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Bramble Bush

BRAMBLE BUSH
THE QUARTERLY NEWSLETTER
OF THE HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
OF MARION COUNTY ARKANSAS

Vol. 2, No. 4        October 1997         Yellville, Arkansas 72687

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THE TUTT, KING, AND EVERETT WAR
(Part 2 - continued from Vol 2, No. 2)
compiled by Vicki A. Roberts
(addendum)

        In September 1849 Arkansas Governor John Sheldon Roane sent General Allan Wood to Marion County to investigate this upheaval and to order out the militia if he deemed it necessary. Obviously Wood felt the need and was given command of the militia raised in Carroll County. Sheriff Mooney and Constable Adams were relieved of their duties. Upon the arrival of Wood and his militia, the Everetts and their friends retreated to Searcy County where they had many friends and relatives.
        On 27 September 1849 Governor Roane ordered William Thornhill, Searcy County Sheriff, to arrest those Everetts and their friends who had murdered the Kings. Thornhill had heard they were at large in Searcy County so in early October General Wood moved his headquarters to Lebanon, Searcy County, in order to round up the culprits and those witnesses needed for court proceedings. Wood learned the Everetts were at a Methodist camp meeting in Wiley's Cove. He ordered Captain W. C. Mitchell to Wiley's Cove to demand the Everetts be surrendered into his custody, expecting this move might force the Everett group to flee for Marion County. At the same time he ordered Captain Tilford Denton and his men to the place on the Yellville-Lebanon road where it crosses Tomahawk and to be ready to arrest the fugitives if they took flight. However, the Methodist campers immediately complied with Captain Mitchell's request and arrests followed.
        On 13 October 1849 General Wood reported from Yellville to Governor Roane that in his opinion there was not one person in Marion County that was impartial. If he placed the prisoners in the hands of one party, they would promptly be set free. If he placed them in the hands of the other party, all out war would ensue. Mooney and some others were allowed to make bail. Everett and Stratton were jailed at Smithville in Lawrence County. Martial law lasted for six weeks and all was quiet. But winter was coming on, the citizen-soldiers needed to be home, so the troops were removed. Within a week of their departure, a mob of Everett followers rode to Smithville, pulled down the jail with ropes and crowbars, and released Everett and Stratton. This mob took to the woods around Yellville, shouting their defiant slogan, "Kill Hamp Tutt!" Knowing the Everetts were gunning for him, Hamp Tutt made his will in August 1850. Some sources say Stratton provoked Hamp into a gun fight but that he outdrew Stratton and survived.
        Hamp Tutt spent considerable time hiding from the Everetts, mostly fortified in his own home. Everett spent his time trying to waylay Tutt and dispatch him. Everett even changed his tactics, letting it be known he was gone from the county. Tutt remained on the alert, seldom if ever leaving Yellville. About this time a handsome young stranger, known only as The Dutchman, came from Indiana to visit his uncle Dave Wickersham, an Everett man, at Cowan Barrens. As the sole surviving Tutt, Hamp was a wealthy man and he had big plans. He planned to build a brick house befitting a man of his means. Next election he planned to run for County Representative. He had his eye on the governor's mansion too. His head was full of big plans for the future instead of caution for the present. This was a tragic mistake. While walking along Crooked Creek on his way to the brick works to see how is order was coming along, Hamp Tutt was shot from ambush and killed. And never again was The Dutchman seen in Yellville.
        The will of Hamp Tutt, which follows, was probated 28 September 1850, indicating he was killed less than a month after it was written.
        I, Hansford Tutt, of the county of Marion and State of Arkansas do make this my last will and testament. First, I give unto my beloved wife Nancy the plantation upon which I now live and the Inston place adjoining during her widowhood and upon her death or remarriage I want the said lands equally divided between my children. The balance of my personal estate I want divided between my children except for Susan Coker and Milton B. Tutt who had had $200 each advanced to them, which sum they are to account for. My son William P. Tutt has also had the sum of $150 advanced to him and this sum he is to account for. I wish my wife to have the use of Bill and Lew during her widowhood for the purpose of raising my children. I want my Negro woman, Millie, sold on a credit of 12 months and the proceeds applied on my debts. I want my son Hansford Tutt, one bay filly. I give unto my daughter Rachel Tutt one sorrel filly. I want my interest in the Abraham Wood place sold for the purpose of paying the amount I am liable for on said land, and my executors are hereby authorized to transfer my interest at a private sale. I also give my son Hansford $15 to buy a saddle and give Rachel $15 to buy a saddle. I give my wife, Nancy, two horses, to wit: One bay mare and the other bay mare. The balance of the horses I want applied to my debts. I also give my wife four cows and calves and one yoke of oxen. I also give my wife all my household and kitchen furniture except one bed which Rachel is to have. I give unto my wife and children jointly all my growing crops. I give unto my wife 10 good pork hogs and 10 stock hogs. I hereby appoint M. B. Tutt and Calvin Coker my executors. Given under my hand and seal this 27th day of August 1850. (Signed) Hansford Tutt.
        Filed the 28th day of September 1850. Witnesses: James A. Wilson, Thomas Jefferson, David K. Tutt.
        There was nothing left in Marion County for the Everett family. Shortly after Hamp's death, Everett and Stratton and some of their friends left one night, canoed down White River, took a steamboat down the Mississippi and up Red River to Shreveport, Louisiana, where cholera was raging. Everrett caught it and died suddenly.
        Thus ended the Tutt, King, and Everett War in Marion County. It was the only great family feud ever known in the State of Arkansas. It cast gloom over Marion County for many years. It began with ambition. It ended with crime, bloodshed, murder, and death.

NOTES OF INTEREST
        Simmons Everett was in Lawrence Co. AR as early as 1830. Thomas E. and John S. Everett are found in the 1836 Searcy Co. AR tax list.
        Hansford Tutt, Thomas H. Flippin, and William Goodall advertised lots for sale in the new town of Yellville in the Batesville News 6 May 1841.
        Hansford Tutt was elected Marion Co. Coroner in 1842.
        David K. Tutt (son of Hamp and Nancy) was killed in a celebrated gun fight on the town square in Springfield MO 20 July 1865 by Wild Bill Hickock and was buried in Springfield.
        I. B. (Barton) Everett was Sheriff of Marion Co. 1838-1842.
        T. E. (Ewell) Everett served as Marion Co. judge 1836 and 1840-42.
        J. N. (Jesse) Everett was the first Marion Co. Surveyor, 1836-1838. He built the first mill in Marion Co. 1839-40. It was on Mill Creek just south of the Indian village.
        R. B. (Benjamin) Tutt was Marion Co. Sheriff 1836-1838.
        Jesse Everett fought the cantankerous John Houston (brother to Sam Houston) at the mouth of Big North Fork River until onlookers pulled them apart.
        Jim Everett, a descendant of the Marion Co. Everetts, was killed in his Forsyth MO Mercantile-Saloon 23 September 1883 by Albert G. Layton, son of John M. & Mary E. (Almond) Layton. This event triggered the formation of the Baldknobber Vigilantes.
        Bald Jesse Mountain, about 5 miles south of Yellville, was named for Jesse Everett who, during the time of the feud, would often watch the village from the top of the mountain for signs of disturbances.

SOURCES
History of Arkansas. 1910.
White River Chronicles of S. C. Turnbo. Lynn Morrow. 1992.
Early Days of Marion County. Marian S. Burnes.
Searcy County AR To 1850. James J. Johnston.
Marion Co. AR Mountain Echo. W. B. Flippin. 1899.
Washington Co. AR Telegraph, 25 October 1848 issue.
Mary Ann Messick. 1976.

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F R O M   T H E   E D I T O R

       Did you notice something a bit odd with the July '97 Bramble Bush? Well, we did. It came as a complete surprise when we got it back from the printer. This time we'll lay the blame at his door. Next time? Let's hope not - but - who knows.
       The second year of Bramble Bush is at an end. Oh, how time flies when you're having fun! It's been a very full and rewarding year. Our thanks to each and every one of you for your patience, endurance, and overall support for this publication. We've had some fantastic reviews, great articles from our readers, and really good queries. And, God willing and the Creeks don't rise, with your help we'll do our best to see that 1998 is even better. We have some exciting ideas in the works - maybe even some pictures.
       During this seventh year of the Society's existence, we've published our first book - Genealogies of Marion County Families 1811-1900 - and sold and delivered nearly all of the first printing. It's been far more of a success than we ever dreamed. If you haven't ordered your copy, you need to. And remember - it makes a great Christmas gift.
       This year we've also collated, printed, and mailed over 600 newsletters. We've held 10 of our 12 meetings (every 3rd Tuesday at 6:00 pm at the Marion County Library in Yellville). We've answered dozens of letters and phone calls and e-mails. We've talked and visited from our booths at the North Arkansas Ancestor Fair and at Turkey Trot while selling lots of Marion County reference materials. We've poured through catalogs in search of more books and microflim for our Permanent Collection at the library. We've choked and coughed our way through layers of dust and age in the courthouse vault researching, researching, researching.
       On top of all this, we've started another book. This one will be Supplement to Genealogies of Marion County Families 1811-1900. John and Nancy Nolan of Grandview WA have already supplied us with vast amounts of data for it concerning their families - for which we'll never be able to thank them adequately. But, we need data on each and every family and person in your families too. We hope to include stories, legends, data on how they lived their lives, where they lived, how they got here and why, what kind of work they did, their military service - the whole shootin' match. But we can't do it without your help so please, please send us whatever you have. We'll put it to good use and share it with all of you.
       A bit early but - HAPPY THANKSGIVING and MERRY CHRISTMAS. Vicki A. Roberts, editor.

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E A R L Y   L A N D   R E C O R D S
(conclusion)

LAND HOLDER

EARLIEST RECORDED

LOCATION

Wood, William Sr.

28 September 1840

T18N R16W Sec 10

T18N R17W Sec 1

T19N R17W Sec 13

Woolsey, Sidney H.

10 September 1850

T18N R14W Sec 27

Yocham, Harve

9 February 1848

T21N R16W Sec 31

Yochum, Asa

9 February 1848

T20N R16W Sec 7

T20N R16W Sec 8

T21N R16W Sec 14

T21N R16W Sec 19

Yochum, Jacob

9 February 1848

T21N R16W Sec 22

T21N R16W Sec 23

Yochum, Michael

18 October 1848

T21N R15W Sec 30

T21N R16W Sec 25

Yochum, William

9 February 1848

T21N R16W Sec 23

Young, Jessie

8 June 1850

T18N R16W Sec 10

T18N R16W Sec 11

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H I S T O R I C A L   & B I O G R A P H I C A L
S K E T C H E S
Of The Early Settlement of the White River Valley
By A. C. Jeffrey
CHAPTER 11
As copied from The Mountain Echo, 31 May 1895 issue)

       Jaho Falenash being the first settler on White River, was for a time a law unto himself and monarch of all he surveyed. He devoted himself to hunting and trapping. The sound of the church going bell never saluted his ears, nor the whistle of the steam engine upon the river ever disturbed the quiet of his mind. Thus he drifted on the tide of time toward eternity, almost as ignorant of the world in which he lived as the wild animals upon which he made his war. In the spring of 1820 he went up stream in a canoe as far as the mouth of the Big North Fork, and whilst on this excursion a flood in upper White River and his loved ones at home being in a low country, he set sail on a high tide to look after them and his cabin. On the voyage down river he reported the river from hill to hill. This was the first over flow in the river of which we have any account.
       A period of ten years elapsed from the time Jahu took possession of White River, which found a few others - a few hardy pioneers - whose object was to hunt and trap, - Ben Bryant, a wandering Portugese, took possession of the Big North Fork and its tributaries, Big Teen (Augustine) and Little Teen Friend came to the river and settled, one of them at the mouth of Friend's Creek, near the John Quincy Adams' place, the other near the mouth of the Buffalo; Jake and Sol Yocham settled and took possession of the river above this, Lin and Jo Coker and the Sneeds, Peter Sneed, at the mouth of Widman's Creek, Jonathan and Bill Iron settled at the Hunt place below Twin Creek, and John Carter, a very singular character, settled a short distance above Mount Olive. John Carter was a native of Virginia educated to the law, full of wit and humor and apparent fine ability, wound his way into the wilderness, and set down to raise a family on a dirt floor. His trait of character may be better understood by the following anecdote: Carter and Irons, living ten miles apart, were close neighbors for those days. It seems they had a falling out, and Iron accused Carter and his son Bill of making conterfeit money, and Carter in turn accused Irons of stealing his meat. Carter learned the men were not at home at Irons and went down. On approaching the door he saluted the women, "Good morning ladies, cool day, I believe I'll take a seat and warm."--Not a woman spoke. Carter seated himself, looking round the cabin he discovered a piece of bacon hanging up in the boards of the cabin roof - a manner in those days of saving bacon. Carter commenced a low humming tune to himself and "My Billy will come out of the kink, yet, if that silver mine goes on, heh he," and casting his eyes up, he continued, "there hangs some of my hog's bacon, heh, he." This was too much for the Irons women to stand they arose in force with sticks in hand and drove John Carter from their cabin.
       On the south bank of the White River old man Lafferty settled opposite the mouth of Lafferty Creek, bringing with him from east of the Mississippi River considerable live-stock. He was living at this place in time of the earthquake of 1811, and reported he saw the bottomless well near his landing blown out. He said there came a terrific shock, and muddy water raised from one side of the river to the other with a great explosion near the south bank where this well appeared. It is about the size of a small capin[?] at the mouth, and has been sounded over two hundred feet without finding any botton. This well remains to be seen, a silent witness of God's power.
       Lafferty had a large family of sons and daughters, the oldest of whom was John C. Lafferty of Van Buren county. He made quite a display, as an early politician in this country. He was an unlettered, cunning, oily talker full of wit and native shrewdness and a good electioneerer. He used to tell in his early campaigns that about 1812 he went to the Post of Arkansas with beef cattle, and on this trip he learned for the first time in his life that men wore breeches made of cloth. He set several sessions in the Arkansas Legislature, and at a later date while cnvassing for State Senator for Van Buren and Izard counties, he made a speech at Athens, which created a great laugh at the time; he had a very keen, shrill feminine voice and talked very smooth.; his time to speak came and he whistled out: "Fellow citizens, my name is John C. Lafferty ___ Van Buren county. I came to this territory in 1809. In 1810 helped to take a four-year-old he out of a hollow sycamore near the mouth of this creek fellow citizens four inches on the b___." By this time a great shout was raised and he continued. "I am a candidate fellow citizen, for State Senator, &c." He lived to shoulder his gun and go into the rebel army during the negro war.
       The valley of White River became the property of United States about the year 1803; and was known for a time as Louisana Territory without any organization of law in this valley. It was afterwards cut off and known as Missouri Territory, with counties, in the lands of Arkansas one south of the Arkansas perhaps Arkansas county and one north, known as Lawrence county, with the county seat at Davidsonville on Black River. The dates of this organization are not before us but was in all [this section cut from original article] laid off into Arkansas Territory with Col. Miller as Governor. Col. Miller gained this appointment by his bravery at the batte of Lundie's Lane, near the Falls of Niagara. It seems the British had planted a heavy battery at the end of the lane which was fast demolishing the American lines. The American commander rode up to Col. Miller and asked him if he could take that bettery. Col. Miller replied "I'll try, sir." Instantly he put his men in order and made one of the most desperate charges made in the war. In a hand to hand fight he drove the enemy from the battery and turned it on them, which act alone turned the fate of the day. Congress voted his whole regiment a military suit with the words "I'll try sir" on the buttons, and he was appointed first Governor of Arkansas Territory. One of the territorial legislature of Arkansas was to divide Lawrence County and created Independence Co. with the county seat at the Falenash place. This location was soon after changed, the county seat located at the mouth of Polk Bayou, and called Batesville in honor of Judge James Woodson Bates of St. Louis, a very eminent jurist at that time.
       A return to the more primitive days of the settlement of this valley is but justice. A period of five years from 1810 to 1815 brought quite a rush of emigration to White River, some of them good citizens, some out laws, and some refugees from justice. During this period there seems to have been organized a regular band of robbers, with a settler a day's journey apart from the head or back water on lower White River to the farthest settlement up the river, with a depot at Negro Hill to deposit their booty.

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R E C E N T   A C Q U I S I T I O N S

POST OFFICES OF MARION COUNTY AR 1836-1971. Mysty McPherson compiler. 1997. Gift of the author.
NUMBERING SYSTEMS IN GENEALOGY. Richard A. Pence. 1995. Donated to the Society
BRAMBLE BUSH, Volume 1. 1996. Supplied by the Society.
BRAMBLE BUSH, Volume 2. 1997. Supplied by the Society.

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R E M I N D E R

       Contributions are being collected for Supplement to Genealogies of Marion County Families 1811-1900. Family data will be corrected and extended, descendants carried beyond the boundaries of Marion County, short stories included, and new families added. Be sure to get YOUR stories, family genealogies, additions, and corrections to Mysty McPherson or Vicki Roberts, PO Box 554, Yellville AR 72687. They need all the help you can give them.

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B I T S   A N D   P I E C E S

       William Davenport of Cotter found one of the prettiest and most perfect pearls that has been taken from the river for some time last Monday afternoon. It was as large as a No. 1 buckshot, was perfectly round, and had a very fine lustre. The Nelson Jewelry Co. of Cotter bought the pearl for $75. Baxter Bulletin, 8 September 1905.
       MARRIED: John Jones to Lillie Cox, aged 15, both of Yellville AR, last Saturday at the Central Hotel, Gainesville MO. Ozark Co. News, 7 October 1887.
       DIED: LeRoy Rose, born White Co. TN 12 Jan 1837 died Sunday at home west of Gainesville MO. He moved when quite young to the southeast part of Missouri and then to North Arkansas. Thirty-two years ago he moved to Ozark MO. At age 25 he married Mary A. Deathrage of Marion Co. AR who with their three daughters and one son survive. Burial was at Center Point Cemetery. Ozark County Times, 10 May 1907.
       MURDERED: Obe Kessinger shot by John Roberts in Marion Co. AR last Saturday. Ozark County Times, 25 September 1908.
       A work order for construction of a Civil Aeronautics Administration airport at Flippin was issued last week by the CAA to the Fonda Construction Co. of Oak Ridge TN. Baxter Bulletin, 12 September 1947.

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M A R I O N   C O U N T Y   F A M I L I E S
1811 - 1900

A genealogical record of those families who settled in Marion County between the years 1811 and 1900

ADAMS, ANGEL, AKIN, ALFORD, ALLEN, ANDERSON, ASHMEAD, ATHEY, ATTERBURY, AVEY, BAILEY, BAKER, BALDRIDGE, BALLARD, BARKHEIMER, BARNETT, BAUCOM, BAYLESS, BEARDEN, BECKHAM, BELL, BENCH, BERRY, BLACK, BLACKWELL, BLANKENSHIP, BLYTHE, BOGLE, BOND, BRADSHAW, BRADY, BRIGGS, BROOKSHER, BROWN, BRYANT, BUNDY, BURCH, BURLESON, BURNES, BURRIS, BURROW, BUTLER, CAGLE, CALLAHAN, CAMP, CANTRELL, CARSON, CARTER, CASEBOLT, CASEY, CAVANESS, CHANDLER, CHAPPELLE, CHEEK, CHOAT, CLEM, CLINE, COCKRAM, COKE, COKER, COLE, COPELAND, CORNELL, COVINGTON, COWAN, COWDREY, COX, CRAIG, CRAVENS, CROWNOVER, DAFFRON, DAVIS, DAVENPORT, DAY, DEAN, DENTON, DePRIEST, DERRYBERRY, DEWEY, DICKERSON, DILDAY, DILLAHUNTY, DILLARD, DOBBS, DODD, DODSON, DOSHIER, DOWELL, DOWNHAM, DOWNUM, DUE, DUGGINS, DUNLAP, DUREN, ELAM, ERWIN, ESTES, EVANS, EVERETT, FAULKENBERRY, FEE, FIRESTONE, FLETCHER, FLIPPIN, FLOYD, FREEMAN, FRIEND, GAGE, GARRETT, GAY, GENTRY, GIBSON, GILBERT, GILLEY, GILLIAM, GLEN, GOODALL, GREENE, GREGORY, HAGGARD, HALL, HAMLET, HAMM, HAMPTON, HAND, HARPER, HARRIS, HELMS, HIGGS, HILLHOUSE, HODGE, HOGAN, HOLLAND, HOLLINGSWORTH, HOLLOWELL, HOLT, HORNER, HORTON, HUDDLESTON, HUDSON, HUDSPETH, HULEN, HURST, JACKSON, JAMES, JEFFERSON, JENKINS, JOBE, JOHNSON, JONES, KEESEE, KEETER, KELLOUGH, KING, LAFFOON, LANCASTER, LANGSTON, LANTZ, LARRAMORE, LASSITER, LAWHON, LAY, LAYTON, LEDFORD, LEE, LEFEVERS, LEWIS, LINCK, LOWERY, LYNCH, MAGNESS, MARBERRY, MARKLE, MARLER, MARTIN, MASSEY, MATHIS, MATLOCK, MATTHEWS, MAXEY, McAFEE, McANALLY, McBEE, McCABE, McCARTY, McCLAIN, McCRACKEN, McDOWELL, McENTIRE, McGINNIS, McGOWAN, McKINNEY, McPHERSON, McVEY, MEARS, MELTON, MERRIMAN, MERRIOT, MESSICK, METHVIN, MILLIGAN, MILUM, MITCHELL, MOORE, MOREAU, MORELAND, MORGAN, MORRIS, MORROW, MOTLEY, MULLINS, MURRY, MUSICK, NALLEY, NANNY, NARRAMORE, NAVE, NEWTON, NOE, NORTHCOTT, NORTON, NOWLIN, ORCUTT, ORR, OSBORNE, OTT, OWEN, OWENS, OXFORD, PACE, PANGLE, PANNELL, PARKER, PARNELL, PASCOE, PATTERSON, PATTON, PAXTON, PERRY, PETITT, PHILLIPS, PICKLE, PIERCE, PIERSON, PIGG, PILGRIM, PLUMLEE, POYNTER, PRICE, PUMPHREY, PURDOM, PYLE, RABY, RAINES, RAILSBACK, RAINES, RAY, REA, REED, REID, REYNOLDS, RICE, RICHARDSON, RISLEY, RITTER, ROBERTS, ROBERTSON, ROBISON, RORIE, ROSE, ROWDEN, RYALS, SANDERS, SASSER, SEAWELL, SETZER, SHARP, SHELTON, SHIPMAN, SIMMONS, SIMS, SMART, SMITH, SNIPES, SNOW, STANLEY, STILL, STINNETT, STOKES, STONECIPHER, STOVALL, SULLIVAN, SUMMERS, SWAFFORD, TABOR, TALBERT, TAYLOR, TEAFF, TERRY, THOMPSON, TICER, TILTON, TIPPET, TREADWAY, TREAT, TRIMBLE, TUCKER, TURNBO, TUTT, UNDERWOOD, VANZANDT, WAGGONER, WATTS, WEBB, WEST, WHITSON, WICKER, WICKERSHAM, WIKLE, WILLIAMS, WILLINGHAM, WILKERSON, WILMOTH, WILSHER, WILSON, WINGATE, WOLF, WOOD, WOOTEN, YOCHAM, YOUNG, YOUNGER.

Includes over 400 families with birth dates and places, marriage dates and places, death dates and places, burial places, date of emigration, where they came from, where they went, where they settled.
Hard Smythe-sewn binding, 8.5 x 11, 680 pages, 93-page cross-reference index, sources for each family, bibliography, contributors with their addresses. $60 including shipping and handling.
        Order from HGSMCA, PO Box 554, Yellville AR 72687.

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T A L K E D   TO   S O M E   K I D S
by Mysty McPherson

       Recently I was asked to speak to the four 11th grade English classes at Yellville-Summit Highschool. The subject was historic and genealogical research.
       Many of the students are part of the relationship web of Marion Co. Many are from "off" and unaware of the area bramble bush (as opposed to family tree). None was aware that what is now Marion Co. was once part of the 1803 Louisiana Purchase, was formerly under the rule of both Spain and France, and was originally Searcy Co. They knew little or nothing of Bushwhackers, Jayhawkers, burned courthouses, the tales of Silas Claiborne Turnbo and Thomas Jerome Estes and even less of about census, archives, and LDS Family History Centers.
       But they listened. They heard. And they asked questions. Most of their questions were the usual - how-can-I and where-do-I. Easy stuff. But four of their questions were quite profound, quite thought-provoking. Quick, easy, off-the-top-of-the-head answers were not an option. They had to be true and honest answers. The kids wanted to know, to understand.
       How would you answer their questions? (My answers are below, slightly paraphrased.)
       1. What got you started researching your family?
       2. How far back have you traced your family?
       3. Why do you do Marion Co. research when you have no kin here?
       4. What's the most surprising, unexpected thing you've found in your research?
       Talking to kids, listening to kids - it's wondrous. You soon learn just how much you know or don't know, whether you're holding their interest or, typically, boring them to death. And they will continually surprise you (if you let them). It was a great four hours; a real learning experience. I thoroughly enjoyed every minute. I learned a lot about them and about myself. Thanks kids.

M Y   A N S W E R S
       1. The elder child when my mother died in 1964, I got all the old family stuff - photos, letters carefully tied with ribbons, family bibles, newspaper clippings, allusions to Mayflower ancestry, pressed flowers, notes and snippets - the works. Oh, well. Another box in the attic, I thought. But my mother-in-law firmly believed that in order to "be someone" you had to get into one of those "pedigree societies." So I jumped into the Mayflower thing and - wonder of wonders! - I proved it! And more. My father-in-law (thus my husband) and I share the same Mayflower ancestor, Stephen Hopkins.
       2. To the beginning of time. Okay. Let me explain. If you buy the Milesian theory - simplistically it's descent from Noah's son Japhet through Milesius of Spain and his sons Heber, Ir, and Heremon (see Irish Pedigrees by John O'Hart. 1892. Reprint 1976.), I can go back to Adam and Eve. If you don't buy it, I can go back to the Picts in Ireland around 2000 BC. That's on my mom's side. On my dad's side I've gotten to about 1815 or 1820 in North Wales. On that side I'm second-generation American.
       3. It's important. It needs to be done before there's no one left who remembers before cyberspace. It's rich in basic sociological and human patterns. I've acquired a lot of the know-how, I can make the time, and I thoroughly enjoy the challenge.
       4. The human brain is an absolute marvel. It puts computers to shame. The brain of a genealogical researcher has an innate ability to latch on to the most bizzare data for no apparent or logical reason. And a genealogical researcher gets a "feeling." Five or six years ago I traced one ancestor on my mom's side back into England. One of the family names I found there as Amyas Paulet, which I thought strange for an English name. So my brain stuck it in that special place in my head that researchers have - not in limbo but not in the forefront either. About three years ago I was at the downtown library in Little Rock doing Marion Co. research. For some unknown reason I picked up a book about Magna Carta barons. Lo! and behold! There was the name Amyas Paulet! I wasn't searching for him - not consciously anyway. And something - something - made me pick up that book. That happenstance launched me into both gentry and royalty and voila! To the beginning of time!

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M E M B E R S H I P   F O R   1 9 9 7   N O W   D U E

       Annual dues of $12 must be received by HGSMCA no later than 31 DECEMBER 1997 in order to continue to have Bramble Bush at your fingertips quarterly through 1998. Don't miss even a single issue. Get those dues in the mail today. THIS WILL BE YOUR ONLY REMINDER!

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Q U E R I E S

       Queries is published in Bramble Bush as a service to researchers who may wish to exchange information of mutual historic and/or genealogical interests. The charge per query is $3. Queries from both members and non-members are accepted, and are published in order of receipt, as space permits. If you respond to a query, kindly send a copy of your answer to Bramble Bush. Responsibility for accuracy of data in queries rests with the submitter.

       BREWER. Seek ancestors/descendants of GEORGE CLEVELAND BREWER (son of Joe Brewer) b MCAR(?) 7 Feb 1886 Mysty McPherson, HCR 66 Box 159, Yellville AR 72687, e-mail shakerag@mtnhome.com OR Teresa Toller , e-mail ktdtllr@aol.com.
       BIRD. Seek ancestors/descendants of NANCY FLORENCE BIRD b GA 17 Sep 1883/5 d Flippin(?) May 1912 m MCAR 1874 THOMAS B. MITCHELL b TN 23 April 1851 d Mounds OK aft 1920. Mysty McPherson, HCR 66 Box 159, Yellville AR 72687, e-mail shakerag@mtnhome.com OR Alison Zedicher, e-mail alison@tcac.com.
       HILTON-JEROME. Seek info LEROY R. HILTON m Union Co. NC 22 Oct 1863 CATHERINE JEROME. Children: LEEAH ANN HILTON b 1864; WILLIAM T. HILTON b 1878; DAVE HILTON; LILY M. HILTON; (child) HILTON d.y. J. L. Pearce, HCR 63 Box 77, Yellville AR 72687-9507. e-mail: jlpearce@taurus.oursc.k12.ar.us.
       HOLLINGSWORTH-PASCOE. Seek ancestors/descendants LEMUEL/SAMUEL HOLLINGSWORTH b Howard Co. IN 30 Oct 1854 m MARTHA JANE PASCOE. Children all b Oakland, MCAR and married POYNTER, HOLMES, HAMPTON, and SANDERS. John & Nancy Nolan, 1015 West Wine Country Road, Grandview WA 98930, e-mail jnolan@televar.com.
       MARCHANT-ARNOLD. Seek ancestors/descendants RUFUS WILEY MARCHANT b AR 8 June 1881 m MARY "Mollie" ARNOLD, daughter of JOE & JOSEPHINE (___) ARNOLD. Children married OTT, HURST, MEARS, FLETCHER. John & Nancy Nolan, 1015 West Wine Country Road, Grandview WA 98930, e-mail jnolan@televar.com.
       MATHIS-BURCH. Seek info possible Cherokee blood CATHERINE "Sis" MATHIS (daughter of Michael "Mike" & Winnie [Wood] Mathis Sr.) b Yellville March 1849 m THOMAS JEFFERSON BURCH b MCAR 1851 d 1914. Natalie Leatherman. 5609 NW Wilfred, Lawton OK 73505.
       MOORE. Would like to correspond with anyone who can identify the F.M. MOORE family found DeSoto Twp MCAR 1900. F.M. MOORE b MO Feb 1857 (parents b NC & MO) m ca 1880 W.E. ___ b TN July 1866. Children: W.A. MOORE (m) b MO July 1881, W.L. MOORE (m) b AR Feb 1884, J.A. MOORE (m) b MO Oct 1886, FOREBA MOORE (f) b AR Nov 1899. Cathy Wood Osborn, 803 S Buckeye, Abilene KS 67410. e-mail cwoodosborn@juno.com.
       PEARCE-JONES. Seek info TOM PEARCE m Madison Co. TN 10 Sep 1871 MARY F. JONES. Known children: ULALA QUEENTINE PEARCE b 1875; JIM PEARCE b 1876; DON PEARCE; LIZZIE PEARCE. Tom's parents believed to be MILES PEARCE b NC ca 1806 & MARY ___ b NC ca 1806. Children: ELIZABETH PEARCE b ca 1832; RACHEL PEARCE b ca 1833; JOHN PEARCE b ca 1836; THOMAS M. PEARCE b ca 1837; WILLIAM PEARCE b ca 1840; MARY E. PEARCE b ca 1842; FRANCIS PEARCE b ca 1845; SUSAN M. PEARCE b ca 1848. J L. Pearce, HCR 63 Box 77, Yellville AR 72687-9507. e-mail jlpearce@ taurus.oursc.k12.ar.us.
       SMITH. Seek Parents CARROLTON/CALTON/CARLTON W. "Calt" SMITH b TN Dec 1828 d MacDonald Co. MO ca 1910 bu Pineville MO m/1 NANCY ___ b TN ca 1830 d 1863/7; childen: THOMAS A. SMITH b KY 1853/4; SARAH E. SMITH b KY ca 1855; NANCY JANE "Nannie" SMITH b AR ca 1857; CHARLES LEWIS SMITH b AR 1858; WILLIAM SINGLETON SMITH b AR 1859; JOHN SMITH b MO ca 1862; MARY SMITH b IL ca 1863; m/2 AVIS CAROLINE (DANIEL) MORROW (widow of Steven Morrow) b Lawrence CO. TN Nov 1840 d MCAR 1901 bu Water Creek Cemetery; children: CHARLOTTE L. "Lottie" b MCAR 15 Nov 1867 d 11 Feb 1931 bu Water Creek Cemetery m WILLIAM FRANKIE RICE; ELIJA C SMITH b MCAR 20 Nov 1869/70 d MCAR 20 Oct 1949 bu Water Creek Cemetery; MELINDA ELLEN SMITH b MCAR 26 April 1872 d Wellesville KS 11 June 1947 m JOSEPH SAMUEL RICE; SILAS LEONARD SMITH b MCAR 31 Aug 1874 d OK 29 June 1931; MILLIE ANN SMITH b MCAR ca 1876. Could JESSE SMITH b VA ca 1781 be Calt's father? Lois Foster, 17720 New Market Road, Dearborn MO 64439-9720.
       SMITH-ROBERTS. Seek Info JOHN CARROLL SMITH m MELISSA ROBERTS. Children: JOHN C. SMITH Jr; JOSIAH SMITH; (child) SMITH; THOMAS SMITH; MINNIE SMITH. Moved from Boone Co. AR to Bryan Co. OK 1894. Kathy Pollard, 1429 Buena Vista, Garland TX 75043. .
       WOOD. Seek info and possible Indian blood/tribe WILLIAM OBEDIAH WOOD m POLLY NORTON. Also father of "Revolutionary Bill" WOOD. Nathalie Leatherman, 5609 NW Wilfred, Lawton OK 73505..

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F A M I L I E S   &   F A I R S

       Families & Fairs is designed to announce dates and places of reunions, ancestor fairs, and historical commemorations wherever they may be held. The information must reach us no later than March 15, June 15, September 15, and/or December 15 to be included in the next issue of Bramble Bush. The name and address of a contact person must be included. This feature is free of charge.
       There are none that we've heard about. The season is pretty well over anyway. If you know of any for 1998, please let us know.

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S E R V I C E   D I R E C T O R Y

       SERVICE DIRECTORY is published in Bramble Bush as a service to those who may wish to advertise some of the many books, products, and services available that relate to historic and/or genealogical research. The charge per ad per year is $12 for 30 words or less, plus 10 cents for each additional word. Please count prices and abbreviations; name and address count as 3 words, phone number as 1 word. Ads from both members and non-members are accepted. The name and address of a contact person must accompany each ad.
       "INDEX TO THE MOUNTAIN ECHO" 12 March thru 26 June 1903. Births, marriages, deaths. $23.50 +$3.50 s/h. Margie Garr, 1505 Mistletoe, Mountain Home AR 72653, (870)-425-0405.
       "MARION COUNTY FAMILIES 1811-1900". Genealogies of 400 families settling in MCAR by 1900. HGSMCA, $60. HGSMCA, PO Box 554, Yellville AR 72687.
       IZARD CO. AR 1830 FEDERAL CENSUS, indexed, $4; MARION CO. AR 1840 FEDERAL CENSUS, indexed, $4; MARION CO. AR 1850 FEDERAL CENSUS, indexed, $10. Nancy A. Wood, 4643 S 28 W Avenue, Tulsa OK 74107.
       GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH. Marion Co. AR area. $10 per hour plus copy costs and postage. Experienced researcher. Mysty McPherson, HCR 66 Box 159, Yellville AR 72687; (870) 449-5223. E-mail: shakerag@mtnhome.com.
       GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH. Marion Co. AR and surrounding areas. Experienced researcher. $10 per hour plus copy costs and postage. Vicki Roberts, HCR 66 Box 399, Yellville AR 72687; (870)-449-6195 aft 6:00 pm CST.
       "EARLY DAYS OF MARION COUNTY" Lester & Marian Burnes, $25. Marion S. Burnes, PO Box 365, Yellville AR 72687.
       "MARION COUNTY CEMETERIES" Marian S. Burnes. $20. Marion S. Burnes, PO Box 365, Yellville AR 72687.
       "MARION COUNTY MARRIAGES 1888-1896" Marian S. Burnes & Vicki A. Roberts $12. Marian S. Burnes, PO Box 365, Yellville AR 72687.
       "MARION COUNTY MARRIAGES 1896-1905" Marian S. Burnes & Vicki A. Roberts $15. Marian S. Burnes, PO Box 365, Yellville AR 72687.
       "MARION COUNTY 1890 CENSUS." Reconstructed from 1880 & 1900 census; land, tax records, etc. Hardbound. $40. Helen McMindes, 626 West South Avenue, Harrison AR 72601.

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HGSMCA MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION

Please add my name to your membership list so that I may continue to receive Bramble Bush.

Enclosed is my check for $12 payable to HGSMCA for 1997.

NAME_________________________________________________________

ADDRESS_________________________________________________________

CITY________________________________________STATE______________
ZIP___________________

SEND TO HGSMCA, PO BOX 554, YELLVILLE AR 72687

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B R A M B L E   B U S H

Bramble Bush is published quarterly by the Historic Genealogical Society of Marion County Arkansas, PO Box 554, Yellville AR 72687. Subscription is $12 per year. EDITORIAL STAFF: Editor, Vicki Roberts; Design/Production, Mysty McPherson; Art Work, Bonnie Sanders; Queries, Mary Birrer; Subscriptions, Barbara Holland; Printing, ABC Printing Co., 721 Hwy 5 N, Mountain Home AR 72653; Contributing writers, Mary Birrer, F. Gene Garr, Ramona Lee. HGSMCA OFFICERS: Chair, L. Don Ott; Vice-Chair, Vicki Roberts; Secretary, Mary Birrer; Treasurer, Barbara Holland; Grants/Purchasing, Mysty McPherson.

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Linda Haas Davenport