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<b><font size="+3"></b><center>HISTORY OF ST.FRANCIS COUNTY- Biographies-M to Z
HISTORY OF ST.FRANCIS COUNTY- Biographies-M to Z


More BiosBIOS G TO LBIOS A TO F=
UPDATED Dec,30.2012
Letter M to Z-183 Entries

- MAHAFFEY - AMERICA - E. - MRS. - DIXON - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - SECOND WIFE OF JESSIE W.MAHAFFEY
PIONEER-1840 - MAHAFFEY - JESSIE - W. - SR. - - 3 15 1831 - 4 6 1897 - ARKHISBIO - Jesse W. Mahaffey, though a native of Georgia, was brought to Arkansas by his parents when nine years of age, and was reared on a farm in St. Francis County, growing up here when there were but few settlers, with schools and churches few and far between, and no society or companions excepting his family, consequently he had but a limited advantage for receiving an education, starting out in life as a common farm laborer at the age of sixteen. In the fall of 1849 he went into the timber business and has been engaged in getting out timber from the forest and rafting it down the St. Francis River since that time in connection with farming. He owns a fine farm on the river bottoms of 520 acres, well adapted to the growing of corn and cotton, and has ninety acres under cultivation, the remainder being timber. This land lies partly in this county, and in Cross and the balance in Crittenden County. Mr. Mahaffey was born in Georgia on March 15, 1831, being a son of John and Lucinda (Wright) Mahaffey, natives of Eastern Tennessee. John Mahaffey was born near Knoxville in 1804, and was married on January 9, 1825, soon after which he removed to Georgia, and in 1840 came to St. Francis County, Ark., living here until his death in 1859. He was a member of the Christian Church in his latter days and took an active interest in all religions matters, his chief object being to train his children in the fear of God. He was the father of seven children: Jesse Woods (the principal of this article), Elizabeth P., William R., Lutishia, Belinda, Winnie and David R. The subject of this sketch is the only one of the family living. He has been twice married; first to Sarah Duncan, in 1854, a native of Tennessee, who died the following year, leaving one daughter. The latter also died when five years old. He married his second wife on May 19, 1857; she was formerly America E. Dixon, a daughter of Thomas Dixon, and a native of Tennessee. They were the parents of eight children, five of whom are living: James W., Jesse W., Thomas F., Lucinda and Mary E. Mr. Mahaffey is a Democrat in politics, though formerly an old line Whig. He is an upright Christian gentleman and a liberal donator to all charitable objects.Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
PIONEER-1840 - MAHAFFEY - JOHN - - - - 1804 - 1859 - ARKHISBIO - FATHER OF JESSIE W.MAHAFFEY
PIONEER - MAHAFFEY - LUCINDA - - MRS. - WRIGHT - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - MOTHER OF JESSIE W. MAHAFFEY
- MAHAFFEY - SARAH - - MRS. - DUNCAN - UNK - 1855 - ARKHISBIO - FIRST WIFE OF JESSIE W.MAHAFFEY
PIONEER - MAHAFFEY - - - - - - NA - FCTIMES - I believe every township except Griggs has a correspondent to the Times. But few citizens of our county, except those interested in lands, have the least conception of our township and its rapid improvements. But a few years ago in the eighties-no one could have a crop, unless he was a walking arsenal, for then it was a wilderness of cane, timber and wild beasts of the forest, with but few citizens, whose habitations were near the railfroad and on the river, but the first pioneers, were the best, most honest men to grow up in the country. There were the Wideners, Mahaffeys, and Pinkstons, most all of whom have passed over the river with but few of their offspring are here now. Within the last ten years, thousands of acres that the noonday sun had never shown upon for the density of the timber and cane are today vast fields of cotton and corn fields, producing annually from one to one and a half bales of cotton or 40 to 80 bushels of corn per acre, and as to sweet and Irish potatoes, turnips, and pumpkins Griggs township is a world beater, little is thought of it. In fact from the river to Blackfish, and from the Military road to six miles south of Widener, is already in cultivation or is being cleared. At Widener we have three good stores run by three good business men, Col.Withers, Maj.DeRossitt, and Esq.John Hall, all of which are doing a big paying trade, both as to cash and credit. Maj.DeRossitt has one of the finest improved Munger gin plants in Eastern Arkansas, also has about 300 or 400 acres of good land in cultivation at his Lake View home on Fishing Lake. Mr.Grahm of your city has a spendid farm of 250 or more acres, well improved, and run by Rev.Robert Walker. Capt.Wynne and Joe also have between two and three hundred acres under supervision of Prof.John Dean..Brandon and Baugh have five or six hundred acres in cultivation with a fine gin plant. Col.John Gatling also has several large and valuable farms. We also have these fine laborers: Pete Covington, Wash Burns, Henry Thomas, and John Stuart just to mention a few. 3-1-1901
WAR OF 1812 - MALLORY - - - MR. - - 3 10 1790 - 1830 - ARKHISBIO - FATHER OF John W. Mallory was born in Petersburg, Va., in the vicinity of which he resided with his mother until the year 1842, when she moved to Fayette County, Tenn.Leaving home in 1843, when fifteen years old, John went to Memphis, Tenn., and became engaged in clerking in a dry-goods store, continuing at that business until 1849. During his stay in Memphis he enlisted in a company fitting out for service in Mexico, but as their services were not needed it was soon disbanded. In the winter of 1848 he returned to Fayette County and in the January following was married. In 1852, moving to St. Francis County, Ark., he engaged in the mercantile business at Mount Vernon, at that time the county seat. To Mr. Mallory's marriage nine children were born: Etta, Cora, Emmett, Bessie, Eddie, John, Roger, Robert and Neeley. He now resides on his farm where he has made his home for thirty-seven years. He is a Mason, having passed the Blue Lodge to the Chapter, and thence to the Knight Templar degree. He is also a member of the L O. O. F. and K. of H. Mr. Mallory's father was a native of Louisa County, Va. He was of Scotch descent and his mother of French, descended from the Huguenots who fled to America on account of religious persecution. At an early age he moved to Petersburg, Va., and engaged in business, subsequently enlisting in the War of 1812 as a member of the Petersburg Blues, and served in Canada under Gen. William Henry Harrison. He was present at the principal engagements of that war, among others the battle of the Thames, in which the celebrated chief, Tecumseh, was slain, and he was only a short distance from him when he fell. He secured his tomahawk, which is still in the possession of the family. It is a piece of wonderfully unique and grotesquely finished workmanship. After the close of the war he was elected high sheriff of Petersburg, which office he held until his death in 1830. In commemoration of his untiring energy and devotion to his office the city council presented him with a silver cup, bearing the date of his birth, March 10, 1790. It is now in the possession of his son, the subject of this sketch. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
NATIVE - MALLORY - BESSIE - - MRS. - MALLAY - 3 13 1857 - 9 17 1886 - MT.VERNON - WIFE OF LOWRY MALLORY
- MALLORY - E. - J. - MRS. - BLACKWOOD - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - MOTHER OF Lowry Mallory
PIONEER-CIVIL WAR - MALLORY - EDWARD - - - - - 1868 - FCTIMES - The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 79: Edward and Elizabeth (Chambliss) Mallory, who were among the pioneers of this section. Edward and Elizabeth Mallory were born and reared near Petersburg, Virginia. They came to Shelby County, Tennessee and engaged in farming near Memphis, and later (in 1850) moved to this county, locating near what is known as Mt.Vernon, where he engaged in the practice of law. He was elected to the legislature, and afterwards to the office of County and Probate Judge, in both of which high positions he served faithfully and well. At the outbreak of the Civil war, he raised a company, and served as captain thoughout the entire period.
PIONEER-CIVIL WAR - MALLORY - EDWARD (NED) - - - - - 1868 - FCTIMES - FATHER OF IKE W.MALLORY
PIONEER-1850 - MALLORY - ELIZABETH (BETTIE) - - MRS. - CHAMBLISS - - UNK - FCTIMES - The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 79: Edward and Elizabeth (Chambliss) Mallory, who were among the pioneers of this section. Edward and Elizabeth Mallory were born and reared near Petersburg, Virginia. They came to Shelby County, Tennessee and engaged in farming near Memphis, and later (in 1850) moved to this county, locating near what is known as Mt.Vernon, where he engaged in the practice of law. He was elected to the legislature, and afterwards to the office of County and Probate Judge, in both of which high positions he served faithfully and well. At the outbreak of the Civil war, he raised a company, and served as captain thoughout the entire period.
PIONEER - MALLORY - ELIZABETH (BETTIE) - - MRS - CHAMBLISS - - UNK - FCTIMES - MOTHER OF IKE W.MALLORY
- MALLORY - ELMA - - MRS. - RAIFORD - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - WIFE OF IKE W.MALLORY
PIONEER-1850-CIVIL WAR-CAPTAIN - MALLORY - GEORGE - B. - SHERIFF - - 2 25 1849 - 2 12 1912 - MT.VERNON - OBIT The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 79:George B.Mallory, the subject of this sketch, was born in Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee, on February 25,1849, and is a son of Edward and Elizabeth (Chambliss) Mallory, who were among the pioneers of this section. Edward and Elizabeth Mallory were born and reared near Petersburg, Virginia. They came to Shelby County, Tennessee and engaged in farming near Memphis, and later (in 1850) moved to this county, locating near what is known as Mt.Vernon, where he engaged in the practice of law. He was elected to the legislature, and afterwards to the office of County and Probate Judge, in both of which high positions he served faithfully and well. At the outbreak of the Civil war, he raised a company, and served as captain thoughout the entire period. Our subject was educated in the common schools of the county, the war having made it impossible to take advantage of higher institutions of learning. He began his business career as a farmer, and has never abandoned completely. His parents died when he was quite young, leaving a family of five children, of which he was the first born, and he devoted his talents and means to their comfort, remaining single and taking care of them until they were grown. In 1896, he was elected Circuit and County Clerk, and has been elected by handsome majorities since, since 1900 only the office of the Circuit Clerk, they being separated at that time. In 1873, Mr.Mallory was happily married to Miss Cornelia M. Laughinghouse, of this county, and they are the parents of 13 children, only three of whom are living, viz.:Claudia, Mary and Bert. He owns his home and a farm of about 560 acres in the St.Francis basin, a part of which he is now cultivating.
- MALLORY - IKE - W. - - - 11 21 1860 - UNK - FCTIMES - The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 73:Ike W. Mallory is a native of St.Francis county, having been born on November 21,1860. He is the youngest son of Ned and Bettie (Chambliss) Mallory, both of whom were pioneers of this county, and his father was one of the first volunteers in the Southern army in the war between the States. His mother died when he was yet in infancy, and his father survived her only a few years, dying in 1868, and he grew up a orphan. After his father's death, he lived with his aunt, Mrs.I.D.Nash, for a year, and then with his brother and sisters, who lived happily together. After the marriage of his brother he lived with him on the farm until 1877, when his brother engaged in the livery business in this city, and he was a handy man around the barn for twelve months, and "could do anything from swilling the hogs to driving the best team in the stable." This was before the Iron Mountain railroad was built through this county, and, to use his own words: "When it came to driving a drummer to the outlying towns, why that was pepper in my gravy, because I got to eat at a hotel and sleep in a real bed, for which I stayed at home and worked in the stable I had to eat with 'Mose', and sleep in the hay loft with John Womack and a bear." His sister, Mrs.Goddard took him in for a night after his brother cut him loose. Then he went to live with Mr.George Seaborn. When the yellow fever broke out in Forrest City, and I hope it never be my misfortune to have to go through another yellow fever epidemic. Under the firm name Mallory & Vaccaro, with Mr.A.J.Vaccaro, "I have the best saloon and the best liquors in Eastern Arkansas: I have the best wife, and prettiest boy (Ned) of any man in the state." On January 20,1892 I married Miss Elma Raiford, of Byhalia, Mississippi. The son, Ned, was born April 5,1898.
- MALLORY - JOHN - W. - - - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - John W. Mallory was born in Petersburg, Va., in the vicinity of which he resided with his mother until the year 1842, when she moved to Fayette County, Tenn.Leaving home in 1843, when fifteen years old, John went to Memphis, Tenn., and became engaged in clerking in a dry-goods store, continuing at that business until 1849. During his stay in Memphis he enlisted in a company fitting out for service in Mexico, but as their services were not needed it was soon disbanded. In the winter of 1848 he returned to Fayette County and in the January following was married. In 1852, moving to St. Francis County, Ark., he engaged in the mercantile business at Mount Vernon, at that time the county seat. To Mr. Mallory's marriage nine children were born: Etta, Cora, Emmett, Bessie, Eddie, John, Roger, Robert and Neeley. He now resides on his farm where he has made his home for thirty-seven years. He is a Mason, having passed the Blue Lodge to the Chapter, and thence to the Knight Templar degree. He is also a member of the L O. O. F. and K. of H. Mr. Mallory's father was a native of Louisa County, Va. He was of Scotch descent and his mother of French, descended from the Huguenots who fled to America on account of religious persecution. At an early age he moved to Petersburg, Va., and engaged in business, subsequently enlisting in the War of 1812 as a member of the Petersburg Blues, and served in Canada under Gen. William Henry Harrison. He was present at the principal engagements of that war, among others the battle of the Thames, in which the celebrated chief, Tecumseh, was slain, and he was only a short distance from him when he fell. He secured his tomahawk, which is still in the possession of the family. It is a piece of wonderfully unique and grotesquely finished workmanship. After the close of the war he was elected high sheriff of Petersburg, which office he held until his death in 1830. In commemoration of his untiring energy and devotion to his office the city council presented him with a silver cup, bearing the date of his birth, March 10, 1790. It is now in the possession of his son, the subject of this sketch. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- MALLORY - JOHN - W. - - - - UNK - FCTIMES - The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 34:Mr.Mallory has been Recording Steward for the Methodist Church for forty-five years. His wife before she became a cripple, was an active member and remembered with great clearness and accuracy the history of her church.
- MALLORY - LOWRY - - - - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - Lowry Mallory is a native of Alabama, and grew to manhood in his native State, supplementing his primary education by an attendance at Oxford College. Upon leaving school he came to Arkansas, locating on White River, in Jackson County, where he opened up a farm and remained for twelve years, improving his land; but overwork impaired his health, and he was obliged to travel for a few years. Thus were spent all the savings which he had made during that time in seeking restoration to his former condition, and he had only about $50 remaining. He then went to West Point, and was engaged in the real-estate business until 1884, when he entered the employ of the Little Rock Oil Company, and for four years was occupied as general purchasing agent of the company, employed in buying cotton seed. Mr. Mallory's marriage was to Miss Bessie Mallay, who was born in St. Francis County. She died in 1886, leaving three children: Walter E., J. W. and Bessie. William Mallory, the father of our subject, is a Virginian by birth, and moved to Alabama at an early date, being one of the pioneers of that part of the State. He was there married to Miss E. J. Blackwood. He was a son of a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and was of Irish descent. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
PIONEER-CIVIL WAR - MALLORY - NED - - - - - 1868 - FCTIMES - The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 73:See Ike W.Mallory, youngest son of Ned and Bettie (Chambliss) Mallory.
WWI - MALLORY - NED - - - - 4 5 1898 - 6 1 1968 - MT.VERNON - SON OF IKE MALLORY
- MALLORY - WILLIAM - - - - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - FATHER OF Lowry Mallory-
- MANNING - A. - D. - MRS. - HARRAH - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - WIFE OF William Manning
37TH ILLINOIS VOLUNTEER INFANTRY-CIVIL - MANNING - WILLIAM - - - - 8 12 1835 - UNK - ARKHISBIO - William Manning was born near the city of Cork, Ireland, on August 12, 1835. In 1844 his father and mother emigrated to the United States, and located in Dutchess County, N. Y., the subject of this sketch, with the other children, following in 1845. The family remained in New York, engaged in the nursery business and farming, until 1856, when all moved to Will County, Ill., and settled on a farm. There our subject continued till 1866, the time of his removal to Jasper County, Iowa, where he was engaged in the nursery business until 1874. Selling his nursery, he returned to Illinois, and remained on the homestead until 1876, when he moved to his present location in St. Francis County, Ark. He was married on April 8, 1863, to Miss A. D. Harrah, a native of Pennsylvania. In September, 1861, Mr. Manning enlisted in the band of the Thirty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and was discharged in June, 1862, when the band was mustered out of service. While in Illinois he served one term as commissioner of highways, and one year as collector of taxes. In 1888 he was elected representative from St. Francis County on the Fusion ticket. He is a Democrat in politics, but not of the ballot-box stuffing variety. In the legislature he upheld every measure that was in the interest of progress and development, and supported every local temperance measure, and was largely instrumental in securing the passage of the native wine bill. His family consists of seven boys and one girl, ranging in age from four to twenty-five years. Since coming to Arkansas Mr. Manning has been engaged in farming and stock raising, and has been fairly successful. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- MATTHEWS - C. - M. - MRS. - GRAY - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - THIRD WIFE OF W.J.MATTHEWS, DR.
- MATTHEWS - CAROLINA - - MRS - PREWITT - 1 2 1841 - 3 25 1881 - CITY - SECOND Wife of W.J.Matthews-AKA CARRIE
- MATTHEWS - ELLA - - MRS. - EASTHAM - 1844 - 1871 - ARKHISBIO - FIRST WIFE OF W.J.MATTHEWS, DR.
- MATTHEWS - LETA - BUNTING - MRS. - - 10 22 1876 - 11 26 1891 - CITY - Dau.of W.J.&C.P.Matthews DAUGHTER OF DR.W.J.MATTHEWS AND CARRIE PREWITT
THIRD CONFEDERATE REGIMENT-CIVIL WAR-SURGEON - MATTHEWS - W. - J. - DR - - 5 28 1834 - 9 10 1896 - CITY - OBIT W. J. Matthews, M. D.-Goodspeed's Biography 1884.-W. J. Matthews, M. D., a popular physician of Forrest City and a credit to the medical fraternity, was born in Maury County, Tenn., May 28, 1831, being one of eight children born to James W. and S. K. (Dooley) Matthews, natives of North Carolina and Tennessee, respectively. James W. Matthews was a pioneer of Tennessee, a farmer by occupation, and surveyor of Maury County for many years. He died in his eighty-third year, his wife having gone before in her sixty-fourth year. The paternal grandfather was born in North Carolina, and came to Tennessee when James W. was a small boy, dying in Tennessee at a very old age. The maternal grandfather also owed his nativity to Tennessee, and served in some of the Indian wars, and was given the euphonious title of 'Old Capt. Dooley.' The great-grandmother was killed by Indians while holding the grandmother (a baby at the time), and engaged in spinning flax. W. J. Matthews passed his early life in the schools of Maury County, Tenn., afterward becoming enrolled as a pupil of Erskine College, South Carolina, remaining away from home for three years. On the completion of his literary education he returned home and began the study of medicine under A. T. Boyd and J. M. Buldridge of Maury County, Tenn., and after having graduated from the Medical Department of the College at Nashville, Tenn., 1860, went immediately to Taylor's Creek, St. Francis County, Ark. In June, 1861, he entered the Confederate army as a private, this company being commanded by Hon. Poindexter Dunn. After three months Dr. Matthews was promoted to the position of surgeon of the Third Confederate Regiment, and served in that company in the same capacity till the close of the war. Of a company of 100 men from this neighborhood, all [p.485] were unmarried, with the exception of the captain. They were in the Army of the Tennessee, and participated in the hard-fought battles of Shiloh, Murfreesboro, Missionary Ridge, Chickamauga, Kenesaw Mountain, Ringgold Gap, Golgotha Church, Jonesboro, Franklin and Perryville. Pat. Cleburne was the major-general, and Dr. Matthews was on the field when he met his death. Twenty-one men of the original number (100) returned home, and nine of them are now living. At the close of the war Dr. Matthews resumed his former practice, which he had established a year previous to the war at Taylor's Creek, and though he voted against secession, he went with his State when it seceded. Coming to Forrest City, in 1871, he has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession, and has attained an enviable position, both in social circles and as a competent physician. Dr. Matthews was married in 1866 to Miss Ella Eastham, of Summerville, Tenn., but death claimed her in 1871, she having borne two children, now deceased. His second wife was Mrs. Carrie Prewitt, of Saulsbury, Tenn., and to them one child was born, Lets B. Mrs. Matthews died, and his third and present wife was Miss C. M. Gray. Dr. Matthews is a member of the State Medical Association, secretary of St. Francis County Medical Society, and a member of the A. F. & A. M., I. O. O. F., K. of H., and K. & L. of H. He is also an earnest worker in the Presbyterian Church. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.He was married to Mary Ella Eastham on 9 Jan 1866 in Maury County, Tennessee. Mary Ella Eastham was born in 1844 in Tennessee. She died in 1871.He was married to Carrie Prewitt about 1875. Carrie Prewitt was born in 1841 in North Carolina. William J. Matthews and Carrie Prewitt had the following children: 365 i. Leta B. Matthews was born in 1877 in St. Francis County, Arkansas.He was married to C. M. Gray on 23 Dec 1884 in St. Francis County, Arkansas.
- MAY - ARCHIBALD - S. - - - 5 30 1854 - 1 28 1936 - HUGHES - Biographies Archibald S. May, a well-known farmer of St. Francis County and numbered among its younger citizens, was born in that county in 1854, being the son of R. A. and L. C. May, natives of North Carolina and Georgia, respectively. With the exception of a few months spent in Texas he has passed his entire life in Arkansas. Mr. May was not fortunate in receiving a liberal education, the advantages at the period of his boyhood being far from satisfactory, but by constant and close application to study of late years he is conversant with many topics of importance of the past and present. He was married in December, 1888, to Miss Mollie Taylor, a daughter of James H. and Lucinda C. Taylor of Arkansas. Mr. May is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and also of the Wheel. His principal business is that of stock raising, and he is a man who stands high in his community-possessing true worth and integrity and being a liberal supporter of all public enterprises. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- MAY - MOLLIE - - MRS. - TAYLOR - UNK - 1930 - HUGHES - BURIAL MAY.21,1930 WIFE OF ARCHIBALD S.MAY
- McCLENDON - FANNIE - - MRS. - WEBBER - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - WIFE OF T.W.McCLENDON
CIVIL-SURGEON-CSA - McCLENDON - JOEL - WILEY - DR. - - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - ST.FRANCIS QUERIES FATHER OF T.W.McCLENDON
- McCLENDON - REBECCA - J. - MRS. - - 4 17 1838 - 9 17 1899 - MT.VERNON - OBIT MOTHER OF T.W.McCLENDON
- McCLENDON - THOMAS - W. - - - - UNK - FCTIMES -
The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 87:T.W.McClendon is a son of Joel W. and Rebecca J. McClendon, and first saw the first light of day at Talledega, Alabama. His parents, pioneers of that state. His father was a surgeon of his regiment in the Civil war. The family came to Arkansas in December, 1870. While growing up our subject worked on a farm and attended the public schools. In 1887 he left the farm, and in 1890 located in Forrest City. He has held the position of Street Commisssioner since 1896. Before coming to Forrest City, he resided at Brinkley, and was married March, 1878, to Miss Fannie Webber, of Lee County, Arkansas. Mr.McClendon owns his home on Cook Street in Forrest City.
- McCORD - EMMA - V. - MRS. - JOHNSON - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - WIFE OF ELDER J.A.McCORD
- McCORD - J. - A. - ELDER - - 10 1 1875 - UNK - FCTIMES -
The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 31:Elder J.A.McCord is the present pastor of the Missionary Baptist Church in this city. He was born in Christian County, Kentucky, October 1,1875, where he was reared on a farm, and thus became familiar with every phase of farm life. His education was obtained in the district school. He professed faith in Jesus Christ at the age of 16, and was baptized into the fellowship of West Mt.Zion Church, in his native county. He was from his conversion a regular attendant at Sunday school and prayer-meeting, taking an active part in both. In January 1895 his church liberated him to preach the gospel. He was married December 28,1903 to Miss Emma V.Johnson, of Crofton, Kentucky.
PIONEER-NATIVE - McDANIEL - AMBROSE - DUDLEY - - - 10 6 1826 - 9 18 1888 - McDANIEL - FATHER OF S.P.McDANIEL
- McDANIEL - CHARLEY - - - - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - SON OF S.P.McDANIEL AND SALLIE EVANS
PIONEER-CO.F.-1ST ARKANSAS REGIMENT -NATIVE - McDANIEL - JOHN - LANDON - - - 9 29 1829 - 3 14 1902 - McDANIEL - OBIT SON OF JOHN AND NANCY McDANIEL
PIONEER 1824 - McDANIEL - JOHN - - - - 1 25 1799 - 10 31 1869 - McDANIEL - PROBABLY FATHER OF JOHN LANDON McDANIEL The father of this respected citizen, John McDaniel, of Scotch origin, was born near Lexington, Ky., January 25, 1799, but grew to manhood in Virginia, where he married Miss Nancy Calvert, of Welsh descent. Soon after that event they decided to move, the tales related of the rich valley beyond the 'Father of Waters,' inspiring them to seek a home in the then new territory of Arkansas, coming of ancestors who were used to conflicts with the Indians, and the hardships of pioneer life, they did not hesitate to start for this new land of promise. Their trip was made by boat to a point several miles above the mouth of L'Anguille River, where they landed in 1824, and set ashore their worldly goods, consisting of one pony, two cows, and what household goods the pony could haul on a sled, and 12 cents in money. With his family, which then consisted of his wife and two children, and with no guide but the compass, Mr. McDaniel struck out through the forest and staked off the farm now owned and occupied by the principal of this sketch. At that time there were not more than twelve families within the limits of the present St. Francis County. Upon the breaking out of the war, Mr. McDaniel was worth over $75,000 in lands, negroes and stock, all accumulated in a little over thirty years, in a wild and unsettled country, and upon a start of only one shilling; such a record is marvelous, and shows the latent force and energy, which was lying dormant in the character of John McDaniel when coming to this locality. Mr. McDaniel lived to a ripe old age, and died October 31, 1869, his wife surviving him only four years. She died September 15, 1873, aged seventy-four years and six months. Ten years after their arrival here, January 17, 1834, was born William H. McDaniel, who, together with his brother, John L., are the only survivors of this pioneer family.
- McDANIEL - MARGIE - P. - MRS. - LEWIS - 1865 - 11 18 1883 - McDANIEL - NOV.18,1883, AGE 18YRS.2MOS.11DAYSBiographies(PIONEER-1824)Biographies FIRST WIFE OF S.P.McDANIEL
PIONEER - McDANIEL - MARIE - E. - MRS. - ORSBORN - 2 1 1837 - 1 22 1889 - McDANIEL - MOTHER OF S.P.McDANIEL
- McDANIEL - MOLLIE - E. - MRS. - FONDREN - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - WIFE OF WILLIAM HOWISON McDANIEL
PIONEER 1824 - McDANIEL - NANCY - - MRS - CALVERT - 3 15 1799 - 9 15 1873 - ARKHISBIO - WIFE OF JOHN McDANIEL
PIONEER 1824 - McDANIEL - NANCY - B. - MRS - CALVERT - 3 15 1799 - 9 15 1873 - ARKHISBIO - SEP.15,1873, AGE 74 YRS.6MOS.10DAYS WIFE OF JOHN McDANIEL
NATIVE - McDANIEL - S. - P. - - - 12 17 1861 - 12 22 1922 - CITY - HUSBAND OF SALLY McDANIEL-Gravestone IMAGE1329-
The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 70:The constant influx of new inhabitants who seek this growing city in search of health and wealth, and the active enterprise of those already here, is constantly adding many new homes to our residence districts, and one of the successful industries of this city, as well as one of the most essential is that of plumbing. Mr.McDaniels' plumbing business house was established in 1895. His shop and office is located at No.211 South Front street. Mr.S.P.McDaniel is a native of this county, having been born at McDaniel, four miles south of Forrest City, on December 17,1861. His parents were Ambrose Dudley and Mary E. (Orsborn) McDaniel, and his grandfather was one of the first settlers in this fertile section. His father was a planter and mill man, and was noted for his charities and dispostion to console all those in trouble who sought his aid or advice. Mr.McDaniel was married in 1882 to Miss Margie P. Lewis, who died the following year. In 1885 he was again married, this time to Miss Sallie J. Evans, daughter of Hiram Evans, a wealthy planter of Franks township, now deceased. One child, Charley McDaniel, blessed their union. Mr. McDaniel came to this city to reside permanently in 1885, from McDaniel, whence he had been engaged in the general merchandise and mill business for a number of years. Since coming here he has been a member of the City Council for three years, and Chief of the Fire Department for six years.
- McDANIEL - SALLY - J. - MRS - EVANS - 2 15 1861 - 10 29 1921 - CITY - WIFE OF S.P.McDANIELGravestone IMAGE1329 SECOND WIFE OF S.P.McDANIEL
PIONEER-CAPT. 13TH ARK. REG.GOVAN'S BRIGADE, CLEBURNS DIVISION - McDANIEL - WILLIAM - HOWISON - - - 1 17 1834 - 10 21 1904 - CITY - CAPT. 13TH ARK. REG.GOVAN'S BRIGADE, CLEBURNS DIVISION-FROM WEN SCHERER:William Howerson McDaniel. He was Nancy Brooke McDaniel Izard's brother. His middle name of "Howerson" was originally Howison, the surname of his maternal grandmother, Ann Wood Howison, who married Landon Calvert. There daughter, Nancy Brooke Calvert, married John McDaniel, and they were the parents of Nancy Brooke McDaniel Izard and William "Howerson" McDaniel. I am a member of UDC, and have proved William H. McDaniel as a Confederate ancestor, along with four of the Izard brothers, including James S. Izard.--Gravestone IMAGE1264&1265- The father of this respected citizen, John McDaniel, of Scotch origin, was born near Lexington, Ky., January 25, 1799, but grew to manhood in Virginia, where he married Miss Nancy Calvert, of Welsh descent. Soon after that event they decided to move, the tales related of the rich valley beyond the 'Father of Waters,' inspiring them to seek a home in the then new territory of Arkansas, coming of ancestors who were used to conflicts with the Indians, and the hardships of pioneer life, they did not hesitate to start for this new land of promise. Their trip was made by boat to a point several miles above the mouth of L'Anguille River, where they landed in 1824, and set ashore their worldly goods, consisting of one pony, two cows, and what household goods the pony could haul on a sled, and 12 cents in money. With his family, which then consisted of his wife and two children, and with no guide but the compass, Mr. DcDaniel struck out through the forest and staked off the farm now owned and occupied by the principal of this sketch. At that time there were not more than twelve families within the limits of the present St. Francis County. Upon the breaking out of the war, Mr. McDaniel was worth over $75,000 in lands, negroes and stock, all accumulated in a little over thirty years, in a wild and unsettled country, and upon a start of only one shilling; such a record is marvelous, and shows the latent force and energy, which was lying dormant in the character of John McDaniel when coming to this locality. Mr. McDaniel lived to a ripe old age, and died October 31, 1869, his wife surviving him only four years. She died September 15, 1873, aged seventy-four years and six months. Ten years after their arrival here, January 17, 1834, was born William H. McDaniel, who, together with his brother, John L., are the only survivors of this pioneer family. The early life of William H. was spent on the farm, helping his father clear up the land which he had settled when coming to Arkansas; the outbreak of the war found him still on the old homestead, but with the enthusiasm of a patriot, and the love of his native State burning in his breast, he enlisted in the Thirteenth Arkansas Volunteer Infantry. Entering as a private, his bravery and good conduct were soon rewarded by his being promoted, first to the position of orderly-sergeant, then first lieutenant, and after the battle of Shiloh to the rank of captain. He participated in the battles of Belmont, Shiloh, Richmond and Murfreesboro (where he was wounded and disabled for a short time, also being wounded at Chickamauga) then at Missionary Ridge, and a number of other hard-fought battles, among which was the battle of Atlanta, July 22, 1864. In August, 1864, the Captain was sent west of the Mississippi, to gather up recruits for the service, and while on duty, in October of that year, was captured and taken to Chicago, and then to Johnson's Island, where he was held until the close of the war. Then returning home, he has since been engaged in farming in this county,. with substantial success, and now owns 1,480 acres in one tract, having 900 under cultivation. His principal crop is cotton, and he owns his own cotton-gin and saw-mill, and a supply store to furnish goods for his tenants. On January 24, 1867, Mr. McDaniel married Miss Mollie E. Fondren, of Tennessee. They are the parents of three daughters: Willie, Nannie and Ads. Several years ago Mr. McDaniel moved his family to Forrest City, where he has since lived, and has been a member of the city council for a number of years; also a member of the school board, and at one time was coroner of the county. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
USARMY-CIVIL - McDONALD - JAMES - P. - CAPT - - 1830 - 3 9 1910 - ARKHISBIO - Resolutions of Respect=To the Worshipful Master Warden and brethren of Rising Star Lodge No.211, F. A. and M. We, your committee appointed to draft suitable resolution to the memory of our deceased brother, J.P.McDonald, who died the 9th day of March, 1910.Robt.Brown,David Duncan,Henry Hughes, Committee. James P. McDonald was born in Kingston, Canada, in the year 1830, and is of Scotch-Irish descent. When quite a young man he left the parental roof, engaging in the lumber business, some little distance from home, and afterward worked on the Erie Canal, in 1854 going to sea. He next went to New Orleans, and having commenced boating on the Mississippi, followed that occupation until 1857, only discontinuing to accompany Albert S. Johnston to Salt Lake City.After sojourning in the land of the 'Mormons' for a while the spring of 1859 found him in California. Later he went to Leavenworth, Kas., and from there to Hagerstown, Md., where he accepted the position of wagon master in the Federal service, gaining the approbation of his superior officers for his faithful attention to every detail of his business. In 1864 Mr. McDonald moved to Memphis, Tenn., and remained until 1866, leaving to take up his permanent abode in St. Francis County, Ark. In 1870 he was united in marriage with Mrs. Williams, who died two years later. In 1874 Miss Lucy Halbert became his wife, and by her he had two children, who have since died: Rosie A. and Sallie Baker. Mrs. McDonald closed her eyes to the scenes of this world in 1876, and in 1881 Mr. McDonald was united in matrimony with Mrs. Lane, his present wife. Mrs. McDonald is a very estimable lady, and enjoys the respect of a wide circle of acquaintances and friends. In secret organizations Mr. McDonald is identified with the Masonic order, and is also a member of the Wheel. In politics he votes the union labor ticket, and with his wife attends the Baptist Church, in which they have been members of many years standing. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- McDONALD - LUCY - - MRS. - HALBERT - - 1876 - ARKHISBIO - SECOND WIFE OF JAMES P.McDONALD
- McDONALD - - - MRS. - LANE - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - THIRD WIFE OF JAMES P.McDONALD
- McDONALD - - - MRS. - WILLIAMS - - 1872 - ARKHISBIO - FIRST WIFE OF JAMES P.McDONALD
- McGOWEN - JOSEPH - - - - 1829 - UNK - ARKHISBIO - COULD BE JOSEPH McGOWAN IN BELL CEMETERY Joseph McGowen, a native of North Carolina, was left an orphan at the age of seven years, his mother having died in 1836 and his father four years later. He was then bound out to a Mr. Turnage, with whom he remained until his seventeenth year, when he commenced working for himself at common farm labor in Shelby County, Tenn., and in 1852 purchased a farm in Tipton County. He was married November 19, 1854, to Cordelia A. Joyce, a native of Tennessee. They were the parents of thirteen children, seven of whom are still living: William Oliver (born January 15, 1856), Eugenia H. (born September 6, 1857) and Thomas Martin (born April 26, 1862), who are married; Edward G. (born October 1, 1860), Annie Eliza (born January 10, 1867), Mary Frances (born December 25, 1868) and James Taylor (born June 28, 1872). Eugenia H. was married to William Williams March 4, 1875; William Oliver was married to M. J. English December 28, 1881; Thomas Martin was married to Gertrude Tennant December 21, 1887. Mr. McGowen remained in Tipton County until 1878 when he removed to Lee County, Ark., but after one year there, came to St. Francis County, where he still resides. He owns a quarter section of land with all but twenty acres under cultivation. Mr. McGowen has always been an active Democrat, and is a strong advocate of the public school system. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- McKNIGHT - CLARENCE - W. - DR - - 6 27 1868 - 7 14 1904 - CITY - Gravestone IMAGE1230 CHILD OF DR.JOHN DAVID McKNIGHT AND VICTORIA WILLIAMS-PROBABLY CLARENCE WILLIAM
- McKNIGHT - FREDDIE - - MISS - - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - CHILD OF DR.JOHN DAVID McKNIGHT AND MATTIE HORNEY
PVT. CO. G. 13 VAUGHN'S BRIGADE, CHEATAM'S DIVISION, ARMY OF TENN-CIVIL - McKNIGHT - JOHN - DAVID - DR. - - 3 12 1842 - 1 8 1905 - CITY - PVT. CO. G. 13 VAUGHN'S BRIGADE, CHEATAM'S DIVISION, ARMY OF TENN.-Gravestone IMAGE1232-The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 59:In memory of Dr. John David McKnight who was born near Somerville, Tennessee, March 12,1842, where he resided until 1871, when he came to Arkansas, locating near Wittsburg, where he had charge of a large plantation for one year. He then removed to Forrest City and resided here three years, going hence to New Castle, where he lived until 1897, when he returned to Forrest City and resided here until his death on Jan.8,1905. He was a gallant and fearless Confederate soldier, who knew no right above his country's welfare. He enlisted in the Thirteenth Tennessee Regiment in 1862, and served throughout the war faithfully, participating in the battles of Belmont, Shiloh, Perryville, Richmond, Murphreesboro, all engagements between Sherman and Joseph E. Johnson from Murphreesboro to Jonesboro, including Mission Ridge, Above the Clouds, Franklin, Tennessee, and many others of more or less importance. He was married on March 13,1867, to Miss Victoria Williams, with whom he lived happily until her death in 1891. She was a daughter of Judge J.W.Williams of Winchester, Tennessee. To this union five children were born, three of whom were reared and lived to manhood and womanhood in this county. Dr. Clarence W. McKnight, his eldest child, died July 14,1904. His two daughters, who survive him are, Mrs.R.J.Lanier, of Caldwell, and Mrs.Robert R. Dixon of Wynne. He was married May 8,18983 to Mrs.Matte E. Horney. Only one child, Freddie, blessed this union, but he left, besides his heart-broken wife, two step-daughters, Misses Addie and Beverly Horney, who were as dear to him, and he to them, as they could have been had they been his own. Dr.McKnight was a practicing physician in this county for twenty-five years, and for eight years resided in Forrest City. He had diplomas from Vanderbilt University and the Memphis Medical College. He was twice elected to the office of Sheriff and Collector of this county, and had only just entered his second term when he passed away.--
- McKNIGHT - MATTIE - - MRS. - HORNEY - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - SECOND WIFE OF DR.JOHN DAVID McKNIGHT
- McKNIGHT - VICTORIA - - MRS. - WILLIAMS - - 1891 - ARKHISBIO - FIRST WIFE OF DR.JOHN DAVID McKNIGHT
- McKNIGHT - - - MISS - - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - CHILD OF DR.JOHN DAVID McKNIGHT AND VICTORIA WILLIAMS-MRS.ROBERT DIXON SURVIVED DR.McKNIGHT
- McKNIGHT - - - MISS - - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - CHILD OF DR.JOHN DAVID McKNIGHT AND VICTORIA WILLIAMS-MRS.R.J.LANIER SURVIVED DR.McKNIGHT
- MERWIN - EMILY - - MRS. - GOVAN - 2 10 1880 - 11 11 1936 - CITY - FEB.10,1880 IN HOLLY SPRINGS, MISS.-DIED IN MISSISSIPPI, NOV.11,1936-WIFE OF T.C.MERWIN SECOND WIFE OF THORBURN MERWIN
- MERWIN - LAURA - - MRS. - CAMPBELL - - 5 1877 - ARKHISBIO - FIRST WIFE OF THORBURN MERWIN
CO.F-1ST ARKANSAS CAVALRY-CSA-CIVIL-CAPTAIN - MERWIN - THORBURN - CHARTRES - Capt. - - 12 25 1845 - 8 19 1922 - CITY - Thorburn Chartres Merwin born Jefferson,Kentucky-1880 census in Marianna, 1910 in St.Francis County-ALL CHILDREN: Mary Merwin b: 16 Jul 1881 in Marianna, Lee, AR Eaton Govan Merwin b: 12 May 1883 William Lister Merwin b: 11 Jun 1886 in Little Rock, Pulaski, AR Georgia Merwin b: 12 Apr 1894 in Marianna, Lee, AR-Gravestone IMAGE1170-child:Given Name: Georgia Surname: Merwin Sex: F Birth: 12 Apr 1894 in Strawberry, AR Death: May 1974 in Forrest City, St. Francis, AR-The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905:Capt.T.C.Merwin, County Clerk fo this St.Francis County, is a son of A.W. and Anna L. (Chartres) Merwin, and was born in Louisville, Kentucky, on Christmas Day, 1845. His father died when he was but seven years of age, and he was educated in the public schools. He began his business career on a farm, afterwards clerking, and early becoming an expert accountant. He came to this state in 1860 from Louisville, and located at Walnut Bend, Lee county. In July, 1861, or subject enlisted with Company F, First Arkansas Cavalry, served through the entire period, and was paroled at Johnson's Island June 18,1865, with transportation and without subsistence. He came to Forrest City in November, 1893, and took the position of deputy clerk under F. Laughinghouse, which he held under succeeding Clerks, until October 1,1900, when, the offices of Circuit and County Clerks having been separated, and having been elected at the primary election a few months previous, he was appointed by Governor Jones, and entered upon his duties as County Clerk, to which official position he has since been twice elected, and now fills the place with extraordinary ability and fidelity. Captain Merwin was married December 26,1874, to Miss Laura Campbell, who died in May, 1877, and he was again married on May 28,1879, this time to Mss Emily Govan, daughter of E.P.Govan, of Lee county. Six children, Olivia, Mary, Will, Georgia, Frank, and Govan have blessed their union, all but one of whom are living. Govan having died in May 1885, at the tender age of two years. He is a Mason and a democrat of the old school, owns his lovely home in West Forrest City at the foot of Hill street, a very good halftone of whch appears herewith.-
- MOHLER - JUDY - S. - MRS. - LAWRENCE - - 1 1878 - ARKHISBIO - FIRST WIFE OF DR.THOMAS I.MOHLER
CORP.CO.D.31 ILLINOIS INF.USA-CIVIL WAR-2ND LIEUT. - MOHLER - THOMAS - I. - M.D. - - 3 10 1844 - UNK - BELL - CORP.CO.D.31 ILLINOIS INF.USA-CIVIL WAR-Thomas I. Mohler, M. D., who occupies a position of prominence in the medical affairs of Eastern Arkansas, was ushered into the world on March 10, 1844, in the State of North Carolina, but was reared in Kentucky, spending his boyhood in a tobacco factory. At the age of eighteen he went to Illinois and the following January enlisted in the Thirty-first Illinois Infantry as a private, before the close of the war being promoted to the position of second lieutenant. He served in Sherman's 'March to the Sea,' and participated in all of the battles in that campaign. After the war going to Johnstown, Mr. Mohler bought a farm, and in April, 1866, was married to Miss Judy S. Lawrence, who died in January, 1878, leaving six children. He was engaged in farming for four years, after which he went into partnership with his brother in the manufacture of tobacco and cigars. Following the death of his wife he commenced the study of medicine and attended lectures at the St. Joe Medical College, subsequently traveling over Missouri, Iowa, Utah, California and all of the Western States. In 1887 he located at Palestine, Ark., and commenced the practice of medicine, and has built up an extensive patronage. He is a Republican in politics and a member of the K. of P. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
CIVIL & MEXICAN WAR - MOORE - B. - B. - MAJOR - - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - FATHER OF CREED T.MOORE
- MOORE - CREED - T. - ESQ. - - 8 15 1863 - 1936 - HUGHES - PLOT 2140 FATHER -
The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 127:Creed T. Moore, Esq., the subject of this sketch is a magistrate of Telico township, and a agent of the Missouri Pacific Railroad at Colt. He is a native of Chickasaw County, Mississippi, where he was born on August 15,1862, and is a son of Major B.B. and Ruth Stovall (Rowland) Moore. His father was of Irish descent, a native of Georgia, and a soldier in the Mexican and civil wars, having been promoted to Major in the latter. He was graduated from the best college of the state; was a scholarly man, a lawyer, editor, and politician; but gave them all up in disgust, and retired to his farm, spending his remaining days in teaching, and writing for various newspapers and magazines. He lived to the age of 89. The mother of our subject was of Irish descent and a native of Virginia. Mr. Moore was educated in the common schools, beside having the advantage of 20 years constant scholarly association, and began life as a farmer, in which he is still engaged. He left home at the age of 23 years, and came to Arkansas, locating in this county in 1886. He worked in timber for a year or so, when he married and resumed farming. In 1888 he was elected magistrate of Telico Township. In 1890 he was appointed postmaster and railroad agent at Colt; again elected magistrate in 1893 and 1902, and in 1905 was appointed to that office by the Governor to succeed H.C.Phillips. In 1887 he was married to Miss Mattie Srum of Colt, the daughter of Jonas Srum, and granddaughter of Mitchell Taylor. Eight children, viz: Ira B., Seabie Eron, Ruth E., Howard Gordon, Harold Garland, James Vernon, Orma Leone, and Jeff Davis, four of whom died in infancy. He owns his home and forty acres of good land.
- MOORE - MATTIE-OR MITTIE - - MRS. - SRUM - 1867 - 10 10 1912 - HUGHES - OBITBiographies WIFE OF CREED T.MOORE-daughter of Jonas Srum, and granddaughter of William Mitchell Taylor
- MOORE - RUTH - STOVALL - MRS - ROWL.AND - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - MOTHER OF CREED T.MOORE
- MOOSE - T. - V. - - - - NA - FCTIMES -
The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 99:Mr.T.V.Moose, Photographer, was born and reared at Taylorsville, N.Carolina, where he received his early education and business training. He came to Forrest City on June 1,1904, and being so well pleased decided to stay and purchased a building next to the Presbyterian church. He is the official photographer of the Times Art Souvenir Supplement. He is a bachelor who says his greatest event of his life was, "several times trying to marry."
- MULLER - CHRISTIAN - PETER - - - 6 6 1879 - 12 25 1951 - FPARK - GRACELAND-1942 DRAFT Christian Peter Muller 6 Jun 1879 De Soto, Missouri Saint Francis, Arkansas White 1515-NEXT TO JULIA MULLER-
The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 87:Mr.Christian P. Muller, junior member of the firm which operates the A.Muller & Son Bottling Company, has permanently resided here in Forrest City. Mr.Chris Muller is a native of Missouri, and is twenty two years of age, and has been engaged in this line of business for eight years.
- NAIL - AMANDA - CAROLYN - MRS - RANEY - 4 1 1844 - 8 1877 - BARNISHAW - FIRST WIFE OF IRVING R.NAIL
PIONEER-1838-JOHNSON'S COMPANY-THIRTEENTH ARKANSAS REGIMENT-CSA - NAIL - ANDREW - - - - - ABT.1840 - ARKHIS - FATHER OF IRVING R.NAIL
PIONEER-1838-JOHNSON'S COMPANY-THIRTEENTH ARKANSAS REGIMENT-CSA - NAIL - IRVING - R. - - - 1825 - NA - ARKHIS - COULD BE ALEXANDER IRVIN NAIL Irving R. Nail owns one of the carefully cultivated farms of St. Francis County, Ark., it consisting of 120 acres, a greater portion of it being under the plow, and the general impression of the observer, is that thrift and prosperity prevail. He owes his success to no one, being thrown on his own resources at the age of thirteen, and though the prospect was not one to encourage one, he never grew despondent, but kept bravely on, with what success is already known. He was born in Tennessee in the year 1825, being the son of Andrew and Lucy, natives of Virginia and Kentucky, respectively. Mr. Nail came to St. Francis County in 1838 where he breathed his last a few years later. Irving R. Nail enlisted in the Confederate [p.486] army in 1861 in Johnston's Company, Thirteenth Arkansas Regiment, participating in the battle of Belmont. He was shortly after discharged on account of illness, this ending his war career. He was married in 1863 to Amanda Raney, a daughter of Thomas and Jane Raney. The result of this union was four children: Martha J., William R., Dorinda and John C. Mrs. Nail died in August, 1877, and Mr. Nail remained a widower until January, 1881, when he took for his second wife Miss Nancy Cobb, whose father, W. M. Cobb, immigrated from South Carolina to Arkansas in 1855, having been born in 1825. Mr. and Mrs. Nail are members in high standing of the Baptist Church, to which the former lends his hearty support and influence. He is a Democrat politically. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
PIONEER-1838-JOHNSON'S COMPANY-THIRTEENTH ARKANSAS REGIMENT-CSA - NAIL - LUCY - - - - - UNK - ARKHIS - MOTHER OF IRVING R.NAIL
- NAIL - NANCY - - MRS. - COBB - - UNK - ARKHIS - SECOND WIFE OF IRVING R.NAIL-DAUGHTER OF W. M. Cobb, who immigrated from South Carolina to Arkansas in 1855, having been born in 1825
- NAYLOR - JOHN - WOODFIN - - - UNK - 1938 - CITY - Announcements of the marriage of Miss Willie Howerson McDaniel, eldest daughter of Capt. & Mrs.W.H.McDaniel, to Mr.John Woodfin Naylor, on Wednesday, Feb.21,1900 at the Baptist church, with Eld.W.H.Paslay officiating. The groom was born and raised in Fayetteville, Tenn., and is connected as commercial traveler with a large wholesale house in Cincinnati.2-9-1900 Photo May 2006-Husband of Mary E. Naylor-The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 55:John W. Naylor, the subject of this sketch, was reared at Fayetteville, Tennessee, and is the son of John W. and Martha (Powell) Naylor. He began his business career as a clerk in his father's store, afterwards, with his brothers, succeeding to the business. Mr.Naylor was married on February 21,1900 to Miss Willie Howerson McDaniel, eldest daughter of Capt. W.H. and Mollie (Fondren) McDaniel, since which time he has constantly prospered in his various business undertakings. He has two farms, aggregating 1,109 acres, in the cultivation of which is used the most modern labor saving implements of various kinds, being under the watchful care of Mr.W.A.Johnson, overseer for over three years. Gravestone IMAGE1070
- NAYLOR - MARY - ELISE - MRS - STEWART - 1877 - 1960 - CITY - Photo May 2006-Wife of John W.Naylor-Gravestone IMAGE1070 WIFE OF JOHN W.NAYLOR
- NAYLOR - WILLIE - HOWERSON - MISS - McDANIEL - 7 25 1870 - 2 3 1915 - CITY - Announcements of the marriage of Miss Willie Howerson McDaniel, eldest daughter of Capt. & Mrs.W.H.McDaniel, to Mr.John Woodfin Naylor, on Wednesday, Feb.21,1900 at the Baptist church, with Eld.W.H.Paslay officiating. The groom was born and raised in Fayetteville, Tenn., and is connected as commercial traveler with a large wholesale house in Cincinnati. 2-9-1900 WIFE OF JOHN W.NAYLOR
- NELSON - MATTIE - - MRS. - WILLIAMS - - UNK - ARKHIS - SECOND WIFE OF N.B.NELSON
- NELSON - MOLLIE - - MRS. - RIVES - - UNK - ARKHIS - FIRST WIFE OF N.B.NELSON
- NELSON - NORBORNE - BLAND - - - 12 10 1862 - 5 19 1927 - CITY - The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 105:Mr.N.B.Nelson is the senior member of the firm N.B.Nelson & Co., dealers in Fine Wines, Liquors, Cigars and Tobaccos, who do a large retail business on North Washington Street. The senior proprietor is a native of Stanton, Haywood County, Tennessee, where he was born on December 10,1860. He is a son of W.L. and Mary E. (Bland) Nelson. His father was a railroad man nearly all his life, and was for years a passenger conductor on the Louisville & Nashville railroad, and "pulled" the first passenger train from Memphis to Stanton, over that road. N.B.Nelson was educated in Nashville, Tennessee, and began his career as a farmer, a noble calling which he has never entirely abandoned. He came to Forrest City in 1889, Mr.Nelson, besides his saloon business, is a stockholder in The J.W.Beck Co., The Bank of Forrest City, The Planters Gin & Mfg. Co., and the Choctaw Brick & Tile Co. of this city, and the Southern Trust Co. of Little Rock. In 1882 he was happily married to Miss Mollie Rives of Mason, Tennessee, and to this union four children were born, only one of whom, Mamie, surviving her mother. In 1889 he was married to Mrs.Mattie Williams, of this city, and to them six children have been born, three of whom died in infancy. Those living are Susie W., Annie Claude, and Kathleen Rhodes Nelson, and a step-daughter, Corrine Williams, now Mrs.Hequembourg, of Missouri.
- NICHOLS - ADDIE - - MRS. - BARD - - UNK - UNKNOWN - SECOND WIFE OF JOHN M.NICHOLS
- NICHOLS - JOHN - M. - - - 7 11 1857 - 1930 - CITY - Photo May 2006-Gravestone IMAGE1257 Photo May 2006--The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 115:Jno.M.Nichols was born July 11,1857, at Raleigh, N.Carolina and is a son of Julius and Mary H.( Ferrell) Nichols. The elder Nichols was a merchant in Raleigh, until shortly after the war, when he moved to near Des Arc, in this state, and engaged in pioneer farming. At the age of 15 years the subject of this sketch began clerking in the general merchandise store of Eddins & Bros., of Byhalia, Mississippi, holding said position for seven years until the fall of 1879, at which time he formed a partnership with George H. Benson under the firm name Benson & Nichols, at Byhalia, and for a long time did a thriving business, but finally got on the wrong side of an erratic cotton market and was compelled to make an assignment. In 1887 Mr. Nichols located in Forrest City and secured employment as salesman and bookkeeper for T.A.Hatcher, where he remained until the dissolution of the firm of Wynne, Dennis & Beck in 1889, when the firm of J.W.Beck & Co. was organized and he took a partnership in the new concern. After several changes, he and Messr. Beck bought out Mr.Wynne, and Mr.Nichols took the position as buyer and outside man for the firm, and Mr.Beck looked after the office affairs and their cotton interests. In addition, Mr.Nichols has been seven years manager of Waters-Pierce Oil Co. for Forrest City and contiguous territory. On April 11,1882, he was married to Miss Lena Pierce of Trenton, Tennessee, but she lived only one year after their union. On January 15,1891, he was married to Miss Addie Bard of Forrest City, a daughter of the lamented and beloved J. H. Bard, at one time agent of the Little Rock & Memphis railroad, and for a long term of years the capable manager of the Western Union Telegraph Co. at this place. Of the latter union two children have been born-Bard and Helen- and these are the prime factors in making one of the happiest homes in the country. Mr.Nichols owns a town residence, and in additon to an interest in some of the most valuable farming lands in conjunction with Mr.Joel Wynne of Memphis.
- NICHOLS - LENA - - MRS. - PIERCE - - 1883 - UNKNOWN - FIRST WIFE OF JOHN M.NICHOLS
- NORTON - CARRIE - V. - MRS. - ROLESON - 5 7 1856 - 11 1 1941 - CITY - WIFE OF NATHAN W.NORTON
- NORTON - NATHAN - WILLIAM - JUDGE - - 10 15 1850 - 3 6 1912 - CITY - Photo May 2006-Gravestone IMAGE2193 The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 93:Judge Nathan W.Norton is one of the most prominent lawyers in Eastern Arkansas. He enjoys an extensive and a very large and lucrative practice. The subject of this sketch was born October 15,1850, near Lick Springs, Kentucky, and is a son of William and Rebecca (Kennedy) Norton, who came from Virginia to Kentucky at an early day. Nathan W.Norton was educated in the schools of Oxford, Ohio, and he has added a wealth of information by close reading and study. He came to Cross County, Arkansas, in 1869, and began his business career by teaching school, afterward holding a position of Deputy Clerk of Cross County, and following with book-keeping. He resided in Cross County from the time he was eighteen years of age until 1885, representing that County in the legislature that year, and soon after came to Forrest City, where he has since resided. Judge Nathan W.Norton was married to Miss Carrie V. Roleson, of Cross County, on November 13,1879, and four children, all now living have blessed their union. Judge Norton is interested in the Bank of Eastern Arkansas, of which he is Vice-President.
- PARROTT - CYNTIA - A. - MRS. - WITTER - 8 29 1834` - 5 18 1914 - CITY - Photo May 2006-WIFE OF JOHN M. PARROTT-The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 122:Johnson Township is situated in the center of the northern half of the county and contains part of the Crowley's Ridge and some of the St.Francis bottom. It's area is approximately 25,000 acres, or a little more than thirty-eight whole sections. Congress during the early years of Jackson's first administration, provided for the opening of military roads to what was then our Western Territory. The trail from the Chickasaw Bluffs, on the Mississippi river to Arkansas Post, crossed the St.Francis river at a point near the present line between Cross and St.Francis Counties, and continued its course westward on a line nearly parallel with the county line to a point on top of Crowley Ridge. The red man had been charmed by this land before the white man arrived and found a large thriving community of the Cherokee Indians, located at what is now the Jones' farm, on a beautiful clear water, afterward called Village creek from this fact. Plenty of land here was designated for Bounty Land by the U.S.Government surveyors for the soldiers of the war of 1812, and the Indian Wars. It remained status quo until the state was admitted to the Union. The first white settlement is unknown, but some of the first three families related, named Filingrin, Tyer, and Strong appear to be first to locate. Samuel Filigren settled Old Wittsburg about 1798, and shortly after moved down into what is known as Johnson Township. John Johnson, for whom the township was named, came about 1812: the Mays shortly thereafter. The remains of Carnes Alexander along with wife, Mary Alexander, are buried with John Johnson in Loughridge Cemetery, hers being dated 1826, is probably the oldest in the county. The county seat remained in Johnson Township from 1827 to 1840. Wm.Strong and Caleb S.Manley both residents of the township were members from the county to the Constitutional Convention of 1836, and Strong was for three terms Sheriff of the county. John Johnson was for two terms County Judge. J.M.Parrott, clerk from 1842 to 1856; and J.M.Halbert, sheriff from 1840 to 1848, were residents of Johnson Township. In 1838, W.S.Mosly, a resident, went to the legislature. In 1840 W.S.Mosly and Wm.Strong went. In 1842, Dr.C.L.Sullivan, a whig, then a young man and a resident of the township, was sent as one of the members of the legislature. In 1841 W.S.Mosly was appointed prosecuting attorney for the judicial court, and shortly after followed his tragic death due to assassination on one Sunday morning, on the old Helena and Batesville road about a half mile south of the farm known as the Yarbrough Place.-Gravestone IMAGE1307 SECOND WIFE OF JOHN PARROTT
CSA-CIVIL-PIONEER-1839 - PARROTT - JOHN - M. - - - 10 1814 - 3 23 1896 - CITY - John M. Parrott, a retired lawyer of Forrest City, is native of Tennessee. His father, John Parrott, moved to that State at a very early day in its history, where he engaged in the saddlery business, serving as a soldier in the War of 1812. He died in 1845, his wife surviving him twenty years. They were the parents of a large family, of whom John M., our subject, who was born in Jefferson County, Tenn., in October, 1814, is the only survivor. He lived at his native town, Dandridge, attending the academy at that place, until seventeen years of age, when his father moved upon a farm in the vicinity. In 1836 he commenced life for himself at Blountsville, Ala., going into the mercantile business, and three years later came to St. Francis County, continuing the same business at Madison. In 1840 he was appointed deputy clerk by Isaac Mitchel, then clerk of the St. Francis circuit court, and in 1842 was elected circuit clerk, which office he filled with such satisfaction to the citizens that he was made his own successor for fourteen years in succession; during this time he applied himself closely to the study of law, and in 1856 he was admitted to the bar and commenced practicing, which he followed until within a few years, when be retired from active professional life. In 1864 Mr. Parrott was elected to the legislature, but did not serve the term, owing to the fact of there being no session that year. In 1874 he was delegate to the constitutional convention. He was a candidate for nomination for the office of auditor of State in 1876, but was beaten by John Crawford. During the war he entered the Confederate service and acted as assistant adjutant, though being in no engagements. Mr. Parrott has been twice married; first, in 1841, to Rhoda Johnson, who died in 1858. His second union, in 1859, was to Mrs. Johnson (nee Witter). They are the parents of six children, three of whom are still living: Kate C. (now Mrs. Martin), Ida Lee (now Mrs. Miller) and Mattie A., all residing in this county. Mr. Parrott has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, for the past forty-five years. He is also connected with the Masonic order. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.It is with the feeling of great sorrow that the Times chronicles the death of Judge John P.Parrott. which sad event occurred at his home, five miles north of the city, on Monday, March 23rd, 1896, in the eighty second year of his age. He was buried in the family cemetery, near Andrew's Landing, on the following day, under the auspices of the F.& A. Masons. Judge Parrott settled in this county in 1835, having moved from Knoxville, Tenn. He represented the county in the only two constitutional conventions held by our state, and held the office of circuit court clerk for fourteen years., and served as County and Probate Judge for one term. There never lived a purer or more honored citizen in this county, and to his last day on earth wore his crown of labor, love, and forebearance meekly, submitting to his long suffering with resignation and courage to the last. May the rising generation imitate his noble life, and that in death they too may be prepared to go in peace. Judge Parrott was a member of the Bar of Eastern Arkansas, and highly esteemed by all the courts. The service was officiated by Dr.H.P.Dooley and Gen.Geo.P.Taylor, in a sweetly impressive manner. He was a charter member of the W.M.W. and brethren of the Rising Star Lodge, and was the first Secretary of the lodge.-3-27-1896
- PARROTT - RHODA - - MRS. - JOHNSON - UNK - 1858 - ARKHIS - FIRST WIFE OF JOHN PARROTT
- PASLAY - GERALDINE - - MRS. - RUPUM - - UNK - ARKHIS - FIRST WIFE OF ELDER W.H.PASLAY
- PASLAY - H. - W. - REV. - - 1802 - 1872 - ARKHIS - FATHER OF REV.W.H.PASLAY
- PASLAY - JULIA - - MRS. - PRINCE - - UNK - ARKHIS - SECOND WIFE OF ELDER W.H.PASLAY
- PASLAY - MARY - - MRS. - WRIGHT - 1803 - 1873 - ARKHIS - MOTHER OF REV. W.H.PASLAY
- PASLAY - W. - H. - ELDER - - - NA - ARKHIS - Rev. W. H. Paslay, prominently associated with the Baptist Church of Forrest City, first saw the light of day in South Carolina, December 18, 1831, being the son of H. W. and Mary (Wright) Paslay, born in South Carolina, in 1803 and 1802, respectively. H. W. Paslay was a graduate from the Medical Institute of Charleston, and also a minister of the Baptist Church. He was recognized as a gentleman of unusual attainments, both in his practice of medicine, and as a minister of the Gospel. He immigrated to Arkansas in 1857, where his death occurred in 1872. To himself and wife a family of eight children were born. The mother of Mr. Paslay closed her eyes to the scenes of this world in 1873. W. H. Paslay received his education in the schools of his native State, afterward taking a full course in the well-known Furman University of South Carolina, graduating therefrom in the year 1855. He then taught school for several years, and was ordained in Alabama, where for fifteen years he was engaged in preaching and teaching. Coming to Arkansas in the fall of 1872, he located in Monroe County, and has endeared himself to many friends and acquaintances by his conscientious and faithful work in the church, as well as by his efficient discharge of the manifold duties of teacher in the schools. He has been occupied in preaching (as at present) in St. Francis, Lee, Monroe and Phillips Counties, his work covering a period of over thirty-one years. During the Civil War he was prevailed upon by many soldiers, who went into active service, to remain at home to look [p.487] after their families, they feeling that his watchful care would keep them from all harm, so his work in the war covered only a short time. Mr. Paslay was first married to Miss Geraldine Rupum, of Alabama, who left four daughters, viz.: Mary Tula, Ora Lana, Alna Mona and Etta Leta. He was next married to Miss Julia Prince of Alabama, who died leaving one child, Estelle. His third and present wife was formerly Miss Ann Dozier of Jasper County, Ga., and by her he became the father of three sons; W. H., Woode D. and Rob E. Mr. Paslay in connection with his many other duties, carefully cultivates a farm of 320 acres of valuable land. He is a Mason in the Blue Lodge and Chapter, and also a Knight of Honor. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.OBIT
- PEARSON - GEORGE - W. - - - 12 25 1830 - NA - ARKHIS - G. W. Pearson, deputy circuit and county clerk of St. Francis County, was born in Mississippi December 25, 1830, being the third in a family of nine children born to John A. and Nancy (Nichols) Pearson. They were natives of North Carolina (near Fair Bluff), and married there, moving to Southern Mississippi in 1829. At the date of their deaths they lived near Brandon, Miss. John A. Pearson was a Methodist Episcopal minister, and had preached from the earliest recollections of his son until his death, in 1842. Of their large family of children, G. W. is the only one now living. Everett died at Nashville, Tenn., in the Confederate army, in the Sixth Mississippi Regiment; John was waylaid and shot by a negro; the sisters married and all died after the war. G. W. has in his possession a cane which was made by his grandfather (a native of North Carolina) when a young man. He was a carpenter and natural mechanic, and died in his seventy-third year. G. W. Pearson received his education in the schools of Mississippi, and selected farming as his occupation, in which he was actively engaged until coming to Arkansas, in 1872. He was married in Mississippi to M. A. Taylor, and their union was blessed by two children: William Atkins and Annie Everett. Mr. Pearson owns a residence in town. He was agent for the Memphis & Little Rock Railroad for nine years, subsequently being appointed magistrate, and has been filling the position of deputy county clerk since May, 1889, discharging the duties of his office in a highly creditable manner. The grandfather of Mr. Pearson and two brothers were taken captives by Indians and carried far back into the interior of the country, after which the savages held a council to determine the best way to dispose of their captives. The brothers were lashed to the ground to await their terrible death, but an Indian maiden became enamored of one of them-a very handsome man-and went to his relief, cutting the lashes that bound him, and telling him at the same time to flee for his life, which injunction he was not slow to follow. He released his brothers, and after running nearly all night, they crawled into a large log, whose capacity was sufficient to hold them all. The Indians followed in hot pursuit, and were close upon them when a herd of deer crossed their path, thereby destroying the trail. The redskins gave up the chase, and actually seated themselves on the log in which the brothers were secreted, and in which they remained until night. They had been without food for three days, and when an opossum crossed their path they killed and devoured it without waiting to have it broiled, their intense hunger making them forget that it was raw. They made their way to a white settlement, and then on to their old home, where they were welcomed by their relatives and friends, who had despaired of ever seeing them again. Mr. Pearson has not been particularly fortunate in amassing property, but he and his honored wife enjoy that which is of far more consequence-an unsullied name and the sincere love of a host of friends. He is a Royal Arch Mason and a member of the Missionary Baptist Church, his wife also being connected with the same church. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- PEARSON - MARY - - MRS. - TAYLOR - - UNK - ARKHIS - WIFE OF GEORGE PEARSON
- PEEVEY - LOUISA - - MRS. - CURRY - - 8 1878 - ARKHIS - SECOND WIFE OF R.W.PEEVEY
- PEEVEY - MARY - J. - MRS. - DEW - - UNK - ARKHIS - THIRD WIFE OF R.W.PEEVEY
- PEEVEY - NELLIE - A. - MRS. - COLLIER - - 1850 - ARKHIS - FIRST WIFE OF R.W.PEEVEY
COL.ROBINSON'S REGIMENT-CSA-CIVIL-MAJOR - PEEVEY - R. - W. - MAJOR - - 1 8 1827 - UNK - ARKHIS - Hon. R. W. Peevey, farmer, stock raiser, and one of the prominent old settlers of St. Francis County, owes his nativity to Alabama, being a son of W. H. and J. A. (Childers) Peevey, originally from Georgia and Tennessee, respectively, and of Irish descent. The parental grandparents of our subject came to this country shortly after the Revolutionary War. R. W. Peevey was born January 8, 1827, and was the fourth son in a family of seven children. He spent his boyhood [p.488] days on his father's farm, and before his twentieth birthday was married to Miss Nellie A. Collier, who died in 1850, leaving three children, two still living: James J. and Emma J. (wife of W. H. Fogg), both in this county. In 1862 Mr. Peevey enlisted in the Confederate army and served in Col. Robinson's regiment, being elected captain of his company at starting out, and in May, 1863, he was promoted to major. He participated in the battles of Vicksburg, Baton Rouge, Corinth and a number of others. After the war he engaged in farming in Madison County, Ala., until 1873, when he came to Arkansas and located in St. Francis County, where he bought his present farm. In October, 1859, he married Miss Louisa Curry. She died in August, 1878, having borne seven children, and of these four survive: Thomas Elbert, Robert H., William H. and Luther B. Mr. Peevey married his third wife, Mary J. Dew, in January, 1880. He is a prominent Democrat, and has ably served his county in the State legislature, to which he was elected in 1876. He also held the office of justice of the peace for several terms, and is still filling that position. A member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, he is also connected with the Masonic fraternity. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- PREWITT - FRANK - E. - - - 6 18 1859 - UNK - ARKHIS - George C. and Frank E. Prewitt are now prominent young farmers of this county, though natives of Missouri. They removed to St. Francis County, Ark., in 1886, and settled on the St. Francis River, a section noted for its fertility and productiveness. Their father, Joseph E. Prewitt, was a native of Scott County, Ky., where he was reared and married, Miss Naomi M. Nash, a native of Covington, Ky., becoming his wife. She was a daughter of William and Elizabeth Nash, and died in 1879, leaving six children: Robert C. (M. D.), William L. (a teacher in Missouri), Bettie A. (wife of George W. Watts), George C. and Frank E., and Mattie C. (now Mrs. Clifford, of Missouri). Mr. Prewitt died in 1874 at the age of sixty-five. George C. Prewitt was born on May 20, 1850, and received a good education, being instructed in the rudiments of farm work by his father, who was an agriculturist of advanced ideas. At the age of twenty he commenced farming for himself. Frank E. was born in Pike County, Mo., June 18, 1859, and started out in life as a tiller of the soil at the age of nineteen, in 1886 becoming associated with his brother George. They are industrious and enterprising young farmers, and are turning their attention to that most lucrative branch of agricultural pursuits, as well as that most beneficial to the community, the breeding of fine stock, in which they will undoubtedly make a decided success. They are Democrats in politics and liberal donators to all charitable and worthy enterprises. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- PREWITT - GEORGE - C. - - - 5 20 1850 - UNK - ARKHIS - SEE GEORGE C.PREWIT
- RAY - ELIJAH - REV - - - - UNK - ARKHIS - FATHER OF JULIA G.HARRIS, WIFE OF EDWARD BONNER-IN 1869 was married to Miss Julia G., daughter of Elijah and Julia (Ray) Harris, Mrs.Bonner's father was Rev.Elijah Ray, a Baptist minister of South Carolina. Her mother's father, Col.William Washington Harris, a native of North Carolina, was a soldier in the War of 1812, serving as Colonel in the volunteer service, and died at the age of eighty-eight years. He was one of the first settlers of Spartanburg, S.C.
- ROLLWAGE - JENNIE - - MRS. - ANDERSON - - UNK - ARKHIS - WIFE OF OTTO B.ROLLWAGE-of Monroe County, a graduate of a female college in Tennessee, and a highly educated and refined lady. She is a leader in the society of Forrest City, and is one of the prominent members of the W. C. T. U. in Arkansas, having been a State delegate to the National Convention held at Nashville in 1887. This worthy couple are the parents of five children: Norma, Otto, Tolise, De Velling and Madeleine.
- ROLLWAGE - LOUIS - - - - - UNK - ARKHIS - BROTHER OF OTTO B.ROLLWAGE
- ROLLWAGE - OTTO - BENJAMIN - MAYOR - - 9 23 1853 - 2 29 1926 - CITY - BORN CINCINATTI, OHIO-Hon. Otto B. Rollwage-Goodspeed's Biography 1884.Hon. Otto B. Rollwage, mayor of Forrest City, and a member of the firm of Rollwage & Co., one of the leading mercantile houses in Forrest City, was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1854, being reared and educated in that city. At the age of twenty years he came to Forrest City, and engaged as salesman in a store in this city for three months, after which he entered into the mercantile business with his brother Louis. They commenced on a small scale, but by close attention to business and strict economy, enjoy a very extensive trade, employing eight salesmen in their store. They own five business houses besides the one they occupy. Mr. Rollwage was a member of the board of aldermen for some time, and so efficient were his services in that capacity, and so diligently did he attend to the duties devolving on him that he was complimented with a nomination for mayor of Forrest City, while away from home, and without his knowledge. His administration has been very beneficial to the city, he having enforced the many ordinances that were before a dead letter on the status, and especially has he been vigorous in the prosecution of all parties violating the whisky laws; as a result there is now no better regulated city in the State. In his domestic relations Mr. Rollwage is not less happily situated than in business circles. He married Miss Jennie Anderson, of Monroe County, a graduate of a female college in Tennessee, and a highly educated and refined lady. She is a leader in the society of Forrest City, and is one of the prominent members of the W. C. T. U. in Arkansas, having been a State delegate to the National Convention held at Nashville in 1887. This worthy couple are the parents of five children: Norma, Otto, Tolise, De Velling and Madeleine. Mr. R. is a son of Frederick and Mina (Kuker) Rollwage, both natives of Germany. Frederick Rollwage is still living and resides in Cincinnati, but spends about half of his time with his son, our subject. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.-The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 94:Hon.Otto B.Rollwage is a lawyer by profession, and is a native of Cincinnatti, Ohio, where he was born On Sept.23,1853. He is a son of F. and Mena (Kuker) Rollwage, who emigrated from Germany in 1838. His father was a tailor by trade, who continued at his chosen calling until sixty-five years of age, when he retired. Our subject was reared in Cincinnatti and educated in the common schools of that city. In 1874, at the age of twenty years, he came to Forrest City and was engaged as a salesman for the firm of Sparks & Rollwage, said firm being composed of William Sparks, and L.Rollwage, brother of our subject. They then formed L.Rollwage & Co. and operated until December 31,1902, Otto Rollwage retired from the firm and soon thereafter, admitted to the bar, and since has been practicing law with marked success. In 1877 he was happily married to Miss Jennie E. Anderson, of Monroe County, who was born and reared in Arkansas, and is a highly educated and refined lady whose friends are legion. Ten children have blessed this match, namely, Talbert, Norma, Otto, Tolise, DeVeiling, Madeline, Ardale, Herman, Virginia and Ralph, all of whom, their first born, Talbert, who died when four years of age, are now living in this city. He was a member of the board of aldermen for three years, and Mayor for two terms, having been nominated for the latter the first time while away from home and without his knowledge. He was chosen President of the Arkansas State Merchant's Association in 1900 at it's organization in Little Rock.
- RUSH - CORA - M. - MRS - PEAK - 10 22 1866 - 1 22 1946 - FPARK - Dr.Rush married Miss Cora M. Peak, daughter of James and Belle (Langdon) Peak of Lexington, Mo. , on April 24,1901. Their children include Frances Marian, who is Mrs.E.T.Slaughter of Dallas, Tx.; Anne Virginia, Mrs.David Gates of near Forrest City; and Stella Mae, who is Mrs.W.B.Rich, Jr. of Forrest City.
- RUSH - JAMES - ODDY - DR. - - 6 2 1867 - 2 25 1960 - FPARK - GRACELAND-1501-Biographies NEXT TO CORA RUSH-A COUNTRY DOCTOR-The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 19:Perhaps the most handsome views in the county is "Rushmore", which represents the typical Southern Plantation, owned by Dr.J.O.Rush, of Forrest City, and comprises 300 acres situated one and a half miles due west of said city in the very heart of prolific agricultural section. The improvements include an overseer's residence, two-story servants' quarters and ten tenant houses, several of which are large double houses built of huge cypress and poplar logs hewn down to 5 and 6 inches, and showing almost a solid face, the lengths varying from 14 to 24 feet. Rushmore is situated in the center of a proposed improvement district for the purpose of drainage, and is on the line of a canal to be constructed from Forrest City to Spy Buck creek, which empties into the L'Anguille river. These public ditches are the backed by Dr.Rush and Capt.James Fussell.[From History of St.Francis Co., 1954-Times Herald Publishing Co.] Born near Mayview, Mo., Dr.Rush was the son of the late Joel G. and Annie (Brigg) Rush. He moved to this county in April 1896, and began practicing at Colt, moving to Forrest City in 1900, where he had an office in the Dyer building on Front Street. It was in 1907 that he built his home, which included his office at 300 North Front St.. He has lived there ever since. Dr.Rush married Miss Cora M. Peak, daughter of James and Belle (Langdon) Peak of Lexington, Mo. , on April 24,1901. Their children include Frances Marian, who is Mrs.E.T.Slaughter of Dallas, Tx.; Anne Virginia, Mrs.David Gates of near Forrest City; and Stella Mae, who is Mrs.W.B.Rich, Jr. of Forrest City. Dr.Rush has over 3,700 Indian relics in his home museum, which are catalogued and form one of the largest collections in the state. These are now in the St.Francis Co.Museum in the same home! He bought the first Ford second-hand in the county, and had the first Ford dealership here. By 1952, he had 600 acres of land when he transferred his farms to his children. A sketch of Dr.Rush would not be complete without something else, however-his deep, hearty laughter, which has sounded up and down Forrest City streets for more than half a century.
- SANDERS - CHARLES - H. - - - 1858 - 5 30 1913 - CITY - Age 55-The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905:The Bank of Eastern Arkansas was established and opened for business in 1886, Mr. Charles H. Sanders of Lebanon, Tennessee, who was largely responsible for its organization, was elected cashier, a position he held until 1905. The bank flourished from the beginning under their able and careful management.
- SANDERS - EVA - - MRS. - DENSON - - BEF.1865 UNK - UNKNOWN - FIRST WIFE OF JOSEPH BOONE SANDERS
- SANDERS - J. - T. - - - 10 13 1873 - 2 9 1943 - CITY - Photo May 2006-"Bapp"-The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905:The Enterprise Drug Store. Forrest City is proud to point its finger of guidance to the Enterprise Drug Store, and attest that it is just what it's name implies. Mr.J.T.Sanders, the proprietor, was born on October 13,1873, in Prairie County, Arkansas. He is the youngest son of Joe Boon and Lucy Clay (Gwyn) Sanders, who came to Arkansas in 1870 from Mississippi, the former being a native of North Carolina, born in 1834, and his mother in Virginia, in 1844. Our subject worked on a farm and attended school in Prairie county until 1891, when he came with the family to Forrest City. He was educated in the common schools and the St.Louis College of Pharmacy, and began his business career by sweeping out, washing bottles, &c., in the store which he now owns. He rose gradually in importance, paid his own way through college, receiving no financial aid from friends and relatives, and in 1899 purchased a one half interest in the business of his employer, and two years later bought him out completely. He was married on May 11,1904 to Miss Lizzie Rose Moores, of Russellville, Arkansas, and one child, Rebecca, now aged eight months, has blessed their union. Gravestone IMAGE1038
18TH REGIMENT-MISSISSIPPI VOLUNTEERS-GEN.FORREST - SANDERS - JOSEPH - BOONE - Prof. - - 8 19 1834 - 11 6 1910 - CITY - DEATH=IN MEMORY OF J.B.SANDERS=The subject of this sketch was born in Johnson courty, in the State of North Carolina on the 19th day of August,1834. He was married in 1856 to Miss Eva Denson, with whom he lived happily until the summons came from her Lord, and she passed into eternal life. To this union were born three children, of which only one survives, Mr.R.H.Sanders, of Devalls Bluff, Ark. He was married a second time to Miss Lucy Gwyn, in 1865, who survives him. Of this union there were born seven children, of whom five, W.T.Sanders, J.G.Sanders, J.T.Sanders, Mrs.Alice Longest and Mrs.Lucy Hargraves-all living. His life span was 76 years, of which he gave 60 years in loving service to the Lord. He had a Christian home, and all his children have turned to God. He was a brave soldier during the Civil war, and served with the 18th Regiment of Mississippi Volunteers, under N.B.Forrest, and he was always ready to engage old comrades and friends in pleasant conversation about their common experiences in and principal events of army life. After the war, he with vigor pursued his vocation of teaching and farming, soon repairing his broken fortunes. He moved from Mississippi to Arkansas, and settled in Prairie county in Des Arc. He came from Hazen in that county to Forrest City in 1894, and resided here until his death, which occurred on Nov.6,1910. Committee:J.F.Fondren/W.W.Campbell/J.M.Prewett. 1-13-1911
- SANDERS - LIZZIE - ROSE - MRS. - MOORES - 5 12 1877 - 11 6 1916 - CITY - Photo May 2006-Wife of J.T.SANDERSGravestone IMAGE1040
- SANDERS - LUCY - CLAY - MRS. - GWYN - 8 27 1846 - 2 16 1927 - CITY - SECOND WIFE OF JOSEPH BOONE SANDERS-He was married a second time to Miss Lucy Gwyn, in 1865, who survives him. Of this union there were born seven children, of whom five, W.T.Sanders, J.G.Sanders, J.T.Sanders, Mrs.Alice Longest and Mrs.Lucy Hargraves-all living. -OBIT Thanks Jean Meaney
- SEABORN - FRANKIE - - MRS. - CASTEEL - - UNK - ARKHIS - WIFE OF GEORGE W.SEABORN-
NATIVE - SEABORN - GEORGE - W. - JR. - - 1853 - BEF.1895 UNK - ARKHIS - G. W. Seaborn, deputy sheriff of St. Francis County, is well known to the residents of that section of Arkansas, and enjoys the esteem of all, except from those whose disregard of law compels him to discharge the duties of his office in an impartial manner; at such a time he would scarcely be recognized as a jovial companion or the perpetrator of many amusing jokes. Mr. Seaborn was born in St. Francis County in 1853, being the son of G. W. and Frankie (Casteel) Seaborn. The former, of Tennessee nativity, came to Arkansas when about nineteen years of age, locating in St. Francis County, and being the first man to bring a flat-boat load of merchandise up the St. Francis River. He purchased the goods in New Orleans, and established an extensive business near Mount Vernon, when that was the county seat. He was the first sheriff of the county, holding that office for twelve years, and subsequently served in the State legislature, and was a member of that body at the breaking out of the late war. In 1863 he moved to Tennessee, and upon the close of hostilities opened a mercantile establishment at Jefferson, Texas. In 1872 he returned to St. Francis County, and died in 1875 at the age of sixty-three years. Mrs. Seaborn accompanied her parents from Tennessee to Arkansas when quite small, and has resided in this county ever since. She was married in St. Francis County and became the mother of two children, G. W. being the youngest. Annie, his sister, is now the wife of B. F. Elington of Atlanta, Ga. Mrs. Seaborn owns a large farm, but resides with her children. G. W. Seaborn grew to manhood in St. Francis County, receiving his education in Texas, where the facilities afforded him were unusually liberal. After finishing his schooling, he came back to his old home and engaged in farming for four years, and with the exception of four years spent in the livery business at Forrest City, has made agricultural pursuits his principal avocation. He now owns about 600 acres in this and adjoining counties. Mr.Seaborn was married in 1876 to Miss Mattie Cabbs, a daughter of Dr. J. H. Cabbs, brother of the present land commissioner. Dr. Cabbs' mother is living in this county at the advanced age of ninety-three years. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Seaborn three children were born. Mrs. Seaborn died in 1883, leaving many friends to mourn her death. In his political views he sides with the Democratic party. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- SEABORN - MATTIE - - MRS. - CABBS - UNK - 1883 - ARKHIS - WIFE OF GEORGE W.SEABORN JR.-Mr.Seaborn was married in 1876 to Miss Mattie Cabbs, a daughter of Dr. J. H. Cabbs, brother of the present land commissioner. Dr. Cabbs' mother is living in this county at the advanced age of ninety-three years. To the union of Mr. and Mrs. Seaborn three children were born. Mrs. Seaborn died in 1883,
CIVIL - SKINNER - JAMES - W. - - - 1842 - NA - ARKHIS - James W. Skinner was born in Fleming County, Ky., in 1842, as the son of Benjamin F. and Lucinda SkinnerHis early life was passed in the schools of his native State, from which he received a superior education, and at the age of nineteen he began in business on his own responsibility in New Orleans, making many friends both in social and business circles during his stay in that city. In 1861, going to Memphis, Tenn., he enlisted in the Confederate service, where he remained for one year and then commenced steamboating on the Mississippi River, following this business until the Federals gained control of the river. In 1868 he came to St. Francis County, Ark., and embarked in the manufacture of staves. Two years later he settled his present farm, which is well improved and gives evidence of thrift and prosperity. Mr. Skinner is a believer in the Christian Church, and in his political views is a Democrat. He is liberal in his support to all worthy enterprises, and a man generally esteemed by the entire community. His ancestors came from Ireland, having emigrated to America previous to the Revolution, in which conflict his grandfather was a gallant soldier. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- SNOWDEN - JOHNIE - - - - 5 18 1873 - 10 6 1875 - ARKHISBIO - SON OF STEPHEN AND TEMPERANCE SNOWDEN
- SNOWDEN - STEPHEN - F. - - - 1844 - NA - ARKHISBIO - Stephen F. Snowden was born in Gibson County, Tenn., in 1844. His father and mother immigrated from North Carolina at an early day and when he was about two years old the father died. At the age of ten years his mother moved to Memphis, Tenn., where she still resides. Stephen's first work in Memphis was in a butcher shop, where he remained about three years. He then went on the Mississippi River as cabin boy, continuing for some time in this and other capacities, or, till about 1863, when he entered the employ of the Memphis & Charleston Railroad as brakesman. He remained at this business about one year. In 1864 Mr. Snowden farmed and cut cord wood on Island Forty in the Mississippi River eighteen miles above Memphis. In 1865-66-67 he was employed on a tug plying the Mississippi River above and below Memphis. His last work on the water was acting as mate on a steamer running up and down White and Black Rivers in 1868. On the second day of March, 1869, he landed in St. Francis County, Ark., where he still resides. He has been occupied in farming since his arrival and now owns 250 acres of land, seventy acres of which are in a high state of cultivation. W. Snowden's father dying when he was quite young and leaving his mother in indigent circumstances caused him to be raised without any education. Consequently he had to depend on mother wit alone, but to his credit be it said he is in better circumstances than many who have had the advantage of a good schooling. Mr. Snowden was married in 1871 to Miss Temperance M. Claiborn, daughter of Thomas and Laura A. Claiborn. To Mr. and Mrs. Snowden have been born four children: Johnie (born May 18, 1873, and died October 6, 1875), Vital (born January 1, 1876), Delia (born August 14, 1878) and Mildred (born November 2, 1882). Mr. Snowden is a Democrat of the first water, and with his wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He is a member in high standing of the Knights of Honor and enjoys the respect of all who know him. He is a liberal supporter of all worthy objects that indicate the growth and prosperity of the country. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- SNOWDEN - STEPHEN - F. - - - - NA - ARKHISBIO - FATHER OF DELIA LESCA (SNOWDEN)- Mrs. Delia Lesca, widow of his former employer, and a daughter of Stephen Snowden, a native of Tennessee.
- SNOWDEN - TEMPERANCE - M. - MRS. - CLABORNE - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - WIFE OF STEPHEN F.SNOWDEN-Mr. Snowden was married in 1871 to Miss Temperance M. Claiborn, daughter of Thomas and Laura A. Claiborn. To Mr. and Mrs. Snowden have been born four children: Johnie (born May 18, 1873, and died October 6, 1875), Vital (born January 1, 1876), Delia (born August 14, 1878) and Mildred (born November 2, 1882).
- SPARKMAN - LIZA - - MRS. - PURVIS - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - WIFE OF DR.R.H.SPARKMAN=MRS.LIZA (PURVIS)DANIEL-Dr. Sparkman was united in marriage on December 23, 1859, to Mrs. Liza (Purvis) Daniel, of North Carolina.
McGEE'S COMPANY-McNEIL'S REGIMENT-CSA - SPARKMAN - R. - H. - DR. - - 5 10 1828 - 12 13 1902 - CITY - Mason-R. H. Sparkman, M. D.-Goodspeed's Biography 1884.R. H. Sparkman, M. D., one of Forrest City's enterprising citizens, was born in North Carolina, May 10, 1828, being the son of John and Nancy (Wooten) Sparkman. John Sparkman owed his nativity to North Carolina, but moved to Tennessee when the subject of this sketch was quite small, locating in Shelby County, Tenn., where his death occurred in his fifty-ninth year. Mrs. Sparkman was also of North Carolina origin and by her union with Mr. Sparkman became the mother of five children, R. H. being the only one now living. The name Sparkman, as might be supposed, is Irish, the ancestors of the family coming at an early day from the Emerald Isle. The grandfather was a soldier in the War of the Revolution, and the maternal grandfather served in the War of 1812. Dr. Sparkman received a good common education in the schools of Shelby County, and afterward attended his first course of medical lectures in Cincinnati, his early ambition having been to be a physician, and by his determination and diligent application to his studies he became a credit to that most noble of all professions. He graduated with honors from the Medical School at Memphis in 1857, and immediately began practice in Shelby County, but a year afterward, in 1858, making a trip to Arkansas became convinced that that State promised a better opening, so located on the Helena road, five miles from Forrest City. At the breaking out of the war he had built up an enviable practice. He joined the Confederate army, McGee's company, McNeil's regiment, afterward becoming surgeon of that regiment. The company was soon made independent and reported to Col. Dobbins, Dr. Sparkman remaining in the service about two years. He returned to Arkansas and practiced until 1875, but succeeded in collecting only about half of his bills, some of them of long standing. He has since retired from active practice, and is now engaged in farming, owning 450 acres of valuable land. Dr. Sparkman was united in marriage on December 23, 1859, to Mrs. Liza (Purvis) Daniel, of North Carolina. Dr. and Mrs. Sparkman are members of the Baptist Church, and the former is a member of A. F. & A. M. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- STAYTON - CAROLINE - - MRS. - LOCKART - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - WIFE OF DR.D.H.STAYTON
CIVIL WAR SURGEON-CSA - STAYTON - D. - H. - MD. - - 9 13 1837 - 8 19 1895 - ARKHISBIO - Dr.D.H.Stayton, formerly of this county, more recently, of Searcy, died at his home Monday. He is the brother of Judge J.W.Stayton of Newport.8-23-1895 D. H. Stayton, M. D., was born and reared in Phillips County, Ark. His father, Thomas N. Stayton, made his advent into the world in Delaware, in 1809, and landed in Arkansas on February 14, 1829, settling in Helens, which was at that time only a village numbering but seven families. Mr. Stayton painted the first house in that present city. His father, Hill D. Stayton, was employed as State surveyor at the time, and helped to lay out the section lines of those counties. Pioneers of such early days depended largely on their rifles for subsistence, as the farms were small and not cleared, but their children are the large land owners and prosperous farmers of the present. Mr. Stayton was married after coming to Arkansas to Miss Easter Harris, a daughter of William R. Harris, who moved to this State in 1833. They were the parents of five children, three of whom are still living: John W. (a lawyer of Jackson County and at one time judge of the court), Ruth (now the wife of Dr. Hearing, of Brinkley, Ark.) and D. H. (the subject of this sketch). The latter was born on September 13, 1837, being reared on the farm in Phillips County. His first absence from home was to attend the University of Louisville (Ky.) Medical Department. After taking his first course he served four years as assistant surgeon in the Confederate army. At the close of the war he practiced in Lee County until 1870, when he returned to the University and completed his course, which hostilities had interfered with, and graduated in the spring of 1871, afterward resuming his practice at his old home. In 1887 he came to and located in St. Francis County, at Palestine, where he has since been engaged in attending to the prosecution of his chosen profession, his practice being large and steadily increasing. Dr. Stayton was married May 9, 1862, to Mrs. Caroline Bowden (nee Lockart), a daughter of Thomas Lockart, of North Carolina. They have a family of three children: David H. (who is married and lives near Palestine), Thomas L. and Lelia C. Dr. Stayton was once president of the board of medical examiners of Lee County, and is medical examiner of the Royal Arcanum; he is also a member of the United States board of pension examining surgeons for this locality, and examiner of the K. of H. and of the K. & L. of H. Besides being a member of the three lodges named he belongs to the Masonic order, in which he has occupied all of the positions of honor. He is a Democrat in politics, and he and his wife are members of the Cumberland Presbyterian Church. He is now lord mayor of the incorporated town of Palestine, Ark. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
PIONEER-1833 - STAYTON - EASTER - - MRS. - HARRIS - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - MOTHER OF DR.D.H.Stayton-Mr. Stayton was married after coming to Arkansas to Miss Easter Harris, a daughter of William R. Harris, who moved to this State in 1833. They were the parents of five children, three of whom are still living: John W. (a lawyer of Jackson County and at one time judge of the court), Ruth (now the wife of Dr. Hearing, of Brinkley, Ark.) and D. H. (the subject of this sketch).
PIONEER - STAYTON - HILL - D. - - - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - FATHER OF THOMAS N.STAYTON-SURVEYOR FOR STATE
PIONEER-1829 - STAYTON - THOMAS - N. - - - 1809 - UNK - ARKHISBIO - FATHER OF DR.D.H.STAYTON-Thomas N. Stayton, made his advent into the world in Delaware, in 1809, and landed in Arkansas on February 14, 1829, settling in Helens, which was at that time only a village numbering but seven families. Mr. Stayton painted the first house in that present city. His father, Hill D. Stayton, was employed as State surveyor at the time, and helped to lay out the section lines of those counties. Pioneers of such early days depended largely on their rifles for subsistence, as the farms were small and not cleared, but their children are the large land owners and prosperous farmers of the present. Mr. Stayton was married after coming to Arkansas to Miss Easter Harris, a daughter of William R. Harris, who moved to this State in 1833. They were the parents of five children, three of whom are still living: John W. (a lawyer of Jackson County and at one time judge of the court), Ruth (now the wife of Dr. Hearing, of Brinkley, Ark.) and D. H. (the subject of this sketch).
84TH PENNSYLVANIA REGIMENT-CIVIL - STERN - J. - G. - CAPT - - 4 17 1844 - NA - ARKHISBIO - Capt. J. G. Stern's first trip south was an unwelcome one, but he remained for some time, boarding at Libby Prison and Belle-Isle. After his exchange he was again taken prisoner at the siege of Petersburg. Preferring death to that of prison life, he took the desperate chances and left his captors on the field of battle; this being done in daylight on the run. He was given a parting salute by a volley of musketry. The patriotic enthusiasm with which it was given was shown by a bullet hole through his equipage and one through his coat. Although given such a hearty farewell he stopped not until he reached his regiment, the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry. He participated in a number of battles, among the principal ones were Fredericksburg. Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Appomattox Court House, through the siege of Petersburg, and was present at the surrender of Gen. Lee. He was born April 17, 1844, in the State of Pennsylvania. At the close of the war he followed his parents to the State of Illinois, where he completed his education, which was very limited up to that time. During the latter years of his residence in that State he was employed in teaching school. In 1872 he went south a second time and located in Arkansaw, Phillips County, at the mouth of St. Francis River, where he worked as a laborer in a saw-mill. He soon engaged in business on his own account, getting out logs and staves. A few years later he accepted a position as agent for the Helena Lumber Company, and purchased a half interest in a boat running on the St. Francis and Mississippi Rivers, of which he was captain and pilot. Selling out his interest in the boat about seven years ago, he came to Madison, where he is now engaged in the timber and shingle business. He leased a shingle-mill about five years ago with a capacity of from 8,000,000 to 10,000,000 shingles per year. He owns a number of thousand of acres of timber land, located near his mill and to which he is connected by a tramway, operated by steam-power and leading into the woods for several miles. His parents are both living in the State of Illinois, his father at the age of seventy-one, and his mother one year younger. They were the parents of nine children, six of whom are living. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- STEWARD - BLANCHE - - MRS. - DAVIS - - NA - ARKHISBIO - CHILD OF D.W.Davis was married in 1863 to Mrs.McClintock. They are the parents of five children:Blanche (wife of James W.Steward, who was superintendent of the public schools for ten years), De Witt (nineteen years of age and who is studying surveying, of which he has practical knowledge, having at the State Fari at Little Rock competed and taken the prize for the best plot of a thirty-two sided farm and architectural drawings), Annie, David, and Mabel.
- STEWARD - JAMES - - - - - NA - ARKHISBIO - HUSBAND OF BLANCHE, CHILD OF D.W.Davis was married in 1863 to Mrs.McClintock. They are the parents of five children:Blanche (wife of James W.Steward, who was superintendent of the public schools for ten years), De Witt (nineteen years of age and who is studying surveying, of which he has practical knowledge, having at the State Fari at Little Rock competed and taken the prize for the best plot of a thirty-two sided farm and architectural drawings), Annie, David, and Mabel.
CO.A-5TH ARK.REGIMENT-CSA - STEWART - JAMES - M. - - - 1842 - 1938 - CITY - Photo May 2006- CSA-HUSBAND OF MOLLIE E. STEWART-Gravestone IMAGE1067 James M. Stewart, of the representative firm of Stewart & Taylor, abstract, loan and general insurance agents of Forrest Citywas born at Collierville, in Shelby County, Tenn., in 1842. In 1859 he came to Arkansas, locating at the old county seat of Madison, in St. Francis County, where for two years he was engaged as clerk and book-keeper by an establishment at that point. When the war between the States was declared he went to Kentucky to join the cavalry service, but the delicate condition of his health caused him to be rejected, much to his chagrin. Giving his supplies to a companion who had been more fortunate in being accepted, he returned to Arkansas and joined the Fifth Arkansas (Hart's) Regiment as a private of Company A; he was afterward adjutant of his regiment, and at the close of the war was commanding Company A, in the Trans-Mississippi Department. He served for four years, and participated in all the principal engagements of the State. When peace had been declared Mr. Stewart accepted a position of trust with a firm at Memphis, Tenn., where he remained until 1868, leaving at that time to return to St. Francis County to fill a position as clerk and book-keeper. In 1879 he was elected clerk of the circuit court, in which capacity he served for four consecutive terms, in a manner eliciting the satisfaction and admiration of all concerned. Mr. Stewart then ceased to be an aspirant for office, and at that time was more popular with the people of the county than he had ever been before. By this prudent and all-wise step he still remains one of the most esteemed and influential men in the community. Soon after leaving the clerk's office he, in company with Mr. Taylor, formed the present real-estate firm, which is one of the most widely known and substantial establishments of this branch of business in this section of the State, they owning over 10,000 acres of valuable land. In societies Mr. Stewart is identified with the F. & A. M., K. T., K. of H. and K. & L. of H. Washington G. and Sarah W. (Griggs) Stewart, his parents, were natives of South Carolina and Tennessee, respectively, he being the fourth of a family of nine children born to their union. Washington Stewart was a millwright by trade, and enjoyed an extensive business in Tennessee and Mississippi. He executed a greater part of the work on the plank road out of Memphis, Tenn., through Mississippi, on Big Creek Plank Road, and many other public highways. He was a man of prominence and influence, and was one of the first mayors of Madison, the old county seat of St. Francis County. He died in 1868. J. M. Stewart was married, in 1866, to Miss Ollie E. Colson, of Paducah, Ky., and by her became the father of three children: James H., Elbert and Mary E. Mr. Stewart, besides his other interests, is a stockholder in and one of the incorporators of the Forrest City Hotel Company. He was elected secretary of that company at its organization, serving as such until forced by ill health to vacate in the winter of 1888. He is also a stockholder in and one of the original incorporators of the Bank of Eastern Arkansas, located at Forrest City. A member of the city council of the town of Forrest City and chairman of the finance committee, he was also twice elected a member of the school board of the special school district of Forrest City, and as such took an active interest in educational affairs. He served as Master of the Masonic Lodge here several terms and was Grand Marshal of the Grand Lodge of this State, also Dictator of the Lodge of K. of H. at same place, several consecutive terms. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- STEWART - SARAH - - MRS. - GRIGGS - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - MOTHER OF JAMES M.STEWART, WIFE OF WASHINGTON G.STEWART-Washington G. and Sarah W. (Griggs) Stewart, his parents, were natives of South Carolina and Tennessee, respectively.
- STEWART - WASHINGTON - G. - - - - 1868 - ARKHISBIO - FATHER OF JAMES M.STEWART-HUSBAND OF SARAH (GRIGGS)STEWART-Washington G. and Sarah W. (Griggs) Stewart, his parents, were natives of South Carolina and Tennessee, respectively, he being the fourth of a family of nine children born to their union. Washington Stewart was a millwright by trade, and enjoyed an extensive business in Tennessee and Mississippi. He executed a greater part of the work on the plank road out of Memphis, Tenn., through Mississippi, on Big Creek Plank Road, and many other public highways. He was a man of prominence and influence, and was one of the first mayors of Madison, the old county seat of St. Francis County. He died in 1868.
CO.B-1ST ARK.MOUNTED RIFLES-CSA - STONE - J. - E. - MD. - - 2 19 1839 - 3 15 1912 - CITY - OBIT J. E. Stone, M. D.-Goodspeed's Biography 1884.J.. E. Stone, M. D., has reached an eminence in his profession which renders his name almost a household word throughout Forrest City, and the surrounding locality. He received his literary education in Tennessee, and commenced the study of medicine under a tutor in Arkansas, afterward entering the Missouri Medical College (known then as the old McDowell College, and situated in St. Louis), where he was graduated with honors. Entering the Confederate army in May, 1861, in Company B, First Arkansas Mounted Rifles, he served over four years, participating in the battles of Oak Hill (where he was severely wounded) and Pea Ridge, and was then transferred across to the Army of Tennessee, just after the battle of Corinth. He also took an active part at Jackson (Miss.), Chickamauga, Duggers' Gap, New Hope Church, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Franklin, and several other engagements of minor importance. After the war Dr. Stone located in Van Buren County, Ark., where he actively followed the practice of his chosen profession for five years, then going to Memphis, and thence to Walnut Bend, Ark. In 1883 he came to Forrest City, and still enjoys an extensive patronage, besides a large livery business, also owning considerable land, both here and in Lee County. He is one of Forrest City's most enterprising and influential citizens, and has done much in his own peculiar way toward the present advancement and prosperity of the place. The Doctor has been twice married, his first union occurring in Tennessee, and the second in Arkansas. He was born in Virginia in 1839, and is the son of M. G. and Martha (Stovall) Stone, also originally from the Old Dominion. Dr. Stone is a member in high standing of the various Masonic lodges of this place. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- STONE - ORA - - MRS. - BRANCH - - 10 24 1874 - UNKNOWN - 1ST WIFE OF DR.J.E.STONE-The Doctor has been twice married, his first union occurring in Tennessee, and the second in Arkansas.
- STOUT - ELIZABETH - B. - MRS. - HARDIN - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - DIED AFTER 1898 WIFE OF CAPT.J.W.STOUT-He was married December 26, to Mrs. Elizabeth B. Brooks, daughter of Benjamin C. Hardin, who had one daughter. They have had nine children born to them, four of whom are dead, three sons and one daughter. Five children are living, two sons and three daughters: Minnie (the wife of Rev. W. W. Hendrix), Hollace W., Flora (wife of Dr. A. A. Berry), Thomas J. and Ophelia. Georgie A., the daughter of Mrs. Stout, is the wife of A. C. Shaver.
1ST BATTALION-ARK.CAVALRY-CSA - STOUT - J. - W. - CAPT - - 1829 - 7 28 1898 - LOUGHRIDGE - OBIT Capt. J. W. Stout enlisted in the Rebel army, in 1862, in the First Battalion, Arkansas Cavalry, Gen. Price commanding. He was captured at the battle of Big Black Bridge, Miss., May 17, 1863, and sent to military prison on Johnson's Island, in Lake Erie, where he was kept till February, 1865. After the collapse of the Confederacy, he returned to his family, and subsequently removed to Cross County. Ark., remaining there till 1871. Coming to St. Francis County, he purchased a home of 200 acres of land, and has since followed farming regularly and successfully, also serving the public as a mill and gin proprietor. Capt. Stout was born in McMinn County. E. Tenn., in 1829, and is of German descent, being a son of Daniel and Elisabeth Stout. His father was born in Virginia, and his mother in Kentucky. Her maiden name was Franklin. The senior Stout was a professional school-teacher in McMinn County, E. Tenn., for a series of years, and taught ten years in succession in the same academy. J. W.'s boyhood was spent in Tennessee, in attending school, and in 1851 he moved with his father to Walker County, Ga., following farming for about one year. Then he was engaged as salesman with Parham & Lee, in the mercantile business, till December, 1854. He was married December 26, to Mrs. Elizabeth B. Brooks, daughter of Benjamin C. Hardin, who had one daughter. They have had nine children born to them, four of whom are dead, three sons and one daughter. Five children are living, two sons and three daughters: Minnie (the wife of Rev. W. W. Hendrix), Hollace W., Flora (wife of Dr. A. A. Berry), Thomas J. and Ophelia. Georgie A., the daughter of Mrs. Stout, is the wife of A. C. Shaver. Capt. Stout and wife, and all the children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South. He also belongs to the Masonic order and the Knights of Honor. His wife is a member of the K. & L. of H. He is Democratic politically. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
PRIVATE CO. C.9TH TENN.INFT.CSA - SWEET - SILVIUS - EMORY - COL. - - 5 12 1843 - 4 3 1921 - CITY - 1-5-1912 COLONEL SWEET REMINISCENT=Widener, Dec.30,1911-For the past 15 days, whenever you meet a man his first words are, did you ever see so much rain and mud in your life. I have frequently, but especially forty nine years ago, on the 15th of December,, when the 19th Tennessee Infanty was detached from the Army at Murphreesboro and sent to LaVergne fifteen miles from Nashville, and there employed as skirimishers to combat the whole Yankee army, until we reached Racon creek on the night of Dec.28th, where we burned the bridge, and delayed the battle of Murphreesboro one day, the Yankees having to rebuild the bridge before they could cross with their artillery. The rain having ceased on the night of the 29th, on the night of the 30th, we were placed in line of battle on the north bank of the Stone river, the ground frozen hard, we were not allowed a spark of fire or light; the Yankee army in line on the Wilkerson Pike with a battery composed of eighteen Napoleon guns, with their line of pickets and sharpshooters only 300 yards in front. We had orders from the commanding general, detailed each regiment by the Adjutant, to watch for the sky rocket that would go up in the town of Murphreesboro the next morning, for Cheatham's Division to open fire and advance on the enemy. We caught the Yankees napping, and got some of their good coffee and ham, something we had not had in a long time. I would like to know how many in St.Francis county today who were on that memorable field. And well do I remember on the night of the 31st, in line of battle all night, still cold and without light, and on Jan.1st, when the gallant General Raines charged those masked field pieces on the Murphreesboro Pike and thereby lost his own life, three comrades who were there, W.H.Coffey, W.H.McDaniel, and J.B.Hodges have crossed the river. I know no others besides myself, but possibly many others in this county were there. I had the honor, or misfortune to be there myself. I held the rank of high private in the rear rank of Company C, 9th Tennessee Infantry; since the close of war, I have held higher positions, having reached the rank as Colonel. Respectfully, S.Emory Sweet. Our Senior, Col. Edwin Landvoight, was in this memorable fight, as a member of the organization known throughout the army as "Clay King's Hellhounds," which was stationed on Breckinridges's right. Ed Vadakin, The Times.
- TAYLOR - ALICE - - MRS. - KOONCE - 1850 - 7 6 1914 - CITY - WIFE OF GEORGE P.TAYLOR-=being married in February, 1873, to Miss Alice Koonce, a native of this county. She is the mother of six children: Edgar P., Walter R., Alva J., Alice N., Nannie and George P., Jr.
CSA - TAYLOR - GEORGE - PRESSLEY - JUDGE/SR./GENERAL - - - NA - ARKHIS - Mr. Taylor also owns several large plantations in this county, and is conceded to be one of its most prominent citizens, especially having the esteem and confidence of the Democracy of this locality, as is shown by the fact that for eight consecutive years he has been chairman of the County Central Committee, and was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention of 1888. He was also a delegate to the National Farmers' Congress, held at Montgomery, Ala., in November, 1889. George P. Taylor enjoys the friendship of, perhaps, a larger number of personal acquaintances than any man in Eastern Arkansas. Of magnificent physical proportions, standing over six feet high and weighing above 195 pounds, he attracts attention in any gathering. He was born in Cooper County, Mo., October 13, 1850, and traces his ancestry back four generations to John Taylor, of Scotch and Irish descant, who was the founder of that branch of the family on this side of the continent. He came to America before the great 'Stamp Act' and 'Boston Tea Party' occurred, and settled among the colonists of South Carolina. He was loyal to the country of his adoption when the great conflict began which announced the birth of the greatest nation on the face of the globe, and gave one of his sons to the cause of freedom. Early in the history of Kentucky John Taylor emigrated to this new territory, and here was born and reared his son, upon whom was conferred the family name of John. He grew to manhood in a locality even then thinly settled, but being lured by the tales of the new region across the Mississippi, followed the train of emigrants westward, and among the prominent names in the early history of Cooper County, Mo., appears that of John Taylor. He was there married to Miss Cochrell. After remaining in that county until the breaking out of the war he moved to St. LouisGeorge P. Taylor spent his early life in his native State, and attended school at Boonville, conducted by the renowned Dr. Kemper. He was fourteen years of age when his father removed to St. Louis, and in 1867 removed to Arkansas, settling in Lee County, on a plantation, where he remained until 1873. Then he came to Forrest City and died here in 1879 of yellow fever, his wife preceding him about one year. George P. Taylor located as a citizen of St. Francis County in 1870, where he was engaged in farming, being married in February, 1873, to Miss Alice Koonce, a native of this county. She is the mother of six children: Edgar P., Walter R., Alva J., Alice N., Nannie and George P., Jr. In 1874, after the reconstruction act, Mr. Taylor was elected representative from St. Francis County, though at that time only twenty-four years of age; he was re-elected in 1878, and in 1880 was appointed county collector. In 1880 he entered into the real-estate business at Forrest City. In 1885 the 'Forrest City Manufacturing Company' was formed, with Mr. Taylor as president, but a $5,000 fire shortly after caused the dissolution of the company. In 1884-85 he formed a partnership with Hatcher & Mann in the mercantile business, this remaining for two years. December, 1886, he was associated with James M. Stewart, as real-estate agents and brokers, then the only firm of the kind in the county. He is one of the organizers and is secretary of the Forrest City Hotel Company, a corporation with a capital stock of $24,000, and is also a stockholder and director of the Bank of Eastern Arkansas, located at Forrest City, which has a capital stock of $50,000. Both enterprises yield good returns, and their stock is quoted above par.
CSA - TAYLOR - GEORGE - PRESSLEY - JUDGE/SR./GENERAL - - 10 13 1850 - 5 13 1902 - CITY - OBITOBITBiographiesPhoto May 2006-Gravestone IMAGE0957&956--The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 66:Picture of monument dedicated June 20,1905, at the City Cemetery for W.W.Rainbolt, Sovereign of the Woodmen of the World, who was a former city marshall killed on the city streets by a desperate outlaw in 1904. General George P.Taylor was the first Consul Commander and Mr.B.R.Shade was the Secretary, both of whom have long since passed to the Supreme Camp above in the City cemetery. George P. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.George P. Taylor enjoys the friendship of, perhaps, a larger number of personal acquaintances than any man in Eastern Arkansas. Of magnificent physical proportions, standing over six feet high and weighing above 195 pounds, he attracts attention in any gathering. He was born in Cooper County, Mo., October 13, 1850, and traces his ancestry back four generations to John Taylor, of Scotch and Irish descant, who was the founder of that branch of the family on this side of the continent. He came to America before the great 'Stamp Act' and 'Boston Tea Party' occurred, and settled among the colonists of South Carolina. He was loyal to the country of his adoption when the great conflict began which announced the birth of the greatest nation on the face of the globe, and gave one of his sons to the cause of freedom. Early in the history of Kentucky John Taylor emigrated to this new territory, and here was born and reared his son, upon whom was conferred the family name of John. He grew to manhood in a locality even then thinly settled, but being lured by the tales of the new region across the Mississippi, followed the train of emigrants westward, and among the prominent names in the early history of Cooper County, Mo., appears that of John Taylor. He was there married to Miss Cochrell. After remaining in that county until the breaking out of the war he moved to St. Louis. George P. Taylor spent his early life in his native State, and attended school at Boonville, conducted by the renowned Dr. Kemper. He was fourteen years of age when his father removed to St. Louis, and in 1867 removed to Arkansas, settling in Lee County, on a plantation, where he remained until 1873. Then he came to Forrest City and died here in 1879 of yellow fever, his wife preceding him about one year. George P. Taylor located as a citizen of St. Francis County in 1870, where he was engaged in farming, being married in February, 1873, to Miss Alice Koonce, a native of this county. She is the mother of six children: Edgar P., Walter R., Alva J., Alice N., Nannie and George P., Jr. In 1874, after the reconstruction act, Mr. Taylor was elected representative from St. Francis County, though at that time only twenty-four years of age; he was re-elected in 1878, and in 1880 was appointed county collector. In 1880 he entered into the real-estate business at Forrest City. In 1885 the 'Forrest City Manufacturing Company' was formed, with Mr. Taylor as president, but a $5,000 fire shortly after caused the dissolution of the company. In 1884-85 he formed a partnership with Hatcher & Mann in the mercantile business, this remaining for two years. December, 1886, he was associated with James M. Stewart, as real-estate agents and brokers, then the only firm of the kind in the county. He is one of the organizers and is secretary of the Forrest City Hotel Company, a corporation with a capital stock of $24,000, and is also a stockholder and director of the Bank of Eastern Arkansas, located at Forrest City, which has a capital stock of $50,000. Both enterprises yield good returns, and their stock is quoted above par. Mr. Taylor also owns several large plantations in this county, and is conceded to be one of its most prominent citizens, especially having the esteem and confidence of the Democracy of this locality, as is shown by the fact that for eight consecutive years he has been chairman of the County Central Committee, and was a delegate to the National Democratic Convention of 1888. He was also a delegate to the National Farmers' Congress, held at Montgomery, Ala., in November, 1889. Mr. Taylor is a member of the Masonic order, in which he holds the office of Master, also belonging to the order of Knights of Pythias. Besides these he is a member of the I. O. O. F., and of the Knights and Ladies of Honor. Mrs. Taylor is a member of the Baptist Church. Their home in Forrest City is one of the finest here, elegantly furnished, and contains one of the largest and best-selected libraries in the county, embrac
CSA - TAYLOR - JOHN - - - - 10 1808 - 12 1879 - CITY - FATHER OF GEORGE P.TAYLOR-DIED OF YELLOW FEVER-AGE 71 YEARS-CSA INF.MARKER
- TAYLOR - JOHN - - - - - - ARKHISBIO - FATHER OF THOMAS L.TAYLOR-John and Mary Elizabeth (Cockrell) Taylor, originally from VirginiaJohn Taylor and wife came to Arkansas in 1866, where he engaged in farming (in this county), during his life
- TAYLOR - MARY - ELIZABETH - MRS - COCKRELL - - - ARKHISBIO - MOTHER OF THOMAS L.TAYLOR-John and Mary Elizabeth (Cockrell) Taylor, originally from VirginiaJohn Taylor and wife came to Arkansas in 1866, where he engaged in farming (in this county), during his life
- TAYLOR - MARY - - MRS. - - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - SECOND WIFE OF WILLIAM MITCHELL TAYLOR
- TAYLOR - NANCY - - MRS. - CASBEER - - BEF.1852 UNK - ARKHISBIO - WIFE OF WILLIAM MITCHELL TAYLOR
- TAYLOR - SALLIE - A. - MRS. - JARMAN - - 1874 - ARKHISBIO - WIFE OF THOMAS L.TAYLOR-Mr. Taylor was married in August, 1874, in Shelby County, Tenn., to Miss Sallie A. Jarman, but she lived only a few months.
CIVIL - TAYLOR - THOMAS - L. - - - - UNK - ARKHISBIO - Thomas L. Taylor, a prominent planter of St. Francis County, is a native of Missouri, and a son of John and Mary Elizabeth (Cockrell) Taylor, originally from VirginiaJohn Taylor and wife came to Arkansas in 1866, where he engaged in farming (in this county), during his life. Thomas L. received a good education at the public schools of this township, and later attended college in Clay County, Mo., supplementing this by an attendance at the Kemper School of Boonville. He left this institution in the fall of 1861 to join the Confederate army, in which he served until taken prisoner in 1863, being confined eight months, after which he was paroled. His health having suffered by close confinement he went to California, but returned in 1866 by wagon train, as the cholera which was prevalent along the rivers prevented a passage by boat. Mr. Taylor was married in August, 1874, in Shelby County, Tenn., to Miss Sallie A. Jarman, but she lived only a few months. He owns a fine farm of 120 acres, with a large part of it under cultivation, having good improvements, etc. He is a prominent Democrat of the Jeffersonian type. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
SPANISH AMERICAN - TURLEY - LINN - - 1STLIEUT. - - 7 9 1872 - 7 12 1938 - CITY - The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 58:Lieut.Linn Turley is a nephew of the senior member of the firm of E.Turley & Co., and was born in Marshall county, Mississippi, July 8,1873. His parents were Newton Paston and Artillia Turley, and he received his education primarily in the University of Arkansas, at Fayetteville. He begins his business career on the farm and came to this city on Sep.1,1889, from Byhalia, Mississippi, to accept a position with J.W.Beck & Co.. He remained with this firm for eight years, until he went to the Spanish American War. He was a First Lieutenant of Company H, which went from this city, and he was in camp ten months, being mustered in on February 28,1898. He returned to Forrest City and accepted a position with Mr.Robert L. Pettus with whom he remained until Sept.1,1904, when he became a member of E.Turley & Co. Lieut. Turley was married on Dec.26,1900, to Miss Maxine V. Webb of this city. He also owns interest in 560 acres of farming land in this county, and is doing well. The firm of E. Turley & Co. is one of seven large furnishing houses in Forrest City.Turley & Co.
- VADAKIN - EDWIN - L. - - - 1864 - 1914 - CITY - The latter, as might be supposed, found himself in rather straightened circumstances, but at this juncture, a railroad advertising agent stopped in the village, and taking a fancy to Mr. Vadakin, induced him to accompany him to Cincinnati, Ohio, promising to use his utmost endeavors to secure for him a good position in some one of the printing offices of that city. This he was unable to do, but he did furnish him a home for some time. Eager to become self-reliant, and not dependent on the bounty of his friends, Mr. Vadakin returned to his old home in Illinois, and accepted the position in one of the printing offices for the sum of $2 per week, and board. An uncle, who was a member of the Union Printing Company at Little Rock, then came to his assistance, and secured him work in an office in that city, where he remained for three years. At one time, while serving his apprenticeship, he had charge of the Union Job Office at Little Rock. Though his promotion was gradual, it was none the less sure, and he is to-day one of the expert printers in Arkansas. After working on the Democrat, at Lonoke, Ark., for some time, the proprietor purchased the Times at Forrest City, appointing Mr. Vadakin the manager, he to receive half of the net profits. The paper had almost died out, having become exceedingly unpopular from the effects of a newspaper controversy, but Mr. Vadakin brought it to the front, and it is now one of the best county papers in the State, besides being the leading publication of St. Francis County. In May, 1886, Mr. Vadakin was united in marriage with Miss Lillie B. Landvoigh, and to their union one child has been born, Dora Annette. Mr. Vadakin and his father-in-law bought the Times, and own it in partnership. He is a member of the Episcopal Church, and in politics a Democrat. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.The Forrest City Times' Art Souvenir-1905-Page 107:E.L.Vadakin, a native of Sullivan, Moultrie County, Illinois, is the junior member of The Forrest City Times firm, and managing editor. He is 41 years of age, and has been engaged in the printing business almost continuously since June 13,1879, at which time he entered the office of the Stewardson (Illinois) Enterprise as printer's devil. He came to Arkansas On October 11,1881, and to Forrest City in 1886. He was married in 1886 to Miss Lillie D. Landvoigt, daughter of the senior member of the firm, Col. Edwin Landvoigt, and to them four children were born, one of whom, Edwin Landvoigt Vadakin,. died in 1891. Mr. Vadakin was again married in 1903 to Miss Grace J.Darling, of Michigan, and one child, a baby boy blesses this union.-Photo May 2006--Gravestone IMAGE0974
- VADAKIN - EDWIN - L. - - - 1864 - 1914 - ARKHIS - E. L. Vadakin, the popular editor of the Forrest City Times, owes his nativity to the State of Illinois, having first seen the light of day near the little town of Sullivan in 1864, as the son of H. F. and A. (Clements) Vadakin. H. F. Vadakin was born in Vermont, but when quite young immigrated to Illinois, settling near Sullivan, where he became well known to the citizens for many miles around as an efficient and courteous druggist. His business was of many years' standing, and his death in 1888 was sincerely mourned, both by his personal friends and those who knew him through reputation. Mrs. Vadakin died when E. L. was a little child. At the age of fourteen, the subject of this sketch entered a printing office and there laid the foundation of his future career. After a few months his brother-in-law purchased the paper, which was located at Stewardson, Ill., but soon sold it. Mr. Vadakin remained with the successor, receiving $10 per month for his services. His next move was to Tower Hill, Ill., where, as no other employment presented itself, he worked for three months on a farm. About this time a campaign paper was started in the town, and afforded work for our subject for some time, but unfortunately it was short-lived, and as it sunk into obscurity, the editor also failed to materialize, having neglected to give Mr. Vadakin any compensation for his labor. The latter, as might be supposed, found himself in rather straightened circumstances, but at this juncture, a railroad advertising agent stopped in the village, and taking a fancy to Mr. Vadakin, induced him to accompany him to Cincinnati, Ohio, promising to use his utmost endeavors to secure for him a good position in some one of the printing offices of that city. This he was unable to do, but he did furnish him a home for some time. Eager to become self-reliant, and not dependent on the bounty of his friends, Mr. Vadakin returned to his old home in Illinois, and accepted the position in one of the printing offices for the sum of $2 per week, and board. An uncle, who was a member of the Union Printing Company at Little Rock, then came to his assistance, and secured him work in an office in that city, where he remained for three years. At one time, while serving his apprenticeship, he had charge of the Union Job Office at Little Rock. Though his promotion was gradual, it was none the less sure, and he is to-day one of the expert printers in Arkansas. After working on the Democrat, at Lonoke, Ark., for some time, the proprietor purchased the Times at Forrest City, appointing Mr. Vadakin the manager, he to receive half of the net profits. The paper had almost died out, having become exceedingly unpopular from the effects of a newspaper controversy, but Mr. Vadakin brought it to the front, and it is now one of the best county papers in the State, besides being the leading publication of St. Francis County. In May, 1886, Mr. Vadakin was united in marriage with Miss Lillie B. Landvoigh, and to their union one child has been born, Dora Annette. Mr. Vadakin and his father-in-law bought the Times, and own it in partnership. He is a member of the Episcopal Church, and in politics a Democrat. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.
- VAN PATTEN - HATTIE - L. - - - - UNK - ARKHIS - DAUGHTER OF DR.PHILIP VAN PATTEN
13TH ARKANSAS REGIMENT-CSA-CIVIL - VAN PATTEN - PHILLIP - - DR. - - 1827 - UNK - ARKHIS - During the war between the States, Dr. Van Patten was surgeon of the Thirteenth Arkansas Volunteer Infantry, Col. Tappen in command. He was afterward promoted to brigade-surgeon, and subsequently to the position of division-surgeon. For a short period he served as brigade-surgeon for Old Frank Cheatam, and was for two years in the Trans-Mississippi Department, under Gen. L. Polk, in Tennessee, Kentucky, Missouri and Mississippi, also being surgeon of Fort Pillow, in 1861. He was present at the battle of Shiloh, and was made division-surgeon by Gen. Polk on the battlefield, in the presence of Albert Sidney Johnston and Beauregard. He was obliged to resign before the war closed, on account of nervous prostration. Dr. Van Patten's children have inherited his own studious propensities, and have been endowed by nature with unusual capabilities. Eva Lillian graduated in higher mathematics at the age of fourteen years, under Prof. D. L. Thompson, of Wittsburg, the course extending through Calculus. After thus having her reasoning powers developed far beyond the height attained by even some of the most brilliant women of our country, in order to give her that proficiency in language, literature and the fine arts, which she had already attained in mathematics, and understanding that a harmonious development of all the faculties is requisite to attain perfect personal and intellectual culture, Dr. Van Patten wisely sent her to Notre Dame, Ind., to the female school there, made famous the world over by the Sisters of Mercy. After having well improved the opportunities afforded her she again returned to her home an even more devoted student than before. During her leisure hours she was found poring over the works of Tyndall. Huxley and Darwin, drinking in the many good things in their writings and criticising contradictory statements appearing on different pages. In mathematics, literature, language, art and every other branch, her mind searched eagerly for knowledge, and she daily meditated on many of the great questions which have from remote ages vexed and perplexed the minds of our greatest thinkers. She was the constant companion of her father, and with him discussed all questions. Her greatness of heart was unlimited, and she had charity for the faults of all. Such women are priceless gems, but her physical constitution could not stand the draft on her intellect, and paralysis of the brain caused her death. Such an affliction is certainly to be lamented by more than her family, and it is to be hoped her young soul, freed from its incumbrance of clay, can see, without effort into all the mysteries she was continually investigating here. Hattie L., now the wife of Eugene Parrish, of Paragould, Ark., was on the point of graduating from Notre Dame, when the breaking out of diphtheria caused her sudden return home, and prevented her receiving a diploma. Her paintings and her music show the touch of an artist. She paints from nature with absolute perfection, and her portrait gems, which have been examined by many, are pronounced worthy of an artist of national reputation. She is an excellent English scholar, and proficient in Latin, French and German. She was married November 2, 1889. Goodspeed's Biography 1884.'Philip Van Patten, M. D.'' So reads the sign that noisily swings to and fro on its rusty hinges, attracting the passers-by on one of the principal streets of Forrest City. The busy little notice is given only a momentary thought by its many readers, but the reputation of him whom it represents, an efficient and popular physician, will survive him many years. Born in Schenectady County, N. Y., in 1827, Dr. Van Patten's boyhood days were passed in carving his name in wonderful designs on his desk and making pictures, much to the delight of his schoolmates, but aside from all his fun, he was a good scholar, and won the approbation and affection of his teachers. When only thirteen years old he was deprived of his father's love and protection, death claiming him while on business in Michigan. Philip then moved with his mother to Iowa, the mother afterward going to Denver, Colo., where she passed away in 1885, at the age of eighty-six years. His literary education was received in Iowa, he taking a classical course, under the able instruction of Father Pelamargues, a Catholic priest, of Paris, France. His studies extended to a course in Latin, Greek and Hebrew, the former being so thoroughly instilled in his mind, that he read Caesar some four years ago without consulting his Lexicon but six times. He made it a rule to regularly demonstrate a certain number of mathematical problems every morning, and now devotes a half hour daily to the study of classics. Entering the Medical University of Iowa when twenty-one, he graduated with honors in 1853, and first announced himself competent to alleviate the sufferings to which flesh is heir, in DeWitt, Iowa, where he practiced for one year in association with Dr. Asa Morgan. During the year 1861 he choose for the partner of his joys and sorrows the daughter of Col. John Miller, of Batesville, Ark., father of the late Gov. Miller. One child, Hattie L., born to Dr, and Mrs. Van Patten alone survives. She is now a student of art in Memphis, Tenn.
- VAN PATTEN - - - MRS - MILLER - - UNK - ARKHIS - WIFE OF DR.PHILIP VAN PATTEN
- VANN - CLAUDE - H. - - - 4 17 1871 - UNK - ARKHIS - Claude H. Vann, editor and proprietor of the Forrest City Register, was born in Cross County, Ark., April 17, 1871, being the son of J. M. and Ida H. (Hare) Vann, well-known and highly esteemed residents of Cross County.Claude H. received his education in the schools of the county, and served an apprenticeship to the newspaper business in the office of the Cross County Chronicle. Having proved an able assistant in the office, at the expiration of his time he was given an opportunity to remain, but as better inducements were offered him by the Morrill Bros. Printing Company of New York as a traveling salesman, he accepted that position, and demonstrated







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