.Paslay, who was assisted in the ceremonies by Elder A.N.Couch, at the Baptist church, Wednesday afternoon at 4 o'clock. The remains were accompanied from the residence by the Blue lodge and a Knights Templar escort, to the Forrest City cemetery under the auspices of Forrest City Lodge No.198, F.A. & M. The Woodmen of the World also attended the funeral in a body, and accompanied the body to its resting place. The funeral procession was lead by Tyler Geo.W.Pearson, and the Citizen's Concert Band, and was one of the largest in the history of the city. The following biographical sketch is taken from the 1892 Souvenir edition of the Forrest City Times: A man of over six feet in height, and 195 pounds, was born in Cooper County, Missouri, Oct.13,1850, and traces his ancestry back to John Taylor of Scotch and Irish descent, who was the founder of that branch of the family on this side of the continent. He came to America before the great "Stamp Act" and "Boston Tea Party" occurred, and settled among the colonies in South Carolina. He was loyal to the country of his adoption when the great conflict began which announced the birth of the greatest nation on the face of the globe, and gave one of his sons to the cause of freedom. Early in the history of Kentucky, John Taylor emigrated to this territory, and here was born and reared his son, upon whom was bestowed the family name of John. He grew to manhood in a locality even then thinly settled, but being lured by the tales of the new region across the Mississippi, followed the train of emigrants westward, and among the prominent names in the early history of Cooper County, Missouri. appears that of John Taylor. He was there married to Miss Cockrell. After remaining there in that county till the breaking out of the war he moved to St.Louis. George P.Taylor spent his life in his native state, and attended school at Boonville, taught by Rev.Dr.Kemper. OBIT-BIO He was fourteen when his father moved to St.Louis, and in 1867 removed to Arkansas; settling in Lee County on a plantation, where he remained until 1873. Then he came to Forrest City, and died here in 1879 of yellow fever, his wife preceding him by about a year. George P.Taylor located as as citizen of St.Francis county in 1870, where he was engaged in farming, being married in Feb.1873 to Miss Alice Koonce, a native of this county. She is the mother of six children-Edgar P.,Walter R.,Alva J., Alice N., Nannie, and George Jr. In 1874 after the reconstruction act, Mr.Taylor was elected representative of St.Francis county, though at that time only twenty four years of age. He was re-elected in 1878 and 1880 was appointed county collector. In 1880 he entered into the real estate business at Forrest City. In 1885, the Forrest City Manufacturing Co. was formed, with Mr.Taylor as President, but a fire after caused the dissolution of the business. In 1881, he formed a partnership with Hatcher & Mann in the mercantile business, remaining two years. December, 1886, he was associated with James M.Stewart as real estate agents and brokers, then the only firm of that kind in the county. He is one of the organizers and is the secretary of the Forrest City Hotel company; a stockholder and director of the Bank of Eastern Arkansas. He also owns several plantations in this county, and is conceded to be one of its most prominent citizens. He is presently a member of the prosperous firm of Taylor & Izard, real estate and insurance agents. He is a member of the Baptist church, and their home is one of the finest here, with a well stocked library. Bringing the sketch on down to now: the firm of Taylor & Izard were succeeded by Geo.P.Taylor & Co., Edgar P.Taylor taking the junior partnership. In 1896, the subject of this sketch was made Brigadier General of the Arkansas State Guard by Governor Fishback. In 1898, he was elected to the office of County and Probate Judge. All of the family aforementioned survive him. CITY CEMETERY
TAYLOR THOMAS L. CSA-Army-Civil War
Thomas L. Taylor, a prominent planter of St. Francis County, is a native of Missouri, and a son of John and Mary Elizabeth (Cockrell) Taylor, originally from Virginia. John Taylor and wife came to Arkansas in 1866, where he engaged in farming (in this county), during his life. Thomas L. received a good education at the public schools of this township, and later attended college in Clay County, Mo., supplementing this by an attendance at the Kemper School of Boonville. He left this institution in the fall of 1861 to join the Confederate army, in which he served until taken prisoner in 1863, being confined eight months, after which he was paroled. His health having suffered by close confinement he went to California, but returned in 1866 by wagon train, as the cholera which was prevalent along the rivers prevented a passage by boat. Mr. Taylor was married in August, 1874, in Shelby County, Tenn., to Miss Sallie A. Jarman, but she lived only a few months. He owns a fine farm of 120 acres, with a large part of it under cultivation, having good improvements, etc. He is a prominent Democrat of the Jeffersonian type.
VADADKIN EDWIN LINCOLN
E. L. Vadakin, the popular editor of the Forrest City Times, owes his nativity to the State of Illinois, having first seen the light of day near the little town of Sullivan in 1864, as the son of H. F. and A. (Clements) Vadakin. H. F. Vadakin was born in Vermont, but when quite young immigrated to Illinois, settling near Sullivan, where he became well known to the citizens for many miles around as an efficient and courteous druggist. His business was of many years' standing, and his death in 1888 was sincerely mourned, both by his personal friends and those who knew him through reputation. Mrs. Vadakin died when E. L. was a little child. At the age of fourteen, the subject of this sketch entered a printing office and there laid the foundation of his future career. After a few months his brother-in-law purchased the paper, which was located at Stewardson, Ill., but soon sold it. Mr. Vadakin remained with the successor, receiving $10 per month for his services. His next move was to Tower Hill, Ill., where, as no other employment presented itself, he worked for three months on a farm. About this time a campaign paper was started in the town, and afforded work for our subject for some time, but unfortunately it was short-lived, and as it sunk into obscurity, the editor also failed to materialize, having neglected to give Mr. Vadakin any compensation for his labor. The latter, as might be supposed, found himself in rather straightened circumstances, but at this juncture, a railroad advertising agent stopped in the village, and taking a fancy to Mr. Vadakin, induced him to accompany him to Cincinnati, Ohio, promising to use his utmost endeavors to secure for him a good position in some one of the printing offices of that city. This he was unable to do, but he did furnish him a home for some time. Eager to become self-reliant, and not dependent on the bounty of his friends, Mr. Vadakin returned to his old home in Illinois, and accepted the position in one of the printing offices for the sum of $2 per week, and board. An uncle, who was a member of the Union Printing Company at Little Rock, then came to his assistance, and secured him work in an office in that city, where he remained for three years. At one time, while serving his apprenticeship, he had charge of the Union Job Office at Little Rock. Though his promotion was gradual, it was none the less sure, and he is to-day one of the expert printers in Arkansas. After working on the Democrat, at Lonoke, Ark., for some time, the proprietor purchased the Times at Forrest City, appointing Mr. Vadakin the manager, he to receive half of the net profits. The paper had almost died out, having become exceedingly unpopular from the effects of a newspaper controversy, but Mr. Vadakin brought it to the front, and it is now one of the best county papers in the State, besides being the leading publication of St. Francis County. In May, 1886, Mr. Vadakin was united in marriage with Miss Lillie B. Landvoigh, and to their union one child has been born, Dora Annette. Mr. Vadakin and his father-in-law bought the Times, and own it in partnership. He is a member of the Episcopal Church, and in politics a Democrat. CITY CEMETERY
VAN PATTEN PHILLIP-DR. CSA-Thirteenth Arkansas Volunteer Infantry-Civil War
'Philip Van Patten, M. D.'' So reads the sign that noisily swings to and fro on its rusty hinges, attracting the passers-by on one of the principal streets of Forrest City. The busy little notice is given only a momentary thought by its many readers, but the reputation of him whom it represents, an efficient and popular physician, will survive him many years. Born in Schenectady County, N. Y., in 1827, Dr. Van Patten's boyhood days were passed in carving his name in wonderful designs on his desk and making pictures, much to the delight of his schoolmates, but aside from all his fun, he was a good scholar, and won the approbation and affection of his teachers. When only thirteen years old he was deprived of his father's love and protection, death claiming him while on business in Michigan. Philip then moved with his mother to Iowa, the mother afterward going to Denver, Colo., where she passed away in 1885, at the age of eighty-six years. His literary education was received in Iowa, he taking a classical course, under the able instruction of Father Pelamargues, a Catholic priest, of Paris, France. His studies extended to a course in Latin, Greek and Hebrew, the former being so thoroughly instilled in his mind, that he read Caesar some four years ago without consulting his Lexicon but six times. He made it a rule to regularly demonstrate a certain number of mathematical problems every morning, and now devotes a half hour daily to the study of classics. Entering the Medical University of Iowa when twenty-one, he graduated with honors in 1853, and first announced himself competent to alleviate the sufferings to which flesh is heir, in DeWitt, Iowa, where he practiced for one year in association with Dr. Asa Morgan. During the year 1861 he choose for the partner of his joys and sorrows the daughter of Col. John Miller, of Batesville, Ark., father of the late Gov. Miller. One child, Hattie L., born to Dr, and Mrs. Van Patten alone survives. She is now a student of art in Memphis, Tenn. During the war between the States, Dr. Van Patten was surgeon of the Thirteenth Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, Col. Tappen in command. He was afterward promoted to brigade-surgeon, and subsequently to the position of division-surgeon. For a short period he served as brigade-surgeon for Old Frank Cheatam, and was for two years in the Trans-Mississippi Department, under Gen. L. Polk, in Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri and Mississippi, also being surgeon of Fort Pillow, in 1861. He was present at the battle of Shiloh, and was made division-surgeon by Gen. Polk on the battlefield, in the presence of Albert Sidney Johnston and Beauregard. He was obliged to resign before the war closed, on account of nervous prostration. Dr. Van Patten's children have inherited his own studious propensities, and have been endowed by nature with unusual capabilities. Eva Lillian graduated in higher mathematics at the age of fourteen years, under Prof. D. L. Thompson, of Wittsburg, the course extending through Calculus. After thus having her reasoning powers developed far beyond the height attained by even some of the most brilliant women of our country, in order to give her that proficiency in language, literature and the fine arts, which she had already attained in mathematics, and understanding that a harmonious development of all the faculties is requisite to attain perfect personal and intellectual culture, Dr. Van Patten wisely sent her to Notre Dame, Ind., to the female school there, made famous the world over by the Sisters of Mercy. After having well improved the opportunities afforded her she again returned to her home an even more devoted student than before. During her leisure hours she was found poring over the works of Tyndall. Huxley and Darwin, drinking in the many good things in their writings and criticising contradictory statements appearing on different pages. In mathematics, literature, language, art and every other branch, her mind searched eagerly for knowledge, and she daily meditated on many of the great questions which have from remote ages vexed and perplexed the minds of our greatest thinkers. She was the constant companion of her father, and with him discussed all questions. Her greatness of heart was unlimited, and she had charity for the faults of all. Such women are priceless gems, but her physical constitution could not stand the draft on her intellect, and paralysis of the brain caused her death. Such an affliction is certainly to be lamented by more than her family, and it is to be hoped her young soul, freed from its incumbrance of clay, can see, without effort into all the mysteries she was continually investigating here. Hattie L., now the wife of Eugene Parrish, of Paragould, Ark., was on the point of graduating from Notre Dame, when the breaking out of diphtheria caused her sudden return home, and prevented her receiving a diploma. Her paintings and her music show the touch of an artist. She paints from nature with absolute perfection, and her portrait gems, which have been examined by many, are pronounced worthy of an artist of national reputation. She is an excellent English scholar, and proficient in Latin, French and German. She was married November 2, 1889. Birth: 1827Schenectady, Schenectady County, New York, USA Death: Jul. 20, 1890 Forrest City, St. Francis County, Arkansas, USA -BURIED COGBILL CEMETERY-CROSS COUNTY
VANN CLAUDE H.
Claude H. Vann, editor and proprietor of the Forrest City Register, was born in Cross County, Ark., April 17, 1871, being the son of J. M. and Ida H. (Hare) Vann, well-known and highly esteemed residents of Cross County.Claude H. received his education in the schools of the county, and served an apprenticeship to the newspaper business in the office of the Cross County Chronicle. Having proved an able assistant in the office, at the expiration of his time he was given an opportunity to remain, but as better inducements were offered him by the Morrill Bros. Printing Company of New York as a traveling salesman, he accepted that position, and demonstrated his ability as a commercial traveler, being considered a valuable acquisition to the force of that house. He subsequently was occupied as solicitor of the Forrest City Times, and in September of 1889 purchased the Register of that city. It had become considerably run down at the time he took it in hand, but though only a few months have intervened since then, he is making rapid strides in its upbuilding, and success is the sure future of his earnest endeavors. Mr. Vann is a young man, eighteen years of age, and only recently located at Forrest City, but the prominence he has attained, the esteem in which he is held, and his position in business and social circles, concede him to be a prominent factor in the county. Birth: Apr. 17, 1872 Death: Mar. 30, 1894 Inscription:Son of J M and Ida VANNDALE CEMETERY-CROSS CO.
WEBB WADE CSA-CO.B-Firfth Arkansas Regiment-Civil War
Wade Webb, a farmer by occupation, owes his nativity to the State of North Carolina, his birth occurring in Edgecombe County in 1841. John and Esther Webb, his parents, were natives of the same State. The ancestors came from England before the Revolutionary War, settling near Jones River in Virginia. Wade Webb passed his youthful days in the schools of North Carolina, and upon coming to St. Francis County, Ark., in 1853, began farming. He now owns 200 acres, with 120 under a successful state of cultivation. He was married in July, 1866, to Matilda V., daughter of Absalom and Matilda Barker, and to their union seven children were given, five living: John Lee, Remington P., Willie W., James R. and Filbert. Mr. Webb enlisted during the war in the Confederate army, in Company B of the Fifth Arkansas Regiment, serving until the final surrender. He participated in the battles of Murfreesboro, Jonesboro, Stone River, Perryville, Missionary Ridge and Cumberland Gap. At the battle of Murfreesboro he received a severe wound. Mr. Webb is an enterprising, energetic farmer and citizen, and contributes liberally to those movements which betoken the good or growth of the county.
WIDENER JOHN M.
John M. Widener first saw the light of day May 25, 1834, in a farm house situated in the wilds of St. Francis County. He grew to manhood in that locality with no companions save his brothers and sisters, and without the advantages of schools and churches which his children now enjoy. After remaining in this county until 1862, he went to Shelby County, Tenn., but three years later moved to Saline County, Ill., returning home in about a year. Mr. Widener owns, at this time, some eighty acres of land on the St. Francis River bottoms, and in connection with farming is successfully engaged in stock raising and in the timber business, his earnest efforts and industry having yielded substantial returns. His father, Samuel Widener, was born in North Carolina, in 1798, and lived there for a number of years, then removing to Alabama, where he remained for a short time. His home was Tennessee for a while, from which State he came to Arkansas, settling in the wilderness of St. Francis County. Here he resided until his death, which occurred in 1842. His wife, Margaret (Evans) Widener, died in 1838, leaving a family of ten children, John M., our subject being the only one living. The latter has been twice married; first, in 1858, to Miss Lavina Land, a native of this State, who died in 1877, leaving four children, two of these survive: Mary J. (wife of Samuel A. Mead, a farmer of St. Francis County) and Samuel A. (living at home). Mr. Widener was married the second time, in June, 1885, to Mrs. Mary McGuffey, daughter of John Halbert, of Missouri birth. Mr. and Mrs. Widener are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, in which they take an active part, Mr. Widener being steward. He is of German descent, and a prominent Democrat, and a leading citizen of this county. OBIT:Word has just reached us of the death of Uncle John Widener, which occurred at Heber, Ark., the latter part of January. Widener was one of the pioneers of St.Francis bottoms, having located there in 1840, near the site of the town of Widener, which was named after his brother. About a year ago he and his son moved there. He was universally loved and respected, his word was law, and many differences were settled amicably by his judgement. His old friends and acquaintances will grieve to learn of his demise. Peace to his ashes. 2-10-1905 CEMETERY UNKNOWN
WILLIAMS NATHANIEL G. CSA-Fifth Arkansas Infantry-Civil War
N. G. Williams is a descendant of a Revolutionary hero, and it was only natural that his patriotism should demonstrate itself at the outburst of civil strife in 1861. His paternal grandfather was one of the early settlers of North Carolina, and a soldier in the War of the Revolution, serving under Gen. Greene. His parents, Hardin and Martha (Tanner) Williams, were both natives of Tennessee, and had a family of three children, two of whom are living: Jane A. (widow of Samuel L. Sutton, of Phillips County) and N. G. The latter was born in Maury County, Tenn., on April 27, 1832. He spent his boyhood on the old home farm in that State, receiving a good education in the common schools of his county, after which he attended the University at Lebanon, Tenn. Two years before becoming of age he commenced farming for himself in Maury County, and in November, 1855, moved to Arkansas, locating in St. Francis County, where he was engaged in tilling the soil on the St. Francis River bottom lands, until the breaking out of the war. Then he entered the Confederate forces in the Fifth Arkansas Infantry, but was in only a few engagements, as he held the office of commissary of his regiment. After peace was declared he settled down to farming again at Taylor's Creek, and in 1883 opened up a stock of merchandise, since which time he has carried on the mercantile business in connection with farming. His stock of goods will invoice about $1,500, and he enjoys a good trade. Mr. Williams was married in 1854 to Mary Lee Wortham, who died thirteen years later, leaving one son, Lawrence E. He was married to his second wife, Martha H. Mosley, in 1869. They are the parents of three children: M. E. Williams, N. G. and M. J., all at home. Mr. Williams now owns 500 acres of land, with 131 acres under cultivation. His life illustrates what pluck and energy can accomplish in connection with good common sense, for success is bound to follow persistent effort. OBIT: 10-23-1908 LAST ROLL CALL= On Thursday, Oct.15th, 1908, at Colt, our old friend and comrade, N.G.Williams, Sr., answered the last roll call, and his spirit passed to its maker. The remains were carried to Caldwell Friday and interred. Nat Williams was 76 year of age at the time of his demise. At the beginning of the "late unpleasantness" he enlisted in the 23rd Arkansas, and bravely followed the fortunes of the "bonnie blue flag" until it was laid away in peace. The few surviving old soldiers regret the passing away of old Nat, and join the Times in sincere sympathy to those of his family left behind. CEMETERY UNKNOWN
WILLIAMS RUFUS G.
R. J. Williams, attorney at law of Forrest City, made his first appeal for his rights in Winchester, Tenn., September 23, 1848. His literary education was received in the schools of that State, and afterward he entered one of the prominent universities of the South, commencing the study of Blackstone under the efficient tutelage of Walker J. Brooks, of South Carolina, in the class of 1869-70. Finally he graduated from a law school in Virginia, and commenced the practice of his chosen profession in this place in 1873, having taught school for two years after finishing his college career, to liquidate the expenses of that course. His clientage has gradually increased, and he is, without exception, now conceded to be one of the most able practitioners of the county. He represented the Seventh senatorial district in 1878, and served until 1881, with an ability and efficiency that not only satisfied his Democratic constituents, but the people at large. Mr. Williams owns some 400 acres of land, and has the finest residence in Forrest City. He was married in Summerville, Tenn., in 1872, to Miss Sallie T. Wainright, and by her is the father of two children: Lucy and Addie. Mr. Williams is the son of J. W. and Mary (McNabb) Williams, natives of Virginia. The former, a mechanic by trade, was for many years established in Winchester. He was judge of Franklin County during the civil war, and held a similar position for twenty years in Winchester. He is now residing in the latter place at the advanced age of seventy years. Mrs. Williams died in 1863. She and her husband had a family of six children, all of them living. Mr. Williams has attained an enviable reputation in his profession, but his popularity does not end there, for he is also a favorite in social circles. Cordiality and a pleasant word for all are among his many noble attributes, and though ready at repartee and jesting, there is no occasion to regret the word spoken. He is a member of the Blue Lodge of the Masonic order, and is High Priest of the Royal Arch Chapter, also belonging to Commandery No. 11, K. T. OBIT:Mr.R.G.Williams, died at Mud Lake Saturday, Oct.4,1902, of typhoid pneumonia, and his remains were laid to rest in the Forrest City Cemetery, Monday morning, Mr.Williams was the manager of the Mud Lake plantation, came originally from Tennessee, and leaves a wife and four children. 10-10-1902 CITY CEMETERY
WILSON EUGENE CSA-Stevenford's Battery-Civil War
Eugene Wilson, proprietor of one of the largest bakeries and confectionery establishments in Forrest City, was born in St. Francis County, in 1870, and is a son of S. C. and Mary (Beck) Wilson, also residents of that city. Mr. Wilson and his partner, John Reno, do a large business in their line, their trade amounting to an average of $200 per week. The latter is a baker by trade, besides whom they also employ an experienced baker to meet the demands of a large trade, having, in connection with the bakery, an ice-cream parlor (that is liberally patronized), and the finest delivery wagon in the city. S. C. Wilson was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, in 1825, but was reared in Pennsylvania, where his parents moved when he was a small boy, settling on a farm, on which he worked when not attending school until sixteen years of age. At that time he was apprenticed to learn the carpenter's trade, serving three years in Lowell County, Ohio. After familiarizing himself with its varied details, he worked two years in New Castle, and then went South, locating in Blackhawk, Miss., in 1846, where he remained about ten years, following his adopted calling. Subsequently he was engaged in the saw-mill business until the war broke out, when he joined the Confederate army, serving in Stevenford's battery until the close of the war. He was captured at the battle Missionary Ridge, and taken to a Federal prison, being confined six months. He participated in the battles of Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga, Murfreesboro, and a number of skirmishes. After the war, returning to Mississippi, he was employed by J. H. Pait in his saw-mill until 1869, at which time he came to Arkansas, and located in St. Francis County, about three miles north of Forrest City. He erected a new saw-mill and operated it in connection with a grist-mill, until removing to the city, in 1881, since which time he has been occupied in the mercantile business, with substantial success. He has acquired some property, owning six houses in the city, besides other possessions. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson are the parents of three children, all residents of this county: Mary E. (wife of William M. Hannah), Charles M. and Eugene (the principal of this sketch). S. C. Wilson is the son of Dr. Andrew and Mary (Simpson) Wilson. His paternal grandfather was of Irish parentage, and his maternal grandfather was born and reared in England, running away from home when a young man in order to marry the girl of his choice, an Irish lady, and a sister of Thomas Nugent, the noted warrior. They eloped and came to America, and were married in New York City, after which they settled in Pennsylvannia, where he engaged in farming. Mrs. Wilson died in March, 1889, and was a prominent member of the Baptist Church, to which she had belonged for over thirty years. Mr. Wilson is a prominent resident of Forrest City, and is the present deputy United States marshal of this district. He is Grand Master of the I. O. O. F. He is the patentee and inventor of the 'patent car coupler', of which he is the sole owner.
WINTHOP H.W. USARMY-CO.N-Fifty-Third Massachussetts Regiment-Civil War
H. W. Winthrop, one of the representative citizens of Forrest City, was born in New England (Vermont) in 1839, being the son of William and Ann (Herron) Winthrop. William Winthrop owed his nativity to England, and was of English and Scotch descent. When quite young he came to America, and became prominently identified with politics, serving as a member of the legislature, and at the date of his death, in his eightieth year, was holding the position of county judge, having acted in that capacity for twelve years. His wife was born in Ireland, but married in Vermont, and by her marriage with Mr. Winthrop became the mother of five children. She is now living with her son, H. W. Winthrop, having passed her eighty-eighth birthday. Grandfather Herron came originally from Ireland, and after losing his first wife there, emigrated to America about the year 1800, attaining a place as one of the richest men in Vermont. He left seventy-two grandchildren, all well-fixed, and the monument erected to his memory in Vermont is one of the largest in the State. The mother of H. W. (the subject of this sketch) is his daughter by the first wife. H. W. Winthrop ran away from home when a boy, but was found in Boston and brought back by his father. He then concluded that the locality in which he was settled did not suit him, so went West, and at the date of the war was in Massachusetts. Joining the Federal army, Company N, Fifty-third Massachusetts Regiment, he served three years, having been promoted first lieutenant, though not commissioned, and he did not go to his regiment. Resigning his position he went into the sutler's department, and was brigade-sutler over the Eleventh New Jersey Cavalry, Second Iowa and Third United States, finding himself at the close of the war in Memphis, Tenn. He purchased a steamboat at that place with the intention of doing a trading business on the St. Francis River, but after making one trip, and landing at Madison, this county, he was accosted by familiar faces, who inquired if he did not recognize them, and whether he was not the man who had captured them, while serving in an official capacity during the Civil War. He first hesitated in replying, but finally admitted the soft impeachment, though not without some fear of results. He indeed was the man, and immediately was at the mercy of several of his former prisoners. OBIT:A gloom was cast over the community last Sunday morning when it became known that Capt.H.W.Wintrhop had passed into the mysterious beyond. The fall from the balcony was the cause of his untimely death. H.W.Winthrop was a native of Ireland, of Scotch and English parentage. His parents emigrated to this country when he was 4 years old and settled in Vermont. the Captain, as he was familiarly called, cast his fortunes with St.Francis County in 1865, first locating at Madison, then the county seat. During his thirty two years of citizenship, the esteem of which he was held is manifested by the many offices of trust which he filled. He held the office of chief clerk of the United States Bureau, was United States Assessor for the Eastern District of Arkansas, United District collector for the same district, Assessor of St.Francis County for six years. He was elected Mayor of Forrest City for two terms, and many improvements stand as monuments to his interest in public affairs. At the time of his death, he was 55 years of age, and leaves a wife and two daughters to mourn their loss. The funeral was conducted under the Auspices of the Knights of Honor. At half past 3 o'clock the remains were brought from the parlor to the dining room, (the former place being unable to hold the multitude of friends and acquaintances) where the beautiful services of the Episcopal Church were read by Rev. Mr.Edward L. Ogilby. At the conclusion of the services the cortege that followed the remains to the "city of the dead" was perhaps the largest the city has known. Mrs.G.A.Winthrop wishes to express her gratitude to all the friends of her family for the many deeds of kindness offered during the period of her husband's illness and the final disposition of the remains; especially she wishes to thank the inmates and patrons of the hotel for their many kind considerations.2-26-1897 CITY CEMETERY
WITHERS THOMAS JEFFERSON
Thomas Jefferson Withers came to this county with his father at the age of five years, and remained on the home farm until the father's death, which occurred in 1876. He then purchased a tract of land and commenced farming for himself, also being engaged in teaching school for three years. In 1881 Miss Mary E. Ratton became his wife. She was a daughter of William Ratton, of Kentucky nativity, and is now the mother of one son, Clarence W. Mr. Withers was born in Kentucky, March 26, 1862, as the son of Thomas Upton Withers, who was engaged in farming in the Blue Grass State (Kentucky), and after moving here was occupied in furnishing the Mississippi steamers with wood. At this calling he was making a good income, until 1858, when, during the high water he lost several hundred cords of wood, which financially crippled him. He then came to St. Francis County, where he resided until his death in 1867, at the age of fifty-nine. His wife, who was born here, survived him eleven years. Mr. Withers owns a farm of 185 acres, of which over 100 acres are under cultivation. He is engaged in stock raising principally, and is one of the most successful farmers in Griggs Township, although a young man not yet twenty-eight years of age. He is also a leading Democrat, and having served three years as justice of the peace, and at this time holds the office of school director, and supervisor of roads of his township, being a prominent member of the County Wheel. Mrs. Withers belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. OBIT:T.J.Withers Killed-Sam McFall, a farmer shoots him twelve times through the intestines. News reached here by telephone yesterday morning, Dec.31,1903, of an shooting affray between T.J.Withers, a merchant of Widener, and Sam McFall, a farmer, with whom he had business. McFall had brought a bale of cotton in, and after a spirited bidding between the buyers at Widener, it was sold by Withers consent to McBee, McFall claimed money for picking the cotton, and McBee told him to come back in the morning and he would pay it. In the meantime, Withers stopped this payment, claiming the cotton on account. The men were standing on or near the railroad track, in front of the business place of Withers, and had some conversation about this money for picking, McFall insisting that he was entitled to it and Withers should pay it. McFall says that Withers remarked to him, "Sam, you're going to keep on until I hurt you bad and quick; I'll do it now," and with that he backed off and drew his gun, a 32 calibre S & W, and began firing. McFall drew his gun, but it hung in his sweater, but in an instant both men emptied their guns. Withers shot five times at McFall, three shots taking effect one in his left forearm, and one on either side of his body, about six or eight inches below the armpits. None of these wounds are serious, all being flesh wounds. McFall shot four times, one cartridge missing fire, two of which took effect in the abdomen of Withers and from which he died in about three hours. McFall called the sheriff to give himself up,and then came over on the morning train. He was taken to the doctor's office, where he had his wounds dressed, and then was put in jail. Withers, though close in money matters and considered a hard man to deal with in a financial way, was a good citizen, a member of and leader in the church, and had the best interests of the community at heart. His untimely death is sorely regretted by a large circle of friends, and McFall himself says he is very sorry indeed that the tragedy occurred. His family has the sympathy of the entire community. 1-1-1904 WIDENER CEMETERY
WOLFF OSCAR PRESLEY
In 1848, O.P.Wolff, Sr., and his wife Annie E. (Russell) Wolff, came to Arkansas from Philadelphia, their native home, and settled on the present site of the town of Colt, which he purchased from W.M.Taylor, consisting of 160 acres, with four acres of it cleared. Mr.Wollf improved the rest and bought adjoining lands, and in 1870, at the time of his death, was the owner of 600 or 700 acres. Soon after arriving here he opened up a stock of general merchandise, and as settlements were few and far between he had a large trade and enjoyed a profitable patronage, which he continued for some years after the war. The place was known as Taylor's Creek, by which name it was called until 1882, then being changed to Colt, after the railroad contractor who built the railroad through. Mr.Wolff was twice married, By his first union he was the father of two children, our subject the only one living; and by his second marriage there were three children: Fisk B., Cornelia W., and Sallie J. (wife of J.H.Hancock of Wynne). Oscar P.Wolff, the subject of this sketch, was born in St.Francis County, May 8,1852, and up to the time the death of his father enjoyed the advantages of attending schools of his neighborhood. After the senior Wolff's demise he went to Texas and was engaged for the following five years as a "cowboy," on the western plains. Returning home he entered into farming on the old homestead for seven years, but in 1882 was employed by Mr.Lesca as book-keeper and clerk. In 1883 he was appointed station agent at Colt for the Iron Mountain Railroad, which position he still holds. November 10,1880, Mr.Wolff married Miss Fannie Gurley. They are the parents of two children: Annie E. and Edward P. Mr.Wolff is a member of the Knights of Pythias and also the Knights of Honor. He is a Democrat in politics, and a well known citizen of Colt. OBIT:6-28-1912 DEATH OF MR.OSCAR PRESLEY WOLFF=Esteemed citizen succombs to tuberculosis after long and painful illness. Mr.Oscar Presley Wolff, one of the best known citizens of St.Francis county and a gentleman who was greatly esteemed by a legion of good friends, died yesterday, June 27,1912, at his home in this city and was buried this morning in the Loughridge graveyard in Johnson township. Deceased was sixty years of age the 8th day of May last, and since the spring of 1908 when he, in company with his friend Mr.S.M.Blalock of Colt, narrowly escaped being asphyxiated in a room at the Fransiota Hotel in Memphis, has steadily gone downward physically. For 5 or 6 months past, deceased had been in such a delicate and frail condiiton, he was unable to leave his home. O.P.Wolff was a native of St.Francis county, having been born at the old family homestead on Taylor's Creek, near Colt in Telico township. He was a brave and fearless man and for for quite a number of years was a prominent figure in the life of our city and county. At the time of his death he was, and for the past six or eight years had served the levee board as tax collector for this county. Prior to his election as collector for the levee board, he had served as City Marshall of Forrest City for several terms where he served with distinction. Deceased was married in the latter 70's to Mrs.Annie Gurley to which union three children were born, viz, Annie, Edward, and Loyd, the former now being the wife of Mr.Paul Logston of Little Rock, all of whom survive him. The funeral arrangements include passage of the remains on the Iron Mountain to Colt, and thence by hearse to Loughridge where Father Bearinger of the Catholic church will perform the last rites. LOUGHRIDGE CEMETERY
WYLDS DANIEL CSA-CO.K-Dobbin's Regiment-Civil War
Daniel Wylds, the son of David and Mary Wylds, natives of Georgia and Tennessee, respectively, was born in St. Francis County, Ark., in 1846. David Wylds, when eighteen years of age, enlisted in the War of 1812, serving through the entire period as orderly-sergeant of his company. About the year 1821 he moved to Arkansas, locating in St. Francis County, where he died at the age of seventy-four years, and it can be truly said that no resident of the county ever passed away who was more sincerely mourned than he. A genial and courteous gentleman, he was one whom it was a pleasure to meet, and his absence in business and social circles was always regretted. He was broad shouldered, well proportioned, with a shrewd, kindly face that was more remarkable for its intelligence and keenness than for its beauty of features. He was a sympathetic listener to the sorrows and ills of the poor and needy, and no one ever told his tale in vain, or went from his home empty-handed. At the time of his removal to Arkansas it was almost a wilderness, and had not then reached the dignity of being a State. He began opening a farm, working under difficulties incident to that period, such as few, if any, of the present generation realize. They had to put up bear meat in winter to do them through the summer. It required a man of nerve and indomitable courage to undertake the work that he did, and his thrift and perseverance formed a oundation for the home of beauty and plenty that Daniel Wylds now enjoys. It should be added in this connection, however, that the wealth and accumulation of property was not all inherited by the son, for he began for himself at the age of twenty years. Possessing in a large degree his father's ambition and energy, he chose for his profession that most independent of all vocations-farming, and has continued it ever since. He has been remarkably successful in amassing property, and now owns large landed estates of over 1,168 acres, aside from being an extensive stock raiser. He is considered one of the wealthiest men in the county. When seventeen years of age, Mr. Wylds enlisted in Company K, Dobbin's regiment, Confederate States army, participating in several battles, and receiving a wound at the battle of Jefferson City, Mo.; he was taken prisoner to Illinois, remaining there until March of 1865, when he was exchanged at Eichmond, Va., and again captured in April, 1865, following, then receiving his parole. After the war he started for home, but was obliged to make more than two-thirds of this distance on foot. Mr. Wylds was married in 1872 to Virginia I. Thompson, a daughter of William and Mahala J. Thompson, natives of Virginia. To their union five children were born: Charles A., Wilmoth O., Mary E. (deceased), Daniel T. and Allen G. Mr. Wylds' mother, who was a lovely woman, came to St. Francis County in 1816, when only eight years old, and made it her home until she died, at the age of sixty-six, a Christian and philanthropist. In politics our subject is a Democrat, and in secret [p.506] societies is identified with the Knights of Honor. In religions faith he is a Presbyterian. Mrs. Wylds is a member of the Baptist Church. He has always been a consistent and liberal contributor to the cause of religions and educational movements, and his private charities are numerous and judicious. He has worthily followed in the footsteps of his honored father, whose favorite text was, "God loves the cheerful giver." His ideas of charity are indeed broad.. Birth: Dec. 4, 1846 Death: Jan. 25, 1917 Note: Son of David and Mary Wylds (apoplexy) WYLDS CEMETERY
WYLDS DAVID USARMY-War of 1812
SEE DANIEL WYLDS Birth: Oct. 12, 1793 Death: May 5, 1868 Note: Husband of Mary Wylds WYLDS CEMETERY

Back to St.Francis County


Table of Contents Maintained By:
Paul V. Isbell
St.Francis County Archives File Manager

St.Francis County Homepage | AR Archives Counties
ARGenWeb | USGenWeb Archives | USGenWeb

Designed January 2009