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Bramble Bush

BRAMBLE BUSH
THE QUARTERLY NEWSLETTER
OF THE HISTORIC GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
OF MARION COUNTY ARKANSAS

Vol. 3, No. 2         April 1998         Yellville, Arkansas 72687

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L A   R I V I E R E   B L A N C H E
Compiled by Vicki A. Roberts

        A stream begins in the Boston Mountains of northwestern Arkansas. It flows to the northeast into southern Missouri, gathering water from rains and run-offs, brooks and creeks, and growing with every mile. By the time it turns southeastward, flowing back into Arkansas, it is a beautiful, full-fledged river, averaging 300 yards in width. Approximately 690 miles from her tiny beginning, this river joins the Arkansas and Mississippi River, flowing ultimately into the Gulf of Mexico.
       Long before the historic Indian tribes left the river valley and long before white settlers inhabited it, French explorers, searching for precious metals and gems, encountered this river. It was said the waters were so clear that a fish could readily be seen all the way across to the other side. Impressed by its crystal clear water and foaming white shoals, they called it La Riviere Blanche -The White River.
       The first travelers of White River were the Indians. The countryside through which she flows was a rugged wilderness containing an abundance of wildlife. With no roads and only limited trails, the river became the highway for early explorers and trappers. The early settlers had no trouble with the "savage" Indian. There were only a few nomadic tribes of Osage and Hussars in northern Arkansas and these weren't known to wander below the prairies of today's Marion and Boone counties. When Francois D'Armand built a trading post near the mouth of the river in 1766, the fur trade along the White gradually became established, but very few white people actually settled the area until after the Louisiana Purchase.
       This White River has given generously to all who have met her. A hunter's and fisherman's and trapper's paradise, she has provided meat, fish, fur, and hides for food, clothing, and shelter. Her often swift-flowing waters have transported these men, their goods, and their families upstream and down. She has given water to livestock, power to grind grain and gin cotton and saw lumber, and her lifesaving fog has risen nightly to protect crops from late frosts. The early settlers often paid dearly for this largesse, for this gentle river also could be of a cantankerous nature. Rains made her waters rise; heavy rains made her waters rise to uncontrollable proportions. And after every "freshet," as early settlers called these floods, fields had to be replowed, fences and houses and barns rebuilt, havoc at fords and ferries and bridges repaired. And after each episode in which man invariably lost, he vowed someday, somehow to tame this Herculean strength and make it useful to mankind. Today her waters churn through flood-control hydroelectric dams, creating electricity for many states. Huge lakes behind these dams are stocked with native fish as well as kinds unheard of a century ago. "Freshets" have become slight rises in water level during the spring rains. But the river is no longer commercially navigable above Batesville.
       This mighty White River became a part of the Louisiana Territory of the United States of America as a result of the Louisiana Purchase in 1803. Schoolcraft wandered the area as early as 1811 when he explored the Northern Arkansas and Southern Missouri regions. The years around 1810 to 1815 brought a rush of emigration to the White River Valley. These men were a new breed. They brought their families, their household goods, their supplies, and their tools. Many traveled the Tennessee, Ohio, and Mississippi Rivers by keel boat to reach the White. This was a new frontier in wide open territory. These settlers came from Tennessee, Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Illinois, Louisiana, Alabama, the Carolinas, Georgia, Virginia - law-abiding, hard-working people. But, there was no law enforcement here, no organization, and the area also became a haven for many who were robbers, horse thieves, even murderers - refugees from the justice and imprisonment awaiting them to the east. Nothing had changed for White River, though. She just provided as always, adding to her generosity space to live or to rest or to hide.
       During these very early, unregulated times, there apparently existed a fairly well organized band of thieves. With no more than a day's travel between settlers from the head of a backwater on the Lower White to the farthest settlement on the Upper White, they established a headquarters, a safe place to hide themselves and their loot. Early settlers believed this general council ground to be at Negro Hill on the Lower White. It was said that there was an old negro called Free Isaac who lived there, acting as warehouseman and herdsman for the thieves. Slowly law and order crept into the White River Valley. With it came discontent among this band of outlaws. Legend says that during a particularly decisive falling out in which several of the group were shot, old Free Isaac was killed and burnt up on this hill in a log cabin.
       Among the early settlers of White River Valley was Major Jacob Wolf, who came from North Carolina by way of Kentucky, having been appointed by President Thomas Jefferson as Indian Agent to the Arkansas Cherokee Indian Nation. About 1809 he chose a house site overlooking White River at today's Norfork and built a two-story house of yellow pine. It was one of the first log houses in Arkansas occupied by a white family and the first two-story log house west of the Mississippi. Built by Indian and Negro workers, no nails were used in its construction. The hand-hewn logs were dove-tailed to fit together tightly and securely. In 1811 it became the first courthouse in the northern half of Arkansas Territory and from 1825 to 1830 was the first courthouse in the newly created Izard County. Beginning in 1811 court was held in the upstairs south room while old fashioned camp meetings were held below the house along White River. One of the first six post offices in Arkansas Territory, it was also a stagecoach stop during the days of Daniel Boone, offering hospitality to such early American heroes as Davy Crockett and Sam Houston. From 1845 through 1905 it was the scene of steamboat landings. Serving as the business, social, religious, and political center of this vast and sparsely populated mountainous region, it was the home of the Wolf family for over a century. It has been said that Major Wolf had perhaps the largest household of kindred and friends of any man on White River. Unfortunately he was imprisoned at Batesville by the Federals during the Civil War and died in 1863.
       In 1811 James Adams came to White River from Kentucky with several slaves and a large family of brothers and sisters. On the south side of White River about five miles below the mouth of Buffalo Fork, he built the first mill. Later his name was given to Adams' Buffalo City Landing, an early steamboat landing.
       Among the wondrous bounty of La Riviere Blanche are river clams and fresh water mussels. The Ozark Aborigines were undoubtedly the first to utilize these for food as well as softly lustrous spoons and personal ornamentation. Pendants fashioned from mother-of-pearl have appeared among the artifacts discovered during archeological excavations at various Indian sites. Pearls, however, rarely have been found in such collections. One exception is the unconfirmed report of a pearl embedded in the cavity of a human tooth.
       Clam digging and pearl hunting, like trapping and hunting, were seasonal enterprises that seldom interfered to any great extent with planting and harvesting farm crops.
       Pearl fishing, probably a common sport and natural diversion when swimming on a hot summer day before the Civil War, was of little economic value in the early years. When in 1891 Dr. J. H. Myers of Black Rock on the Black River, a major tributary of the White, found a 14 grain, pinkish pearl of fine luster, he sparked a virtual stampede of pearl hunters. Word spread that pearls were bringing anywhere from $5 to $50 each, with rumors of even higher prices. The Pearl Rush was on.
       The clam shell market spanned a period of around 35 years. According to the ledger of J. L. Evans, he began buying the shells in early 1900 for $4 a ton. The highest price he ever paid was $70 a ton in 1927. With the onset of the Great Depression Era of the 1930s, the price dropped to $20 a ton. (To be continued - - -)

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F R O M   T H E   E D I T O R

       Thought some of you might be curious about all those boring bibliographies found in Bramble Bush, even asking yourself what earthly good they are.. Well, whenever I do research for articles of any kind, I'm reminded of some very sage advice I've heard. "Cite your sources" and "Learn your history from the people who lived it." That's why each article ends with a list of where I've found the information I've used and why some of these sources are as old as the events themselves, written by people who were there when they happened.
       This issue of Bramble Bush begins a series of articles on the major waterways in and around Marion County. They were the primary way people got here and why they settled where they did. I'm afraid the series is a bit more poetic than usual - but, in spite of Man and his Progress, these waterways are still magnificently beautiful, even majestic. Apologies if I got too carried away. All this research teaches lots about Marion County, historical as well as current. Sure hope you enjoy reading these articles as much as I've enjoyed writing them.
       Please take note of the pleas for additions and corrections for Supplement to Genealogies of Marion County Families 1811-1900 and for input on the proposed Internet column. The book can only be successful if you help make it work by sharing whatever you have and whatever you know. It's important to your ancestors as well as your descendants. And that http://www stuff can, I hear, open doors to people and places we'd never think of looking for in a jillion years.
       Hope to see you at the North Arkansas Ancestor Fair.
       Vicki A. Roberts, Editor

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T R I V I A

       FREE BOOKS. If you're on the Internet, go to http://www.heritagebooks.com. Every week you can take a chance on being the winner of a free book chosen from that week's book list. It works! I won one! Mysty McPherson, HCR 66 Box 159, Yellville AR 72687.
       GOOD ADVICE. "Take nothing but photographs; leave nothing but footprints." From Blue Mountain Park, Queensland, New Zealand.
       POINTS TO PONDER. The higher you climb in your family tree, the more you'll realize that the tree's not really a tree. For as its branches divide again and again, more and more of them reconnect with one another, as well as with the branches of the family trees of everyone else on earth. The further you look into your own genealogy, then, the more you're struck by the fact that we're all related to Dante and Mozart, to Churchill and Hitler - and to one another. To me, that's the ultimate lesson of genealogy; a lesson not in snobbery and self-importance, but in the fact that we're all members of one large family. Bruce Bawer quoted in Reader's Digest, July 1973, page 149.

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NEW MARKER HONORS GRAVE OF ONE OF
MARION COUNTY'S FIRST VETERANS

       On Monday, November 10, a new headstone was placed in Layton Cemetery to honor the grave of one of Marion County's first deceased veterans, Obediah Wood, 1759-1845.
       The new marker was ritually placed at the grave by Jim Wood of Dardenelle, Lyle Wood of Flippin, Marian Burnes of Yellville and four members of the Dardenelle Chapter National Society of Daughters of the American Revolution.
       Obediah Wood was born in Wake County NC in 1759. He was drafted into the Army on August 1, 1780, and served under Captain L. Bletcher, Colonel S. Humphrey, General A. Ramsey, Captain M. Lane, Colonel Turner, and General Green.
       At 75 years of age, Obediah applied for his military pension, which amounted to $5 every three months.
       He moved with his family from North Carolina to Tennessee, then to Marion County in September 1835. He died here August 10, 1845.
       SOURCE: The Mountain Echo, 13 November 1997, page 1

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W I L L I A M   O B E D I A H
"Revolutionary Bill"   W O O D
H I S   C H I L D R E N
A N D   H I S   G R A N D C H I L D R E N
Compiled by Vicki Roberts and Mysty McPherson

1. WILLIAM OBEDIAH "Revolutionary Bill" WOOD b Wake Co. NC 1730/39/45 d MCAR 10 Aug 1845 m/1 FRANCES CHARLES; m/2 POLLY NORTON d TN killed by a falling tree. In Knox Co. TN 1799. Purchased land Knox Co. TN 1802 and Anderson Co. TN 1805, both on the south side of the Clinch River. Emigrated May 1837. Living with son William in Union Township MCAR 1840. Reported to have been aged 106 or 115 when he died, the oldest person in Marion Co.

1. Children of William Obediah "Revolutionary Bill" & Frances (Charles) Wood
       2. WILLIAM "Dancin' Bill" or "Billy" A. WOOD Sr. b Wake Co. NC 1775 d MCAR 1865 aged 90 m 1805 HANNAH AUSTIN b VA 1784 d MCAR 1870. Searcy County Judge 1836; Marion County Judge 1838-40, 1850-52. In Union Township MCAR 1840, Buffalo Fork Township MCAR 1850, Union Township MCAR 1860. Living with daughter Winnie 1865. Recorded land in MCAR 28 Sep 1840.
       3. GEORGE WOOD Sr. b Wake Co. NC 1780 m/1 ___; m/2 MARY ___ b TN 1813. In Union Township MCAR 1840, Buffalo Fork Township MCAR 1850.
       4. JOHN WOOD d ca 1812 in the War of 1812.
       5. BENJAMIN "Cedar Ben" WOOD b Wake Co. NC 1790/1800 d Locust Grove Township, Searcy Co. AR bef 1870 m MILLEY ___ b NC 1803. His nickname came from the cedar cabin he lived in among the Cherokee at Shawneetown (now Yellville).
       6. JAMES "Rosin' the Bow" WOOD b Wake Co. NC 1792 d Benton Co. OR Terr. bef 1870 m JANE COKER (daughter of William & Elizabeth [Hudspeth] Coker). Emigrated about age 20. Living with son William in Benton Co. OR 1860.
       7. THOMAS D. WOOD b Knox Co. TN 1800.

1. Children of William Obediah "Revolutionary Bill" & Polly (Norton) Wood
       8. CHARITY WOOD b TN ca 1820 d MCAR April 1901 m JOHN QUINCY ADAMS (son of Matthew & Pryscilla Catherine "Katy" [Wolf] Adams) b KY ca 1818 d MCAR/MO 1863 probably killed by jayhawkers. In Union Township MCAR 1850. Children (surname Adams): Caroline Marian "Nancy;" Angelina W. "Annie;" Catherine; Michael J.; Sarah Jane; Margaret Agnes "Aggie;" John Quincy Jr.; Mary Frances; Agnes; Matthew "Bud;" Tempy Ann; Salitha Jane; William Madison; Isabelle Jane "Belle;" prob Winnie; prob Robert.
       9. WINNIE WOOD b MCAR 1824 m MICHAEL "Mike" MATHIS b TN 1815/8. In Union Township MCAR 1840, 1850. Children (surname Mathis): Mary Ann; Dianah Jane; Winnie "Sis;" Henry C; Catherine "Sis;" Michael "Mike" Jr.; Cyrene (twin); Adrine (twin); William; Armina; Thomas.
       10. MARY "Polly" WOOD b MCAR 1826 m WILLIAM C. BRASHEARS. In Union Township MCAR 1840.

2. Children of William "Dancin' Bill" & Hannah (Austin) Wood Sr.
       11. JAMES A. "Jim" WOOD b Anderson Co. TN 1800/10 d MCAR 1839 m REDISSA "Dicy" TRIMBLE (daughter of William & Sallie [Coker] Trimble) b MCAR 1814 d Pontiac, Ozark Co. MO aft 1850. In Union Township MCAR 1840 living with brother William "Squirrel Bill."
       12. WILLIAM A. "Squirrel Bill" WOOD Jr. b Anderson Co. TN 1815 d 1860/5 during the Civil War m MCAR ELIZABETH "Betsy" COKER b AL 1808 d AR. Marion Co. Sheriff 1850-52. Recorded land in Union Township 24 March 1852. In Union Township MCAR 1840.
       13. GEORGE WOOD b Anderson Co. TN 1805 m NANCY JANE COKER (daughter of William "Buck" Coker) b TN 1810. In Union Township MCAR 1840; Sugar Loaf Township MCAR 1850, 1860.
       14. ELIZABETH "Betsy" WOOD b Anderson Co. TN 1808 m DAVID STINNETT b TN 1797. In Union Township MCAR 1840, 1850, 1860. Moved to Baxter Co. AR. Children (surname Stinnett): Lethe; Elizabeth; David S.; William; Benjamin; Isham C. "Ice;" Wiley.
       15. JOHN WOOD b Anderson Co. TN 1814/5 d MCAR ca 1863 at the mouth of Spring Creek m 1832 MARY JANE HUDSON (daughter of John B. & Agness [___] Hudson) b KY 1817. John emigrated 1817 aged 3 with his parents to Big North Fork. Moved to Shawneetown (Yellville) at 14 (1828). Mary Jane emigrated 1822 aged 5 with her parents. John owned slaves Green, Joe, and Morg. In Blythe Township MCAR 1840, Union Township MCAR 1850, Blythe Township MCAR 1860.
       16. SOLOMON M. "Bud" WOOD b Anderson Co. TN ca 1818 d MCAR 1851 m 1838 MARTHA "Patsy" MAGNESS (daughter of James W. & Narcissa [Barnett] Magness) b SC 15 Jan 1817. In Blythe Township MCAR 1840, Buffalo Fork Township MCAR 1850. Patsy was a widow in Blythe Township in 1860. They raised John D. Hurst (son of William & Narcissa [Magness] Hurst) b 1847; his mother died when he was 8 days old, gave him to her sister to raise.
       17. OBEDIAH WOOD b Anderson Co. TN 2 Nov 1821 d Yell Co. AR 17 Nov 1909 m/1 SARAH A. GARRETT/GRAY who was 3/4 Cherokee b 2 Feb 1819 d 8 Feb 1870; m/2 Yell Co. AR 10 June 1897 LULU (SWILLING) COATES/THURL. Enlisted at MCAR in Co. B, 14th AR Infantry 13 July 1861; private; deserted near Little Rock 23 April 1862. In Union Township MCAR 1840. Moved to Yell Co. AR.
       18. JEFFERSON WOOD b Anderson Co. TN 1825 killed during Civil War m MAHALA ___ b AL 1826. In Buffalo Fork Township MCAR 1850 with John Hall aged 20 in their household.
       19. CHARITY WOOD b Anderson Co. TN 1823 m JAMES "Limber Jim" WOOD (son of James "Rosin the Bow" & Jane [Coker] Wood) b TN 1817. They were 1st cousins.
       20. MARION O.WOOD b AR ca 1833. Probably named for Marion Co.

3. Children of George Wood
       21. ELIJAH "Lize" WOOD b TN 1823 m NANCY COKER (daughter of William & Elizabeth [Hudspeth] Coker) b AR 1830. In Buffalo Fork Township MCAR 1850, Union Township MCAR 1860. Settled at Dodd City MCAR.
       22. JEFFERSON WOOD b TN 1825 m LOUISA ___ b TN 1827. In White River Township MCAR 1860.
       23. WILLIAM "Southfoot Bill" WOOD b TN 1828 d Comanche Co. TX m MELINDA JANE COKER (daughter of William & Elizabeth [Hudspeth] Coker) b AR 1824. Marion Co. Sheriff. In Buffalo Fork Township MCAR 1850, Union Township MCAR 1860. Moved to TX after the Civil War.
       24. BENJAMIN WOOD b TN 1830 m NANCY E.___ b KY 1833. In Buffalo Fork Township MCAR 1850, Union Township MCAR 1860.
       25. (daughter) WOOD b ca 1832.
       26. (daughter) WOOD b ca 1834.

3. Children of George & Mary (___) Wood
       27. SARAH WOOD b MCAR 1836.
       28. ELIZABETH WOOD b MCAR 1838.
       29. HANNAH WOOD b MCAR 1840.
       30. TABITHA E. WOOD b MCAR 1842
       31. JOHN WOOD b MCAR 1844.
       32. GEORGE W. WOOD Jr. b MCAR 1849.

5. Children of Benjamin "Cedar Ben" & Milley (___) Wood
       33. (daughter) WOOD b 1825/30.
       34. WILLIAM WOOD b AR 1835 m ___ d Searcy Co. AR bef 1870. In Searcy Co. AR 1850, 1860, 1870. His mother, Milley, is a widow aged 65 living with them in Locust Grove Township, Searcy Co. AR 1870.
       35. SYLVESTER WOOD b AR 1838 m NANCY ___ b 1837/8. 3 kids. In Locust Grove Township, Searcy Co. AR 1860, 1870.
       36. BENJAMIN RISNER WOOD b AR 1836.

6. Children of James "Rosin the Bow" & Jane (Coker) Wood
       37. JAMES "Limber Jim" WOOD b TN 1817 m CHARITY WOOD (daughter of William "Dancin' Bill" & Hannah {Austin] Wood) b Anderson Co. TN 1823. In Buffalo Fork Township MCAR 1850, Blythe Township MCAR 1860. They were 1st cousins.
       38. WILLIAM WOOD b TN 1821 m REBECCA ___. In Benton Co. OR Terr. 1860. Children (surname Wood): James W. b MO 1844, William H. b MO 1845, Hiram b MO 1850.
       39. FED WOOD. Emigrated to TX.
       SOURCE: Genealogies of Families of Marion County 1811-1900. Vicki Roberts & Mysty McPherson. 1997

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L I T T L E   K N O W N
N O T  F O R G O T T E N

        Among the many characters to be found in the valley of White River who had come into notice east of the Mississippi was the Woods family - old man Woods and son Big Bill Woods - - they were worthy of note from being the father and brother of John Woods who was court-martialed and shot in Jackson's army in the War of 1812.
        It seems that General Jackson had some trouble to enforce subordination, his army being composed of raw troops fresh from the country.
        Old Man Woods and his two sons, John and Big Bill, enlisted in Tennessee for the campaign south against the Indians. The young men were good soldiers, but somewhat reckless. John Woods was on picket duty and left his post: he was court-martialed and condemned to be shot, with a recommendation for mercy. Jackson had reprieved others, but notified the court he would not reprieve any more. John Woods was the next, and his life was in one end of the balance, and General Jackson's word in the other. The General's word was the heaviest and John Woods fell. His father and brother stayed with him and cared for him - dressed him for death - and when the file of soldiers marched him off, they went in another direction in great agony, refusing to see him shot. They soon after deserted the army and came to White River and settled at the ford of the river, three miles above Mt. Olive. It was believed that Jackson was glad they had deserted as there was no effort made to bring them back to the army. Through life the old man and Big Bill took this matter greatly to heart; at the mention of Jackson's name, Big Bill would grow frantic with oaths, and the old man would melt into tears.
        SOURCE: Historical & Biographical Sketches of the Early Settlement of the White River Valley, Chapter 5. A. C. Jeffreys. 1877.

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E A R L Y   M A R R I A G E S
FROM THE DIARY OF REVEREND WILLIAM HENRY WOOD

HICKS, James C. M., age 31, of Marion Co AR - JEFFERSON, Miss Elizabeth, age 20, of Marion Co - 15 August 1857 by Rev. William Henry Wood

ESTES. F. G., age 28, of Marion Co. AR - WARD. Miss Amanda, age 21, of Marion Co. AR - 1880 by Rev. William Henry Wood

NIXON, John, age 36, of Carroll Co. AR - FALLEN, Miss Sarah, age 32, of Marion Co, AR - 8 October 1857 by Rev. William Henry Wood

DUDLEY, Ebartus W,. age 19 of Marion Co. AR - HURST, Miss Arabell, age ___, of Marion Co. AR AR - 1880 by Rev. William Henry Wood

JONES, Micaja, age 40, of Carroll Co. AR - BLACK, Miss Rachel, age 31, of Marion Co AR - 8 October 1857 by Rev. William Henry Wood

BURCH, L. D., age 23, of Marion Co. AR - MORGAN, Miss Pally, age 16, of Marion Co. AR - 25 July 1880 by Rev. William Henry Wood

COKER, Joseph C., age 40, of Carroll Co. AR - KING, Miss Elizabeth, age 40, of Marion Co - 8 October 1857

PARNELL, D. C., age 20, of Marion Co. AR - MERRIOTT, Miss Christinia, age 16, of Marion Co - 1880

FOWLER, Franklin B., age 24, of Marion Co - CUNBOW, Miss Martha A., age 19, of Marion Co - 17 December 1857

ERVIN, Thomas W., age 19, of Marion Co - WOOD, Mary Margaret, age 19, of Marion Co - (daughter of Joseph Wood & Emily Summers) 1880

BROWN, Manon J., age 28, of Marion Co - (unreadable) - 24 December 1857

NEWTON, Allen, age 65, of Marion Co. - COLE, Miss Elizabeth, age 45, of Marion Co.- 10 September 1881

WALKER, Phillip M, aged 20, of Marion Co - DUNHAMS, Miss Rebecca, age 15, of Carroll Co. AR - 7 February 1858 by Rev. William Henry Wood

MAY, William M, age 20, of Marion Co - COLE, Miss Elisabeth, age 18, of Marion Co. -18 September 1881

PARNELL, Littleton W., age 26, of Marion Co. - HICKS, Miss Nancy L., age 23, of Marion Co - 28 July 1858 by Rev. William Henry Wood

BURCH, George W., age 26, of Marion Co - HUDSON, Miss Mandana, age 23, of Marion Co.- 4 December 1881

HICKS, William L., aged 25, of Marion Co. - REYNOLDS, Miss Martah M., age 21, of Marion Co - 22 August 1858 by Rev. William Henry Wood

POYNTER, James T., age 23, Of Marion Co.- FURNAWIAN, Miss Pena, age 21, of Marion Co - 1 January 1882

PARRISH, James A., age 22, of Marion Co - REYNOLDS, Miss Rachel E., age 21 - 22 August 1858 by Rev. William Henry Wood

SCALF, S. B., age 23, of Marion Co. - WARD. Miss Lillian F., age 16, of Marion Co - 5 February 1882

SANDERS, J. T., age 25, of James Creek - PANGLE, Miss Syria - 25 July 1858 by Rev. William Henry Wood

DRAKE, J. T., age 23, of Marion Co - WILLIAMS, Miss Mary A., age 20, of Marion Co. - 9 February 1882

McCRACKEN, W/M. G., age 47, James Creek - NOE, Miss Martha J., age 39, Marion Co - 1880

WARD, B. B., age 50, of Marion Co. - ;_____, Miss Elizabeth, age 40's, of Marion Co. - 12 February 1882

FLIPPIN, John, age 23, of Marion Co - PEACOCK, Miss Mary J., 19, of Marion Co. - 20 ___ 1880 by Rev. William Henry Wood

POYNTER, W. H., age 23, of Marion Co - ESTES, Miss Mary Catherine, age 19, of Marion Co (daughter of John Estes & Missouri Wood) - 24 December 1882

SUNDY, Henry, age 28, of Marion Co. - ESTES, Miss Margaret, age 17, of Marion Co. - 18 ___ 1880 by Rev. William Henry Wood

ESTES, J. R., age 27, of Marion Co. - BAXTER. Miss ___, age 17, of ___ - 1882

MATTHEWS, J. G, age 22, of Marion Co. - BROWN, Miss Mary A., age 19, of Marion Co. - 1880

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Y O U R  F A M I L Y  P L E A S E

       Contributions are needed for Supplement to Genealogies of Marion County Families 1811-1900. Family data will be corrected and extended, ancestors and descendants carried beyond the boundaries of Marion County, new families added. Be sure to get YOUR family genealogies, additions, and corrections to Mysty McPherson or Vicki Roberts, PO Box 554, Yellville AR 72687.

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R E C E N T   A C Q U I S I T I O N S

       BOONE CO. AR 1880 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       FULTON CO. AR 1850 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       FULTON CO. AR 1860 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       FULTON CO. AR 1870 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       HOWELL CO. MO 1870 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       INDEPENDENCE CO. AR 1860 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       INDEPENDENCE CO. AR 1870 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       IZARD CO. AR 1860 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by yhe Society.
       IZARD CO. AR. 1870 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       OREGON CO. MO 1870 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       OZARK CO. MO 1870 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       SEARCY CO. AR 1850 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       SEARCY CO. AR 1870 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       SEARCY CO. AR 1900 FEDERAL CENSUS. Microfilm. Purchased by the Society.
       DESCENDANTS OF JESSE E. CASEY. 2 volumes. Vonda Fairbanks Dihm. 1995. Gift of the author.
       MARRIAGES OF RUTHERFORD CO. NC 1779-1868. Brent H. Holcomb. 1986. Purchased by the Society.
       OVERTON CO. TN GENEALOGICAL RECORDS. Edythe Rucker Whitley. 1979. Donated by Vicki Roberts
       RUTHERFORD CO. NC WILLS AND MISCELLANEOUS RECORDS 1783-1868. James & Vivian Wooley. Purchased by the Society.

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B I T S   A N D   P I E C E S

       JOHN BRIGGS served in the Virginia line, and was pensioned on Overton County, shown on the list of 1840. Overton Co. TN Genealogical Records page 64.
        CHOWNING. Power of Attorney, NANCY CHOWNING, MASON KELLY and SARAH KELLY, MILDRED CHOWNING, BARTHENA W. CHOWNING, THOMAS CHANDLER and JOANNA CHANDLER, GORDON BROWN and ELSEY S. BROWN, being heirs at law of the late THOMAS CHOWNING, Elder, dec'd, all of Overton Co. TN, appoint their brother WILLIAM C. CHOWNING of said county our attorney, to sell land and attend to transaction of business. 200 acres of land seems to be involved which is in Henry Co. VA on the east side of Smith's River. 23 January 1819. All sign. Overton Co. TN Deed Book D page 295.
        FRIEND. JOHN FRIEND of Ozark Co. "have this day adopted as my lawfull heirs POLLYANN FRIEND, JEMIMAH FRIEND, SARA NETY FRIEND, the minor children of ELIAS FRIEND and ELIZABETH FRIEND deceased." Dated 30 January 1869. Ozark Co. MO Circuit Court Minutes, Book B page 231.
        MORROW. WILLIAM H. MORROW, P. O. Celina, Clay Co. Pension No. 165278. Injury in left leg. Pensioned March 1880. Overton Co. TN 1883 Pension List.
        SNOW. PHILANDER L. SNOW was born 13 June 1828 in PA near Lake Erie. He came with his stepfather, JIMMIE FORREST, to Little North Fork in 1833. The Ridge Runners, August 1973, page 79.

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h t t p : / / w w w .* . *

       We Bush people are considering a column - a small column - reserved just for internet info. It would be designed around sharing sites, pages to visit, and e-mail addresses (we'll only publish these with permission from you). From time to time we might include opinions on what's good and what's not so good. It would not solve problems with servers, feed the latest hype on browsers, nor explain how to surf. It would be a place to exchange addresses - period. We figure that when it comes to genealogy, maybe we can help each other in this whacky new world of cyberspace. Let us know what you think of the idea.
       E-mail Mysty at shakerag@mtnhome.com or snail-mail at PO Box 554, Yellville AR 72687.

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Q U E R I E S

       Queries is published in Bramble Bush as a service to researchers who may wish to exchange information of mutual historic and/or genealogical interests. The charge per query is $3. Queries from both members and non-members are accepted, and are published in order of receipt, as space permits. If you respond to a query, kindly send a copy of your answer to Bramble Bush. Responsibility for accuracy of data in queries rests with the submitter.

       COKER. Seek info WILLIAM C. COKER (son of Strander "Dud" & Jane [Wood] Coker) b MCAR 1859 and siblings CHARITY JOSEPHINE COKER b MCAR 1857 m WILLILAM AKIN (son of John H. & Caroline [___] Akin) b MCAR 1848, REBECCA COKER b MCAR 1862. Jane Coker, widowed, and her 3 children were living in the Lewis & Rebecca Chapman household in Sugar Loaf Township in 1870. Karen Rega, 1002 Liskeard Avenue, Orange City FL 32763. 904-775-0419. E-mail: krega@bitstorm.net.
        DRAKE. Would like to exchange info STEPHEN B. DRAKE b IN ca 1832 d MCAR m ca 1855 JULIA A. ___ b IN ca 1841. Children JAMES A. DRAKE b AR ca 1857; WILLIAM D. DRAKE b AR ca 1860. Julia m/2 MCAR 1878 Thomas Haggard Perry Flippin (son of Thomas H & Elizabeth [Baugh] Flippin). Dorcas Beaver, 1228 Southwood Drive, Waco TX 76712. E-mail: Harold_Beaver@baylor.edu.
        REEME. Need info re children of JOHN REEME b PA ca 1812 d AR ca 1868 m/2 MARY ___ b MS 1827 d MCAR ca 1861 JOHN REEME Jr b MS 1835; MARTHA REEME b LA 1844; CEILA REEME b MS 1845; JAMES REEME b AR 1849; THOMAS REEME b AR 1851; JOSEPH REEME b AR 1855; FANNY REEME b AR 1858. Younger children farmed out when mother died and after father was killed. Mysty McPherson, HCR 66 Box 159, Yellville AR 72687. E-mail: shakerag@mtnhome.com.
        SMITH. Seek info MARGARET D. ___ b 1843, wife of WILLIAM P. SMITH. Children: JESSIE L. SMITH; JOHN M. SMITH; ALONZATH SMITH; ELLEN J. SMITH. Walter F. Smith Jr., 12354 Courtyard Lake Drive, Sunset Hills MO 63127.
        TRIMBLE. Seek info BEN H. TRIMBLE b KY/MO Jan 1837 d MCAR 1911 m MCAR 18 Oct 1896 LAURA BELLE COCHRAN (daughter of George Logan & Louisa Isabella [Carson] Cochran) b MCAR 1871. Need parents, other spouses, children. Kathy Reeves, 9215 FM 1130, Orange TX 77632. E-mail: kreeves@tenet.edu.

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F A M I L I E S   &   F A I R S

       Families & Fairs is designed to announce dates and places of reunions, ancestor fairs, and historical commemorations wherever they may be held. The information must reach us no later than March 15, June 15, September 15, and/or December 15 to be included in the next issue of Bramble Bush. The name and address of a contact person must be included. This feature is free of charge.
       BURCH FAMILY REUNION, 20th ANNUAL. 26 July 1998 at Simmons Center, Duncan OK. Contact Natalie Leatherman, 5609 NW Wilfred, Lawton OK 73505
       BURROWS FAMILY REUNION, Bi-annual National. 26-28 June 1998 at Holiday Inn, Oxford MS. Contact W. O. Burrow, PO Box 7, Myrtle MS 38650; e-mail: cmburrow@olemiss.edu
       NORTH ARKANSAS ANCESTOR FAIR, Ninth Annual. 4-6 June 1998, Leslie Public School, Leslie AR. Contact James J. Johnston, 2333 East Oaks Drive, Fayetteville AR 72703; e-mail: johnston@ipa.net
       OTT FAMILY REUNION. 23-24 May 1998. Contact L. Don Ott, Rt 1 Box 1270, Lakeview AR 72642; e-mail: dott@centuryinter.net

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S E R V I C E   D I R E C T O R Y

       SERVICE DIRECTORY is published in Bramble Bush as a service to those who may wish to advertise some of the many books, products, and services available that relate to historic and/or genealogical research. The charge per ad per year is $12. Ads from both members and non-members are accepted. The name and address of a contact person must accompany each ad.
       "MARION COUNTY FAMILIES 1811-1900." Genealogies of 400 families settling in MCAR by 1900. Hardbound. HGSMCA $60. HGSMCA, PO Box 554, Yellville AR 72687
        "INDEX TO THE MOUNTAIN ECHO 12 March 1886 thru 26 June 1903." Births, marriages, deaths. $23.50 + $3.50 s/h. Margie Garr, 1505 Mistletoe, Mountain Home AR 72653, (870)-425-0405.
        IZARD CO. AR 1830 FEDERAL CENSUS , Indexed, $4. Nancy A. Wood, 4643 S 28 Avenue, Tulsa OK 74107.
        MARION CO. AR 1840 FEDERAL CENSUS , indexed, $4. Nancy A. Wood, 4643 S 28 Avenue, Tulsa OK 74107.
        MARION CO. AR 1850 FEDERAL CENSUS , indexed, $10. Nancy A. Wood, 4643 S 28 Avenue, Tulsa OK 74107.
        GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH . Marion Co. AR and surrounding areas. Experienced researcher. $10 per hour plus copy costs and postage. Vicki Roberts, HCR 66 Box 399, Yellville AR 72687; (870)-449-6195 aft 6:00 pm CST.
        GENEALOGICAL RESEARCH . Marion Co. AR area. $10 per hour plus copy costs and postage. Experienced researcher. Mysty McPherson, HCR 66 Box 159, Yellville AR 72687; (870)-449-5223.. E-mail: shakerag@mtnhome.com.
        "EARLY DAYS OF MARION COUNTY" Lester & Marion Burnes, $25. Marion S. Burnes, PO Box 365, Yellville AR 72687.
        "MARION COUNTY CEMETERIES" Marion S. Burnes. $20. Marion S. Burnes, PO Box 365, Yellville AR 72687.
        "MARION COUNTY MARRIAGES 1888-1896" Marion S. Burnes & Vicki A. Roberts $12. Marion S. Burnes, PO Box 365, Yellville AR 72687.
        "MARION COUNTY MARRIAGES 1897-1906" Marion S. Burnes & Vicki A. Roberts $15. Marion S. Burnes, PO Box 365, Yellville AR 72687.
        "MARION COUNTY MARRIAGES 1905-1915" Marian S, Burnes & Vicki A. Roberts $15. Marian S. Burnes, PO Box 365, Yellville AR 72687.
        "MARION COUNTY 1890 CENSUS." Reconstructed from 1880 & 1900 census; land, tax records, etc. Hardbound. $40. Helen McMindes, 626 West South Avenue, Harrison AR 72601.

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H G S M C A   M E M B E R S H I P

       Membership in the Historical Genealogical Society of Marion County Arkansas is $12 per year
       Membership for one year runs from 1 January to 31 December of that year.
       Membership includes the quarterly newsletter Bramble Bush
       Membership begun later in the year includes all issues of Bramble Bush for that year.
       Please make your check for $12 payable to HGSMCA and send to HGSMCA, PO Box 554, Yellville AR 72687-9612.

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B R A M B L E   B U S H
NEWSLETTER
HGSMCA
PO BOX 554
YELLVILLE AR 72687

       Bramble Bush is published quarterly by the Historic Genealogical Society of Marion County Arkansas, PO Box 554, Yellville AR 72687. EDITORIAL STAFF: Editor, Vicki Roberts; Design/Production, Mysty McPherson; Art Work, Bonnie Sanders; Queries, Mary Birrer; Subscriptions, Barbara Holland; Printing, Quality Quick Printing, 828 Pine St., Harrison AR 72601; Contributing writers, Vicki Roberts, Mysty McPherson. HGSMCA OFFICERS: Chair, Vicki Roberts; Vice-Chair, Don Duggins; Secretary, Mary Birrer; Treasurer, Barbara Holland; Grants/Purchasing, Mysty McPherson.

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Linda Haas Davenport